Celestial Atlas
(NGC 250 - 299) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 300 - 349 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 350 - 399)
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Page last updated Apr 25, 2016
Checked Corwin positions, original NGC entries
WORKING 333: IDs (Corwin+)

NGC 300 (= PGC 3238)
Discovered (Aug 5, 1826) by
James Dunlop (530)
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 8.1 spiral galaxy (type SA(s)d) in Sculptor (RA 00 54 53.5, Dec -37 41 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 300 (= GC 169 = JH 2359, (Dunlop 530), 1860 RA 00 48 25, NPD 128 27.1) is "pretty bright, very large, very much irregularly extended, very gradually pretty much brighter middle".
Physical Information: NGC 300 is the brightest of the five larger spiral galaxies in the direction of the Sculptor Group of galaxies. NGC 55 and NGC 300 are only a million or so light years apart, and are thought be a gravitationally bound pair (the bottom image shows their relative positions). Until recently, they were considered members of the Sculptor group of galaxies, but are now known to be foreground galaxies. The 145 km/sec recessional velocity of NGC 300 is too small to be a reliable distance indicator, and redshift-independent distance estimates range from 4 to 9 million light years, with 7 or so million light years being the most accepted guesstimate. Given that, its apparent size of 22 by 16 arcmin corresponds to about 45 thousand light years. It is a relatively diffuse spiral with a poorly defined core, much like M33, in Triangulum. As such, it is an absolutely perfect example of its type. The image immediately below shows the galaxy as it would appear if our eyes were hundreds of times more sensitive to light and color than they are. In that sense, it is a "realistic" image, even though giving a false impression of the actual appearance of the galaxy as it would be seen by the eye, even through a telescope. Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type SA(s)d.
ESO visible-light image of spiral galaxy NGC 300
Above, a ? arcmin wide visible light image of NGC 300 (Image Credit ESO)
Below, an image of NGC 300 viewed through an Hα filter, so that gaseous regions heated by hot young stars or shock waves from stellar explosions stand out, while the visible and ultraviolet radiation of those stars is blocked, making them fade into the background. The image is in black and white, which is actually the way that all professional astronomical images are taken. Colors are added when combining images taken at different wavelengths, to highlight different features. (Image Credit ESO)
ESO infrared image of spiral galaxy NGC 300
Below, a composite of visible light (colored red and yellow) images of NGC 300 and a far UV GALEX image (colored blue), which emphasizes various features by use of the false colors used for the images. The result is that young hot blue stars stand out in the regions where they recently formed, while gases heated by their ultraviolet radiation and shock waves from stellar explosions appear in pink, and older stars in the core look yellow-green. This reveals more structural information than a "realistic" color choice, but is a "false-color" image in every sense of the phrase. (Image Credit JPL-Caltech/OCIW/GALEX, NASA)
Composite of visible and GALEX X-ray images of spiral galaxy NGC 300
Below, an HST image of the core of NGC 300, in which millions of stars are individually imaged. Studying such images over a period of time should allow the discovery of hundreds of Cepheid variables, and provide a far more accurate estimate of the galaxy's distance than is currently available. (Image Credit Hubble Heritage Team (AURA / STScI), ESA, NASA)
HST detail of the core of spiral galaxy NGC 300
Below, images of NGC 300 at upper left, the region imaged in detail (above) at upper right, and a small inset of the core at the bottom, to show just how detailed the HST image really is. (Image Credit NASA, ESA, and The Hubble Heritage Team (AURA/STScI), HubbleSite)
A series of HST images showing greater and greater detail in spiral galaxy NGC 300
Below, a 9 degree wide DSS image of the region between NGC 300 and NGC 55
The bright star at the bottom is Ankaa, or α Phoenicis
DSS image of the region between NGC 55 and NGC 300

NGC 301 (= PGC 3345)
Discovered (1886) by
Frank Muller
A magnitude 14.8 lenticular galaxy (type (R'?)SB0/a?) in Cetus (RA 00 56 18.3, Dec -10 40 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 301 (Muller list I (#18), 1860 RA 00 48 30, NPD 101 25.8) is "extremely faint, small, irregularly round, gradually brighter middle, 8th magnitude star 30 sec of time to west".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.5 arcmin? Corwin's position indicates an uncertain identification.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 301, also showing the star thought to be NGC 302
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 301, also showing the probable NGC 302
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 301

NGC 302
Recorded (1886) by
Frank Muller (list I-19)
A magnitude 16.1 star in Cetus (RA 00 56 25.3, Dec -10 39 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 302 (Muller list I (#19), 1860 RA 00 48 30, NPD 24.8) is "extremely faint, very small". Given the NGC positions, NGC 302 must be one of the stars near NGC 301 (since there are no other galaxies in the region, as shown in the wide-field image of NGC 301). Various stars have been suggested at various times, but since the NGC is supposed to be about clusters and nebulae, the identification of a particular star that was mistaken for a nebula seems of less than earth-shaking importance; so the argument (per Corwin) that posits the one listed above as the correct one will be covered in the next iteration of this page.

