Celestial Atlas
(NGC 200 - 249) ←      NGC Objects: NGC 250 - 299     → (NGC 300 - 349)
Click here for Introductory Material
QuickLinks:
250, 251, 252, 253, 254, 255, 256, 257, 258, 259, 260, 261, 262, 263, 264, 265, 266,
267, 268, 269, 270, 271, 272, 273, 274, 275, 276, 277, 278, 279, 280, 281, 282, 283,
284, 285, 286, 287, 288, 289, 290, 291, 292, 293, 294, 295, 296, 297, 298, 299

Page last updated Nov 23, 2014
WORKING: Check positions/historical IDs (Corwin+)

NGC 250 (= PGC 2765)
Discovered (Nov 10, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.8 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a(rs) pec?) in Pisces (RA 00 47 16.0, Dec +07 54 36)
Per Dreyer, NGC 250 (Swift list III (#2), 1860 RA 00 40 18, NPD 82 52.0) is "extremely faint, very small, round, among 3 stars". The position precesses to RA 00 47 33.0, Dec +07 53 55, a little over 4 arcmin east of the galaxy, but the position of the galaxy (near the center of a right triangle formed by three stars) so perfectly matches the description that the identification is certain. Apparent size 1.1 by 0.6 arcmin?
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 250
Above,a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 250
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing Swift's position
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 250, also showing Swift's position

NGC 251 (= PGC 2806)
Discovered (Oct 15, 1784) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Pisces (RA 00 47 53.9, Dec +19 35 49)
Apparent size 2.4 by 1.9 arcmin?
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 251
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 251
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 251

NGC 252 (= PGC 2819)
Discovered (Oct 26, 1786) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 12.4 lenticular galaxy (type S0/(r)a?) in Andromeda (RA 00 48 01.7, Dec +27 37 24)
Per Dreyer, NGC 252 (GC 136 = GC 139, JH 59 = JH 60, WH II 609, 1860 RA 00 40 33, NPD 63 08.6) is "pretty bright, small, round, pretty much brighter middle, mottled but not resolved into stars, double star to the west". The position precesses to RA 00 48 01.8, Dec +27 37 18, almost dead center on the galaxy, so the identification is certain. Apparent size 2.1 by 1.5 arcmin?
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 252
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 252
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 258
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 252, also showing NGC 258

NGC 253 (= PGC 2789), the Sculptor Galaxy, the Silver Dollar Galaxy
Discovered (Sep 23, 1783) by
Caroline Herschel
A magnitude 7.2 spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)c) in Sculptor (RA 00 47 33.1, Dec -25 17 15)
Apparent size 25 by 5.5 arcmin. Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type SAB(s)c.
ESO image of spiral galaxy NGC 253, also known as the Sculptor Galaxy, or the Silver Dollar Galaxy; also shown is the distant pair of galaxies listed as PGC 198197
Above, a 24 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 253; also shown is PGC 198197 (Image Credits: ESO)
Below, a rotated view of the the galaxy to allow for more detail (Image Credits as above)
ESO image of spiral galaxy NGC 253, also known as the Sculptor Galaxy, or the Silver Dollar Galaxy

NGC 254 (= PGC 2778)
Discovered (Sep 28, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.7 lenticular galaxy (type (R)SAB0/a(r)?) in Sculptor (RA 00 47 27.5, Dec -31 25 19)
Apparent size 2.6 by 1.7 arcmin?
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 254
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 254
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 254

NGC 255 (= PGC 2802)
Discovered (Nov 27, 1785) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 11.9 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)bc) in Cetus (RA 00 47 47.3, Dec -11 28 06)
Apparent size 3.1 by 2.7 arcmin?.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 255
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 255
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide region shown in more detail (Image Credits: Adam Block/NOAO/AURA/NSF)
NOAO image of spiral galaxy NGC 255 superimposed on a DSS background to show more detail
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy (Image credits as above)
NOAO image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 255 superimposed on a DSS background to fill in missing areas

