Celestial Atlas
(NGC 3750 - 3799) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 3800 - 3849 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 3850 - 3899)
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3800, 3801, 3802, 3803, 3804, 3805, 3806, 3807, 3808, 3809, 3810, 3811, 3812, 3813, 3814, 3815, 3816,
3817, 3818, 3819, 3820, 3821, 3822, 3823, 3824, 3825, 3826, 3827, 3828, 3829, 3830, 3831, 3832, 3833,
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Page last updated Oct 30, 2013
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NGC 3800 (= PGC 36197, and with
NGC 3799 = Arp 83)
Discovered (Apr 8, 1784) by William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)b? pec) in Leo (RA 11 40 13.3, Dec +15 20 32)
Based on a recessional velocity of 3310 km/sec, NGC 3800 is about 155 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.85 by 0.7 arcmin, it is about 85 thousand light years across. With NGC 3799 it is thought to be part of an interacting pair, also known as Arp 83. (Note: A conflicting radial velocity measurement of 5850 km/sec would put NGC 3800 at a distance of 270 million light years, in which case the "pair" would actually be an optical double, and only appear to be gravitationally interacting; but if anything, NGC 3800 appears to be in front of NGC 3799, so the larger velocity and corresponding distance are probably incorrect.)
SDSS image of spiral galaxies NGC 3799 and 3800, which comprise Arp 83
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 3799 and NGC 3800
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 3799, also showing NGC 3800
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxies NGC 3799 and NGC 3800, which comprise Arp 83

NGC 3801 (= PGC 36200)
Discovered (Apr 17, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a pec) in Leo (RA 11 40 16.8, Dec +17 43 39)
Based on a recessional velocity 3315 km/sec, NGC 3801 is about 155 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 2.9 by 2.1 arcmin, it is about 130 thousand light years across. NGC 3801 is at about the same distance as NGC 3802, but its distorted appearance is not believed to be due to their apparent proximity, but to the merger of an earlier version of NGC 3801 with another galaxy the best part of a billion years ago. The merger of those galaxies created a wave of star formation that ended several hundred million years ago, and the galaxy's present appearance is due to powerful high-speed jets of gas (shown in green in the multi-spectral image below) emitted by a central supermassive black hole that are blowing away colder gas that might have served to form new stars.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 3801
Above, a 4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 3801
Below, a multi-spectral image of the galaxy (Image Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SDSS/NRAO/ASIAA)
A multi-spectral image of lenticular galaxy NGC 3801, combining visible light SDSS images (in yellow) with ultraviolet GALEX images (in blue), infrared Spitzer images (in red) and radio NRAO images (in green)
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 3802
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 3801, also showing spiral galaxy NGC 3802

NGC 3802 (= PGC 36203)
Discovered (Mar 14, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Leo (RA 11 40 18.7, Dec +17 45 55)
Based on a recessional velocity of 3320 km/sec, NGC 3802 is about 155 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.3 by 0.3 arcmin, it is about 60 thousand light years across. Its edge-on orientation makes accurate classification difficult, and it is listed with different types in different databases; the one given here is based on the central band of dusty clouds in its disk, and the small size of its nucleus. NGC 3802 is at about the same distance as NGC 3801, but although they may be a pair, the distorted appearance of the larger galaxy is not believed to be due to their apparent proximity.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 3802
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 3802
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 3801
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 3802, also showing lenticular galaxy NGC 3801

NGC 3803 (= PGC 36204)
Discovered (Mar 27, 1856) by
R. J. Mitchell
A 16th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0) in Leo (RA 11 40 17.3, Dec +17 48 06)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.4 arcmin.

NGC 3804 (=
NGC 3794 = PGC 36238)
Discovered (Apr 14, 1789) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3794)
Discovered (Mar 18, 1790) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3804)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)d) in Ursa Major (RA 11 40 54.0, Dec +56 12 06)
Based on a recessional velocity of 1380 km/sec, NGC 3804 is about 65 million light years away, well within the range of redshift-independent distance estimates of 50 to 80 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 2.2 by 1.5 arcmin, it is about 40 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 3804
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 3804
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 3804

NGC 3805 (= PGC 36224)
Discovered (Apr 25, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Leo (RA 11 40 41.6, Dec +20 20 37)
Apparent size 1.4 by 1.1 arcmin.

