Celestial Atlas
(NGC 3250 - 3299) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 3300 - 3349     → (NGC 3350 - 3399)
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3300, 3301, 3302, 3303, 3304, 3305, 3306, 3307, 3308, 3309, 3310, 3311, 3312, 3313, 3314, 3315, 3316,
3317, 3318, 3319, 3320, 3321, 3322, 3323, 3324, 3325, 3326, 3327, 3328, 3329, 3330, 3331, 3332, 3333,
3334, 3335, 3336, 3337, 3338, 3339, 3340, 3341, 3342, 3343, 3344, 3345, 3346, 3347, 3348, 3349

Page last updated Aug 17, 2014
WORKING: Add basic pix

NGC 3300 (= PGC 31472)
Discovered (Mar 19, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SAB(r)0?) in Leo (RA 10 36 38.5, Dec +14 10 16)
Based on a recessional velocity of 3080 km/sec, NGC 3300 is about 145 million light years away, in good agreement with a redshift-independent distance estimate of 140 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 1.7 by 0.9 arcmins, it is about 70 thousand light years cross.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 3300
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 3300
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region around lenticular galaxy NGC 3300

NGC 3301 (=
NGC 3760 = PGC 31497)
Discovered (Mar 12, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3301)
Discovered (Feb 21, 1863) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 3760)
An 11th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a?) in Leo (RA 10 36 55.8, Dec +21 52 54)
The identity with NGC 3760 (which see for a discussion of the double listing) was noted in the first IC, and has therefore been known for more than a century. 3.3 by 1.0 arcmin apparent size.

NGC 3302 (= PGC 31391)
Discovered (Jan 28, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Antlia (RA 10 35 47.4, Dec -32 21 30)
1.6 by 1.2

NGC 3303 (= PGC 31508)
Discovered (Mar 21, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc pec) in Leo (RA 10 36 59.9, Dec +18 08 13)
1.7 by 1.3 arcmin

NGC 3304 (= PGC 31572)
Discovered (Mar 17, 1787) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa) in Leo Minor (RA 10 37 37.9, Dec +37 27 23)
1.7 by 0.6 arcmin

NGC 3305 (= PGC 31421)
Discovered (Mar 24, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0) in Hydra (RA 10 36 11.7, Dec -27 09 44)
1.1 by 1.1 arcmin

NGC 3306 (= PGC 31528)
Discovered (Apr 27, 1886) by
Lewis Swift (3-57)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBm) in Leo (RA 10 37 10.1, Dec +12 39 09)
1.4 by 0.5 arcmin

NGC 3307 (= PGC 31430)
Discovered (Mar 22, 1836) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a) in Hydra (RA 10 36 17.2, Dec -27 31 44)
0.9 by 0.3 arcmin

NGC 3308 (= PGC 31438)
Discovered (Mar 24, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/SB0) in Hydra (RA 10 36 22.3, Dec -27 26 14)
1.7 by 1.3 arcmin

NGC 3309 (= PGC 31466)
Discovered (Mar 24, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2) in Hydra (RA 10 36 35.7, Dec -27 31 03)
1.9 by 1.6 arcmin

NGC 3310 (= PGC 31650)
Discovered (Apr 12, 1789) by
William Herschel
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc pec) in Ursa Major (RA 10 38 45.6, Dec +53 30 12)
3.1 by 2.4 arcmin

NGC 3311 (= PGC 31478)
Discovered (Mar 30, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Hydra (RA 10 36 42.7, Dec -27 31 43)
2.3 by 2.1 arcmin

NGC 3312 (=
IC 629 = PGC 31513)
Discovered (Mar 26, 1835) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3312)
Discovered (Feb 26, 1887) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 629)
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SA(s)b pec?) in Hydra (RA 10 37 02.4, Dec -27 33 55)
(See IC 629 for a discussion of the double listing.) Apparent size 3.1 by 0.8 arcmin. Part of the Hydra I galaxy cluster, also known as Abell 1060.
Capella Observatory image of spiral galaxy NGC 3312
Above, a 3.2 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 3312 (Image Credit & © Capella Observatory; used by permission)

NGC 3313 (= PGC 31551)
Discovered (1886) by
Ormond Stone (I-176)
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBab) in Hydra (RA 10 37 25.5, Dec -25 19 08)
The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 10 30 47 and adds "The star is south of the nebula". 3.9 by 3.2 arcmin apparent size.