NGC 303 (= PGC 3240)
Discovered (1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A magnitude 14.3 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a? pec) in Cetus (RA 00 54 54.7, Dec -16 39 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 303 (Leavenworth list I (#20), 1860 RA 00 48 30, NPD 107 25.8) is "extremely faint, very small". The second Index Catalog lists a corrected 1860 RA (per Howe) of 00 47 57, and adds "extended 160 degrees". The corrected position precesses to RA 00 54 54.5, Dec -16 40 12, a little less than an arcmin south of the galaxy, and the description fits its appearance, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.3 arcmin? (Note: Listed as a contact pair of galaxies in some places, but the image and other references give no indication of that; however, Corwin lists a northern knot at RA 00 54 54.4, Dec -16 39 12 and a southern knot at RA 00 54 55.0, Dec -16 39 28, so perhaps those were mistaken for a bi-nuclear galaxy.)
DSS image of region near DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 303
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 303
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 303

NGC 304 (= PGC 3326)
Discovered (Oct 23, 1878) by
Édouard Stephan
A magnitude 13.1 spiral galaxy (type Sa pec?) in Andromeda (RA 00 56 06.0, Dec +24 07 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 304 (Stephan list IX (#2), 1860 RA 00 48 39, NPD 66 37.8) is "pretty faint, small, round, suddenly a very little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.7 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 304
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 304
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 304

NGC 305 (= "PGC 3325922")
Discovered (Oct 17, 1825) by
John Herschel
A group of stars in Pisces (RA 00 56 20.5, Dec +12 04 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 305 (= GC 170 = JH 76, 1860 RA 00 49 00, NPD 78 40.9) is "a cluster, small, scattered stars".
Physical Information: Half a dozen or so loosely scattered stars. (Per Corwin, the PGC listing is due to an error in an early version of the Revised NGC; but LEDA does indicate that the object is stellar.)
DSS image of region near stellar group NGC 305
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 305

NGC 306 (an OCL in the Small Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Oct 4, 1836) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12 open cluster in Tucana (RA 00 54 15.2, Dec -72 14 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 306 (= GC 171 = JH 2361, 1860 RA 00 49 16, NPD 163 00 00) is "faint, very small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 arcmin?
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 306, in the Small Magellanic Cloud, also showing NGC 299
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 306, also showing NGC 299
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the cluster
DSS image of open cluster NGC 306, in the Small Magellanic Cloud

NGC 307 (= PGC 3367)
Discovered (Sep 6, 1831) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.8 lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Cetus (RA 00 56 32.6, Dec -01 46 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 307 (= GC 172 = JH 77, 1860 RA 00 49 25, NPD 92 31.5) is "pretty faint, small, extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.7 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 307 and the star listed as NGC 308; also shown is the star listed as NGC 310, and PGC 3325895, which is sometimes misidentified as NGC 310
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 307
Also shown are the stars listed as NGC 308 and NGC 310, and PGC 3325895
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy, also showing the star listed as NGC 308
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 307 and the star listed as NGC 308

NGC 308
Recorded (Dec 31, 1866) by
Robert Ball
A magnitude 15.7 star in Cetus (RA 00 56 34.3, Dec -01 47 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 308 (= GC 5126, Ball using Lord Rosse's 6-foot telescope, 1860 RA 00 49 27, NPD 92 32.2) is "very faint, extremely small, 1 arcmin southeast of h77", h77 being NGC 307. The position precesses to RA 00 56 35.7, Dec -01 46 40, but there is nothing there save for some stars and NGC 307 itself. Therefore one of those stars must be what Ball observed, and mistakenly thought had some nebulosity. Per Corwin, Lord Rosse's detailed records of the object's position relative to NGC 307 (the mean of three nearly identical observations being only 55" distant, at PA 149 degrees) firmly establish that it was the star whose position is listed above, and is shown in the images of NGC 307.

NGC 309 (= PGC 3377)
Discovered (1876) by
Wilhelm Tempel
A magnitude 11.9 spiral galaxy (type SAB(r)c) in Cetus (RA 00 56 42.7, Dec -09 54 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 309 (= GC 5127, Tempel list I (#4), 1860 RA 00 49 30, NPD 100 42.5) is "pretty bright, pretty large, 12th to 13th magnitude star to north".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0 by 2.4 arcmin? Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type SAB(r)c.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 309
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 309
Below, a 3 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 309

"NGC 309A"
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 309A
A magnitude 15.5(?) star in
Cetus (RA 00 56 27.5, Dec -09 55 56)
Warning About Non-Standard Designations: This star was listed as NGC 309A in the Revised NGC by Sulentic and Tifft. It is therefore listed as such by Corwin and NED, but it is not listed in LEDA. Since it is not a nebula, galaxy or cluster it does not belong in the NGC/IC in the first place, and its non-standard designation in the Revised NGC simply adds to the confusion, making it a good example of why such non-standard designations should never be used.
SDSS image of region near the star listed as NGC 309A, also showing NGC 309 and Q005631.24-095757.5, which is a quasar
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on "NGC 309A", also showing NGC 309
Also shown is the presumed quasar Q005631.24-095757.5

NGC 310
Recorded (Dec 31, 1866) by
Robert Ball
A magnitude 14.6 star in Cetus (RA 00 56 48.1, Dec -01 45 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 310 (= GC 5128, Ball using Lord Rosse's 6-foot telescope, 1860 RA 00 49 41, NPD 92 31.1) is "stellar". The position precesses to RA 00 56 49.7, Dec -01 45 35, but there is nothing there save some stars and a 17th magnitude galaxy that is too faint to have been seen by Ball. Despite its faintness the galaxy (PGC 3325895) is listed as NGC 310 in some places; but per Corwin, Lord Rosse's detailed records of the object's position relative to NGC 307 (the mean of two nearly identical observations being about 232" distant, at PA 83 degrees) firmly establish that it was the substantially brighter star whose position is listed above and shown below.
SDSS image of region near the star listed as NGC 310, also showing PGC 3325895, the spiral galaxy sometimes misidentified as NGC 310, and NGC 307 and the star listed as NGC 308
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 310, also showing NGC 307 and 308, and PGC 3325895