NGC 256 (in the Small Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.7 open cluster in Tucana (RA 00 45 53.3, Dec -73 30 25)
Apparent size 0.6 arcmin?
DSS image of NGC 256, an open cluster in the Small Magellanic Cloud
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 256
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the open cluster, also showing NGC 265
DSS image of region near NGC 256, an open cluster in the Small Magellanic Cloud, also showing NGC 265

NGC 257 (= PGC 2818)
Discovered (Dec 29, 1790) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 12.6 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Pisces (RA 00 48 01.6, Dec +08 17 48)
Apparent size 1.9 by 1.3 arcmin?
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 257
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 257
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 257

NGC 258 (= PGC 2829)
Discovered (Dec 22, 1848) by
George Stoney
A magnitude 14.2 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Andromeda (RA 00 48 12.8, Dec +27 39 28)
Per Dreyer, NGC 258 (GC 137, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 00 40 50, NPD 63 07) is "extremely faint, small, very faint star close". The position precesses to RA 00 48 18.9, Dec +27 38 54, about one and a half arcmin southeast of the galaxy, but there is nothing else nearby, and the nearby star makes the identification certain. Apparent size 0.5 by 0.4 arcmin?
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 258
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 258
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 252 and 260
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 258, also showing NGC 252 and NGC 260

NGC 259 (= PGC 2820)
Discovered (Dec 13, 1786) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 12.8 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Cetus (RA 00 48 03.2, Dec -02 46 33)
Apparent size 2.9 by 0.6 arcmin?
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 259
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 259
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 259

NGC 260 (= PGC 2844)
Discovered (Aug 27, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type Scd pec?) in Andromeda (RA 00 48 34.9, Dec +27 41 31)
Per Dreyer, NGC 260 (GC 5118, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 00 41 08, NPD 63 04.8) is "extremely faint, pretty small, a little extended". The position precesses to RA 00 48 37.1, Dec +27 41 05, only about half an arcmin southeast of the galaxy, so the identification is certain. Apparent size 0.8 by 0.8 arcmin?
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 260
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 260
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 258
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 260, also showing NGC 258

NGC 261 (in the Small Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Sep 5, 1826) by
James Dunlop (4, 21)
A magnitude 12 emission nebula in Tucana (RA 00 46 27.9, Dec -73 06 14)
Apparent size 1.9 arcmin?
DSS image of NGC 261, an emission nebula in the Small Magellanic Cloud
Above, a 4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 261
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the emission nebula, also showing NGC 249
DSS image of NGC 261, an emission nebula in the Small Magellanic Cloud, also showing NGC 249

NGC 262 (= PGC 2855)
Discovered (Sep 17, 1885) by
Lewis Swift (2-10)
A magnitude 13.1 lenticular galaxy (type SA0/a?(s)) in Andromeda (RA 00 48 47.1, Dec +31 57 27)
Per Dreyer, NGC 262 (Swift list II (#10), 1860 RA 00 41 29, NPD 58 48.4) is "extremely faint, very small, round, very difficult". The second Index Catalog lists a corrected RA (per Bigourdan) of 00 41 15. The corrected position precesses to RA 00 48 47.7, Dec +31 57 29, right on the galaxy, so the identification is certain. Apparent size 1.1 by 1.1 arcmin?
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 262
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 262
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 262

NGC 263 (= PGC 2856)
Discovered (1886) by
Francis Leavenworth (I-13)
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Cetus (RA 00 48 48.4, Dec -13 06 26)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.3 arcmin?
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 263
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 263
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 263

NGC 264 (= PGC 2831)
Discovered (Aug 30, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.5 lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Sculptor (RA 00 48 20.9, Dec -38 14 04)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.3 arcmin?
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 264
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 264
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 264

NGC 265 (in the Small Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.2 open cluster in Tucana (RA 00 47 11.1, Dec -73 28 38)
Apparent size 1.0 arcmin? About two hundred thousand light-years distant, in the Small Magellanic Cloud, are the 12th magnitude open clusters NGC 265 and NGC 290. Each cluster spans about 65 light years, and contains hundreds or thousands of brilliant young stars. Most of the stars in the HST image are not cluster members, but lie in front of (in our own galaxy or the Small Magellanic Cloud) or behind (in the Small Magellanic Cloud) the clusters.
DSS image of open cluster NGC 265, in the Small Magellanic Cloud
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide image of NGC 265
Below, a roughly 1.2 arcmin wide detail (Image Credits: E. Olszewski (U. Arizona), HST, ESA, NASA, Hubble Site)
HST image of open cluster NGC 265, in the Small Magellanic Cloud
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the cluster, also showing NGC 256 and 269
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 265, in the Small Magellanic Cloud, also showing NGC 256 and NGC 269

