Celestial Atlas
(NGC 3800 - 3849) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 3850 - 3899 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 3900 - 3949)
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3850, 3851, 3852, 3853, 3854, 3855, 3856, 3857, 3858, 3859, 3860, 3861, 3862, 3863, 3864, 3865, 3866,
3867, 3868, 3869, 3870, 3871, 3872, 3873, 3874, 3875, 3876, 3877, 3878, 3879, 3880, 3881, 3882, 3883,
3884, 3885, 3886, 3887, 3888, 3889, 3890, 3891, 3892, 3893, 3894, 3895, 3896, 3897, 3898, 3899

Page last updated Oct 26, 2013
WORKING: Add positions/physical data (per Steinicke)

NGC 3850 (= PGC 36660)
Discovered (Apr 14, 1789) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(s)c) in Ursa Major (RA 11 45 35.5, Dec +55 53 12)
Based on a recessional velocity of 1155 km/sec, NGC 3850 is about 55 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 50 to 70 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 1.9 by 0.8 arcmins, it is about 30 thousand light years across. It is a member of the NGC 3898 group of galaxies.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 3850
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 3850
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 3850

NGC 3851 (= PGC 36516)
Discovered (Feb 24, 1827) by
John Herschel
A 15th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3) in Leo (RA 11 44 20.4, Dec +19 58 52)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.4 arcmin. (for now, see wide-field image of NGC 3842)

NGC 3852 (=
NGC 3825 = PGC 36348)
Discovered (Mar 15, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3852)
Discovered (Apr 15, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3825)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa) in Virgo (RA 11 42 23.8, Dec +10 15 53)
(this entry will probably contain only historical information; for anything else see NGC 3825)

NGC 3853
Discovered (1871) by
Alphonse Borrelly (4)

NGC 3854 (=
NGC 3865)
Discovered (1880) by Andrew Common (and later listed as NGC 3865)
Discovered (1886) by Francis Leavenworth (II-449) (and later listed as NGC 3854)

NGC 3855 (=
IC 2953)
Discovered (May 8, 1864) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 3855)
Discovered (Jun 11, 1896) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 2953)
The first IC adds (per Spitaler) "RA is 11 36 56, while d'Arrest's PD is correct".

NGC 3856 (=
NGC 3847)
Discovered (Apr 3, 1831) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3847)
Discovered (May 8, 1864) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 3856)
The first IC adds (per Spitaler) "RA 11 37 06, NPD 55 53.3, very faint, round, brighter middle".

NGC 3857
Discovered (Mar 23, 1884) by
Édouard Stephan (13b-63)

NGC 3858 (=
NGC 3866)
Discovered (1880) by Andrew Common (and later listed as NGC 3866)
Discovered (1886) by Francis Leavenworth (II-450) (and later listed as NGC 3858)

NGC 3859
Discovered (Mar 23, 1884) by
Édouard Stephan (13b-64)

NGC 3860
Discovered (Apr 27, 1785) by
William Herschel

NGC 3861
Discovered (Mar 23, 1827) by
John Herschel

NGC 3862 (= PGC 36606)
Discovered (Apr 27, 1785) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 12.7 elliptical galaxy (type E0??) in Leo (RA 11 45 05.0, Dec +19 36 23)
Apparent size 1.5 by 1.5 arcmin?

NGC 3863
Discovered (Mar 25, 1865) by
Albert Marth (224)

NGC 3864
Discovered (Mar 23, 1884) by
Édouard Stephan (13b-65)

NGC 3865 (=
NGC 3854)
Discovered (1880) by Andrew Common (23) (and later listed as NGC 3865)
Discovered (1886) by Francis Leavenworth (and later listed as NGC 3854)

NGC 3866 (=
NGC 3858)
Discovered (1880) by Andrew Common (23) (and later listed as NGC 3866)
Discovered (1886) by Francis Leavenworth (and later listed as NGC 3858)

NGC 3867
Discovered (Mar 23, 1881) by
Édouard Stephan (13b-66)

NGC 3868
Discovered (Mar 23, 1884) by
Édouard Stephan (13b-67)

NGC 3869
Discovered (Mar 10, 1826) by
John Herschel

NGC 3870
Discovered (Mar 17, 1790) by
William Herschel

NGC 3871 (=
IC 2959)
Discovered (Apr 3, 1831) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3871)
Discovered (Jun 11, 1896) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 2959)
The first IC lists a corrected position (per Spitaler) of RA 11 38 52, NPD 56 08.0 and adds "In 'Description' dele the question mark. To the note on p. 218 should be added that Spitaler has seen them all four. The Catalogue places of the three following ones are correct."