PGC 3325895 (not =
NGC 310)
Not an NGC object, but listed here since it is sometimes misidentified as NGC 310
A magnitude 16.8 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Cetus (RA 00 56 52.8, Dec -01 46 27)
Historical Misidentification: (Listed in NED as 2MASXJ00565286-0146246.) As noted at NGC 310, the temptation to list a galaxy in place of a stellar or otherwise unidentified NGC object led to this galaxy being incorrectly listed as that object.
Physical Information: Other than an apparent size of 0.35 by 0.2 arcmin, nothing seems to be known about the galaxy.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 3325895, which is sometimes misidentified as NGC 310; also shown is the star that is listed as NGC 310
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 3325895, also showing the star listed as NGC 310 (which see)

NGC 311 (= PGC 3434)
Discovered (Sep 15, 1828) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.0 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Pisces (RA 00 57 32.7, Dec +30 16 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 311 (= GC 173 = JH 78, 1860 RA 00 49 58, NPD 60 28.6) is "pretty faint, very small, round, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.8 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 311, also showing NGC 313, NGC 315 and NGC 316
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 311, also showing NGC 313, 315 and 316
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 311
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 311

NGC 312 (= PGC 3343)
Discovered (Sep 5, 1836) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.4 elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Phoenix (RA 00 56 16.0, Dec -52 46 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 312 (= GC 174 = JH 2363, 1860 RA 00 50 04, NPD 143 32.1) is "faint, small, round, 12th magnitude star to east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.1 arcmin?
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 312
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 312
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 312

NGC 313
Discovered (Nov 29, 1850) by
Bindon Stoney
A triplet of stars in Pisces (RA 00 57 45.7, Dec +30 22 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 313 (= GC 5059, the 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 00 50 09, NPD 60 23.5) is "very faint, extremely small, 1 arcmin northwest of II 210", II 210 being NGC 315 (which see for images). The position precesses to RA 00 57 44.5, Dec +30 21 59, just west of a triplet of stars. Per Corwin, the object was observed at Birr Castle on six occasions, being recorded as nebulous on five of those, but as a double star on the sixth (in lower resolution images, the northern pair looks like a single star, so the triplet would look like a double), so the identification is certain.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case Bindon Stoney.

NGC 314 (= PGC 3395)
Discovered (Sep 27, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.4 lenticular galaxy (type (R)SB0/a(rs)?) in Sculptor (RA 00 56 52.4, Dec -31 57 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 314 (= GC 175 = JH 2362, 1860 RA 00 50 11, NPD 122 43.2) is "extremely faint, very small, round, pretty bright star 2 arcmin to east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.8 arcmin?
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 314
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 314
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 314

NGC 315 (= PGC 3455)
Discovered (Sep 11, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.2 elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Pisces (RA 00 57 48.9, Dec +30 21 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 315 (= GC 176 = JH 79 = WH II 210, 1860 RA 00 50 13, NPD 60 24.4) is "pretty bright, pretty large, round, gradually brighter middle, 9th magnitude star 3 arcmin to northeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0 by 2.5 arcmin? In looking at the images below, keep in mind that only the bright core of the galaxy can be seen without photography, so the stellar objects which to us seem well within the boundary of the galaxy appeared as separate objects to visual observers of the 19th century.
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 315, also showing NGC 311, NGC 313, NGC 316 and NGC 318
Above a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 315, also showing NGC 311, 313, 316 and 318
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy, also showing NGC 313 and 316
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 315, also showing the triplet of stars listed as NGC 313, and the star listed as NGC 316

NGC 316
Discovered (Nov 29, 1850) by
Bindon Stoney
A magnitude 13.9 star in Pisces (RA 00 57 52.4, Dec +30 21 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 316 (= GC 5129, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 00 50 16, NPD 60 24.3) is "very faint, extremely small, stellar, 1 arcmin east of II 210", II 210 being NGC 315 (which see for images). The position precesses to RA 00 57 51.5, Dec +30 21 11, almost dead on the star, and given the description of NGC 316 as "stellar", the identification is certain.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case Bindon Stoney.

NGC 317 (= PGC 3442 + PGC 3445)
Discovered (Oct 1, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
A pair of interacting galaxies in Andromeda
PGC 3442 = A magnitude 13.5 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a? pec) at RA 00 57 39.1, Dec +43 48 03
PGC 3445 = A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type SBbc? pec) at RA 00 57 40.4, Dec +43 47 32
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 317 (Swift list II (#11), 1860 RA 00 50 16, NPD 46 56.7) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, a little extended, double star close to east".
Physical Information: Apparent size for PGC 3442 is 1.4 by 1.3 arcmin(?); for PGC 3445, 1.1 by 0.5 arcmin? (This does not count the northern extension of PGC 3442 or the southeastern extension of PGC 3445 caused by their interaction.)
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 3445 and lenticular galaxy PGC 3442, the interacting pair which comprise NGC 317
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 317
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the pair
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 3445 and lenticular galaxy PGC 3442, the interacting pair which comprise NGC 317

NGC 318 (= PGC 3465)
Discovered (Nov 29, 1850) by
Bindon Stoney
Also observed (date?) by Édouard Stephan
A magnitude 14.4 lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Pisces (RA 00 58 05.2, Dec +30 25 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 318 (= GC 177, 3rd Lord Rosse, Stephan list XII (#??), 1860 RA 00 50 28, NPD 60 19.8) is "very faint, very small, round, brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 00 58 03.7, Dec +30 25 40, less than half an arcmin from the galaxy, so the identification is certain.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case Bindon Stoney.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.3 arcmin?
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 318, also showing the triplet of stars listed as NGC 313, the star listed as NGC 316, and NGC 315
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 318, also showing NGC 313, 315 and 316
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 318