NGC 3314 (= PGC 31531 (= PGC 751405) + PGC 31532)
Discovered (Mar 24, 1835) by
John Herschel
A pair of galaxies in Hydra
PGC 31531 = A magnitude 13.1 spiral galaxy (type SBab?) at RA 10 37 12.7, Dec -27 41 00
PGC 31532 = A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type SA(s)c? pec) at RA 10 37 13.2, Dec -27 41 06
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3314 (= GC 2162 = JH 3283, 1860 RA 10 30 40, NPD 116 56.8) is the "8th of 9 nebulae", the 7th and 9th being NGC 3312 and 3316.
Warning Note: Sometimes the two components of NGC 3314 are referred to as NGC 3314A and NGC 3314B, but which is A and which is B is different in different references. In addition, NGC 3314B is sometimes used to refer to a completely different object, PGC 87327. This confused state of affairs can lead to serious errors when data for one object are incorrectly assigned to a completely different one, and since that apparently occurs in this entry, it is a particularly good example of why adding letters to NGC or other designations is a terrible idea.
Physical Information: NGC 3314 looks like an interacting pair of galaxies, but is actually an accidental overlapping of two galaxies that just happen to be in the same direction. The unusual alignment of the galaxies allows a more detailed view than usual of the clouds of gas and dust in the foreground galaxy (PGC 31532). Normally such clouds are only visible in regions where hot bright stars have recently formed from the clouds, and heat and light them up; but in this case, dusty regions without stellar beacons are outlined by the stars in the background galaxy. In addition, the stars in the background galaxy are substantially dimmed and reddened by the dust lying between us and them. There is a problem with the recessional velocities listed for this system, probably due to confusion about the proper designation for the galaxies in the region (see the Warning Note above). Based on a recessional velocity of 2850 km/sec, PGC 31531 is about 135 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 85 to 140 million light years, and close to a Hubble Heritage Program distance estimate of 140 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 1.75 by 0.35 arcmin, the galaxy is about 70 thousand light years across. However, PGC 31532 has a listed recessional velocity of 4640 km/sec, which corresponds to a Hubble expansion distance of 215 million light years, far beyond the galaxy that lies behind it, and far beyond the Hubble Heritage Program distance estimate of 120 million light years. The only way to explain this is to assume that the confusion about the "names" of the galaxies has led to a recessional velocity for a completely different galaxy being assigned to PGC 31532. For that reason I have chosen to ignore the listed recessional velocity for PGC 31532, and assume that the Hubble Heritage distance estimate of 120 million light years is reasonable (at least it puts the galaxy in front, which is obviously correct). Given that and its apparent size of 1.7 by 1.0 arcmin, PGC 31532 is about 60 thousand light years across.
HST image of overlapping spiral galaxies PGC 31531 and PGC 31532, which comprise NGC 3314, overlaid on a DSS background to fill in missing areas; also shown are NGC 3316 and PGC 87327, which is sometimes called NGC 3314B
Above, a 12 arcmin wide HST/DSS mosaic centered on NGC 3314, also showing NGC 3316 and PGC 87327
(Image Credit above & below Hubble Legacy Archive/ESA/NASA; Processing Martin Pugh, post-processing Courtney Seligman)
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide HST image of NGC 3314 (PGC 31531 is in back, PGC 31532 in front)
HST image of overlapping spiral galaxies PGC 31531 and PGC 31532, which comprise NGC 3314
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide HST image of the central portion of the image above (Image Credit as above)
HST image of central portion of overlapping spiral galaxies PGC 31531 and PGC 31532, which comprise NGC 3314

PGC 87327
Listed here because mistakenly listed as NGC 3314B in some references
A magnitude 14.3 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0??) in
Hydra (RA 10 37 09.6, Dec -27 39 27)
Based on a recessional velocity of 4115 km/sec, PGC 87327 is about 190 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 180 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 0.4 by 0.3 arcmin, the nearly stellar galaxy is about 20 thousand light years across.
Wikisky cutout of lenticular galaxy PGC 87327
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 87327; also shown is part of NGC 3314

NGC 3315 (= PGC 31540)
Discovered (1870) by
Edward Austin (207, HN40)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Hydra (RA 10 37 19.2, Dec -27 11 30)
1.1 by 1.0 arcmin

