Celestial Atlas
(NGC 2800 - 2849) ←NGC Objects: NGC 2850 - 2899 Link for sharing this page on Facebook→ (NGC 2900 - 2949)
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2850, 2851, 2852, 2853, 2854, 2855, 2856, 2857, 2858, 2859, 2860, 2861, 2862, 2863, 2864, 2865, 2866,
2867, 2868, 2869, 2870, 2871, 2872, 2873, 2874, 2875, 2876, 2877, 2878, 2879, 2880, 2881, 2882, 2883,
2884, 2885, 2886, 2887, 2888, 2889, 2890, 2891, 2892, 2893, 2894, 2895, 2896, 2897, 2898, 2899

Page last updated Feb 10, 2019
Updated formatting to current standards, added images, updated captions, tags
Added Dreyer entries, checked Steinicke's/Corwin's databases
LATER: Verify all IDs, add physical data, look for better images

NGC 2850 (= PGC 26452)
Discovered (Mar 22, 1882) by
Édouard Stephan
A magnitude 14.2 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Hydra (RA 09 20 57.0, Dec -04 56 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2850 (Stephan list XII (#36), 1860 RA 09 13 57, NPD 94 21.0) is "very faint, very small, round, much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 7430 km/sec, NGC 2850 is about 345 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.9 by 0.7 arcmins, it is about 90 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2850
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2850
Below, a 1 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2850
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2850

NGC 2851 (= PGC 26422)
Discovered (Feb 27, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.3 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Hydra (RA 09 20 30.2, Dec -16 29 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2851 (Swift list III (#43), 1860 RA 09 14 00, NPD 105 55.3) is "extremely faint, pretty small, much extended, following (east of) III 488", (WH) III 488 being NGC 2848.
Physical Information:
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2851, also showing NGC 2848
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2851, also showing NGC 2848
Below, a 2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lentiular galaxy NGC 2851
Below, a 1.75 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of lentiular galaxy NGC 2851

NGC 2852 (= PGC 26571)
Discovered (Mar 18, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 18, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.2 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Lynx (RA 09 23 14.6, Dec +40 09 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2852 (= GC 1831 = JH 588 = WH III 629, 1860 RA 09 14 21, NPD 49 16.5) is "very faint, considerably small, round, 10th magnitude star 2 arcmin preceding (to west), 1st of 2", the other being NGC 2853.
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2852, also showing NGC 2853
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2852, also showing NGC 2853
Below, a 1.75 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2852

NGC 2853 (= PGC 26580)
Discovered (Mar 18, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 18, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.3 lenticular galaxy (type SAB(rs)b?) in Lynx (RA 09 23 17.4, Dec +40 12 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2853 (= GC 1832 = JH 590 = WH III 630, 1860 RA 09 14 24, NPD 49 14.7) is "very faint, small, very gradually brighter middle, 2nd of 2", the other being NGC 2852.
Physical Information: A starburst galaxy.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2853, also showing NGC 2852
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2853, also showing NGC 2852
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2853
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the central portion of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of central portion of spiral galaxy NGC 2853

NGC 2854 (= PGC 26631)
Discovered (Mar 9, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 7, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Ursa Major (RA 09 24 03.1, Dec +49 12 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2854 (= GC 1833 = JH 589 = WH III 714, 1860 RA 09 14 30, NPD 40 11.7) is "considerably faint, considerably small, very little extended, pretty gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2854, also showing NGC 2856
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2854, also showing NGC 2856
Below, a 2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2854

NGC 2855 (= PGC 26483)
Discovered (Mar 19, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 9, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.7 lenticular galaxy (type (R)SA(r)0/a) in Hydra (RA 09 21 27.5, Dec -11 54 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2855 (= GC 1835 = JH 592 = WH I 132, 1860 RA 09 14 42, NPD 101 19.0) is "pretty bright, pretty large, round, gradually much brighter middle and nucleus".
Physical Information: Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type (R)SA(r)0/a.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2855
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2855
Below, a 4.75 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2855

NGC 2856 (= PGC 26648)
Discovered (Mar 9, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 7, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type (R)SB(rs)bc? pec) in Ursa Major (RA 09 24 16.0, Dec +49 14 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2856 (= GC 1836 = JH 591 = WH III 713, 1860 RA 09 14 44, NPD 40 09.3) is "considerably faint, considerably small, a little extended, brighter middle".
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2856, also showing NGC 2854
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2856, also showing NGC 2854
Below, a 2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2856