NGC 319 (= PGC 3398)
Discovered (Sep 5, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type (R')SAB(s)a?) in Phoenix (RA 00 56 57.6, Dec -43 50 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 319 (= GC 178 = JH 4007, 1860 RA 00 50 29, NPD 134 35.9) is "extremely faint, very small, round, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.8 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 319
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 319
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 319

NGC 320 (= PGC 3510)
Discovered (1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type (R)SB0/a?(rs)) in Cetus (RA 00 58 46.5, Dec -20 50 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 320 (Leavenworth list II (#295), 1860 RA 00 50 30, NPD 111 35.8) is "very faint, pretty small, extended 160°, 10th magnitude star to the north". The second Index Catalog lists a corrected 1860 RA (per Howe) of 00 51 54. The corrected position precesses to RA 00 58 46.9, Dec -20 50 23, right on the galaxy, and there is a (12th magnitude) star just north of the galaxy, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.5 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 320
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 320
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 320

NGC 321 (= PGC 3443)
Discovered (Sep 27, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 15.0 elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Cetus (RA 00 57 39.2, Dec -05 05 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 321 (= GC 5130, Marth #21, 1860 RA 00 50 34, NPD 95 51) is "extremely faint, very small". The position precesses to RA 00 57 40.1, Dec -05 05 31, less than an arcmin southeast of the galaxy and the description fits, so the identification is certain, and should not have involved any problems. However, careless errors in various databases have led to NGC 321 often being misidentified as NGC 325, and a galaxy to the north (PGC 3435) being misidentified as NGC 321 (as an example, Wikisky makes both these errors). As a result, discussions of galaxies in this area often refer to the wrong object.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.5 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 321, often misidentified as NGC 325, overlaid on a DSS background to cover missing areas; also shown are the correct NGC 325, NGC 327, NGC 329, and PGC 3435 (which is often misidentified as NGC 321)
Below, a SDSS image overlaid on a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 321
Also shown are NGC 325, 327 and 329 and PGC 3435
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 321, often misidentified as NGC 325

PGC 3435 (not =
NGC 321)
Not an NGC object but listed here since often misidentified as NGC 321
A magnitude 14 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)cd? pec) in Cetus (RA 00 57 35.1, Dec -05 00 09)
Historical Misidentification: As noted in the entry for NGC 321, PGC 3435 is often misidentified as that object, despite there being no good reason for the error.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.6 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 3435, often misidentified as NGC 321, also showing the actual NGC 321
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on PGC 3435, also showing NGC 321
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 3435, often misidentified as NGC 321

NGC 322 (= PGC 3412)
Discovered (Sep 5, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.4 lenticular galaxy (type S0 pec?) in Phoenix (RA 00 57 10.1, Dec -43 43 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 322 (= GC 179 = JH 4008, 1860 RA 00 50 36, NPD 134 30.0) is "very faint, very small, round, a little brighter middle, 3 stars to west".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.4 arcmin? Apparently interacting with PGC 95427.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 322 and its apparent companion, lenticular galaxy PGC 95427
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 322, also showing PGC 95427
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the pair
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 322 and its apparent companion, lenticular galaxy PGC 95427

PGC 95427
Not an NGC object but listed here because an apparent companion of
NGC 322
A magnitude 16.5 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Phoenix (RA 00 57 09.1, Dec -43 43 48)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.15 by 0.1 arcmin? Apparently interacting with NGC 322 (which see for images), and if so, presumably at the same distance; but if merely an optical double, nothing else is known.

NGC 323 (= PGC 3374)
Discovered (Oct 3, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Phoenix (RA 00 56 41.7, Dec -52 58 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 323 (= GC 180 = JH 2365, 1860 RA 00 50 37, NPD 143 44.0) is "pretty faint, small, round, brighter middle, preceding (western) of 2", the other being NGC 328.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.1 arcmin?
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 323, also showing NGC 328
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 323, also showing NGC 328
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 323

NGC 324 (probably = PGC 3416)
Discovered (Oct 23, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.9 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Phoenix (RA 00 57 14.8, Dec -40 57 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 324 (= GC 181 = JH 2364, 1860 RA 00 50 40, NPD 131 12.6) is "questionable, faint, small, stellar". The position precesses to RA 00 57 12.6, Dec -40 27 06, but there is nothing there. However, per Corwin, if we assume that Herschel made exactly a half-degree error in the declination (a more common error than one might suppose) we land almost exactly on PGC 3416, so that galaxy has been more or less generally adopted as NGC 324. Whether that is what Herschel actually observed cannot be known, but it seems as good a guess as any.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.5 arcmin?
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy PGC 3416, which is probably NGC 324
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 3416, which is probably NGC 324
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 3416, which is probably NGC 324

NGC 325 (= PGC 3454)
Discovered (Sep 27, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 14.8 spiral galaxy (type Scd?) in Cetus (RA 00 57 47.9, Dec -05 06 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 325 (= GC 5131, Marth #22, 1860 RA 00 50 41, NPD 95 53) is "very faint, very small". The position precesses to RA 00 57 47.0, Dec -05 07 31, only 0.8 arcmin south of the galaxy listed above and the description fits, so the identification should be certain. However, as noted in the entry for NGC 321, due to careless errors in some databases that galaxy is often misidentified as NGC 325, so discussions of NGC 325 may refer to PGC 3454, or to the galaxy that is actually NGC 321.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.2 arcmin?
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 325
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 325; for wide-field views see NGC 321 or 327

