Celestial Atlas
(NGC 3200 - 3249) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 3250 - 3299 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 3300 - 3349)
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3250, 3251, 3252, 3253, 3254, 3255, 3256, 3257, 3258, 3259, 3260, 3261, 3262, 3263, 3264, 3265, 3266,
3267, 3268, 3269, 3270, 3271, 3272, 3273, 3274, 3275, 3276, 3277, 3278, 3279, 3280, 3281, 3282, 3283,
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Page last updated Nov 22, 2016
WORKING 3267: Add positions/physical data (per Steinicke)

NGC 3250 (= PGC 30671)
Discovered (Feb 1, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.1 elliptical galaxy (type E4??) in Antlia (RA 10 26 32.1, Dec -39 56 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3250 (= GC 2109 = JH 3252, 1860 RA 10 20 26, NPD 129 13.8) is "pretty bright, pretty large, round, very gradually (then) pretty suddenly bright middle, 13th magnitude star at position angle of 45".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 2825 km/sec, NGC 3250 is about 130 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 100 to 145 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 2.8 by 2.0 arcmin, it is about 105 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 3250
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 3250
Below, a 3.0 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of  elliptical galaxy NGC 3250

PGC 30790 (= "NGC 3250A")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 3250A since in general area of
NGC 3250
A magnitude 14.9 spiral galaxy (type Sb??) in Antlia (RA 10 27 53.6, Dec -40 04 52)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.2 arcmin?

PGC 30775 (= "NGC 3250B")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 3250B since in general area of
NGC 3250
A magnitude 12.7 spiral galaxy (type SBa??) in Vela (RA 10 27 44.5, Dec -40 26 08)
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.2 by 0.6 arcmin?

PGC 30774 (= "NGC 3250C")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 3250C since in general area of
NGC 3250
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type Sab??) in Antlia (RA 10 27 42.3, Dec -40 00 09)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 0.5 arcmin?

PGC 30792 (= "NGC 3250D")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 3250D since in general area of
NGC 3250
A magnitude 13.3 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Antlia (RA 10 27 57.8, Dec -39 48 55)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 0.3 arcmin?

PGC 30865 (= "NGC 3250E")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 3250E since in general area of
NGC 3250
A magnitude 12.5 spiral galaxy (type SBc??) in Antlia (RA 10 29 00.8, Dec -40 04 57)
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 1.4 arcmin?

NGC 3251 (=
IC 2579 = PGC 30892)
Discovered (Feb 19, 1862) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 3251)
Discovered (Apr 2, 1900) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 2579)
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type SBc??) in Leo (RA 10 29 16.5, Dec +26 05 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3251 (= GC 2110, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 10 20 29, NPD 63 11.7) is "very faint, pretty large, 3 bight stars to southwest". The second IC asks "Is this = IC 2579, (Javelle) 1158, the RA of which is exactly 1 minute greater? d'Arrest only one observation".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0 by 0.4 arcmin?

NGC 3252 (= PGC 31278)
Discovered (Apr 3, 1785) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type SBd??) in Draco (RA 10 34 22.3, Dec +73 45 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3252 (= GC 2111 = WH III 316, 1860 RA 10 20 51, NPD 15 27.2) is "extremely faint, pretty small, much extended, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 0.6 arcmin?

NGC 3253 (= PGC 30829)
Discovered (Apr 27, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type SBbc??) in Leo (RA 10 28 27.3, Dec +12 42 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3253 (= Swift list III (#55), 1860 RA 10 20 55, NPD 76 36.1) is "very faint, pretty small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 1.1 arcmin?

NGC 3254 (= PGC 30895)
Discovered (Mar 13, 1785) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 11.7 spiral galaxy (type Sbc??) in Leo Minor (RA 10 29 19.9, Dec +29 29 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3254 (= GC 2112 = JH 714 = WH I 72, 1860 RA 10 21 27, NPD 59 47.7) is "considerably bright, large, much extended 45, pretty suddenly much brighter middle and nucleus".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.5 by 1.4? arcmin.

NGC 3255 (= OCL 817)
Discovered (Feb 4, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.0 open cluster (type I3m) in Carina (RA 10 26 31.3, Dec -60 40 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3255 (= GC 2113 = JH 3253, 1860 RA 10 21 32, NPD 149 57.8) is a "cluster, pretty small, very compressed, stars of 15th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0? arcmin.

