Celestial Atlas
(NGC 3300 - 3349) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 3350 - 3399 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 3400 - 3449)
Click here for Introductory Material
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3350, 3351, 3352, 3353, 3354, 3355, 3356, 3357, 3358, 3359, 3360, 3361, 3362, 3363, 3364, 3365, 3366,
3367, 3368, 3369, 3370, 3371, 3372, 3373, 3374, 3375, 3376, 3377, 3378, 3379, 3380, 3381, 3382, 3383,
3384, 3385, 3386, 3387, 3388, 3389, 3390, 3391, 3392, 3393, 3394, 3395, 3396, 3397, 3398, 3399

Page last updated Aug 29, 2015
Original NGC entries posted, need to check GC, NGC notes, all other Dreyer papers
WORKING: Add positions/physical data (per Steinicke)

NGC 3350
Discovered (Apr 10, 1831) by
John Herschel
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3350 (= GC 2183 = JH 742, 1860 RA 10 36 34, NPD 58 32.4) is "extremely faint, very small, 2 stars of 9th or 10th magnitude to south".
Physical Information:

NGC 3351 (=
M95 = PGC 32007)
Discovered (Mar 20, 1781) by Pierre Méchain
Observed/recorded (Mar 24, 1781) by Charles Messier as M95
Also observed (Apr 10, 1825) by John Herschel
A magnitude 9.7 spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Leo (RA 10 43 57.8, Dec +11 42 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3351 (= GC 2184 = JH 743, M95, 1860 RA 10 36 34, NPD 77 33.8) is "bright, large, round, pretty gradually much brighter middle and nucleus". The position precesses to RA 10 43 57.9, Dec +11 42 14, essentially dead center on the galaxy listed above and it fits the description, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: M95 is a member of the Leo I galaxy group, which includes M96, M105, and a number of other galaxies, spread across a region about 40 million light years away. M96 has two ringlike structures (emphasized in the second and third images, below), one surrounding the inner half of the galaxy, which may just be an odd arrangement of the outer spiral arms as they wind toward the ends of the bar, and a much smaller one near the very center, which involves several bright regions enveloped in clouds of gas and dust and suggests a recent episode of intense star formation.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 3351, also known as M95
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on M95, with North on top
Below, a detail (Image Credit & © Jean-Charles Cuillandre (CFHT), Hawaiian Starlight, CFHT; used by permission)
CFHT image of spiral galaxy NGC 3351, also known as M95
Below, a similar view with the 32" Misti Mountain telescope (Credit & © Jim Misti; used by permission)
Misti Mountain Observatory image of spiral galaxy NGC 3351, also known as M95
Below, a similar view with the 0.9 meter Kitt Peak telescope (AURA, NSF, NOAO)
NOAO image of spiral galaxy NGC 3351, also known as M95
Below, a closeup of the innermost core, considerably enlarged (Hillary Mathis, N.A.Sharp/AURA/NSF/NOAO)
NOAO image of innermost core of spiral galaxy NGC 3351, also known as M95

NGC 3352
Discovered (Mar 19, 1880) by
Édouard Stephan
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3352 (Stephan list X (#26), 1860 RA 10 36 39, NPD 66 53.6) is "pretty bright, small, round, brighter middle and nucleus".
Physical Information:

NGC 3353
Discovered (Mar 18, 1790) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3353 (= GC 2185 = JH 741 = WH III 842, 1860 RA 10 36 39, NPD 33 18.5) is "faint, considerably small, round, pretty gradually brighter middle, star 90 arcsec to south".
Physical Information:

NGC 3354
Discovered (May 1, 1834) by
John Herschel
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3354 (= GC 2186 = JH 3292, 1860 RA 10 36 41, NPD 125 38.9) is "faint, small, very little extended, pretty suddenly brighter middle, 2nd of 3", the others being NGC 3347 and 3358.
Physical Information:

NGC 3355
Discovered (Apr 12, 1866) by
Samuel Langley
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3355 (Langley (#215, HN29), 1860 RA 10 36 50, NPD 112 28) is a "nebula, no description".
Physical Information:

NGC 3356 (= PGC 32021)
Discovered (Apr 17, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc??) in Leo (RA 10 44 12.4, Dec +06 45 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3356 (= GC 2187 = JH 744 = WH III 107, 1860 RA 10 36 53, NPD 82 30.8) is "very faint, pretty small, round, brighter middle, 9th magnitude star about 150 arcsec to the south".
Physical Information: About 1.7 by 0.8 arcmin wide??
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 3356
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 3356, also showing NGC 3349
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 3356

NGC 3357
Discovered (Apr 5, 1864) by
Albert Marth
Also observed (Feb 22, 1865) by Heinrich d'Arrest
Also observed (Nov 18, 1881) by Wilhelm Tempel
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3357 (= GC 5533, Marth 202, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 10 36 55, NPD 75 10.9) is "faint, small, much brighter middle".
Physical Information:

NGC 3358
Discovered (Feb 2, 1835) by
John Herschel
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3358 (= GC 2188 = JH 3293, 1860 RA 10 37 12, NPD 125 39.0) is "considerably faint, very small, very little extended, very small (faint) star attached, 3rd of 3", the others being NGC 3347 and 3354.
Physical Information:

NGC 3359 (= PGC 32183)
Discovered (Nov 28, 1793) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 2, 1832) by John Herschel
A magnitude 10.6 spiral galaxy (type SBc??) in Ursa Major (RA 10 46 36.3, Dec +63 13 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3359 (= GC 2189 = JH 745 = WH V 52, 1860 RA 10 37 21, NPD 26 02.4) is "pretty bright, large, extended 0°, gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 7.2 by 4.4 arcmin?

NGC 3360 (= PGC 32026)
Discovered (1880) by
Andrew Common
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type Sc??) in Sextans (RA 10 44 16.2, Dec -11 14 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3360 (Common (#4), 1860 RA 10 37 32±, NPD 100 42) is one of a "faint pair of nebulae, the eastern one the brighter", the other one (namely the eastern one) being NGC 3361. The second IC lists a corrected position (per Howe) of RA 10 37 18, NPD 100 52 and adds "very faint, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.9 arcmin?

NGC 3361 (= PGC 32044)
Discovered (1880) by
Andrew Common
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A magnitude 12.8 spiral galaxy (type SBc??) in Sextans (RA 10 44 29.1, Dec -11 12 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3361 (Common (#4), 1860 RA 10 37 32±, NPD 100 42) is one of a "faint pair of nebulae, the eastern one the brighter", the other one (namely the western one) being NGC 3360. The second IC lists a corrected position (per Howe) of RA 10 37 28, NPD 100 53.4 and adds "much extended 160°".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 0.8 arcmin?

NGC 3362 (= PGC 32078)
Discovered (Mar 22, 1865) by
Albert Marth
Also observed (Mar 18, 1882) by Édouard Stephan
A magnitude 12.8 spiral galaxy (type Sc??) in Leo (RA 10 44 51.7, Dec +06 35 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3362 (= GC 5534, Marth #203, Stephan list XII (#??), 1860 RA 10 37 33, NPD 82 40.0) is "very faint, pretty small, round, a little brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.1 arcmin?

NGC 3363 (= PGC 32089)
Discovered (Mar 22, 1882) by
Édouard Stephan
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type Sc??) in Leo (RA 10 45 09.5, Dec +22 04 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3363 (Stephan list XII (#40), 1860 RA 10 37 33, NPD 67 11.1) is "faint, pretty small, irregularly round, a little brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.8 arcmin?