NGC 266 (= PGC 2901)
Discovered (Sep 12, 1784) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 11.6 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)ab) in Pisces (RA 00 49 47.8, Dec +32 16 39)
Apparent size 3.0 by 2.9 arcmin? Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type SB(rs)ab.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 266
Above, a 3.6 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 266
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 266

NGC 267 (in the Small Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Oct 4, 1836) by
John Herschel
An open cluster in Tucana (RA 00 48 02.9, Dec -73 16 27)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.5 arcmin?
DSS image of region near NGC 267, an open cluster in the Small Magellanic Cloud
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 267
Below, a 4 arcmin wide DSS image of the open cluster
DSS image of NGC 267, an open cluster in the Small Magellanic Cloud

NGC 268 (= PGC 2927)
Discovered (Nov 22, 1785) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 13.1 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)bc?) in Cetus (RA 00 50 09.4, Dec -05 11 38)
Apparent size 1.6 by 1.1 arcmin?
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 268
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 268
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 268

NGC 269 (in the Small Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Nov 5, 1836) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.3 open cluster in Tucana (RA 00 48 21.0, Dec -73 31 54)
Apparent size 0.6 arcmin?
DSS image of NGC 269, an open cluster in the Small Magellanic Cloud
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 269
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the cluster, also showing NGC 265
DSS image of region near NGC 269, an open cluster in the Small Magellanic Cloud, also showing NGC 265

NGC 270 (= PGC 2938)
Discovered (Dec 10, 1798) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 12.9 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a? pec) in Cetus (RA 00 50 32.4, Dec -08 39 06)
Apparent size 1.7 by 1.2 arcmin?
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 270
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 270
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 270

NGC 271 (= PGC 2949)
Discovered (Oct 1, 1785) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 12.0 spiral galaxy (type (R')SB(rs)ab) in Cetus (RA 00 50 41.9, Dec -01 54 38)
Apparent size 2.2 by 1.7 arcmin?
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 271
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 271
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 271

NGC 272 (= OCL 312)
Discovered (Aug 2, 1864) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 8.5 group of stars in Andromeda (RA 00 51 26.0, Dec +35 49 18)
Apparent size 5.0 arcmin?
DSS image of region near stellar group NGC 272
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 272

NGC 273 (= PGC 2959)
Discovered (Sep 10, 1785) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 12.9 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Cetus (RA 00 50 48.4, Dec -06 53 08)
Apparent size 2.1 by 0.6 arcmin?
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 273
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 273
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 273

NGC 274 (= PGC 2980, and with
NGC 275 = Arp 140)
Discovered (Sep 10, 1785) by William Herschel
A magnitude 11.8 lenticular galaxy (type E/SAB0(r) pec) in Cetus (RA 00 51 01.8, Dec -07 03 24)
Apparent size 1.4 by 1.2 arcmin? Used by the Arp Atlas as an example of material emanating from an elliptical galaxy.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 274 and peculiar spiral galaxy NGC 275, collectively known as Arp 140
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 274 and 275
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 274 and peculiar spiral galaxy NGC 275, collectively known as Arp 140

NGC 275 (= PGC 2984, and with
NGC 274 = Arp 140)
Discovered (Oct 9, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.5 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)cd pec) in Cetus (RA 00 51 04.5, Dec -07 03 55)
Apparent size 1.5 by 1.2 arcmin? Used by the Arp Atlas as an example of material emanating from an elliptical galaxy (NGC 274, which see for images).