NGC 3316 (= PGC 31571)
Discovered (Mar 26, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB(rs)0^0) in Hydra (RA 10 37 37.2, Dec -27 35 39)
Based on a recessional velocity of 3940 km/sec, NGC 3316 is about 185 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 180 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 1.3 by 1.1 arcmin, it is about 70 thousand light years across. It appears to have a small companion, which is listed here as "NGC 3316B".
Wikisky cutout of lenticular galaxy NGC 3316
Above, a 2.4 arcmin closeup of NGC 3316; also shown is its probable companion, "NGC 3316B"
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy; also shown is NGC 3314
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 3316, with an HST overlay of NGC 3314

"NGC 3316B"
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in
Hydra (RA 10 37 38.1, Dec -27 35 59)
"NGC 3316B" is not an NGC object, but it is an apparent and probably a physical companion of NGC 3316 (which see for images), hence the designation used here (it is listed in NED as HCC 015). Based on a recessional velocity of 3995 km/sec, the galaxy is about 185 million light years away, or about the same distance as its likely companion. Given that and its 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin apparent size, the galaxy is about 15 thousand light years across.

NGC 3317
Recorded (1870) by
Edward Austin (210, HN41)
Three stars in Hydra (RA 10 37 43.1, Dec -27 31 09)

NGC 3318 (= PGC 31533)
Discovered (Mar 2, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc) in Vela (RA 10 37 15.0, Dec -41 37 38)
2.3 by 1.2 arcmin

"NGC 3318A" (= PGC 31373)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc) in
Vela (RA 10 35 31.2, Dec -41 44 25)
Not an NGC object, but listed as "NGC 3318A" in some references. Probably no relationship to NGC 3318 save for being in the same general direction, but will check various references and update this entry at the next iteration of this page. 1.3 by 0.4 arcmin apparent size.

"NGC 3318B" (= PGC 31565)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc) in
Vela (RA 10 37 33.3, Dec -41 27 58)
Not an NGC object, but listed as "NGC 3318B" in some references. Probably no relationship to NGC 3318 save for being in the same general direction, but will check various references and update this entry at the next iteration of this page. 15 by 1.1 arcmin apparent size.

NGC 3319 (= PGC 31671)
Discovered (Feb 3, 1788) by
William Herschel
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc) in Ursa Major (RA 10 39 09.6, Dec +41 41 14)
6.1 by 3.4 arcmin apparent size. As a large, bright object probably well studied; will be among the first objects addressed in the next iteration of this page.

NGC 3320 (= PGC 31708)
Discovered (Apr 1, 1788) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc) in Ursa Major (RA 10 39 36.5, Dec +47 23 50)
2.2 by 1.0 arcmin

NGC 3321 (=
NGC 3322 = PGC 31653)
Discovered (1880) by Andrew Common (and later listed as NGC 3322)
Discovered (Jan 3, 1887) by Francis Leavenworth (II-423) (and later listed as NGC 3321)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Sextans (RA 10 38 50.5, Dec -11 38 56)
The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 10 31 53.

NGC 3322 (=
NGC 3321 = PGC 31653)
Discovered (1880) by Andrew Common (3) (and later listed as NGC 3322)
Discovered (Jan 3, 1887) by Francis Leavenworth (and later listed as NGC 3321)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Sextans (RA 10 38 50.5, Dec -11 38 56)
The second IC lists a corrected RA for NGC 3321 (per Howe) of 10 31 53. It also states, for NGC 3322, "Not found by Howe (2 nights). Probably = 3321". 2.5 by 1.2 arcmin

NGC 3323 (= PGC 31712)
Discovered (Mar 15, 1877) by
Édouard Stephan (9-22)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB pec) in Leo Minor (RA 10 39 39.1, Dec +25 19 21)
1.0 by 0.6 arcmin

NGC 3324
Discovered (May 1, 1826) by
James Dunlop (322)
An emission nebula in Carina (RA 10 37 19.3, Dec -58 38 03)
The second IC lists a corrected position (per Harv. Ann. xxvi. p.207) of RA 10 32 08, NPD 148 00. About 16 by 14 arcmin