NGC 3256 (= PGC 30785)
Discovered (Feb 3, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.5 spiral galaxy (type Sb?? pec) in Vela (RA 10 27 51.4, Dec -43 54 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3256 (= GC 2114 = JH 3254, 1860 RA 10 21 53, NPD 133 11.1) is "considerably bright, small, round, gradually much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.8 by 2.1? arcmin.

PGC 30626 (= "NGC 3256A")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 3256A since in general region of
NGC 3256
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type SBm??) in Vela (RA 10 25 51.1, Dec -43 44 51)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.6? arcmin.

PGC 30867 (= "NGC 3256B")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 3256B since in general region of
NGC 3256
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type SBbc??) in Vela (RA 10 29 01.1, Dec -44 24 12)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 0.5? arcmin.

PGC 30873 (= "NGC 3256C")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 3256C since in general region of
NGC 3256
A magnitude 12..6 spiral galaxy (type SBcd??) in Vela (RA 10 29 05.8, Dec -43 51 01)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.2? arcmin.

NGC 3257 (= PGC 30849)
Discovered (May 2, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.1 lenticular galaxy (type E/SB0??) in Antlia (RA 10 28 47.0, Dec -35 39 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3257 (= GC 2115 = JH 3255, 1860 RA 10 22 30, NPD 124 56.8) is "very faint, very small, round, pretty suddenly brighter middle, 1st of 4", the others being NGC 3258, 3260 and 3273.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.9? arcmin.

NGC 3258 (= PGC 30859)
Discovered (May 2, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.5 elliptical galaxy (type E1??) in Antlia (RA 10 28 53.4, Dec -35 36 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3258 (= GC 2116 = JH 3256, 1860 RA 10 22 37, NPD 124 53.1) is "considerably faint, small, round, pretty suddenly little brighter middle, 2nd of 4", the others being NGC 3257, 3260 and 3273.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.9 by 2.5? arcmin.

PGC 30815 (= "NGC 3258A")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 3258A since in general region of
NGC 3258
A magnitude 13.2 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a??) in Antlia (RA 10 28 19.1, Dec -35 27 17)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.5? arcmin.

PGC 83128 (= "NGC 3258B")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 3258B since in general region of
NGC 3258
A magnitude 14.2 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Antlia (RA 10 30 25.1, Dec -35 33 49)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.3? arcmin.

PGC 31053 (= "NGC 3258C")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 3258C since in general region of
NGC 3258
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type SBa??) in Antlia (RA 10 31 24.1, Dec -35 13 12)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.8? arcmin.

PGC 31094 (= "NGC 3258D")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 3258D since in general region of
NGC 3258
A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type SBb??) in Antlia (RA 10 31 55.6, Dec -35 24 37)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.9? arcmin.

PGC 31131 (= "NGC 3258E")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 3258E since in general region of
NGC 3258
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type Sb??) in Antlia (RA 10 32 24.8, Dec -34 59 53)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.3? arcmin.

NGC 3259 (= PGC 31145)
Discovered (Apr 3, 1791) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 12.1 spiral galaxy (type SBbc??) in Ursa Major (RA 10 32 34.5, Dec +65 02 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3259 (= GC 2117 = JH 715 = WH II 870, 1860 RA 10 22 50, NPD 24 14.0) is "faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 0.9? arcmin.

NGC 3260 (= PGC 30875)
Discovered (May 2, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.6 elliptical galaxy (type E3??) in Antlia (RA 10 29 06.1, Dec -35 35 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3260 (= GC 2118 = JH 3257, 1860 RA 10 22 53, NPD 124 52.6) is "very very faint, very small, round, pretty suddenly little brighter middle, 3rd of 4", the others being NGC 3257, 3258 and 3273. The second IC notes "No doubt Sw. XI.108 is identical with this".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.9? arcmin.

NGC 3261 (= PGC 30868)
Discovered (Mar 15, 1836) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.2 spiral galaxy (type SBbc??) in Vela (RA 10 29 01.4, Dec -44 39 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3261 (= GC 2119 = JH 3258, 1860 RA 10 23 03, NPD 133 56.2) is "faint, small, round, among stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.5 by 2.8? arcmin.

NGC 3262 (= PGC 30876)
Discovered (Feb 3, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.2 lenticular galaxy (type SB0??) in Vela (RA 10 29 06.1, Dec -44 09 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3262 (= GC 2120 = JH 3260, 1860 RA 10 23 08, NPD 133 29.1) is "extremely faint, small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.7? arcmin.