NGC 2857 (= PGC 26666 =
Arp 1)
Discovered (Jan 9, 1856) by R. J. Mitchell
A magnitude 12.3 spiral galaxy (type SA(rs)c?) in Ursa Major (RA 09 24 37.7, Dec +49 21 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2857 (= GC 1834, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 09 15 20, NPD 40 04.4) is "very faint, pretty large, 4 stars preceding (to the west)".
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case R. J. Mitchell.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 4885 km/sec, NGC 2857 is about 225 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.9 by 1.7 arcmins, it is about 125 thousand light years across. The galaxy is the first of six chosen by Halton Arp for his Atlas of Peculiar Galaxies as an example of spiral galaxies of low surface brightness, hence its designation as Arp 1.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2857, also known as Arp 1
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2857
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2857, also known as Arp 1

NGC 2858 (= PGC 26556)
Discovered (Mar 3, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 12.6 lenticular galaxy (type SBA(r)0/a?) in Hydra (RA 09 22 55.0, Dec +03 09 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2858 (= GC 5474, Marth #161, 1860 RA 09 15 39, NPD 86 15) is "very faint, small, much brighter middle".
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2858
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2858
Below, a 2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2858

NGC 2859 (= PGC 26649)
Discovered (Mar 28, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Jan 22, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 10.9 lenticular galaxy (type (R)SB(rl)0/a?) in Leo Minor (RA 09 24 18.5, Dec +34 30 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2859 (= GC 1837 = JH 593 = WH I 137, 1860 RA 09 15 45, NPD 54 53.4) is "very bright, pretty large, round, suddenly much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.6 by 4.1 arcmin. Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type (R)SB(rl)0+.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2859
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2859
Below, a 5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2859

NGC 2860 (= PGC 26685)
Discovered (Mar 17, 1884) by
Édouard Stephan
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type (R)SB(rs)a? pec) in Lynx (RA 09 24 53.2, Dec +41 03 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2860 (Stephan list XIII (#47), 1860 RA 09 15 58, NPD 48 20.4) is "very faint, very small, round, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2860
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2860
Below, a 1.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2860

NGC 2861 (= PGC 26607)
Discovered (Mar 28, 1864) by
Albert Marth
Also observed (Feb 8, 1866) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Hydra (RA 09 23 36.5, Dec +02 08 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2861 (= GC 5475, Marth #162, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 09 16 20, NPD 87 18.8) is "pretty faint, small, irregularly round, 14th magnitude star following (to the east)".
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2861
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2861
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2861

NGC 2862 (= PGC 26690)
Discovered (Feb 21, 1863) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 12.9 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Leo (RA 09 24 55.1, Dec +26 46 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2862 (= GC 5476, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 09 16 46, NPD 62 37.8) is "faint, small, extended, brighter middle".
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2862
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2862
Below, a 3 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2862

NGC 2863 (= PGC 26609 =
NGC 2869)
Discovered (Mar 25, 1786) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 2863)
Also observed (Mar 9, 1828) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 2863)
Also observed (Feb 15, 1887) by Guillaume Bigourdan (while listed as NGC 2863)
Discovered (1886) by Frank Muller (and later listed as NGC 2869)
Not found (Mar 5, 1891) by Guillaume Bigourdan (while listed as NGC 2869)
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe (while listed as NGC 2863 and NGC 2869)
A magnitude 12.9 spiral galaxy (type Sdm?) in Hydra (RA 09 23 36.6, Dec -10 26 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2863 (= GC 1838 = JH 594 = WH III 520, 1860 RA 09 16 48, NPD 99 50.1) is "considerably faint, small, extended, between 2 stars of 12th and 16th magnitude". The second IC adds (per Howe) "2869 = 2863"; so the duplication of the entries has been known for more than a century.
Physical Information:
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2863, also showing NGC 2868
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2863, also showing NGC 2868
Below, a 1.1 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2863
Below, a 0.9 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2863

NGC 2864 (= PGC 26644)
Discovered (Mar 6, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)bc?) in Hydra (RA 09 24 15.4, Dec +05 56 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2864 (= GC 5477, Marth #163, 1860 RA 09 16 49, NPD 83 28) is "very faint, pretty large, a little extended".
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2864
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2864
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy, also showing 2MASS J09241532+0556076
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2864 and its companion, J2000 0924153+055608

2MASS J09241532+0556076
Not an NGC object but listed here since interacting with
NGC 2864
A magnitude 17.5(?) lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a? pec) in Hydra (RA 09 24 15.3, Dec +05 56 08)
Physical Information: Vr 10430 km/sec, z 0.034794; see NGC 2864 for images.