NGC 3806 (= PGC 36231)
Discovered (Apr 21, 1862) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SABb) in Leo (RA 11 40 46.7, Dec +17 47 44)
Based on a recessional velocity of 3495 km/sec, NGC 3806 is about 165 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.8 by 1.3 arcmin, it is about 85 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 3806
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 3806
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy (NGC 3801 is just outside the field, on the right)
(The star listed as NGC 3807 is also shown, to the northeast of NGC 3806)
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 3806, also showing the location of lenticular galaxy NGC 3801 (just outside the field at lower right) and the star listed as NGC 3807

NGC 3807
Recorded (Mar 27, 1856) by
R. J. Mitchell
A 15th-magnitude star in Leo (RA 11 40 54.7, Dec +17 49 07)
(See the wide-field image of NGC 3806)

NGC 3808 (= PGC 36227, and with
PGC 36228 = Arp 87)
Discovered (Apr 10, 1785) by William Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)c? pec) in Leo (RA 11 40 44.0, Dec +22 25 47)
Based on the nearly identical recessional velocities of NGC 3808 (= 7075 km/sec) and its companion, PGC 36228 (= 7055 km/sec), the pair of galaxies is about 330 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.6 by 0.9 arcmin, NGC 3808 is about 150 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of spiral galaxies NGC 3808 and PGC 36228 (sometimes called NGC 3808A), also known as Arp 87
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 3808 and its companion, PGC 36228
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxies NGC 3808 and PGC 36228 (sometimes called NGC 3808A), also known as Arp 87

PGC 36228 (= "NGC 3808A", and with
NGC 3808 = Arp 87)
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 3808A due to its association with NGC 3808
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc? pec) in Leo (RA 11 40 44.7, Dec +22 26 48)
As discussed at NGC 3808 (which see for images), the pair of galaxies known as Arp 87 is about 330 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.9 by 0.4 arcmin, PGC 36228 is about 85 thousand light years across.

NGC 3809 (= PGC 36263)
Discovered (Aug 20, 1866) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Ursa Major (RA 11 41 15.9, Dec +59 53 10)
Apparent size 1.0 by 0.8 arcmin.

NGC 3810 (= PGC 36243)
Discovered (Mar 15, 1784) by
William Herschel
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SA(rs)c) in Leo (RA 11 40 58.6, Dec +11 28 13)
Based on a recessional velocity of 990 km/sec, NGC 3810 is about 45 million light years away, in reasonably good agreement (especially for such small distances, at which peculiar (non-Hubble expansion) velocities can significantly change the result) with redshift-independent distance estimates of 45 to 80 million light years. The current consensus is in the range of 50 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 4.0 by 3.0 arcmin, the galaxy is about 60 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 3810
Above, a 4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 3810
Below, a detail of the central galaxy (Image Credits: ESA/Hubble/NASA)
HST closeup of spiral galaxy NGC 3810
Below, a slightly wider-field HST view (Image Credits: Hubble Legacy Archive, Wikimedia Commons)
'Raw' HST view showing more of spiral galaxy NGC 3810
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 3810

NGC 3811 (= PGC 36265)
Discovered (Feb 9, 1788) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(r)cd?) in Ursa Major (RA 11 41 16.5, Dec +47 41 28)
Based on a recessional velocity of 3105 km/sec, NGC 3811 is about 145 million light years away, in reasonable agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 145 to 215 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 2.4 by 1.7 arcmin, the galaxy is about 100 thousand light years across. NGC 3811 is a starburst galaxy.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 3811
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 3811
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 3811

NGC 3812 (= PGC 36256)
Discovered (Apr 6, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1) in Leo (RA 11 41 07.8, Dec +24 49 21)
Apparent size 1.7 by 1.6 arcmin.