NGC 276 (=
IC 1591 = PGC 3054)
Discovered (1886) by Frank Muller (and later listed as NGC 276)
Discovered (Nov 3, 1898) by DeLisle Stewart (#123) (and later listed as IC 1591)
A magnitude 14.7 spiral galaxy (type SAB(r)b? pec) in Cetus (RA 00 52 06.5, Dec -22 40 49)
Per Dreyer, NGC 276 (Muller list II (#294), 1860 RA 00 44 01, NPD 113 27.9) is "extremely faint, pretty small, extended 265°, 11th magnitude star 3' north". The second Index Catalog lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 00 45 14, and adds "the star to the northeast is an 8th magnitude close double". The corrected position precesses to RA 00 52 07.5, Dec -22 42 10, about 1.3 arcmin south of the galaxy, but there is nothing else nearby, and the double star makes the identification certain. Apparent size 1.0 by 0.4 arcmin?
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 276
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 276
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 276

NGC 277 (= PGC 2995)
Discovered (Oct 8, 1864) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 13.7 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Cetus (RA 00 51 17.2, Dec -08 35 47)
Apparent size 1.4 by 1.2 arcmin?
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 277
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 277
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 277

NGC 278 (= PGC 3051)
Discovered (Dec 11, 1786) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 10.8 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)b) in Cassiopeia (RA 00 52 04.5, Dec +47 33 03)
Apparent size 2.1 by 2.0 arcmin? Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type SA(rs)b.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 278
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 278
Below, a more detailed image of a similar field of view (Image Credits: Hubble Legacy Archive)
HST image of nucleus of spiral galaxy NGC 278
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 278

NGC 279 (= PGC 3055)
Discovered (Oct 1, 1785) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 12.7 lenticular galaxy (type (R')SAB0/a(r) pec?) in Cetus (RA 00 52 08.9, Dec -02 13 06)
Apparent size 1.6 by 1.2 arcmin?
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 279
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 279
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 279

NGC 280 (= PGC 3076)
Discovered (Dec 5, 1785) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type (R)SAB(rs)b pec?) in Andromeda (RA 00 52 30.2, Dec +24 21 03)
Apparent size 1.7 by 1.1 arcmin?
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 280
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 280
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 280

NGC 281 (perhaps =
IC 11?)
Discovered (Nov 16, 1881) by Edward Barnard (a) (and later listed as NGC 281)
Perhaps reobserved (1890's?) by Edward Barnard (and later listed as IC 11)
An emission nebula in Cassiopeia (RA 00 52 53.8, Dec +56 37 30)
(Historical information to be added in the next iteration of this page.) The nebula is about 10 thousand light years away, and based on its 40 arcmin apparent size, is a little over 100 light years across. It is associated with open cluster OCL 313.
DSS image of emission nebula NGC 281
Above, a 45 arcmin wide view of NGC 281

NGC 282 (= PGC 3090)
Discovered (Oct 13, 1879) by
Édouard Stephan (10-3)
A magnitude 13.7 elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Pisces (RA 00 52 42.0, Dec +30 38 20)
Apparent size 1.0 by 0.9 arcmin?
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 282
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 282 (glare is from 8th magnitude HD 5051)
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 282

NGC 283 (= PGC 3124)
Discovered (Oct 2, 1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)c?) in Cetus (RA 00 53 13.1, Dec -13 09 48)
Per Dreyer, NGC 283 (Leavenworth list I (#14), 1860 RA 00 45 30, NPD 103 55.8) is "extremely faint, small, round, the 1st of 4", the others being NGC 284, 285 and 286, all of which have identical positions and descriptions in the original NGC. The second Index Catalog lists a corrected position (per Howe) of RA 00 46 14, NPD 103 55.5. That precesses to RA 00 53 14.6, Dec -13 09 49, right on the galaxy, so the identification is certain. Apparent size 1.6 by 1.0 arcmin?
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 283
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 283
Below, a 6 arcmin wide region showing NGC 283, 284, 285 and 286
DSS image of NGC 283, NGC 284, NGC 285 and NGC 286
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 284, 285 and 286
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 283, also showing NGC 284, NGC 285 and NGC 286

NGC 284 (= PGC 3132)
Discovered (Oct 2, 1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
A magnitude 14.4 elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Cetus (RA 00 53 24.2, Dec -13 09 30)
Per Dreyer, NGC 284 (Leavenworth list I (#15), 1860 RA 00 45 30, NPD 103 55.8) is "extremely faint, small, round, the 2nd of 4", the others being NGC 283, 285 and 286, all of which have identical positions and descriptions in the original NGC. The second Index Catalog lists a corrected position (per Howe) of RA 00 46 25, NPD 103 55.2. That precesses to RA 00 53 25.5, Dec -13 09 32, right on the galaxy, so the identification is certain. Apparent size 0.6 by 0.5 arcmin? For images, see NGC 285.