NGC 326 (= PGC 3482)
Discovered (Aug 24, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 13.2 elliptical galaxy (type E0? pec) in Pisces (RA 00 58 22.7, Dec +26 51 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 326 (= GC 5132, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 00 50 49, NPD 63 53.1) is "faint, a little extended, 9th or 10th magnitude star to southeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.4 arcmin? A binuclear object in which black holes at the center of colliding galaxies appear to have merged, creating a complex and powerful radio source. Northern component at RA 00 58 22.6, Dec +26 51 59, southern component at RA 00 58 22.9, Dec +26 51 53.
SDSS image of region near binuclear elliptical galaxy NGC 326
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 326
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of binuclear elliptical galaxy NGC 326
Below, a ? arcmin wide radio image of the object (Image Credit NRAO/AUI (Inset, STScI))
NRAO radio image of binuclear elliptical galaxy NGC 326

NGC 327 (= PGC 3462)
Discovered (Sep 27, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)bc?) in Cetus (RA 00 57 55.4, Dec -05 07 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 327 (= GC 5133, Marth #23, 1860 RA 00 50 50, NPD 95 54) is "faint, small, extended". The position precesses to RA 00 57 56.0, Dec -05 08 32, on the southern end of the galaxy, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.6 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 327, overlaid on a DSS background to fill in missing areas; also shown are NGC 325, NGC 329, and NGC 321 (which is sometimes misidentified as NGC 325)
Above, a SDSS image overlaid on a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 327
Also shown are NGC 321, 325 and 329
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 327

NGC 328 (= PGC 3399)
Discovered (Sep 5, 1836) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)a pec?) in Phoenix (RA 00 56 57.6, Dec -52 55 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 328 (= GC 182 = JH 2366, 1860 RA 00 50 52, NPD 143 40.0) is "very faint, a little extended, very gradually brighter middle, following (eastern) of 2", the other being NGC 323.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.6 by 0.5 arcmin?
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 328, also showing NGC 323
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 328, also showing NGC 323
Below, a 3 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 328

NGC 329 (= PGC 3467)
Discovered (Sep 27, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Cetus (RA 00 58 01.6, Dec -05 04 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 329 (= GC 5134, Marth #24, 1860 RA 00 50 56, NPD 95 50) is "faint, extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.6 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 329, overlaid on a DSS background to fill in missing areas; also shown are NGC 325 and NGC 327, and NGC 321 (which is sometimes misidentified as NGC 325)
Above, a SDSS image overlaid on a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 329
Also shown are NGC 321, 325 and 327
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 329

NGC 330 (a GCL in the Small Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Aug 1, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 9.6 globular cluster in Tucana (RA 00 56 17.9, Dec -72 27 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 330 (= GC 183 = JH 2367, Dunlop 23, 1860 RA 00 51 27, NPD 163 13.6) is "a globular cluster, very bright, small, a little extended, stars from 13th to 15th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 arcmin?
DSS image of region near globular cluster NGC 330, in the Small Magellanic Cloud
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 330
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the cluster
DSS image of globular cluster NGC 330, in the Small Magellanic Cloud

PGC 2759 (probably but not certainly = NGC 331)
Discovered (1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type SABbc?) in Cetus (RA 00 47 06.9, Dec -02 43 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 331 (Leavenworth list II (#296), 1860 RA 00 51 30±, NPD 93 28.8) is "extremely faint, very small, round, a little brighter middle, 12th magnitude star 3 arcmin northeast", the ± sign on the right ascension being due to Leavenworth stating that the right ascension was doubtful. The position precesses to RA 00 58 37.9, Dec -02 43 22, but there is nothing there, which might be expected given the disclaimer about the right ascension. The question is, can a reasonably certain identification be made under such circumstances? Presuming the declination is more or less accurate, we could scan east and west for a nebula that fits the description, but others have already done that for us. Per Corwin there are at least two galaxies that might fit the bill, PGC 3406 and PGC 2759. The former is closer to the NGC position, but has a 7th magnitude star to the northwest that Corwin feels Leavenworth would certainly have mentioned, so he rejects it while noting that others have adopted it as NGC 331 despite that problem. The latter is further (11 1/2 minutes of time to the west), but has a star of about the right brightness 3 arcmin north-northeast of the galaxy, so Corwin feels it is the most suitable candidate for the NGC listing, and most references have followed his suggestion (and I find it very convincing). For that reason this entry discusses NGC 331 as if it is PGC 2759; but since it is also commonly identified as PGC 3406, that galaxy is covered in the following entry.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 7140 km/sec, PGC 2759 is about 330 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.8 by 0.5 arcmin, it is about 75 thousand light years across. (Listed as NGC 331 in NED, but not in LEDA.)
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 2759, which is probably but not indisputably NGC 331
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on PGC 2759, which is probably NGC 331
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 2759, which is probably but not indisputably NGC 331

PGC 3406 (possibly but not likely =
NGC 331)
Probably not NGC 331, but listed here because identified as such in some places
A magnitude 15 spiral galaxy (type SABc?) in Cetus (RA 00 57 04.9, Dec -02 46 12)
Historical Identification: As noted in the entry for NGC 331, the identification with PGC 2759 is uncertain, and it is possible (although unlikely) that PGC 3406 is the correct identification; but whether it is or not, it is treated as NGC 331 in some places, so it is appropriate to discuss it here.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 13765 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 3406 is about 640 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the Universal expansion during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 610 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 620 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.6 by 0.3 arcmin, it is about 105 thousand light years across. (Listed as NGC 331 in LEDA, but not in NED.)
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 3406, which is sometimes (probably incorrectly) called NGC 331
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on PGC 3406, which is often (mis?)identified as NGC 331
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 3406, which is sometimes (probably incorrectly) called NGC 331