NGC 2865 (= PGC 26601)
Discovered (Jan 23, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.7 elliptical galaxy (type (R)E/S0? pec) in Hydra (RA 09 23 30.2, Dec -23 09 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2865 (= GC 1841 = JH 3161, 1860 RA 09 17 11, NPD 112 34.6) is "bright, small, round, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information:
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2865
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2865
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2865

NGC 2866 (= OCL 774 = "PGC 3518272")
Discovered (Mar 31, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.5(?) open cluster (type II2p) in Vela (RA 09 22 06.0, Dec -51 06 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2866 (= GC 1842 = JH 3162, 1860 RA 09 17 22, NPD 140 30.4) is "a cluster, a little compressed".
Discovery Notes: Most references list the size of this cluster as about 20 arcmin, which presumably refers to a loose group of a few bright stars which are probably not members of a cluster at all, while Herschel's Cape of Good Hope observation reads "a small compact knot of stars", and must refer only to the densely packed group of fainter stars in the center of the larger region. So the supposedly larger scattering of stars has nothing to do with NGC 2866.
Physical Information: About 2.5 arcmin apparent size.
DSS image of open cluster NGC 2866
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2866

NGC 2867 (= P-K 278-05.1 = "PGC 3517760")
Discovered (Apr 1, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 9.7 planetary nebula in Carina (RA 09 21 25.3, Dec -58 18 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2867 (= GC 1843 = JH 3163, 1860 RA 09 17 28, NPD 147 43.0) is “a very remarkable object, a planetary nebula equal to an 8th magnitude star, very small, round, 15th magnitude star 13 arcsec distant at position angle 59°”. [The NGC actually reads 59°.13", while the GC reads 59°·13, 13", so Dreyer truncated Herschel's position for the star. Herschel observed the star on 8 nights, obtaining a large number of position angles, scattered around a mean of 59°, but in no way accurate enough to specify a position to the nearest hundredth of a degree, and the dot between the 59 and the first 13 is not a decimal point, but merely a separator. Odds are that it is supposed to indicate that the position angle was based on 13 more or less reliable measurements.]
PGC Designation Note: For purposes of completeness LEDA has assigned a PGC designation to this object, despite its not being a galaxy; but a search of the database for that designation returns no result, so it is shown in quotes.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.3 by 0.3 arcmin (from the images below). Distance (from the HST press release) about 6000 light years.
DSS image of region near planetary nebula NGC 2867
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2867
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the planetary nebula
DSS image of planetary nebula NGC 2867
Below, a 0.4 arcmin wide HST image of the planetary nebula (Image Credit Howard Bond (STScI) & NASA/ESA)
HST image of planetary nebula NGC 2867

NGC 2868 (= PGC 26598)
Discovered (1886) by
Frank Muller
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe (while listed as NGC 2868)
A magnitude 14.3 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Hydra (RA 09 23 27.2, Dec -10 25 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2868 (Muller list II (#411), 1860 RA 09 17 30±, NPD 99 49.4) is "extremely faint, small, round, 10 seconds of time preceding (to the west of) next, (?RA 09h 22m)", "next" being NGC 2869. The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 09 16 38, indicating that Dreyer's guess that the RA might have actually been 09 22 was wrong. The corrected position precesses to RA 09 23 26.8, Dec -10 25 14, only about half an arcmin north northwest of the galaxy listed above and the description fits, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information:
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2868, also showing NGC 2863
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2868, also showing NGC 2863
Below, a 0.9 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2868
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2868

NGC 2869 (= PGC 26609 =
NGC 2863)
Discovered (Mar 25, 1786) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 2863)
Also observed (Mar 9, 1828) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 2863)
Also observed (Feb 15, 1887) by Guillaume Bigourdan (while listed as NGC 2863)
Discovered (1886) by Frank Muller (and later listed as NGC 2869)
Not found (Mar 5, 1891) by Guillaume Bigourdan (while listed as NGC 2869)
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe (while listed as NGC 2863 and NGC 2869)
A magnitude 12.9 spiral galaxy (type Sm?) in Hydra (RA 09 23 36.6, Dec -10 26 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2869 (Muller list II (#412), 1860 RA 09 17 30±, NPD 99 49.4) is "extremely faint, pretty small, extended 170°, gradually brighter middle, between 2 faint stars". The second IC adds (per Howe) "2869 = 2863"; so the duplication of the entries has been known for more than a century.
Discovery Note: Muller's position was well off the mark, hence Bigourdan's successful observation of NGC 2863, but failure to find NGC 2869.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 2863 for anything else.