NGC 285 (= PGC 3141)
Discovered (Oct 2, 1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
A magnitude 14.7 lenticular galaxy (type (R'?)E/S0?) in Cetus (RA 00 53 29.8, Dec -13 09 37)
Per Dreyer, NGC 285 (Leavenworth list I (#16), 1860 RA 00 45 30, NPD 103 55.8) is "extremely faint, small, round, the 3rd of 4", the others being NGC 283, 284 and 286, all of which have identical positions and descriptions in the original NGC. The second Index Catalog lists a corrected position (per Howe) of RA 00 46 31, NPD 103 55.2. That precesses to RA 00 53 31.5, Dec -13 09 32, right on the galaxy, so the identification is certain. Apparent size 0.7 by 0.4 arcmin?
DSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 284 and lenticular galaxy NGC 285
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 285 and 284
Below, a 6 arcmin wide region showing NGC 283, 284, 285 and 286
DSS image of NGC 283, NGC 284, NGC 285 and NGC 286
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 285 and NGC 284, also showing NGC 283 and 286
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 284 and lenticular galaxy NGC 285, also showing NGC 283 and NGC 286

NGC 286 (= PGC 3142)
Discovered (Oct 2, 1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
A magnitude 14.1 lenticular galaxy (type SAB0(s) pec?) in Cetus (RA 00 53 30.3, Dec -13 06 44)
Per Dreyer, NGC 286 (Leavenworth list I (#17), 1860 RA 00 45 30, NPD 103 55.8) is "extremely faint, small, round, the 4th of 4", the others being NGC 283, 284 and 285, all of which have identical positions and descriptions in the original NGC. The second Index Catalog lists a corrected position (per Howe) of RA 00 46 31, NPD 103 52.4. That precesses to RA 00 53 31.5, Dec -13 06 44, right on the galaxy, so the identification is certain. Apparent size 1.3 by 0.9 arcmin?
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 286
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 286; for other images, see NGC 285

NGC 287 (= PGC 3145)
Discovered (Nov 22, 1827) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 14.0 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a?) in Pisces (RA 00 53 28.3, Dec +32 28 57)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.4 arcmin?
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 287
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 287
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 287

NGC 288 (= GCL 2)
Discovered (Oct 27, 1785) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 8.1 globular cluster (type X) in Sculptor (RA 00 52 45.5, Dec -26 35 51)
Apparent size 13 arcmin?
DSS image of globular cluster NGC 288
Above, an 18 arcmin wide image of NGC 288
Below, a detailed view of the core of the cluster (Hubble Legacy Archive)
HST image of core of globular cluster NGC 288

NGC 289 (= PGC 3089)
Discovered (Sep 27, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.0 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)bc) in Sculptor (RA 00 52 42.1, Dec -31 12 20)
The brighter portion of NGC 289 appears to be a more or less normal spiral galaxy about 3.1 by 2.5 arcmin across; but its wispy outer arms extend across a more than 9.5 by 7.5 arcmin wide region. A faint elliptically shaped area on one of the northern arms may be a large star-forming region, or an elliptical companion whose interaction with the larger galaxy is responsible for its appearance. Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type SB(rs)bc.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 289
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 289
Below, an enhanced version of the same image, showing the extended outer arms
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 289, digitally enhanced to show off its outer arms
Below, a portion of the galaxy's central regions (Image Credits: Hubble Legacy Archive)
HST image of part of the central region of spiral galaxy NGC 289