NGC 332 (= PGC 3511)
Discovered (Oct 22, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 14.0 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Pisces (RA 00 58 49.1, Dec +07 06 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 332 (Swift list V (#10), 1860 RA 00 51 32, NPD 83 38.5) is "very faint, small, round, several stars near to south".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.5 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 332
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 332
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 332

NGC 333 (= PGC 3519)
Discovered (1877) by
Wilhelm Tempel
Also observed (date?) by Howe
A magnitude 13.9 lenticular galaxy (type SB(r)0?) in Cetus (RA 00 58 51.3, Dec -16 28 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 333 (Tempel list I (#5), 1860 RA 00 51 54, NPD 107 18) has "no description". The second Index Catalog lists a corrected 1860 NPD (per Howe) of 107 13.5. The corrected position precesses to RA 00 58 50.7, Dec -16 28 05, right on the galaxy, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 16210 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that NGC 333 is about 755 million light years away. However, for galaxies at such distances we should take into account the Universal expansion during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 710 million light years away when the light by which we see it was emitted, about 728 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time. Given that and its apparent size of 1.5 by 0.8 arcmin(?), it is about 330 thousand light years across. It appears to have a faint companion (PGC 3073571); whether they are actually related or merely an optical double is unknown, but they are generally presumed to be a physical pair.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 333, also showing lenticular galaxies PGC 3518 and PGC 3073571, which are more or less randomly called NGC 333A or NGC 333B
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 333, also showing PGC 3518 and 3073571
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy, also showing PGC 3518 and 3073571
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 333, also showing lenticular galaxies PGC 3518 and PGC 3073571, which are more or less randomly called NGC 333A or NGC 333B

PGC 3518 (= "NGC 333A")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 333A
A magnitude 16.5? lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in
Cetus (RA 00 58 50.9, Dec -16 29 00)
Warning About Non-Standard Designations: This galaxy and the following one (PGC 3073571) are a good example of why non-standard NGC designations should be strongly discouraged, as they and NGC 333 itself are all called NGC 333A in one place or another, and PGC 3073571 is also called NGC 333B in other places, making it very likely that data belonging to one of them will end up being applied to another in numerous references, leading to hopeless confusion.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.3 by 0.15 arcmin? (See NGC 333 for images.) No position listed by Corwin.

PGC 3073571 (= "NGC 333B" / "NGC 333A")
Not an NGC object, but listed here since sometimes called NGC 333A or NGC 333B
A magnitude 16.5? lenticular galaxy (type S0? pec) in
Cetus (RA 00 58 51.0, Dec -16 28 19)
Warning Against Non-Standard Designations: This is perhaps the best example of why non-standard NGC designations should be avoided, as the term NGC 333A has been applied to three different galaxies: NGC 333 itself (which see for images), PGC 3518 and PGC 3073571, which as shown above is also called NGC 333B. Talk about a sure recipe for confusion! In fact, one result of the double designation is that this galaxy is even given the wrong PGC designation (namely PGC 3518) in NED, and I suspect that if any data were available for the galaxy, they would be more likely than not to be assigned to the wrong galaxy.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.1 by 0.09 arcmin. Nothing else is known, or if so, has been mis-assigned to one of the other "333"s.

NGC 334 (= PGC 3514)
Discovered (Sep 25, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type (R')SB(s)b pec?) in Sculptor (RA 00 58 49.8, Dec -35 06 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 334 (= GC 184 = JH 2368, 1860 RA 00 52 11, NPD 125 53.4) is "very faint, small, round, gradually a little brighter middle, 2 stars of 11th magnitude to south".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.6 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 334
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 334
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 334

NGC 335 (= PGC 3544)
Discovered (Oct 9, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Cetus (RA 00 59 19.8, Dec -18 14 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 335 (Leavenworth list I (#21), 1860 RA 00 52 30, NPD 109 01.8) is "very faint, pretty small, extended, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.3 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 335
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 335
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 335

NGC 336 (= PGC 3470)
Discovered (Oct 31, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth
A magnitude 14.7 irregular galaxy (type IB? pec) in Cetus (RA 00 58 02.6, Dec -18 23 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 336 (Leavenworth list I (#22), 1860 RA 00 52 30, NPD 109 10.8) is "very faint, very small, round, suddenly brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 00 59 24.9, Dec -18 25 24, or about 9 arcmin south of NGC 335, but there is nothing there. The effort to identify what Leavenworth saw has led to several candidates, including a double star, a galaxy still further to the south (PGC 3526), and most recently one only 7 arcmin south of NGC 335, but more than 10 arcmin to the west (namely, the one listed as the NGC object in this entry). Given only the description in the NGC, any of these could be correct; but fortunately (per Corwin), there is a sketch of area observed by Leavenworth whose star field only matches the one near PGC 3470, so despite the unfortunate error in its right ascension, the identification of NGC 336 as PGC 3470 seems certain, and has been adopted by most major databases (although in the case of LEDA, a search for NGC 336 provides an identifier which is the same as for PGC 3470, but the entry for that object does not specifically state that it is NGC 336).
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5500 km/sec, PGC 3470 is about 250 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.75 by 0.3 arcmin, it is about 55 thousand light years across. Its peculiar appearance has led to suggestions that it may be a double system or a colliding pair of galaxies, but far better images than those shown below will be needed to decide whether those suggestions should be given any credence.
DSS image of region near irregular galaxy NGC 336
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 336
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of irregular galaxy NGC 336