NGC 3872
Discovered (Apr 8, 1784) by
William Herschel

NGC 3873
Discovered (May 8, 1864) by
Heinrich d'Arrest

NGC 3874
Discovered (Apr 15, 1784) by
William Herschel

NGC 3875
Discovered (Apr 27, 1785) by
William Herschel

NGC 3876
Discovered (Apr 15, 1784) by
William Herschel
The first IC states (per Spitaler) "Seconds of RA should be 14".

NGC 3877
Discovered (Feb 5, 1788) by
William Herschel

NGC 3878
Discovered (Apr 29, 1827) by
John Herschel

NGC 3879
Discovered (Apr 7, 1793) by
William Herschel

NGC 3880
Discovered (Apr 29, 1827) by
John Herschel

NGC 3881
Discovered (Apr 29, 1827) by
John Herschel

NGC 3882
Discovered (Apr 3, 1834) by
John Herschel

NGC 3883
Discovered (Apr 13, 1785) by
William Herschel

NGC 3884
Discovered (Apr 27, 1785) by
William Herschel

NGC 3885
Discovered (Mar 10, 1790) by
William Herschel

NGC 3886
Discovered (May 9, 1864) by
Heinrich d'Arrest

NGC 3887
Discovered (Dec 31, 1785) by
William Herschel

NGC 3888 (= PGC 36789)
Discovered (Apr 14, 1789) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)c) in Ursa Major (RA 11 47 34.0, Dec +55 57 58)
Based on a recessional velocity of 2410 km/sec, NGC 3888 is about 110 million light years away, in fair agreement with redshift-independent distance measurements of 120 to 135 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 1.8 by 1.4 arcmin, it is about 60 thousand light years across. The galaxy is listed as a member of the NGC 3898 group of galaxies, but is apparently considerably farther away than either NGC 3850 or NGC 3898, so even if physically connected, it must lie at the far end of the group.
SDSS image of NGC 3888
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 3888
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region around NGC 3888

NGC 3889
Discovered (Apr 1, 1878) by
Lawrence Parsons, 4th Lord Rosse

NGC 3890 (=
NGC 3939)
Discovered (Dec 12, 1797) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3890)
Discovered (Apr 2, 1801) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3939)

NGC 3891
Discovered (Feb 3, 1788) by
William Herschel

NGC 3892
Discovered (Mar 4, 1786) by
William Herschel

NGC 3893
Discovered (Feb 9, 1788) by
William Herschel

NGC 3894
Discovered (Mar 18, 1790) by
William Herschel

NGC 3895
Discovered (Mar 18, 1790) by
William Herschel

NGC 3896
Discovered (Feb 9, 1788) by
William Herschel

NGC 3897
Discovered (Apr 28, 1785) by
William Herschel

NGC 3898 (= PGC 36921)
Discovered (Apr 14, 1789) by
William Herschel
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SA(s)ab) in Ursa Major (RA 11 49 15.3, Dec +56 05 05)
The brightest member of the NGC 3898 group of galaxies (two of the other four being NGC 3850 and 3888). Based on a recessional velocity of 1175 km/sec, NGC 3898 is about 55 million light years away, in fair agreement with a redshift-independent distance estimate of 70 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 4.4 by 2.6 arcmins, it is about 70 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of NGC 3898
Above, a 5 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 3898
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region around NGC 3898

NGC 3899 (=
NGC 3912)
Discovered (Apr 6, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3912)
Discovered (Mar 26, 1827) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3899)
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 3800 - 3849) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 3850 - 3899     → (NGC 3900 - 3949)