NGC 290 (in the Small Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.0 open cluster in Tucana (RA 00 51 14.7, Dec -73 09 45)
Apparent size 0.8 arcmin? About two hundred thousand light-years distant, in the Small Magellanic Cloud, are the 12th magnitude open clusters NGC 265 and NGC 290. Each cluster spans about 65 light years, and contains hundreds or thousands of brilliant young stars. Most of the stars in the HST image are not cluster members, but lie in front of (in our own galaxy or the Small Magellanic Cloud) or behind (in the Small Magellanic Cloud) the clusters.
DSS image of NGC 290, an open cluster in the Small Magellanic Cloud
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide image of NGC 290
Below, a HST image of the cluster (Image Credits: E. Olszewski (U. Arizona), HST, ESA, NASA, Hubble Site)
HST image of open cluster NGC 290, in the Small Magellanic Cloud
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the cluster
DSS image of region near NGC 290, an open cluster in the Small Magellanic Cloud

NGC 291 (= PGC 3140)
Discovered (Sep 27, 1864) by
Albert Marth (#17)
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type (R')SB(r)a?) in Cetus (RA 00 53 29.8, Dec -08 46 03)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.6 arcmin? A Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 2).
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 291
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 291
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 291

NGC 292 (= PGC 3085), the Small Magellanic Cloud
Discovered (1501) by
Amerigo Vespucci
A magnitude 2.3 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)m pec) in Tucana (RA 00 52 45, Dec -72 49 43)
The Small Magellanic Cloud is a satellite or companion of our Milky Way Galaxy. Its recessional velocity of 158 km/sec is too small, in comparison to normal peculiar velocities (non-Hubble-redshift motions) to provide a reasonable estimate of distance. Redshift-independent distance estimates range from 160 to 250 thousand light years distance. At that distance, the SMC's apparent size of 315 by 235 arcmins implies a diameter of 18 thousand light years.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 292, the Small Magellanic Cloud
Above, a 4 degree wide view of NGC 292, the Small Magellanic Cloud
Below, a 3.5 degree wide view using the HST color palette
(Image Credit: ESA/Hubble and Digitized Sky Survey 2. Acknowledgements: Davide De Martin (ESA/Hubble)
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 292, the Small Magellanic Cloud, altered by using the HST color palette
Below, a ground-based near infrared view of the galaxy
(Image Credits: F. Winkler/Middlebury College, MCELS Team, NOAO/AURA/NSF)
NOAO infrared image of spiral galaxy NGC 292, the Small Magellanic Cloud
Below, a space-based far infrared image (Image Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/WISE)
WISE infrared image of spiral galaxy NGC 292, the Small Magellanic Cloud

NGC 293 (= PGC 3195)
Discovered (Sep 27, 1864) by
Albert Marth (#18)
A magnitude 14.2 spiral galaxy (type (R')SB(rs)b) in Cetus (RA 00 54 16.0, Dec -07 14 08)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.9 arcmin?
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 293
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 293
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 293

NGC 294 (in the Small Magellanic Cloud)
Possibly observed (Sep 5, 1826) by
James Dunlop (D 5,6 ?)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.7 open cluster in Tucana (RA 00 53 05.7, Dec -73 22 50)
Apparent size 0.8 arcmin?
DSS image of NGC 294, an open cluster in the Small Magellanic Cloud
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide image of NGC 294
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the cluster
DSS image of region near NGC 294, an open cluster in the Small Magellanic Cloud