NGC 3263 (= PGC 30887)
Discovered (Feb 3, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.9 spiral galaxy (type SBc??) in Vela (RA 10 29 13.3, Dec -44 07 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3263 (= GC 2122 = JH 3261, 1860 RA 10 23 14, NPD 133 24.5) is "faint, small, much extended 280, pretty suddenly brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 5.1 by 1.4? arcmin.

NGC 3264 (= PGC 31125)
Discovered (Feb 9, 1831) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.0 spiral galaxy (type SBm??) in Ursa Major (RA 10 32 19.9, Dec +56 05 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3264 (= GC 2124 = JH 716, 1860 RA 10 23 18, NPD 33 11.6) is "extremely faint, between 2 small stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.9 by 1.2? arcmin.

NGC 3265 (= PGC 31029)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1785) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 12.9 elliptical galaxy (type E2??) in Leo Minor (RA 10 31 06.8, Dec +28 47 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3265 (= GC 2123 = JH 718 = WH III 349, 1860 RA 10 23 20, NPD 60 29.6) is "pretty faint, small, round, pretty suddenly bright middle, star to southeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7? arcmin.

NGC 3266 (= PGC 31198)
Discovered (Apr 3, 1791) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 12.4 lenticular galaxy (type SB0??) in Ursa Major (RA 10 33 17.6, Dec +64 44 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3266 (= GC 2125 = JH 717 = WH II 871, 1860 RA 10 23 34, NPD 24 31.9) is "considerably faint, very small, round, pretty suddenly much brighter middle (like) star".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.2? arcmin.

WORKING HERE: Steinicke physical information

NGC 3267
Discovered (Apr 18, 1835) by
John Herschel
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size ? arcmin.

NGC 3268
Discovered (Apr 18, 1835) by
John Herschel
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size ? arcmin.

NGC 3269
Discovered (May 1, 1834) by
John Herschel
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size ? arcmin.

NGC 3270
Discovered (Apr 10, 1785) by
William Herschel

NGC 3271 (=
IC 2585)
Discovered (May 1, 1834) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3271)
Discovered (May 1, 1900) by DeLisle Stewart (and later listed as IC 2585)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size ? arcmin.

NGC 3272
Discovered (Mar 9, 1866) by
Herman Schultz (Nova VI)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size ? arcmin.

NGC 3273
Discovered (May 3, 1834) by
John Herschel
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size ? arcmin.

NGC 3274 (= PGC 31122)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.8 spiral galaxy (type SBcd?) in Leo (RA 10 32 17.2, Dec +27 40 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3274 (= GC 2131 = JH 720 = WH II 358, 1860 RA 10 24 28, NPD 61 37.0) is "faint, pretty large, round, gradually a little brighter middle, double star to east".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 2.5 by 1.2 arcmin (from the images below). Per the HST image caption, about 20 million light years away.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 3274
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 3274
Below, a 2.8 by 2.0 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit ESA/Hubble/NASA, D. Calzetti)
HST image of spiral galaxy NGC 3274
Below, the image above rotated clockwise 90 and digitally enhanced to show faint outer regions
Digitally enhanced HST image of spiral galaxy NGC 3274

NGC 3275
Discovered (Feb 1, 1835) by
John Herschel
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size ? arcmin.

NGC 3276
Discovered (Mar 3, 1835) by
John Herschel
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size ? arcmin.

NGC 3277
Discovered (Apr 11, 1785) by
William Herschel
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size ? arcmin.

NGC 3278
Discovered (Mar 2, 1835) by
John Herschel
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size ? arcmin.

NGC 3279 (=
IC 622 = PGC 31302)
Discovered (Mar 5, 1878) by David Todd (and later listed as NGC 3279)
Discovered (Jan 29, 1890) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 622)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sd??) in Leo (RA 10 34 42.8, Dec +11 11 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3279 (= Todd (#30), 1860 10 25 30, NPD 78 04) is "faint, much extended". Todd's efforts were concentrated on a search for a trans-Neptunian planet, and his positions for the "novae" discovered during that search were relatively poor, hence the duplicate listing. (More to follow in the next iteration of this page; see Corwin for a detailed discussion of 3279.)
   Physical Information: Apparent size 2.9? by 0.4 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 3279
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 3279
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 3279

NGC 3280 (=
NGC 3295 = IC 617)
Discovered (1880) by Andrew Common (2) (and later listed as NGC 3280)
Discovered (Feb 26, 1886) by Francis Leavenworth (and later listed as NGC 3295)
Discovered (Apr 19, 1892) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 617)
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Hydra (RA 10 32 43.8, Dec -12 38 14)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size ? arcmin. The second IC lists a corrected position (per Howe) of RA 10 25 50, NPD 101 55.0; it also contains a note for NGC 3295, declaring its identity with NGC 3280. However, the identity with IC 617 was not noted at that time.