PGC 3526 (not =
NGC 336)
Not an NGC object, but listed here because sometimes misidentified as NGC 336
A magnitude 12 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)bc) in Cetus (RA 00 58 58.0, Dec -18 44 34)
Historical Misidentification: As noted at the entry for NGC 336, PGC 3526 is identified as NGC 336 in various places (for instance, a Wikisky search for NGC 336 shows PGC 3526, albeit with only its PGC label); but its star field does not match a sketch by the discoverer of NGC 336, so its identification with that object is almost certainly wrong.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 2000 km/sec, PGC 3526 is about 95 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 3.0 by 1.4 arcmin, it is about 80 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 3526, which is sometimes misidentified as NGC 336
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 3526 (sometimes misidentified as NGC 336)
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 3526, which is sometimes misidentified as NGC 336

NGC 337 (= PGC 3572)
Discovered (Sep 10, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.6 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)d) in Cetus (RA 00 59 50.0, Dec -07 34 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 337 (= GC 185 = JH 80 = WH II 433, 1860 RA 00 52 46, NPD 98 19.9) is "pretty faint, large, extended, gradually a little brighter middle, 10th magnitude star 21 seconds of time to the east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0 by 1.8 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 337
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 337
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 337

PGC 3671 (= "NGC 337A")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 337A
A magnitude 12.2 spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)dm) in
Cetus (RA 01 01 33.8, Dec -07 35 19)
Physical Information: Apparent size 6.6 by 5.0 arcmin? A very low surface brightness object.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 3671, sometimes called NGC 337A
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on PGC 3671
Below, a 7 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 3671, sometimes called NGC 337A

NGC 338 (= PGC 3611)
Discovered (1877) by
Wilhelm Tempel
Also observed (date?) by Édouard Stephan
A magnitude 12.8 spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Pisces (RA 01 00 36.4, Dec +30 40 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 338 (Tempel list I (#6), Stephan list XII (#??), 1860 RA 00 53 00, NPD 60 05.2) is "very faint, very small, irregular figure, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 0.6 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 338
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 338
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 338

NGC 339 (a GCL in the Small Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Sep 18, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.8 globular cluster in Tucana (RA 00 57 46.7, Dec -74 28 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 339 (= GC 186 = JH 2369, 1860 RA 00 53 13, NPD 165 12.5) is "faint, large, round, very gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.2 arcmin? (Corwin lists the position of the core as RA 00 57 45.4, Dec -74 28 11)
DSS image of region near globular cluster NGC 339, in the Small Magellanic Cloud
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 339
Below, a 3 arcmin wide DSS image of the globular cluster
DSS image of globular cluster NGC 339, in the Small Magellanic Cloud
Below, a 2.8 arcmin wide HST image of the cluster (Image Credit ESA/Hubble/NASA, Judy Schmidt)
HST image of globular cluster NGC 339, in the Small Magellanic Cloud

NGC 340 (= PGC 3610)
Discovered (Sep 27, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Cetus (RA 01 00 34.9, Dec -06 52 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 340 (= GC 5135, Marth #25, 1860 RA 00 53 30, NPD 97 37) is "very faint, small, extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.4 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 340, also showing NGC 342
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 340, also showing NGC 342
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 340

NGC 341 (= PGC 3620, and with
PGC 3627 = Arp 59)
Discovered (Oct 21, 1881) by Édouard Stephan
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type SAB(r)bc) in Cetus (RA 01 00 45.8, Dec -09 11 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 341 (Stephan list XII (#9), 1860 RA 00 53 44, NPD 99 56.6) is "faint, pretty large, round, a little brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 4555 km/sec, NGC 341 is about 210 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.2 by 1.0 arcmin(?), it is about 75 thousand light years across. NGC 341 is a starburst galaxy, presumably as a result of its interaction with its companion. Used by the Arp Atlas as an example of a spiral galaxy (NGC 341) with a small high surface brightness companion (PGC 3627).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 341 and irregular galaxy PGC 3627, which are also known as Arp 59
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 341 and its companion, PGC 3627
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the pair, also known as Arp 59
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 341 and irregular galaxy PGC 3627, which are also known as Arp 59
Below, the 12 arcmin wide image above, also showing labels for PGC objects 173280 and 994057
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 341 and irregular galaxy PGC 3627, which are also known as Arp 59; also shown are PGC 173280 and PGC 994057

PGC 3627 (= "NGC 341B" and with
NGC 341 = Arp 59)
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 341B
A magnitude 15.8 irregular galaxy (type Irr?) in Cetus (RA 01 00 47.7, Dec -09 11 16)
Physical Information: Located at the end of one arm of NGC 341, which see for images. Given that, presumably at the same distance of about 210 million light years, in which case its apparent size of 0.3 by 0.15 arcmin corresponds to about 18 thousand light years. Used by the Arp Atlas as an example of a spiral galaxy (NGC 341) with a small high surface brightness companion (PGC 3627).

NGC 342 (= PGC 3631)
Discovered (Sep 27, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 14.4 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Cetus (RA 01 00 49.9, Dec -06 46 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 342 (= GC 5136, Marth #26, 1860 RA 00 53 46, NPD 97 32) is "very faint, very small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.4 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 342, also showing NGC 340
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 342, also showing NGC 340
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 342