NGC 2870 (= PGC 26856)
Discovered (Mar 19, 1790) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Feb 9, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)bc?) in Ursa Major (RA 09 27 53.7, Dec +57 22 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2870 (= GC 1844 = JH 595 = WH III 846, 1860 RA 09 17 38, NPD 32 01.7) is "considerably faint, small, extended, very gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2870
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2870
Below, a 2.75 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2870

NGC 2871
Discovered (Mar 7, 1874) by
Lawrence Parsons, 4th Earl of Rosse
Looked for (date?) but not observed by Rudolf Spitaler (while listed as NGC 2871)
A magnitude 16.3 star in Leo (RA 09 25 39.5, Dec +11 26 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2871 (= GC 5478, 4th Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 09 18 05, NPD 77 57.1) is "extremely faint, h 597 an arcmin to southeast", (JH) 597 being NGC 2872. The first IC adds (for 2871 and 2875) "Not seen by Spitaler; but he is wrong in assuming them = h597 and 598. They are marked ε and γ in the Birr diagram".
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near the star listed as NGC 2871, also showing NGC 2872 and NGC 2874 (which comprise Arp 307) and NGC 2873
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on the star listed as NGC 2871
Also shown are NGC 2872, NGC 2873 and 2874

NGC 2872 (= PGC 26733, and with
NGC 2874 = Arp 307)
Discovered (Mar 15, 1784) by William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 3, 1826) by John Herschel
Looked for (date?) but not found by Herman Schultz (as WH II 57)
Also observed (date?) by Heinrich d'Arrest (as JH 597)
A magnitude 11.9 elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Leo (RA 09 25 42.5, Dec +11 25 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2872 (= GC 1839 = GC 1845 = JH 597 = WH II 57 = WH II 546, 1860 RA 09 18 08, NPD 77 58.0) is "pretty faint, pretty small, round, brighter middle". A note at the end of the NGC says (for NGC 2872 and 2874) "(W)H gives the following places for II 57 and II 58: RA 09 17 08, NPD 77 46.0 and RA 09 17 11, NPD 77 46.3, two objects 1 arcmin distance, northwest and southeast, western one pretty small, eastern one pretty large. They were searched for in vain by Schultz and are not mentioned by d'Arrest, who observed (J)h 597 - 598. They are doubtless identical with the latter, as (W)H's description and relative position agrees with those of (J)h 597-98". Dreyer's position precesses to RA 09 25 43.0, Dec +11 25 55, right on the galaxy listed above, and the position relative to NGC 2874 fits the description in the NGC notes, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Used by the Arp Atlas with NGC 2874 as as an unclassified example of a galaxy pair.
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 2872, also showing NGC 2871, NGC 2872 and NGC 2874 (with which it comprises Arp 307)
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2872, also showing NGC 2871, 2873 and 2874
Below, a 3 arcmin wide SDSS image of Arp 307
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 2872 and spiral galaxy NGC 2874, with which it comprises Arp 307
Below, a labeled version of the image above (NGC 2871 and 2873 are not part of the Arp object)
Labeled SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 2872 and spiral galaxy NGC 2874, with which it comprises Arp 307
Below, a 2.1 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 2872, also showing NGC 2871 and part of NGC 2874
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 2872, also showing NGC 2871 and part of NGC 2874

NGC 2873 (= PGC 26742)
Discovered (Feb 22, 1857) by
R. J. Mitchell
A magnitude 15.4 lenticular galaxy (type SBA(r)0/a?) in Leo (RA 09 25 48.5, Dec +11 27 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2873 (= GC 1846, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 09 18 13, NPD 77 56.5) is "very faint, very small, round, north of extended nebula".
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case R. J. Mitchell.
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2873, also showing NGC 2871, NGC 2872 and NGC 2874
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2873, also showing NGC 2871, 2872 and 2874
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2873