NGC 3281
Discovered (May 2, 1834) by
John Herschel
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size ? arcmin.

NGC 3282
Discovered (Mar 5, 1886) by
Lewis Swift (3-56)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size ? arcmin.

NGC 3283
Discovered (Mar 3, 1837) by
John Herschel
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size ? arcmin.

NGC 3284 (=
NGC 3286)
Discovered (Apr 8, 1793) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3284)
Discovered (Apr 9, 1793) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3286)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size ? arcmin.

NGC 3285
Discovered (Mar 24, 1835) by
John Herschel
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size ? arcmin.

NGC 3286 (=
NGC 3284)
Discovered (Apr 8, 1793) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3284)
Discovered (Apr 9, 1793) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3286)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size ? arcmin.

NGC 3287
Discovered (Jan 1, 1862) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size ? arcmin.

NGC 3288
Discovered (Apr 9, 1793) by
William Herschel
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size ? arcmin.

NGC 3289
Discovered (Apr 20, 1835) by
John Herschel
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size ? arcmin.

NGC 3290 (= PGC 31346 = PGC 31347 =
Arp 53)
Discovered (1886) by Francis Leavenworth (II-422)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)bc pec) in Hydra (RA 10 35 17.5, Dec -17 16 36)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size ? arcmin. Used in the Arp Atlas as an example of a spiral galaxy with small bright companions. Based on a recessional velocity of 10575 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that NGC 3290 is about 490 million light years away. But for objects at such distances we should take into account the Universal expansion during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing so shows that the galaxy was a little over 470 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 480 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and the galaxy's apparent size of 1.0 by 0.5 arcmin, it is about 140 thousand light years across.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 3290, also known as Arp 53
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 3290
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 3290, also known as Arp 53

NGC 3291
Discovered (Apr 5, 1885) by
Guillaume Bigourdan (I-44)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size ? arcmin.

NGC 3292
Discovered (Apr 16, 1887) by
Lewis Swift (6-36)
The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 10 28 32

NGC 3293, the Gem Cluster
Discovered (1751) by
Nicolas Lacaille (II.8)
Also observed (Apr 29, 1826) by James Dunlop
Also observed (probably between Mar 5, 1834 and Nov 2, 1836) by John Herschel
A magnitude 4.7 open cluster (type I3r) in Carina (RA 10 35 51.0, Dec -58 13 48)
Historical Identification: (= GC 2144 = JH 3276 = Dunlop 321 (per Steinicke))
Discovery Notes: See notes for NGC 2050 for an example of how the date of Herschel's observation was determined (and hopes for a future better determination) Physical Information: Apparent size ? arcmin. The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Harv. Ann. xxvi. p. 207) of 10 30 30

NGC 3294
Discovered (Mar 17, 1787) by
William Herschel
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size ? arcmin.

NGC 3295 (=
NGC 3280 = IC 617)
Discovered (1880) by Andrew Common (and later listed as NGC 3280)
Discovered (Feb 26, 1886) by Francis Leavenworth (I-173) (and later listed as NGC 3295)
Discovered (Apr 19, 1892) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 617)
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Hydra (RA 10 32 43.8, Dec -12 38 14)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size ? arcmin.The second IC notes "Not found by Howe. No doubt = 3280".

NGC 3296 (=
IC 618)
Discovered (Feb 26, 1886) by Francis Leavenworth (I-174) (and later listed as NGC 3296)
Discovered (Apr 19, 1892) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 618)
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Hydra (RA 10 32 45.5, Dec -12 43 03)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size ? arcmin. The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 10 25 52 and adds (presumably also by Howe) "I could only suspect 3297". However, the identity with IC 618 was not noted at that time.

NGC 3297
Discovered (Feb 26, 1886) by
Francis Leavenworth (I-175)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size ? arcmin. Per the second IC note for NGC 3296, only suspected (by Howe?); but it does indeed exist, and is simply very faint.

NGC 3298
Discovered (Apr 12, 1789) by
William Herschel
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size ? arcmin.

NGC 3299
Discovered (Mar 19, 1784) by
William Herschel
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size ? arcmin.
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 3200 - 3249) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 3250 - 3299     → (NGC 3300 - 3349)