NGC 3813 (= PGC 36266)
Discovered (Apr 28, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SA(rs)b?) in Ursa Major (RA 11 41 18.5, Dec +36 32 48)
The first IC adds "Position angle of elongation 83 degrees (Armagh). Also observed and drawn by Spitaler". Based on a recessional velocity of 1465 km/sec, NGC 3813 is about 70 million light years away, in reasonable agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 70 to 95 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 2.0 by 1.0 arcmin, it is about 40 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 3813
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 3813
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 3813

NGC 3814 (= PGC 36267)
Discovered (Apr 25, 1881) by
Édouard Stephan (11a-14)
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Leo (RA 11 41 27.7, Dec +24 48 20)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.3 arcmin. (for now, see the wide-field image of NGC 3815)

NGC 3815 (= PGC 36288)
Discovered (Apr 10, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab) in Leo (RA 11 41 39.3, Dec +24 48 01)
Based on a recessional velocity of 3710 km/sec, NGC 3815 is about 175 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.7 by 0.9 arcmin, it is about 85 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 3815
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 3815
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 3814
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 3815, also showing lenticular galaxy NGC 3814
The "bright" star at right is 8th-magnitude HD 101558

NGC 3816 (= PGC 36292)
Discovered (May 9, 1864) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Leo (RA 11 41 47.8, Dec +20 06 13)
Apparent size 1.9 by 1.1 arcmin.

NGC 3817 (= PGC 36299)
Discovered (Jan 18, 1828) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a) in Virgo (RA 11 41 52.8, Dec +10 18 16)
Apparent size 1.0 by 0.9 arcmin. (for now, see the wide-field view of NGC 3820)

NGC 3818 (= PGC 36304)
Discovered (Mar 5, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E6) in Virgo (RA 11 41 57.3, Dec -06 09 20)
Apparent size 2.0 by 1.2 arcmin.

NGC 3819 (= PGC 36311)
Discovered (Jan 18, 1828) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1) in Leo (RA 11 42 05.8, Dec +10 21 06)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.7 arcmin. (for now, see the wide-field view of NGC 3820)

NGC 3820 (= PGC 36308)
Discovered (Apr 29, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc) in Leo (RA 11 42 04.8, Dec +10 23 04)
Based on a recessional velocity of 6100 km/sec, NGC 3820 is about 285 million light years away. Given that and its 0.7 by 0.4 arcmin apparent size, it is about 60 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 3820
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 3820
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 3817 and NGC 3819
Hundreds of more distant galaxies are scattered across the background
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 3820, also showing lenticular galaxies NGC 3817 and 3819

NGC 3821 (= PGC 36314)
Discovered (Apr 26, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type (R)SAB(s)ab) in Leo (RA 11 42 09.0, Dec +20 18 55)
Based on a recessional velocity of 5765 km/sec, NGC 3821 is about 270 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.4 by 1.3 arcmin, it is about 110 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 3821
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 3821
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, slightly enhanced to show off its ring
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 3821

NGC 3822 (=
NGC 3848 = PGC 36319)
Discovered (Mar 15, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3848)
Discovered (Apr 15, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3822)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Virgo (RA 11 42 11.1, Dec +10 16 41)
Apparent size 1.4 by 0.8 arcmin. (for now, see the wide-field view of NGC 3825)

NGC 3823 (= PGC 36331)
Discovered (May 7, 1836) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1) in Crater (RA 11 42 15.1, Dec -13 52 00)
Based on a recessional velocity of 6620 km/sec, NGC 3823 is about 310 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.5 by 1.3 arcmin, it is about 135 thousand light years across. The faint galaxy to its northeast (PGC 3093645) has no association with it in terms of its NGC listing, as it is too faint to have any effect on Herschel's observation; but as noted below, it is at about the same distance as NGC 3823, and it is possible that the two are physically related (particularly if a second listing of the larger galaxy's type as cD pec is correct).
DSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 3823 and its possible companion, spiral galaxy PGC 3093645
Above, a 2.4 arcmin closeup of NGC 3823 and its possible companion, PGC 3093645
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 3823 and its possible companion, spiral galaxy PGC 3093645

PGC 3093645
Not an NGC object but listed here because of its proximity to
NGC 3823
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in Crater (RA 11 42 18.9, Dec -13 51 42)
The 6565 km/sec recessional velocity of PGC 3093645 is almost the same as that of its apparent neighbor, NGC 3823 (which see for images), so they are probably at about the same distance from us (about 310 million light years), and there is a possibility that the two are physically related. Whether they are or not, the smaller galaxy's 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin apparent size implies that it is about 25 thousand light years across.

