Celestial Atlas
(NGC 2800 - 2849) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 2850 - 2899 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 2900 - 2949)
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2850, 2851, 2852, 2853, 2854, 2855, 2856, 2857, 2858, 2859, 2860, 2861, 2862, 2863, 2864, 2865, 2866,
2867, 2868, 2869, 2870, 2871, 2872, 2873, 2874, 2875, 2876, 2877, 2878, 2879, 2880, 2881, 2882, 2883,
2884, 2885, 2886, 2887, 2888, 2889, 2890, 2891, 2892, 2893, 2894, 2895, 2896, 2897, 2898, 2899

Page last updated Nov 23, 2014
WORKING: Add positions/physical data (per Steinicke)

NGC 2850 (= PGC 26452)
Discovered (Mar 22, 1882) by
Édouard Stephan (12-36)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Hydra (RA 09 20 56.9, Dec -04 56 22)
Based on a recessional velocity of 7430 km/sec, NGC 2850 is about 345 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.9 by 0.7 arcmins, it is about 90 thousand light years across.
DSS image of NGC 2850
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 2850
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near NGC 2850

NGC 2851
Discovered (Feb 27, 1886) by
Lewis Swift (3-43)

NGC 2852
Discovered (Mar 18, 1787) by
William Herschel

NGC 2853
Discovered (Mar 18, 1787) by
William Herschel

NGC 2854
Discovered (Mar 9, 1788) by
William Herschel

NGC 2855
Discovered (Mar 19, 1786) by
William Herschel

NGC 2856
Discovered (Mar 9, 1788) by
William Herschel

NGC 2857 (= PGC 26666 =
Arp 1)
Discovered (Jan 9, 1856) by R. J. Mitchell
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SA(s)c) in Ursa Major (RA 09 24 37.7, Dec +49 21 26)
Based on a recessional velocity of 4885 km/sec, NGC 2857 is about 225 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.9 by 1.7 arcmins, it is about 125 thousand light years across. The galaxy is the first of six chosen by Halton Arp for his Atlas of Peculiar Galaxies as an example of spiral galaxies of low surface brightness, hence its designation as Arp 1.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2857, also known as Arp 1
Above, a 2.4-arcmin wide closeup of NGC 2857
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region around spiral galaxy NGC 2857, also known as Arp 1

NGC 2858
Discovered (Mar 3, 1864) by
Albert Marth (161)

NGC 2859 (= PGC 26649)
Discovered (Mar 28, 1786) by
William Herschel
An 11th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a) in Leo Minor (RA 09 24 18.6, Dec +34 30 48)
Apparent size 4.6 by 4.1 arcmin. Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type (R)SB(rl)0+.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2859
Above, a 5 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 2859
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2859

NGC 2860
Discovered (Mar 17, 1884) by
Édouard Stephan (13-47)

NGC 2861
Discovered (Mar 28, 1864) by
Albert Marth (162)

NGC 2862
Discovered (Feb 21, 1863) by
Heinrich d'Arrest

NGC 2863 (=
NGC 2869)
Discovered (Mar 25, 1786) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 2863)
Discovered (1886) by Frank Muller (and later listed as NGC 2869)
The second IC adds (per Howe) "2869 = 2863"; so the identity of the two entries has been known for more than a century

NGC 2864
Discovered (Mar 6, 1864) by
Albert Marth (163)

NGC 2865 (= PGC 26601)
Discovered (Jan 23, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3 pec?) in Hydra (RA 09 23 30.2, Dec -23 09 41)
A closeup of the galaxy shows an apparently ordinary elliptical galaxy; but a wider-field view (such as the "closeup" below) shows clouds of stars extending to the northwest and east.
DSS image of NGC 2865
Above, a 5 arcmin wide "closeup" of NGC 2865
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near NGC 2865

NGC 2866
Discovered (Mar 31, 1835) by
John Herschel

NGC 2867
Discovered (Apr 1, 1834) by
John Herschel

NGC 2868
Discovered (1886) by
Frank Muller (II-411)
The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 09 16 38

NGC 2869 (=
NGC 2863)
Discovered (Mar 25, 1786) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 2863)
Discovered (1886) by Frank Muller (II-412) (and later listed as NGC 2869)
The second IC adds (per Howe) "2869 = 2863"; so the identity of the two entries has been known for more than a century

WORKING: Add discoverers (per Steinicke)

NGC 2870
Discovered (Mar 19, 1790) by
William Herschel

NGC 2871
Discovered (Mar 7, 1874) by
Lawrence Parsons, 4th Earl of Rosse
The first IC adds (for 2871 and 2875) "Not seen by Spitaler; but he is wrong in assuming them = h597 and 598. They are marked ε and γ in the Birr diagram".