NGC 295 (not = PGC 3260)
Recorded (Oct 26, 1872) by
Ralph Copeland
A lost or nonexistent object in Pisces (RA 00 55 05.4, Dec +31 31 49)
Per Dreyer, NGC 295 (GC 5123, Copeland using Lord Rosse's 6-foot reflector, 1860 RA 00 47 30, NPD 59 13.8) is "faint, small, round, star 10 arcsec north, II 214 northeast", II 214 being NGC 296. The position precesses to RA 00 55 05.4, Dec +31 31 49, whence the position listed above, but there is nothing there, save for NGC 296 (which must be there, since Copeland measured the position relative to what he thought was that nebula). As a result, NGC 295 has long been (and still is, in some places) thought to be the galaxy that should be listed as NGC 296, and that galaxy was thought to be lost, which is the exact opposite of the truth. Per Corwin, Copeland thought he was observing NGC 296 and another galaxy near it, but it is now clear that he must have been observing a different pair of galaxies, as his description (posted at the end of this entry) does not match anything in the field. To date, no one has found out which galaxies, but Copeland's notes may enable a future search for suitable candidates. For the presumed but incorrect NGC 296 he wrote: "faint, round, 10th magnitude yellow star at position angle 29.6 degrees, 123.1 arcsec distant". For the "Nova" that became NGC 295 he wrote: "small, round, with a star or another nebula 10 arcsec north. Position angle from (the erroneous NGC 296) 242.0 degrees, 314.6 arcsec distant, or 21.6 seconds of time to the west and 147.6 arcsec south".
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 296, showing Copeland's position for NGC 295 and Herschel's position for NGC 296
Above, a 12 arcmin wide view of spiral galaxy NGC 296 and Herschel and Copeland's positions for NGC 296 and 295 makes it appear that the galaxy should be Copeland's NGC 295, and not Herschel's NGC 296; and that was thought to be the case for a long time. But Copeland's description of the field does not match the galaxy, whereas Herschel's does; so it is now believed that the galaxy is NGC 296, and NGC 295 is lost or nonexistent.

NGC 296 (= PGC 3260)
Discovered (Sep 12, 1784) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 12.6 spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Pisces (RA 00 55 07.4, Dec +31 32 32)
Per Dreyer, NGC 296 (GC 167, WH II 214, 1860 RA 00 47 52, NPD 59 11.3) is "faint, a little extended, 10th magnitude star 2' to northeast" (note: in the copy of the NGC available to me 'a little extended', which should be lE, looks like lF, probably due to a damaged piece of type). The position precesses to RA 00 55 27.6, Dec +31 34 38, about 20s of time east-northeast of the correct position. That is close enough to the galaxy that it might have been easily identified as NGC 296 save for one thing, namely the 10th magnitude star supposedly 2' to the northeast, which does not match the galaxy at all. Per Corwin, the problem is the entry for Copeland's NGC 295 (which see for more about the confounding of these entries), whose incorrect position is considerably closer to the correct NGC 296 than Herschel's position, leading to the presumption that NGC 295 was the galaxy now identified as NGC 296, and Herschel's object was lost or nonexistent. This incorrect identification was aided by Dreyer's description, which is not that of either William or John Herschel, but an amalgamation of their descriptions and the one for NGC 295 by Copeland (which as just noted was presumed to be "this" galaxy). The two Herschel's descriptions, though slightly different, agree that WH II 214 is "faint, extended, with a bright star to the east (and very near)". That is a perfect description of PGC 3260, and despite the error in Herschel's position, makes it certain that NGC 296 is the galaxy formerly identified as NGC 295. Apparent size 2.2 by 1.0 arcmin?
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 296, formerly misidentified as NGC 295
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 296, formerly misidentified as NGC 295
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 296, formerly misidentified as NGC 295

NGC 297 (= PGC 1020464)
Discovered (Sep 27, 1864) by
Albert Marth (#19)
A magnitude 15.5 elliptical galaxy (type E3 pec?) in Cetus (RA 00 54 58.9, Dec -07 21 01)
Apparent size 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin? Close to NGC 298, which see for images.

NGC 298 (= PGC 3250)
Discovered (Sep 27, 1864) by
Albert Marth (#20)
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type Scd?) in Cetus (RA 00 55 02.2, Dec -07 20 01)
Apparent size 1.7 by 0.4 arcmin?
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 298 and elliptical galaxy NGC 297
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 298 and 297
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxies
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 298 and elliptical galaxy NGC 297

NGC 299 (in the Small Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Aug 12, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11 open cluster in Tucana (RA 00 53 24.7, Dec -72 11 47)
Apparent size 0.7 arcmin?
DSS image of open cluster NGC 299, in the Small Magellanic Cloud
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 299
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide closeup of the cluster (Image Credits: Hubble Legacy Archive)
HST closeup of open cluster NGC 299, in the Small Magellanic Cloud
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the cluster, also showing NGC 306
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 299, in the Small Magellanic Cloud, also showing NGC 306
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 200 - 249) ←      NGC Objects: NGC 250 - 299     → (NGC 300 - 349)