NGC 2874 (= PGC 26740, and with
NGC 2872 = Arp 307)
Discovered (Mar 15, 1784) by William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 3, 1826) by John Herschel
Looked for (date?) but not found by Herman Schultz (as WH II 58)
Also observed (date?) by Heinrich d'Arrest (as JH 598)
A magnitude 12.5 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)bc?) in Leo (RA 09 25 47.3, Dec +11 25 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2874 (= GC 1840 = GC 1847 = JH 598 = WH II 58 = WH II 547, 1860 RA 09 18 13, NPD 77 58.5) is "very faint, pretty large, much extended". A note at the end of the NGC says (for NGC 2872 and 2874) "(W)H gives the following places for II 57 and II 58: RA 09 17 08, NPD 77 46.0 and RA 09 17 11, NPD 77 46.3, two objects 1 arcmin distance, northwest and southeast, western one pretty small, eastern one pretty large. They were searched for in vain by Schultz and are not mentioned by d'Arrest, who observed (J)h 597 - 598. They are doubtless identical with the latter, as (W)H's description and relative position agrees with those of (J)h 597-98". Dreyer's position precesses to RA 09 25 48.0, Dec +11 25 25, right on the galaxy listed above, and the position relative to NGC 2872 fits the description in the NGC notes, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Used by the Arp Atlas with NGC 2872 as an unclassified example of a galaxy pair.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2874, also showing NGC 2871, NGC 2872 and NGC 2873
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2874, also showing NGC 2871, 2872 and 2873
Below, a 3 arcmin wide SDSS image of Arp 307
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 2872 and spiral galaxy NGC 2874, with which it comprises Arp 307
Below, a labeled version of the image above (NGC 2871 and 2873 are not part of the Arp object)
Labeled SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 2872 and spiral galaxy NGC 2874, with which it comprises Arp 307
Below, a 2.1 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 2874, also showing part of NGC 2872
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2874, also showing part of NGC 2872, with which it comprises Arp 307

NGC 2875
Discovered (Mar 7, 1874) by
Lawrence Parsons, 4th Earl of Rosse
Looked for (date?) but not observed by Rudolf Spitaler (while listed as NGC 2875)
A star-forming region in NGC 2874 (RA 09 25 48.9, Dec +11 25 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2875 (= GC 5479, 4th Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 09 18 15, NPD 77 58.1) is "extremely faint, northeast of h 598", (JH) 598 being NGC 2874. The first IC adds (for 2871 and 2875) "Not seen by Spitaler; but he is wrong in assuming them = h597 and 598. They are marked ε and γ in the Birr diagram".
Physical Information:
SDSS image of star-forming region NGC 2875, which is part of spiral galaxy NGC 2874, also showing half of that galaxy
Above, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2875, also showing part of NGC 2874

NGC 2876 (= PGC 26710)
Discovered (Mar 5, 1880) by
Édouard Stephan
Also observed (1886) by Ormond Stone
A magnitude 13.1 pair of galaxies (type (R')(S0? + S0?) pec) in Hydra (RA 09 25 13.8, NPD -06 43 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2876 (Stephan list IX (actually list X #20), 1860 RA 09 18 17, NPD 96 07.0) is "faint, small, several very faint stars involved". The second IC adds the correction (noted in parentheses) "For 'St IX' read 'St X' ", and "Query = IC 2471, Bigourdan 398"
Physical Information: Apparently binuclear, and probably a pair of colliding galaxies. Also, probably a physical companion of PGC 26718. Vr 6110 km/sec.
DSS image of region near the colliding lenticular galaxies listed as NGC 2876, also showing PGC 26718
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2876
Below, a 3 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy, also showing PGC 26718
DSSS image of the colliding lenticular galaxies listed as NGC 2876
Below, a 2.5 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of the colliding lenticular galaxies listed as NGC 2876

PGC 26718
Not an NGC object, but listed here as a possible companion of
NGC 2876
A magnitude 15(?) lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Hydra (RA 09 25 19.8, Dec -06 40 28)
Physical Information: Vr 6125 km/sec, nearly the same as for NGC 2876, so probably a physical companion of the colliding pair.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy PGC 26718, also showing its probable companions, NGC 2876Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 26718, also showing NGC 2876
Below, a 0.9 arcmin wide DSS image of PGC 26718
DSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 26718
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of PGC 26718
PanSTARRS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 26718