NGC 3824 (= PGC 36370)
Discovered (Apr 14, 1789) by
William Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SA(s)a?) in Ursa Major (RA 11 42 44.8, Dec +52 46 48)
Based on a recessional velocity of 5645 km/sec, NGC 3824 is about 265 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.3 by 0.7 arcmin, the galaxy is about 100 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 3824
Above, a 2.4 arcmin closeup of NGC 3824
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 3824

NGC 3825 (=
NGC 3852 = PGC 36348)
Discovered (Mar 15, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3852)
Discovered (Apr 15, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3825)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa) in Virgo (RA 11 42 23.8, Dec +10 15 53)
Based on a recessional velocity of 6505 km/sec, NGC 3825 is about 300 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.3 by 1.0 arcmin, it is about 115 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 3825
Above, a 2.4 arcmin closeup of NGC 3825
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 3819 and NGC 3822
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 3825, also showing lenticular galaxies NGC 3819 and NGC 3822

NGC 3826 (=
NGC 3830 = PGC 36359)
Discovered (Apr 6, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3826)
Discovered (Apr 19, 1832) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3830)
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2) in Leo (RA 11 42 32.9, Dec +26 29 21)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin.

NGC 3827 (= PGC 36361)
Discovered (Dec 29, 1861) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sm) in Leo (RA 11 42 36.2, Dec +18 50 43)
Based on a recessional velocity of 3130 km/sec, NGC 3827 is about 145 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.9 by 0.8 arcmin, it is about 40 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 3827
Above, a 2.4 arcmin closeup of NGC 3827
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 3827

NGC 3828 (= PGC 36376)
Discovered (Mar 28, 1886) by
Guillaume Bigourdan (I-46)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S) in Leo (RA 11 42 58.3, Dec +16 29 16)
Based on a recessional velocity of 10345 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that NGC 3828 is about 480 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the Universal expansion during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was just over 460 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 470 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.8 by 0.5 arcmin, the galaxy is about 110 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 3828
Above, a 2.4 arcmin closeup of NGC 3828
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy; also shown is PGC 36431
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 3828, also showing spiral galaxy PGC 36431

NGC 3829 (= PGC 36439)
Discovered (Apr 14, 1789) by
William Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(s)b?) in Ursa Major (RA 11 43 27.3, Dec +52 42 41)
Based on a recessional velocity of 5675 km/sec, NGC 3829 is about 265 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.1 by 0.6 arcmin, it is about 85 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 3829
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 3829
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 3829

NGC 3830 (=
NGC 3826 = PGC 36359)
Discovered (Apr 6, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3826)
Discovered (Apr 19, 1832) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3830)
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2) in Leo (RA 11 42 32.9, Dec +26 29 21)
(this entry will probably contain only historical information; for anything else see NGC 3826)

NGC 3831 (= PGC 36417)
Discovered (Mar 9, 1828) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SAB0+(r) pec) in Crater (RA 11 43 18.6, Dec -12 52 41)
Based on a recessional velocity of 5265 km/sec, NGC 3831 is about 245 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 2.7 by 0.6 arcmin, it is about 195 thousand light years across. A Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 2). NGC 3831 has two apparent companions (PGC 36416 to its east and PGC 36393 to its west), which have sufficiently similar recessional velocities that they could be physical companions, as well; for that reason, they are discussed immediately below instead of on the corresponding PGC Objects page.
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 3831 and its possible companion, spiral galaxy PGC 36416
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 3831 and its possible companion, PGC 36416
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair, also showing PGC 36393
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 3831 and its possible companions, spiral galaxy PGC 36416 and lenticular galaxy PGC 36393