NGC 343 (probably = PGC 133741)
Discovered (1886) by
Frank Muller
A magnitude 15.5 spiral galaxy (type Sa? pec / Sc? pec?) in Cetus (RA 00 58 24.0, Dec -23 13 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 343 (Muller list II (#297), 1860 RA 00 54 02, NPD 113 58.8) is "extremely faint, very small, irregularly round, suddenly brighter middle and nucleus (perhaps a star?)". The position and description are identical to NGC 344 save for being 1 arcmin further north, so NGC 343 and 344 should be a pair of nebulae separated by about an arcmin in the north-south direction. The positions precess to RA 01 00 52.0, Dec -23 13 29 and RA 01 00 52.0, Dec -23 14 29, but there is nothing there. This is unfortunately common with Leander-McCormick Observatory observations, which often have errors in right ascension of 2 or more minutes of time, and means that a painstaking assessment of possible objects along a more or less east-west line has to be undertaken to decide what, if anything, fits the observations. Per Corwin, the most likely pair appears to be PGC 133741 for NGC 343, and PGC 198261 for NGC 344. Their right ascensions are about twice as far "off" as usual (4m of time), and their relative positions are not perfect, but their appearance and declinations more or less accurately fit Muller's observation, and do so better than anything else along the east-west line; so for lack of a better choice I have accepted his suggestion. (NED also adopts Corwin's identifications, though with a note stating that the NGC identification is uncertain, as other candidates have been suggested elsewhere; but LEDA and Wikisky assign the same object (PGC 133741) to both NGC entries.)
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.6 by 0.2 arcmin, so about ? thousand light years across. Vr 16575 km/sec, z 0.055288
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 133741, which is probably NGC 343, and spiral galaxy PGC 198261, which is probably NGC 344
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on the probable NGC 343 and 344
Below, a 1 arcmin wide DSS image centered on the pair
DSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 133741, which is probably NGC 343, and spiral galaxy PGC 198261, which is probably NGC 344

Corwin notes a companion (GALEXASC J005824.25-231344.6) at RA 00 58 24.1, Dec -23 13 45, but absolutely nothing seems to be known about it save for its position and apparent size and it is completely ignored by many references, so ignoring it here is probably best (but will be considered in the next (final?) iteration of this page.

NGC 344 (probably = PGC 198261 = PGC 803236)
Discovered (1886) by
Frank Muller
A magnitude 16.5(?) spiral galaxy (type Sa? pec) in Cetus (RA 00 58 25.5, Dec -23 13 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 344 (Muller list II (#298), 1860 RA 00 54 02, NPD 113 59.8) is "extremely faint, very small, irregularly round, suddenly brighter middle and nucleus (perhaps a star?)". The position and description are identical to NGC 343 save for being 1 arcmin further south, so NGC 343 and 344 should be a pair of nebulae separated by about an arcmin in the north-south direction. For that reason, see the entry for NGC 343 for a discussion of the NGC objects' more or less probable identification with PGC 133741 and 198261, and for images of the pair.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.35 by 0.2 arcmin, so about ? thousand light years across. Vr 16785 km/sec, z 0.055992

NGC 345 (= PGC 3665)
Discovered (Sep 27, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 13.9 lenticular galaxy (type S0/(rs)a?) in Cetus (RA 01 01 22.1, Dec -06 53 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 345 (= GC 5137, Marth #27, 1860 RA 00 54 17, NPD 97 38) is "very faint, very small, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.8 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 345
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 345, also showing 7th magnitude HD 6031
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 345

Note: The galaxy near HD 6031 is PGC 1028378; should create an entry for it in the PGC pages

NGC 346 (in the Small Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Aug 1, 1826) by
James Dunlop (D 25)
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
An open cluster and emission nebula in Tucana (RA 00 59 04.2, Dec -72 10 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 346 (= GC 187 = JH 2370, Dunlop 25, 1860 RA 00 54 20, NPD 162 56.1) is "bright, large, very irregular figure, much brighter middle similar to double star, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 9.0 by 8.5 arcmin? The largest emission nebula in the Small Magellanic Cloud.
DSS image of region near open cluster and emission nebula NGC 346, in the Small Magellanic Cloud
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image of the region near NGC 346
Below, a 4 arcmin wide HST image of the central region (Image Credit NASA, ESA and A. Nota (STScI/ESA))
HST image of open cluster and emission nebula NGC 346, in the Small Magellanic Cloud
Below, a 2.5 arcmin wide HST image of the central region (Image Credit NASA/ESA/A. Nota (ESA/STScI/AURA))
HST image of open cluster and emission nebula NGC 346, in the Small Magellanic Cloud

NGC 347 (= PGC 3673)
Discovered (Sep 27, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 14.8 spiral galaxy (type SBcd?) in Cetus (RA 01 01 35.2, Dec -06 44 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 347 (= GC 5138 = Marth #28, 1860 00 54 31, NPD 97 30) is "very faint, very small". The position precesses to RA 01 01 35.4, Dec -06 44 43, right on the galaxy, so the identification is certain. (Despite that, some references list other objects as NGC 347, so as is often the case, reading about some NGC object doesn't necessarily mean that the writer is referring to the same object as other authors; that is one reason for using a photographic as well as a text description for each entry.)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5585 km/sec, NGC 347 is about 260 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.6 by 0.45 arcmin, it is about 45 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 347, also showing NGC 349 and NGC 350
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 347, also showing NGC 349 and 350
The 'bright' star is 7th magnitude HD 6031 (also shown in the wide-field view of NGC 345)
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 347

NGC 348 (= PGC 3632)
Discovered (Oct 3, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Phoenix (RA 01 00 52.0, Dec -53 14 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 348 (= GC 188 = JH 2371, 1860 RA 00 54 45, NPD 143 59.8) is "extremely faint, small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.7 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 348
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 348
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 348

NGC 349 (= PGC 3687)
Discovered (Sep 27, 1864) by
Albert Marth (29)
A magnitude 13.1 lenticular galaxy (type E/SA0?) in Cetus (RA 01 01 50.8, Dec -06 47 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 349 (= GC 5139, Marth #29, 1860 RA 00 54 47, NPD 97 34) is "very faint, very small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.3 arcmin??
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 349, also showing NGC 347 and NGC 350
Below, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 349, also showing NGC 347 and 350
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 349
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 250 - 299) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 300 - 349     → (NGC 350 - 399)