NGC 2877 (= PGC 26738)
Discovered (Mar 28, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 14.3 peculiar galaxy (type (R')S(rs)a?) in Hydra (RA 09 25 47.0, Dec +02 13 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2877 (= GC 5480, Marth #164, 1860 RA 09 18 31, NPD 87 10) is "very faint, small, very little extended".
Physical Information: Vr 7310 km/sec, z 0.024382. Suggested as a companion of PGC 1220557, but that is more than twice as distant, so they are merely an optical double.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2877, also showing PGC 1220557
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2877, also showing PGC 1220557
Below, a 0.9 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2877

NGC 2878 (= PGC 26739)
Discovered (Mar 28, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 14.0 lenticular galaxy (type SBA(s)0/a? pec) in Hydra (RA 09 25 47.5, Dec +02 05 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2878 (= GC 5481, Marth #165, 1860 RA 09 18 33, NPD 87 18) is "very faint, small, very little extended".
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2878
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2878
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2878

NGC 2879
Discovered (Feb 27, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
Four stars in Hydra (RA 09 25 22.5, Dec -11 39 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2879 (= GC 5482, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 09 18 34, NPD 101 02.9) is "very faint, very small, round, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: The central and northwestern stars are magnitude 14.2, the northeastern star is magnitude 15.8, and the southern star is magnitude 16.6.
DSS image of region near the four stars listed as NGC 2879
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2879

NGC 2880 (= PGC 26939)
Discovered (Apr 2, 1791) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 8, 1832) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.5 lenticular galaxy (type E/SAB0?) in Ursa Major (RA 09 29 34.6, Dec +62 29 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2880 (= GC 1848 = JH 596 = WH I 260, 1860 RA 09 18 35, NPD 26 54.3) is "bright, considerably small, round, much brighter middle, among stars".
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2880
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2880
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2880

NGC 2881 (= PGC 26747, and =
Arp 275)
Discovered (Feb 9, 1886) by Lewis Swift
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe (while listed as NGC 2881)
A pair of galaxies in Hydra (RA 09 25 54.3, Dec -11 59 37)
Component 1: A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type SABb? pec) at RA 09 25 54.7, Dec -11 59 45
Component 2: A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type Sc? pec) at RA 09 25 53.8, Dec -11 59 31
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2881 (Swift list III (#44), 1860 RA 09 19 04, NPD 101 24.2) is "extremely faint, pretty small, 2 stars 4 arcmin following (to the east)". The second IC notes (per Howe) "The 2 stars are southeast, 9.5 and 10.5 magnitude".
Physical Information: Used by the Arp Atlas as an example of interacting galaxies.
DSS image of region near the pair of interacting spiral galaxies that comprise NGC 2881, also known as Arp 275
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2881
Below, a 1.25 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxies
DSS image of the pair of interacting spiral galaxies that comprise NGC 2881, also known as Arp 275
Below, a 1.25 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the interacting galaxies
PanSTARRS image of the pair of interacting spiral galaxies that comprise NGC 2881, also known as Arp 275

NGC 2882 (= PGC 26781)
Discovered (Mar 6, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 12.6 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Leo (RA 09 26 36.2, Dec +07 57 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2882 (= GC 5483, Marth #166, 1860 RA 09 19 08, NPD 81 26) is "faint, pretty large, extended".
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2882
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2882
Below, a 1.9 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2882

NGC 2883 (= PGC 26713)
Discovered (Apr 7, 1837) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 14.4 irregular galaxy (type IBm?) in Pyxis (RA 09 25 18.4, Dec -34 06 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2883 (= GC 1849 = JH 3164, 1860 RA 09 19 30, NPD 123 29.6) is "very faint, small, very gradually a little brighter middle, well resolved, clearly consisting of stars, stars of 15th magnitude".
Discovery Note: The galaxy is very faint, and involved with numerous stars; and given Herschel's description, he may not have seen the galaxy, but the apparent cluster of stars, instead. In which case, NGC 2883 would be the stars, and not the galaxy; and the galaxy would merely be a background object.
Physical Information:
DSS image of region near irregular galaxy NGC 2883
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image of irregular galaxy NGC 2883
Below, a 2.5 by 3 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of irregular galaxy NGC 2883