PGC 36393
Not an NGC object, but listed here since a possible companion of
NGC 3831
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0+?) in Crater (RA 11 43 09.4, Dec -12 51 51)
Based on a recessional velocity of 5050 km/sec, PGC 36393 is about 235 million light years away, or about 10 million light years closer than its apparent companion, NGC 3831. However, the difference in their recessional velocity is within normal variations in galaxy motions, so they may actually be physical companions and at the same distance (of perhaps 240 million or so light years). Either way, its apparent size of 1.6 by 0.2 arcmin corresponds to about 110 thousand light years.
DSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 36393
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 36393; for a wider view, see NGC 3831)

PGC 36416
Not an NGC object, but listed here since a possible companion of
NGC 3831
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab) in Crater (RA 11 43 22.4, Dec -12 53 14)
Based on a recessional velocity of 4900 km/sec, PGC 36416 is about 230 million light years away, or about 15 million light years closer than its apparent companion, NGC 3831 (which see for images). However, the difference in their recessional velocity is within normal variations in galaxy motions, so they may actually be physical companions and at the same distance (of perhaps 240 million or so light years). Either way, its apparent size of 0.25 by 0.2 arcmin corresponds to about 18 thousand light years.

NGC 3832 (= PGC 36446)
Discovered (Apr 10, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)bc) in Leo (RA 11 43 31.4, Dec +22 43 31)
Based on a recessional velocity of 6910 km/sec, NGC 3832 is about 320 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 2.1 by 1.6 arcmin, it is almost 200 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 3832
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 3832
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 3832

NGC 3833 (= PGC 36441)
Discovered (Apr 15, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Virgo (RA 11 43 28.9, Dec +10 09 41)
Based on a radial velocity of 6060 km/sec, NGC 3833 is about 280 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 275 to 325 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 1.4 by 0.7, the galaxy is about 115 thousand light years across. As it happens, its nearest apparent companion (PGC 36456) is at about the same distance, but whether the two are in any way related is unknown.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 3833
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 3833
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing PGC 36456
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 3833, also showing spiral galaxy PGC 36456

NGC 3834 (= PGC 36443)
Discovered (Dec 29, 1861) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Leo (RA 11 43 37.7, Dec +19 05 26)
Based on a recessional velocity of 6815 km/sec, NGC 3834 is about 315 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.4 by 1.0 arcmin, it is about 130 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 3834
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 3834
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 3834

NGC 3835 (= PGC 36493)
Discovered (Apr 14, 1831) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Ursa Major (RA 11 44 05.0, Dec +60 07 13)
Based on a recessional velocity of 2465 km/sec, NGC 3835 is about 115 million light years away, in fair agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 130 to 140 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 2.2 by 0.7 arcmin, the galaxy is about 80 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 3835
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 3835
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 3835

PGC 36776 (= "NGC 3835A")
Not an NGC object, but sometimes called NGC 3835A since in general area of
NGC 3835
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Ursa Major (RA 11 47 22.8, Dec +60 18 02)
Based on a recessional velocity of 3570 km/sec, PGC 36776 is about 165 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.0 by 1.0 arcmin, it is about 50 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 36776, sometimes called NGC 3835A
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 36776
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 36776, sometimes called NGC 3835A

NGC 3836 (= PGC 36445)
Discovered (Apr 29, 1877) by
Wilhelm Tempel (I-36, IV-8)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb pec) in Crater (RA 11 43 29.9, Dec -16 47 47)
NGC 3836 is a distorted spiral galaxy, with a bright emission region to the northwest of its nucleus and a foreground star superimposed on its northern arm. (Its complex appearance has led to a probable misclassification as a multiple galaxy in some references.) Based on a recessional velocity of 3675 km/sec, the galaxy is about 170 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.3 by 1.3 arcmin, it is about 65 thousand light years across.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 3836
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 3836
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 3836

NGC 3837 (= PGC 36476)
Discovered (Apr 26, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0) in Leo (RA 11 43 56.6, Dec +19 53 41)
Based on a recessional velocity of 6130 km/sec, NGC 3837 is about 285 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 275 to 300 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 0.8 by 0.8 arcmin, it is about 45 thousand light years across. Like many of its neighbors, it appears to be part of galaxy cluster Abell 1367.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 3837
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 3837
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy;
also shown are NGC 3841, 3842, 3845 and 3851, and PGC 36466
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 3837, also showing lenticular galaxy NGC 3841, elliptical galaxies NGC 3842 and 3851, irregular galaxy PGC 36466, and part of spiral galaxy NGC 3845

NGC 3838 (= PGC 36505)
Discovered (Mar 18, 1790) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a) in Ursa Major (RA 11 44 13.4, Dec +57 56 55)
Apparent size 1.4 by 0.6 arcmin.