NGC 3364 (= PGC 32314)
Discovered (Apr 3, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Nov 4, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.8 spiral galaxy (type SBbc??) in Ursa Major (RA 10 48 29.5, Dec +72 25 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3364 (= GC 2190 = JH 746 = WH III 318, 1860 RA 10 38 02, NPD 16 50.1) is "very faint, large, round, very gradually brighter middle, mottled but not resolved, double star to southeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 1.5 arcmin?

NGC 3365 (= PGC 32153)
Discovered (Apr 13, 1828) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.6 spiral galaxy (type Sc??) in Sextans (RA 10 46 12.7, Dec +01 48 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3365 (= GC 2191 = JH 747, 1860 RA 19 39 00, NPD 87 28.5) is "considerably faint, large, extremely extended 159°, very gradually a very little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.5 by 0.8 arcmin?

NGC 3366 (= PGC 31335 =
IC 2592)
Discovered (Mar 15, 1836) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3366)
Discovered (1899) by DeLisle Stewart (and later listed as IC 2592)
A mangitude 11.3 spiral galaxy (type SBb??) in Vela (RA 10 35 08.1, Dec -43 41 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3366 (= GC 2192 = JH 3294, 1860 RA 10 39 04±, NPD 132 58.7) is "faint, extended, gradually brighter middle, 6.7 magnitude star very near".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 0.8 arcmin?

NGC 3367 (= PGC 32178)
Discovered (Mar 19, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 23, 1830) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.5 spiral galaxy (type SBc??) in Leo (RA 10 46 34.9, Dec +13 45 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3367 (= GC 2193 = JH 748 = WH II 78, 1860 RA 10 39 10, NPD 75 30.9) is "pretty bright, considerably large, irregularly round, very gradually a little brighter middle, mottled but not resolved, 1st of 3", the others being NGC 3371 and 3373.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.5 by 2.4 arcmin?

NGC 3368 (=
M96 = PGC 32192)
Discovered (Mar 20, 1781) by Pierre Méchain
Observed and recorded (Mar 24, 1781) by Charles Messier as M96
Also observed (Mar 10, 1826) by John Herschel
A magnitude 9.3 spiral galaxy (type SBab?) in Leo (RA 10 46 45.8, Dec +11 49 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3368 (= GC 2194 = JH 749, Méchain, M96, 1860 RA 10 39 22, NPD 77 26.7) is "very bright, very large, a little extended, very suddenly very much brighter middle, mottled but not resolved". The position precesses to RA 10 46 45.6, Dec +11 49 08, essentially dead center on the galaxy listed above and the description fits, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: M96 is a member of the Leo I galaxy group, which includes M95, M105, and a number of other galaxies, spread across a region about 40 million light years away. One interesting feature of the region is a huge ring of cold gas which surrounds most of the galaxies in the group. A 2010 study of the ring with the CFHT telescope reveals its (very faint) visible structure, and in combination with computer modeling, indicates that the ring consists of material blown out of M96 and NGC 3384 in a direct collision between the two galaxies, about a billion years ago. During that time the two galaxies have moved nearly 40 million light years apart, so their connection to each other (and the gas ring) was not at all obvious, and it had been speculated that the gas was "primordial gas", left over from the formation of the Universe, which had never been inside any galaxy. As a result of the study, the search for such gas continues (none having been found anywhere, to date).
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 3368, also known as M96, with post-processing for color correction and brightness adjustment
Above, a 10.7 arcmin wide SDSS image of M96, enhanced to show its outer structure
Below, a closeup of the dusty core (Adam Block/AURA/NSFNOAO)
NOAO image of the dusty core of spiral galaxy NGC 3368, also known as M96
Below, a 16 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 3368, also known as M96

NGC 3369
Discovered (1886) by
Ormond Stone
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3369 (Ormond Stone list I (#177), 1860 RA 10 39 35, NPD 114 30.5) is "extremely faint, very small, round".
Physical Information: The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 10 40 04.