NGC 2884 (= PGC 26773)
Discovered (Feb 27, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 12.6 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)ab?) in Hydra (RA 09 26 24.5, Dec -11 33 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2884 (= GC 5484, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 09 19 37, NPD 100 57.0) is "faint, small, mottled but not resolved?".
Physical Information:
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2884
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2884
Below, a 2.75 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2884
Below, a 2 by 2.5 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2884

NGC 2885 (= PGC 26811 =
IC 538)
Discovered (Feb 24, 1827) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 2885)
Discovered (Mar 21, 1890) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 538)
A magnitude 13.9 lenticular galaxy (type (R')S(r)0/a? pec) in Leo (RA 09 27 18.5, Dec +23 01 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2885 (= GC 1850 = JH 599, 1860 RA 09 19 42, NPD 66 23.0) is "extremely faint, very small, extended 90°".
Physical Information: Vr 7890 km/sec, z 0.026315; probably a companion of PGC 26820. IC 2474 and PGC 26816, though possible companions of each other, are almost certainly background objects.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2885, also showing IC 2474
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2885
Also shown are IC 2474, PGC 26820 and PGC 26816
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2885

PGC 26820
Not an NGC object but listed here since a probable companion of
NGC 2885
A magnitude 15(?) elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Leo (RA 09 27 25.0, Dec +23 01 50)
Physical Information: Certainly a physical companion of NGC 2885, and probably the reason for that galaxy's peculiar appearance. (Vr 7880, z 0.026286)
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy PGC 26820, a physical companion of NGC 2885
Above, a 0.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy; for a wider-field image, see NGC 2885

NGC 2886
Discovered (Feb 1, 1837) by
John Herschel
Four stars in Hydra (RA 09 26 38.7, Dec -21 44 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2886 (= GC 1851 = JH 3165, 1860 RA 09 20 08, NPD 111 08.6) is "most extremely faint, pretty large".
Physical Information:
DSS image of region near the four stars listed as NGC 2886
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on the four stars listed as NGC 2886

NGC 2887 (= PGC 26592)
Discovered (Mar 8, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.7 lenticular galaxy (type E/SA(s)0?) in Carina (RA 09 23 24.1, Dec -63 48 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2887 (= GC 1852 = JH 3168, 1860 RA 09 20 11, NPD 153 12.5) is "faint, small, round, pretty much brighter middle, bright star near".
Physical Information:
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2887
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2887
Below, a 3.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2887

NGC 2888 (= PGC 26768)
Discovered (Mar 30, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.6 elliptical galaxy (type E3??) in Pyxis (RA 09 26 19.7, Dec -28 02 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2888 (= GC 1853 = JH 3166, 1860 RA 09 20 13, NPD 117 25.4) is "considerably faint, small, round, gradually much brighter middle".
Physical Information:
DSS image of region near elliptical galay NGC 2888
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2888
Below, a 1 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of elliptical galay NGC 2888
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of elliptical galay NGC 2888

NGC 2889 (= PGC 26806)
Discovered (Mar 19, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 9, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.7 spiral galaxy (type S(r's)c?) in Hydra (RA 09 27 12.6, Dec -11 38 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2889 (= GC 1854 = JH 600 = WH II 555, 1860 RA 09 20 25, NPD 101 02.3) is "pretty faint, pretty small, very little extended, very gradually a little brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information:
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2889
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2889
Below, a 2.25 by 2.5 arcmin wide image of the galaxy
(Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of spiral galaxy NGC 2889

NGC 2890 (= PGC 26778)
Discovered (Jan 11, 1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe (while listed as NGC 2890)
A magnitude 14.5 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Hydra (RA 09 26 29.8, Dec -14 31 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2890 (Leavenworth list I (#154), 1860 RA 09 20 35, NPD 103 55.3) is "extremely faint, small, round, brighter middle and nucleus". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 09 19 50.
Physical Information:
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2890
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2890
Below, a 1.25 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2890
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
(The yellowish-green rectangular area is an image flaw)
PanSTARRS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2890

NGC 2891 (= PGC 26794)
Discovered (Jan 23, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.6 lenticular galaxy (type (R?)E/S0?) in Pyxis (RA 09 26 56.6, Dec -24 46 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2891 (= GC 1855 = JH 3167, 1860 RA 09 20 41, NPD 114 11.7) is "faint, small, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information:
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2891
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2891
Below, a 2.75 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2891
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of the core of lenticular galaxy NGC 2891