NGC 3839 (= PGC 36475)
Discovered (Apr 19, 1882) by
Édouard Stephan (12a-48)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sdm?) in Leo (RA 11 43 54.4, Dec +10 47 04)
Based on a recessional velocity of 5915 km/sec, NGC 3839 is about 275 million light years away, in unusually poor agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 175 to 185 million light years. Using the Hubble distance and its apparent size of 1.1 by 0.5 arcmin, the galaxy is about 90 thousand light years across (and of course somewhat smaller if the redshift-independent estimates are more accurate).
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 3839
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 3839
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 3839, with some glare at bottom from 8th and 9th magnitude stars

NGC 3840 (= PGC 36477)
Discovered (May 8, 1864) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa) in Leo (RA 11 43 59.0, Dec +20 04 37)
Based on a recessional velocity of 7370 km/sec, NGC 3840 is about 345 million light years away, in reasonable agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 275 to 340 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 1.1 by 0.8 arcmin, the galaxy is about 110 thousand light years across. Like many of its neighbors, it appears to be part of galaxy cluster Abell 1367.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 3840
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 3840
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 3844, 3845 and 3851
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 3840, also showing lenticular galaxy NGC 3844, spiral galaxy NGC 3845 and elliptical galaxy NGC 3851

NGC 3841 (= PGC 36469)
Discovered (Mar 25, 1827) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Leo (RA 11 44 02.1, Dec +19 58 20)
Based on a recessional velocity of 6355 km/sec, NGC 3841 is about 295 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.75 by 0.5 arcmin, it is about 65 thousand light years across. Like many of its neighbors, it appears to be part of galaxy cluster Abell 1367.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 3841 and part of elliptical galaxy NGC 3842
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 3841 and part of NGC 3842 (which see for a wider image)

NGC 3842 (= PGC 36487)
Discovered (Apr 26, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3) in Leo (RA 11 44 02.0, Dec +19 57 00)
Based on a recessional velocity of 6315 km/sec, NGC 8342 is about 295 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 275 to 300 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 1.4 by 1.0 arcmin, it is about 120 thousand light years across. Like many of its neighbors, it appears to be part of galaxy cluster Abell 1367.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 3842
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 3842
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy;
also shown are NGC 3837, 3841, 3844, 3845 and 3851, and PGC 36466
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 3842, also showing lenticular galaxy NGC 3841, elliptical galaxies NGC 3837 and 3851, spiral galaxy NGC 3845 and irregular galaxy PGC 36466

NGC 3843 (= PGC 36471)
Discovered (Apr 27, 1881) by
Edward Holden (5)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a) in Virgo (RA 11 43 54.6, Dec +07 55 34)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.4 arcmin.

NGC 3844 (= PGC 36481)
Discovered (May 8, 1864) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a) in Leo (RA 11 44 00.9, Dec +20 01 46)
Based on a recessional velocity of 6780 km/sec, NGC 3844 is about 315 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.2 by 0.2 arcmin, it is about 110 thousand light years across. Like many of its neighbors, it appears to be part of galaxy cluster Abell 1367.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 3844
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 3844; for a wide-field view, see NGC 3840 or 3845