NGC 3370 (= PGC 32207)
Discovered (Mar 21, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SA(s)c) in Leo (RA 10 47 04.0, Dec +17 16 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3370 (= GC 2195 = JH 750 = WH II 81, 1860 RA 10 39 35, NPD 71 59.7) is "considerably bright, pretty large, very little extended, gradually brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 1280 km/sec, NGC 3370 is about 60 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 60 to 110 million light years. Given that and its (approximate) apparent size of 2.6 by 1.5 arcmin, it is about 45 thousand light years away.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 3370
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 3370
Below, a (rotated) HST image (Image Credits: NASA, The Hubble Heritage Team and A. Riess (STScI)
HST image of spiral galaxy NGC 3370
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
HST image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 3370 overlaid on an SDSS background to fill in missing areas

NGC 3371 (=
NGC 3384, which see)
Discovered (Mar 11, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3384)
Recorded (Mar 23, 1830) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3371)
Also observed (date?) by Christian Peters (and later listed as NGC 3371)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3371 (= GC 2196 = JH 751, Peters, 1860 RA 10 39 37, NPD 75 28.4) is "extremely faint, round, 2nd of 3", the others being NGC 3367 and 3373.
Physical Information:

WORKING: Check size/quality of pix already on page

NGC 3372, the Carina (or Keyhole) Nebula
Discovered (1751) by
Nicolas Lacaille
Also observed (Apr 4, 1826) by James Dunlop
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
An emission nebula in Carina (RA 10 45 09, Dec -59 52 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3372 (= GC 2197 = JH 3295, Lacaille III.6, Dunlop 309, 1860 RA 10 39 37, NPD 148 56.7) is "a remarkable object, the Great nebula, η Argûs" (Dreyer using the original constellation name, Argo Navis, instead of one of the three constellations (Carina, Vela and Puppis) that Lacaille proposed breaking it into, in 1752).
Physical Information: The Carina Nebula, a star forming region 300 light years across, and 7500 light years away, is a huge complex of glowing gas, and clusters of stars formed from that gas, embedded within the southern Milky Way. The full-field views below show the nebula as an irregularly circular cloud, separated by a very dark V-shaped pair of dust lanes. The portion above the V is much brighter than the rest of the nebula, and in shorter exposures, appears as a roughly triangular region, surrounded by the dark clouds of dust which divide it from the rest of the nebula. Near its lower apex, an exceptionally bright region is lit by the energetic radiation of η Carinae, one of the brightest, most massive stars in our galaxy. An irregularly shaped lane of dark dust which crosses the region lit by η Car is referred to as the Keyhole Nebula. In fact, the entire nebula was once referred to as the Keyhole Nebula because of this feature, and it is not unusual to see images of minute portions of the nebula labeled as the Keyhole, even though they have no relationship to the "original".
     Since there are so many clouds, pillars, dust lanes, star clusters, and other features scattered throughout the region, a page devoted to a multitude of NGC objects is not the appropriate place to discuss their myriad details. For that reason, a separate page, The Carina Nebula, discusses the nebula and its contents in detail, while this section only shows three full- or nearly-full nebular views, and one detail image, to clarify the location of η Car and the Keyhole.
Below: Image of NGC 3372 released to public domain on Wikipedia

Below: 1975 image by NSF/AURA, NOAO

Below: Slight closeup by K. Weis & W. J. Duschl (ITA, U. Heidelberg), apod990719

Below, the region near η(K. Weis & W. J. Duschl (ITA, U. Heidelberg), apod990523


NGC 3373 (=
NGC 3389)
Discovered (Mar 11, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3389)
Recorded (Mar 23, 1830) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3373)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3373 (= GC 1298 = JH 753, 1860 RA 10 39 49, NPD 75 35.3) is "faint, round, 3rd of 3", the others being NGC 3367 and 3371.
Physical Information:

NGC 3374
Discovered (Feb 3, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3374 (= GC 2199 = JH 752 = WH III 701, 1860 RA 10 39 49, NPD 46 04.3) is "very faint, considerably small, irregularly round".
Physical Information:

NGC 3375
Discovered (Feb 21, 1878) by
Wilhelm Tempel
Also observed (Apr 23, 1881) by Édouard Stephan
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3375 (Temple (list I#26 and) list V (#6), Stephan list XI (#??), 1860 RA 10 40 01, NPD 99 12.2) is "faint, small, round, gradually much brighter middle".
Physical Information:

NGC 3376
Discovered (Feb 19, 1863) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3376 (= GC 2200, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 10 40 10, NPD 83 12.6) is "very faint, small".
Physical Information:

NGC 3377 (= PGC 32249)
Discovered (Apr 8, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 10th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E5) in Leo (RA 10 47 42.3, Dec +13 59 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3377 (= GC 2201 = JH 754 = WH II 99, 1860 RA 10 40 17, NPD 75 16.7) is "very bright, considerably large, a little extended, suddenly very much brighter middle and bright nucleus".
Physical Information: Apparent size 5.0 by 3.0 arcmin. Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type E5-6.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 3377
Above, a 6 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 3377
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy; the faint object at upper right is PGC 32226
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 3377, also showing PGC 32226, sometimes called NGC 3377A

PGC 32226 (= "NGC 3377A")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 3377A
Physical Information:

NGC 3378
Discovered (Feb 1, 1835) by
John Herschel
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3378 (= GC 2202 = JH 3296, 1860 RA 10 40 22, NPD 129 17.0) is "considerably faint, small, round, gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information:

NGC 3379 (= PGC 32256 =
M105)
Discovered (Mar 24, 1781) by Pierre Méchain
Neither observed nor recorded by Charles Messier
Discovered (Mar 11, 1784) by William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 10, 1825) by John Herschel
Appended (1947) to the Messier Catalog by Helen Sawyer Hogg as M105
A magnitude 9.3 elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Leo (RA 10 47 49.5, Dec +12 34 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3379 (= GC 2203 = JH 757 = WH I 17, Méchain, 1860 RA 10 40 26, NPD 76 40.9) is "very bright, considerably large, round, pretty suddenly brighter middle, mottled but not resolved". The position precesses to RA 10 47 50.3, Dec +12 34 52, right on the galaxy listed above, so the identification is certain.
Additional Notes (about its listing as M105): Although Méchain discovered this object before Messier finished compiling his published catalog, it was not added to the catalog. Méchain didn't measure its position until April 10, but that was still two or three weeks before it was too late for Messier to add it to the catalog, so it is not obvious why it was not included, especially since it is brighter than M95 and M96, which were discovered only a few days earlier and were included in the catalog. Whatever the reason for its original omission, since this object was found by Méchain in the same time frame as the last of the objects in the Messier Catalog, Helen Sawyer Hogg decided to add it to the catalog as M105 in 1947.
Physical Information: Apparent size 5.3 by 4.8 arcmin? M105 is a member of the Leo I galaxy group, which includes M95, M96 and a number of other galaxies spread across a region about 40 million light years away.
Color-corrected SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 3379, also known as M105
Above, a 12 arcmin wide color-corrected SDSS image centered on NGC 3379, also showing NGC 3384
Below, a 6 arcmin wide color-corrected SDSS image of the galaxy
Color-corrected SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 3379, also known as M105

NGC 3380
Discovered (Apr 11, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3380 (= GC 2204 = JH 755 = WH II 360, 1860 RA 10 40 28, NPD 60 39.7) is "pretty bright, pretty small, round, suddenly brighter middle".
Physical Information:

NGC 3381
Discovered (Mar 28, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3381 (= GC 2205 = JH 756 = WH II 565, 1860 RA 10 40 33, NPD 54 33.3) is "pretty faint, considerably large, irregularly round, very gradually a little brighter middle, 1st of 3", the others being NGC 3384 and 3389.
A Minor Oddity: Usually, NGC or similar references to the "xth of y" objects involve objects that are all at similar NPD's and Declinations, but here, the others are 22 degrees to the south.
Physical Information:

NGC 3382
Discovered (Apr 5, 1874) by
Lawrence Parsons, 4th Earl of Rosse
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3382 (4th Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 10 40 35, NPD 52 32) is "faint, small, irregularly round, perhaps a small cluster?"
Physical Information:

NGC 3383
Discovered (Mar 20, 1835) by
John Herschel
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3383 (= GC 2206 = JH 3297, 1860 RA 10 40 40, NPD 113 41.6) is "faint, pretty large, irregularly round, gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information:

NGC 3384 (=
NGC 3371)
Discovered (Mar 11, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3384)
Also observed (Apr 10, 1825) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3384)
Also observed (Mar 23, 1830) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3371)
A 10th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/SB0) in Leo (RA 10 48 17, Dec +12 37 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3384 (= GC 2207 = JH 758 = WH I 18, 1860 RA 10 40 53, NPD 76 38.0) is "very bright, large, round, pretty suddenly much brighter middle, 2nd of 3", the others being NGC 3381 and 3389.
Physical Information:
Color-corrected Wikisky SDSS image of NGC 3384
Above, an 8 arcmin-wide color-corrected SDSS view of NGC 3384
Below, a 12 arcmin-wide region centered on the galaxy
Color-corrected Wikisky SDSS image of region near NGC 3384

NGC 3385
Discovered (Apr 9, 1828) by
John Herschel
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3385 (= GC 2209 = JH 760, 1860 RA 10 40 53, NPD 84 20.2) is "very faint, small, round, southern of 2", the other being NGC 3386.
Physical Information:

NGC 3386
Discovered (Apr 9, 1828) by
John Herschel
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3386 (= GC 2208 = JH 759, 1860 RA 10 40 54, NPD 84 15.4) is "very faint, small, a little extended, brighter middle, northern of 2", the other being NGC 3385.
Physical Information:

NGC 3387
Discovered (Mar 15, 1830) by
John Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Heinrich d'Arrest
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3387 (= GC 2210 = JH 762, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 10 40 57, NPD 84 15.9) is "extremely faint, extremely small".
Physical Information:

NGC 3388 (=
NGC 3425)
Discovered (Apr 17, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3425)
Discovered (1880) by Andrew Common (and later listed as NGC 3388)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3388 (Common (#5), 1860 RA 10 41, NPD 80 40) is "faint, round".
Physical Information:

NGC 3389 (=
NGC 3373)
Discovered (Mar 11, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3389)
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3389)
Recorded (Mar 23, 1830) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3373)
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Leo (RA 10 48 28, Dec +12 31 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3389 (= GC 2211 = JH 761 = WH II 41, 1860 RA 10 41 03, NPD 76 44.1) is "faint, large, extended east-west, very gradually a little brighter middle, 3rd of 3", the others being NGC 3381 and 3384.
Physical Information:
Color-corrected Wikisky SDSS image of NGC 3389
Above, a 4 arcmin-wide color-corrected SDSS view of NGC 3389
Below, a 12 arcmin-wide region centered on the galaxy
Color-corrected SDSS image of region near NGC 3389

NGC 3390
Discovered (Apr 29, 1834) by
John Herschel
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3390 (= GC 2212 = JH 3298, 1860 RA 10 41 33, NPD 120 48.7) is "faint, small, pretty much extended 0°".
Physical Information:

NGC 3391
Discovered (Apr 1, 1864) by
Albert Marth
Also observed (Mar 19, 1865) by Heinrich d'Arrest
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3391 (= GC 5535, Marth 204, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 10 41 34, NPD 75 02.5) is "faint, small, round, between 2 nearby stars".
Physical Information:

NGC 3392
Discovered (Apr 3, 1791) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3392 (= GC 2213 = JH 763 = WH III 881, 1860 RA 10 41 36, NPD 23 28.7) is "very faint, small, pretty suddenly brighter middle, star near".
Physical Information:

NGC 3393
Discovered (Mar 24, 1835) by
John Herschel
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3393 (= GC 2214 = JH 3299, 1860 RA 10 41 42, NPD 114 25.6) is "faint, small, round, pretty suddenly brighter middle, two 10th magnitude stars to east".
Physical Information:

NGC 3394
Discovered (Apr 3, 1791) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3394 (= GC 2215 = JH 764 = WH II 872, 1860 RA 10 42 00, NPD 23 30.9) is "considerably faint, small, a little extended, very gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information:

NGC 3395 (=
IC 2613 = PGC 32424, and with NGC 3396 = Arp 270)
Discovered (Dec 7, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3395)
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3395)
Discovered (May 13, 1896) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 2613)
A magnitude 12.1 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)cd pec?) in Leo Minor (RA 10 49 49.9, Dec +32 58 53)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3395 (= GC 2216 = JH 765 = WH I 116, 1860 RA 10 42 01, NPD 56 16.7) is "considerably bright, pretty small, irregularly a little extended, 1st of 2", the other being NGC 3396.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.9 arcmin. A starburst galaxy. Used by the Arp Atlas (with NGC 3396) as an example of galaxies with connected arms.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 3395 and irregular galaxy NGC 3396, which comprise Arp 270
Above, a 4 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 3395 and 3396, which comprise Arp 270
Below, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on the pair
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 3395 and irregular galaxy NGC 3396, which comprise Arp 270

NGC 3396 (= PGC 32434, and with
NGC 3395 = Arp 270)
Discovered (Dec 7, 1785) by William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.0 irregular galaxy (type IBm? pec) in Leo Minor (RA 10 49 55.6, Dec +32 59 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3396 (= GC 2217 = JH 766 = WH I 117, 1860 RA 10 42 06, NPD 56 16.2) is "pretty bright, pretty small, irregularly a little extended, 2nd of 2", the other being NGC 3395.
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.6 by 1.0 arcmin. Used by the Arp Atlas (with NGC 3395, which see for images) as an example of galaxies with connected arms.

NGC 3397 (=
NGC 3329 = PGC 32059)
Discovered (Apr 2, 1801) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3397)
Discovered (Sep 2, 1828) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3329)
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Draco (RA 10 44 39.0, Dec +76 48 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3397 (= GC 2218 = WH I 284, 1860 RA 10 42 35, NPD 11 57.8) is "considerably bright, very small, irregular figure (place very uncertain?)".
Discovery Notes: Like a multitude of other objects observed by William Herschel on Apr 2, 1801, with large unexplicable errors, only recently explained as being due to his telescope being out of alignment with the meridian.
Physical Information: 1.9 by 1.1 arcmin

NGC 3398 (probably =
IC 644 = PGC 32564)
Discovered (Apr 17, 1789) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3398)
Discovered (May 8, 1890) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 644)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa pec?) in Ursa Major (RA 10 51 31.6, Dec +55 23 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3398 (= GC 2219 = WH III 792, 1860 RA 10 42 57, NPD 33 49.9) is "very faint, small, extended, extremely mottled but not resolved".
Discovery Notes: (See IC 644 for a discussion of the double listing. The uncertainty in the equivalence of the two listings will be discussed here in the next iteration of this page.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.8 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 3398
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 3398
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 646 and PGC 32587
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 3398, also showing spiral galaxy IC 646 and lenticular galaxy PGC 32587, which is sometimes misidentified as IC 644

NGC 3399
Discovered (Apr 1, 1864) by
Albert Marth
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3399 (= GC 5536, Marth 205, 1860 RA 10 43 02, NPD 73 02) is "faint, very small".
Physical Information:
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 3300 - 3349) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 3350 - 3399     → (NGC 3400 - 3449)