NGC 3325 (= PGC 31689)
Discovered (Mar 19, 1880) by
Édouard Stephan (10-25)
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1) in Sextans (RA 10 39 20.4, Dec -00 11 59)
1.2 by 1.1 arcmin

NGC 3326 (= PGC 31701)
Discovered (Mar 22, 1865) by
Albert Marth (196)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa) in Sextans (RA 10 39 31.8, Dec +05 06 26)
0.6 by 0.6 arcmin

NGC 3327 (= PGC 31729)
Discovered (Apr 10, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Leo Minor (RA 10 39 57.8, Dec +24 05 30)
1.1 by 0.8 arcmin

NGC 3328
Recorded (May 21, 1879) by
Wilhelm Tempel (V)
A pair of stars in Leo (RA 10 39 54.2, Dec +09 18 02)
The first IC lists a corrected position (per Spitaler) of RA 10 32 19, NPD 80 03.4 and adds "very small cluster, not nebulous".

NGC 3329 (=
NGC 3397 = PGC 32059)
Discovered (Apr 2, 1801) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3397)
Discovered (Sep 2, 1828) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3329)
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Draco (RA 10 44 39.0, Dec +76 48 35)

NGC 3330 (= OCL 806)
Discovered (Apr 29, 1826) by
James Dunlop (355)
A 7th-magnitude open cluster (type II2p) in Vela (RA 10 38 46.0, Dec -54 06 54)
6 arcmin across

NGC 3331 (= PGC 31743)
Discovered (1886) by
Frank Muller (II-424)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc) in Hydra (RA 10 40 09.0, Dec -23 49 14)
The first IC lists a corrected RA (per Ormond Stone) of 10 32 18. The second IC adds "Howe gives the RA = 10 33 28, but this does not agree with that given in Publ. L. M'Cormick Obs. vi. p. 207 (10h 32m 18s) unless we assume that the sign of Δα (-35.4 seconds) is wrong, on which supposition there is perfect agreement with Howe's result". 1.2 by 0.9 arcmin apparent size.

NGC 3332 (=
NGC 3342 = PGC 31768)
Discovered (Jan 18, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3342)
Discovered (Mar 4, 1796) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3332)
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Leo (RA 10 40 28.2, Dec +09 10 57)

NGC 3333 (= PGC 31723)
Discovered (Feb 2, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc) in Antlia (RA 10 39 49.7, Dec -36 02 10)
2.1 by 0.4 arcmin

NGC 3334 (= PGC 31845)
Discovered (Mar 17, 1787) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Leo Minor (RA 10 41 31.1, Dec +37 18 45)
1.1 by 1.0 arcmin

NGC 3335 (= PGC 31706)
Discovered (1886) by
Frank Muller (II-425)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a) in Hydra (RA 10 39 34.1, Dec -23 55 19)
The first IC lists a corrected RA (per Ormond Stone) of 10 32 54. 1.1 by 0.9 arcmin apparent size.

NGC 3336 (= PGC 31754)
Discovered (Mar 24, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc) in Hydra (RA 10 40 16.8, Dec -27 46 38)
2.0 by 1.6 arcmin

NGC 3337 (= PGC 31860)
Discovered (Mar 22, 1865) by
Albert Marth (197)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S) in Sextans (RA 10 41 47.5, Dec +04 59 20)
0.6 by 0.3 arcmin

NGC 3338 (= PGC 31883)
Discovered (Mar 19, 1784) by
William Herschel
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Leo (RA 10 42 07.6, Dec +13 44 48)
5.7 by 3.4 arcmin

NGC 3339
Recorded (Jan 30, 1865) by
Albert Marth (198)
A star in Sextans (RA 10 42 10.0, Dec -00 22 06)

NGC 3340 (= PGC 31892)
Discovered (Jan 30, 1865) by
Albert Marth (199)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc) in Sextans (RA 10 42 17.9, Dec -00 22 37)
1.0 by 0.9 arcmin

NGC 3341 (= PGC 31915)
Discovered (Mar 22, 1865) by
Albert Marth (200)
A 14th-magnitude peculiar galaxy (type pec) in Sextans (RA 10 42 31.5, Dec +05 02 39)
1.2 by 0.4 arcmin

NGC 3342 (=
NGC 3332 = PGC 31768)
Discovered (Jan 18, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3342)
Discovered (Mar 4, 1796) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3332)
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Leo (RA 10 40 28.2, Dec +09 10 57)
1.4 by 1.4 arcmin