NGC 2892 (= PGC 27111)
Discovered (May 11, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.1 elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Ursa Major (RA 09 32 52.9, Dec +67 37 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2892 (Swift list I (#8), 1860 RA 09 21 11, NPD 21 45.8) is "pretty faint, pretty small, round, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 2892
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2892
Below, a 2.25 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 2892

NGC 2893 (= PGC 26979)
Discovered (Mar 13, 1785 by
William Herschel
Also observed (Jan 27, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.2 lenticular galaxy (type (R')SB(r)0/a?) in Leo (RA 09 30 17.0, Dec +29 32 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2893 (= GC 1856 = JH 602 = WH III 297, 1860 RA 09 22 00, NPD 59 50.0) is "very faint, small, round, very suddenly brighter middle equal to 12th magnitude star".
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2893
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2893
Below, a 1.25 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2893

NGC 2894 (= PGC 26932)
Discovered (Jan 23, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Dec 25, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.4 spiral galaxy (type Sa? pec) in Leo (RA 09 29 30.2, Dec +07 43 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2894 (= GC 1857 = JH 603 = WH III 8, 1860 RA 09 22 02, NPD 81 39.7) is "very faint, extended, extremely mottled but not resolved, 2 or 3 stars involved".
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2894
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2894
Below, a 2.4 by 3.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy and its northern extension
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2894

NGC 2895 (= PGC 27092)
Discovered (Feb 9, 1831) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)bc?) in Ursa Major (RA 09 32 25.1, Dec +57 28 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2895 (= GC 1858 = JH 601, 1860 RA 09 22 12, NPD 31 54.4) is "very faint, very small, round, very gradually brighter middle, double star 7 arcmin to south".
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2895
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2895
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2895

NGC 2896 (= PGC 26985)
Discovered (May 1, 1864) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 14.0 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Leo (RA 09 30 17.0, Dec +23 39 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2896 (= GC 5485, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 09 22 14, NPD 65 43.6) is "faint, very small, round, 17th magnitude star attached".
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2896
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2896
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2896

NGC 2897 (= PGC 26949)
Discovered (Feb 6, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 14.5 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Hydra (RA 09 29 45.7, Dec +02 12 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2897 (= GC 5486, Marth #167, 1860 RA 09 22 29, NPD 87 12) is "extremely faint, small".
Physical Information: Vr 7028, z 0.023443. An apparent companion of PGC 135724, but given a difference of nearly 600 km/sec in their recessional velocities, probably just an optical double. Still, the odd appearance of the companion might indicate some past interaction between them.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2897, also showing apparent companion PGC 135724
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2897
Also shown is possible companion PGC 135724
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 2897
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2897

PGC 135724
Not an NGC object but listed here as a possible companion of
NGC 2897
A magnitude 16(?) galaxy (type (R')S0(s)/a? pec) in Hydra (RA 09 29 41.2, Dec +02 12 20)
Vr 6440 km/sec
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 135724, an unlikely but possible companion of NGC 2897
Above, a 1 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 135724; for a wide-field view, see NGC 2897

NGC 2898 (= PGC 26950)
Discovered (Feb 6, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 13.4 lenticular galaxy (type S(r?)0/a?) in Hydra (RA 09 29 46.3, Dec +02 03 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2898 (= GC 5487, Marth #168, 1860 RA 09 22 37, NPD 87 20) is "very faint, very small, a little extended".
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2898
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2898
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2898

NGC 2899 (= P-K 277-03.1 = "PGC 3517761")
Discovered (Feb 27, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.8 planetary nebula in Vela (RA 09 27 03.0, Dec -56 06 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2899 (= GC 1859 = JH 3169, 1860 RA 09 22 42, NPD 145 30.3) is "faint, pretty large, round, gradually much brighter middle, among 80 stars".
PGC Designation Note: For purposes of completeness LEDA has assigned a PGC designation to this object, despite its not being a galaxy; but a search of the database for that designation returns no result, so it is shown in quotes.
Physical Information:
DSS image of region near planetary nebula NGC 2899
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2899
Below, a 3 arcmin wide image of the planetary nebula
(Image Credit & © Capella Observatory; used by permission (slightly post-processed by Courtney Seligman))Capella Observatory image of planetary nebula NGC 2899
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 2800 - 2849) ←NGC Objects: NGC 2850 - 2899→ (NGC 2900 - 2949)