NGC 2872 (= PGC 26733, and with
NGC 2874 = Arp 307)
Discovered (Mar 15, 1784) by William Herschel (as WH II 57)
Also observed (Mar 3, 1826) by John Herschel (as JH 597)
Looked for but not found by Herman Schultz (as WH II 57)
Also observed by Heinrich d'Arrest (as JH 597)
A magnitude 11.9 elliptical galaxy (type E2??) in Leo (RA 09 25 42.9, Dec +11 25 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2872 (= GC 1839 = GC 1845 = JH 597 = WH II 57 = WH II 546, 1860 RA 09 18 08, NPD 77 58.0) is "pretty faint, pretty small, round, brighter middle". A note at the end of the NGC says (for NGC 2872 and 2874) "(W)H gives the following places for II 57 and II 58: RA 09 17 08, NPD 77 46.0 and RA 09 17 11, NPD 77 46.3, two objects 1 arcmin distance, northwest and southeast, western one pretty small, eastern one pretty large. They were searched for in vain by Schultz and are not mentioned by d'Arrest, who observed (J)h 597 - 598. They are doubtless identical with the latter, as (W)H's description and relative position agrees with those of (J)h 597-98". Dreyer's position precesses to RA 09 25 43.0, Dec +11 25 55, right on the galaxy listed above, and the position relative to NGC 2874 fits the description in the NGC notes, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information:
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 2872 and spiral galaxy NGC 2874, which comprise Arp 307
Above, a 4 arcmin wide SDSS image of Arp 307

NGC 2873
Discovered (Feb 22, 1857) by
R. J. Mitchell

NGC 2874 (= PGC 26740, and with
NGC 2872 = Arp 307)
Discovered (Mar 15, 1784) by William Herschel (as WH II 58)
Also observed (Mar 3, 1826) by John Herschel (as JH 598)
Looked for but not found by Herman Schultz (as WH II 58)
Also observed by Heinrich d'Arrest (as JH 598)
A magnitude 12.5 spiral galaxy (type SBbc??) in Leo (RA 09 25 47.8, Dec +11 25 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2874 (= GC 1840 = GC 1847 = JH 598 = WH II 58 = WH II 547, 1860 RA 09 18 13, NPD 77 58.5) is "very faint, pretty large, much extended". A note at the end of the NGC says (for NGC 2872 and 2874) "(W)H gives the following places for II 57 and II 58: RA 09 17 08, NPD 77 46.0 and RA 09 17 11, NPD 77 46.3, two objects 1 arcmin distance, northwest and southeast, western one pretty small, eastern one pretty large. They were searched for in vain by Schultz and are not mentioned by d'Arrest, who observed (J)h 597 - 598. They are doubtless identical with the latter, as (W)H's description and relative position agrees with those of (J)h 597-98". Dreyer's position precesses to RA 09 25 48.0, Dec +11 25 25, right on the galaxy listed above, and the position relative to NGC 2872 fits the description in the NGC notes, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information:

NGC 2875
Discovered (Mar 7, 1874) by
Lawrence Parsons, 4th Earl of Rosse
The first IC adds (for 2871 and 2875) "Not seen by Spitaler; but he is wrong in assuming them = h597 and 598. They are marked ε and γ in the Birr diagram".

NGC 2876
Discovered (Mar 5, 1880) by
Édouard Stephan (10-20)
The second IC adds the correction "For 'St IX' read 'St X' ", and "Query = IC 2471, Bigourdan 398"

NGC 2877
Discovered (Mar 28, 1864) by
Albert Marth (164)

NGC 2878
Discovered (Mar 28, 1864) by
Albert Marth (165)

NGC 2879
Discovered (Feb 27, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest

NGC 2880
Discovered (Apr 2, 1791) by
William Herschel

NGC 2881
Discovered (Feb 9, 1886) by
Lewis Swift (3-44)
The second IC notes (per Howe) "The 2 stars are southeast, 9.5 and 10.5 magnitude".

NGC 2882
Discovered (Mar 6, 1864) by
Albert Marth (166)

NGC 2883
Discovered (Apr 7, 1837) by
John Herschel

NGC 2884
Discovered (Feb 27, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest

NGC 2885 (=
IC 538)
Discovered (Feb 24, 1827) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 2885)
Discovered (Mar 21, 1890) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 538)

NGC 2886
Discovered (Feb 1, 1837) by
John Herschel

NGC 2887
Discovered (Mar 8, 1834) by
John Herschel

NGC 2888
Discovered (Mar 30, 1835) by
John Herschel

NGC 2889
Discovered (Mar 19, 1786) by
William Herschel

NGC 2890
Discovered (Jan 11, 1886) by
Francis Leavenworth (I-154)
The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 09 19 50

NGC 2891
Discovered (Jan 23, 1835) by
John Herschel

NGC 2892
Discovered (May 11, 1885) by
Lewis Swift (1-8)

NGC 2893
Discovered (Mar 13, 1785 by
William Herschel

NGC 2894
Discovered (Jan 23, 1784) by
William Herschel

NGC 2895
Discovered (Feb 9, 1831) by
John Herschel

NGC 2896
Discovered (May 1, 1864) by
Heinrich d'Arrest

NGC 2897
Discovered (Feb 6, 1864) by
Albert Marth (167)

NGC 2898
Discovered (Feb 6, 1864) by
Albert Marth (168)

NGC 2899
Discovered (Feb 27, 1835) by
John Herschel
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 2800 - 2849) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 2850 - 2899     → (NGC 2900 - 2949)