NGC 3845 (= PGC 36470)
Discovered (Mar 17, 1831) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in Leo (RA 11 44 05.5, Dec +19 59 46)
Based on a recessional velocity of 5690 km/sec, NGC 3845 is about 265 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.8 by 0.3 arcmin, it is about 60 thousand light years across. Different classifications are found in different databases, ranging from S0 and S0/a to S and Sb; so depending upon details of its structure that are not revealed by images alone, it can only be considered as being somewhere on the borderline between a spiral and a lenticular galaxy. Like many of its neighbors, it appears to be part of galaxy cluster Abell 1367.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 3845
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 3845
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy;
also shown are NGC 3837, 3840, 3841, 3842 and 3844, and 3851, and PGC 36466
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 3845, also showing spiral galaxy NGC 3840, elliptical galaxies NGC 3837, 3842 and 3851, lenticular galaxies NGC 3841 and 3844, and irregular galaxy PGC 36466

NGC 3846 (= PGC 36539)
Discovered (Feb 10, 1831) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAbc?) in Ursa Major (RA 11 44 28.9, Dec +55 39 08)
Based on a recessional velocity of 9695 km/sec, NGC 3846 is about 450 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.1 by 0.7 arcmin, it is about 145 thousand light years across. NED lists it as a possible member of Abell 1377.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 3846
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 3846
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 3846

PGC 36506 (= "NGC 3846A")
Not an NGC object, but sometimes called NGC 3846A since in general area of
NGC 3846
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(s)m?) in Ursa Major (RA 11 44 14.8, Dec +55 02 06)
Based on a recessional velocity of 1435 km/sec, PGC 36506 is about 65 million light years away, in fair agreement with a single redshift-independent distance estimate of 80 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 1.9 by 1.5 arcmin (including the extended region outside the brighter center) it is about 35 thousand light years across. PGC 36506 is over half a degree to the south of NGC 3846, so the use of "NGC 3846A" as a reference to their being "near" each other is a bit of a stretch. However, the galaxy is bright enough that save for its very low surface brightness, it might well have been found during the era that created the NGC and IC catalogs, in which case it would have earned an entry of its own.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 36506, sometimes called NGC 3846A
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 36506
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing PGC 36463
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 36506, sometimes called NGC 3846A, also showing PGC 36463
Below, a 25 by 40 arcmin wide view of the region between NGC 3846 and PGC 36506
SDSS image of region between spiral galaxy NGC 3846 and spiral galaxy PGC 36506, sometimes called NGC 3846A, also showing PGC 36463

NGC 3847 (=
NGC 3856 = PGC 36504)
Discovered (Apr 3, 1831) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3847)
Discovered (May 8, 1864) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 3856)
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0) in Ursa Major (RA 11 44 14.0, Dec +33 30 52)
The second IC states "NPD 55 52.3, not 42.3 (per Wolf, list VIII; h. one observation only)". Apparent size 1.1 by 1.1 arcmin.

NGC 3848 (=
NGC 3822 = PGC 36319)
Discovered (Mar 15, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3848)
Discovered (Apr 15, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3822)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Virgo (RA 11 42 11.1, Dec +10 16 41)
(this entry will probably contain only historical information; for anything else see NGC 3822) Note: The galaxy Wikisky shows as NGC 3848 is actually PGC 36456.

PGC 36456
Not an NGC object; listed here because Wikisky misidentifies this object as
NGC 3848
A 14th?-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Virgo (RA 11 43 41.8, Dec +10 14 44)
Based on a recessional velocity of 6005 km/sec, PGC 36456 is about 280 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.7 by 0.4 arcmin, it is about 55 thousand light years across. As it happens, its nearest apparent companion (NGC 3833) is at about the same distance, but whether the two are in any way related is unknown.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 36456, which is not NGC 3848
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 36456, which is not NGC 3848
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 3833
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 36456, which is not NGC 3848; also shown is spiral galaxy NGC 3833

NGC 3849 (=
IC 730 = PGC 36658)
Discovered (Feb 11, 1878) by David Todd (10) (and later listed as NGC 3849)
Discovered (Mar 22, 1893) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 730)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a pec?) in Virgo (RA 11 45 35.2, Dec +03 13 54)
Based on a recessional velocity of 6055 km/sec, NGC 3849 is about 280 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.9 by 0.55 arcmin, it is about 75 thousand light years across. (Need to add historical discussion of the double listing in the next iteration of this page.)
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 3849
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 3849
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 3849
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 3750 - 3799) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 3800 - 3849     → (NGC 3850 - 3899)