WORKING HERE

NGC 3343 (= PGC 32143)
Discovered (Apr 3, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3) in Draco (RA 10 46 10.3, Dec +73 21 12)
1.3 by 0.9 arcmin

NGC 3344 (= PGC 31968)
Discovered (Apr 6, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 10th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc) in Leo Minor (RA 10 43 30.9, Dec +24 55 22)
7.1 by 6.5 arcmin

NGC 3345
Recorded (Mar 19, 1784) by
William Herschel
A pair of stars in Leo (RA 10 43 31.9, Dec +11 59 09)

NGC 3346 (= PGC 31982)
Discovered (Apr 8, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc) in Leo (RA 10 43 38.7, Dec +14 52 20)
2.7 by 2.6 arcmin

NGC 3347 (= PGC 31926)
Discovered (May 1, 1834) by
John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb) in Antlia (RA 10 42 46.6, Dec -36 21 12)
3.4 by 2.1 arcmin

"NGC 3347A" (= PGC 31761)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc) in
Antlia (RA 10 40 20.5, Dec -36 24 45)
2.0 by 0.8 arcmin apparent size. Not an NGC object, but often listed as NGC 3347A, presumably because in roughly the same direction as NGC 3347. Whether there is any relationship between the two is another matter, to be dealt with in the next iteration of this page.

"NGC 3347B" (= PGC 31875)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBcd) in
Antlia (RA 10 42 00.2, Dec -36 56 11)
3.2 by 0.8 arcmin apparent size. Not an NGC object, but often listed as NGC 3347B, presumably because in roughly the same direction as NGC 3347. Whether there is any relationship between the two is another matter, to be dealt with in the next iteration of this page.

"NGC 3347C" (= PGC 31797)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBcd) in
Antlia (RA 10 40 53.8, Dec -36 17 19)
1.4 by 1.1 arcmin apparent size. Not an NGC object, but often listed as NGC 3347C, presumably because in roughly the same direction as NGC 3347. Whether there is any relationship between the two is another matter, to be dealt with in the next iteration of this page.

NGC 3348 (= PGC 32216)
Discovered (Apr 3, 1785) by
William Herschel
An 11th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0) in Ursa Major (RA 10 47 10.0, Dec +72 50 20)
2.0 by 2.0 arcmin

NGC 3349 (= PGC 31989)
Discovered (Mar 22, 1865) by
Albert Marth (201)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Leo (RA 10 43 50.6, Dec +06 45 47)
Per Dreyer, NGC 3349 (= Marth 201, 1860 RA 10 36 31, NPD 82 30) is "extremely faint, very small". The position precesses to 10 43 49.3, Dec +06 46 02, about 0.4 arcmin northwest of the center of PGC 31989, not far from its outline, so the identification is reasonably certain. (PGC 2800964, which lies just to the southeast of PGC 31989, is a tenth of a magnitude brighter, but is a more diffuse and therefore more difficult visual object; so aside from being a little further from Marth's position, it seems a less likely candidate for what he saw, and there has been no suggestion that it was Marth's object.) Based on a recessional velocity of 8255 km/sec, NGC 3349 is about 385 million light years away. Given that and its 0.65 by 0.65 arcmin apparent size, it is about 75 thousand light years across. The aforementioned PGC 2800964 is probably a physical as well as apparent companion.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 3349 and peculiar galaxy PGC 2800964
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 3349; also shown is PGC 2800964
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy; also shown is NGC 3356
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 3349

PGC 2800964
Listed here because an apparent (and probably physical) companion of
NGC 3349
A 14th-magnitude peculiar galaxy (type pec) in Leo (RA 10 43 52.7, Dec +06 45 26)
Listed in NED as VV514 NED03. Based on a recessional velocity of 8090 km/sec, PGC 2800964 is about 375 million light years away. Given that and its 0.75 by 0.5 arcmin apparent size, it is about 55 thousand light years across. Since it is in almost the same direction and at almost the same distance as NGC 3349 (which see for images), PGC 2800964 may be a physical companion of the other galaxy. Its distorted appearance suggests a gravitational interaction with some other object, which makes a link between the two galaxies seem even more likely.
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 3250 - 3299) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 3300 - 3349     → (NGC 3350 - 3399)