Celestial Atlas
(NGC 300 - 349) →     NGC Objects: NGC 350 - 399     → (NGC 400 - 449)
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350, 351, 352, 353, 354, 355, 356, 357, 358, 359, 360, 361, 362, 363, 364, 365, 366,
367, 368, 369, 370, 371, 372, 373, 374, 375, 376, 377, 378, 379, 380, 381, 382, 383,
384, 385, 386, 387, 388, 389, 390, 391, 392, 393, 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, 399

Page last updated Mar 4, 2014
WORKING: Check positions/historical IDs (Corwin+)

NGC 350 (= PGC 3690)
Discovered (Sep 27, 1864) by
Albert Marth (#30)
A 1magnitude 14.4 lenticular galaxy (type E/SB0?) in Cetus (RA 01 01 56.6, Dec -06 47 43)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.5 arcmin?
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 350, also showing part of NGC 349
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 350, showing part of NGC 349 (which see for wider image)

NGC 351 (= PGC 3693)
Discovered (Nov 10, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.2 lenticular galaxy (type (R')SB0/a?(r)) in Cetus (RA 01 01 57.8, Dec -01 56 11)
Per Dreyer, NGC 351 (Swift list III (#3), 1860 RA 00 55 02, NPD 92 41.9) is "extremely faint, pretty small, northwestern of 2", the other being NGC 353. The second Index Catalog lists a corrected 1860 RA (per Bigourdan) of 00 54 50. Apparent size 1.5 by 0.8 arcmin?
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 351
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 351
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 351

NGC 352 (= PGC 3701)
Discovered (Sep 20, 1784) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 12.6 spiral galaxy (type (R')SB(rs)b?) in Cetus (RA 01 02 09.1, Dec -04 14 43)
Apparent size 2.4 by 0.8 arcmin?
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 352
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 352
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 352

NGC 353 (= PGC 3714)
Discovered (Nov 10, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type SBa pec?) in Cetus (RA 01 02 24.6, Dec -01 57 25)
Per Dreyer, NGC 353 (Swift list III (#4), 1860 RA 00 55 24, NPD 92 43.4) is "extremely faint, pretty small, round, southeastern of 2", the other being NGC 351. Apparent size 1.3 by 0.4 arcmin?
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 353
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 353
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 353

NGC 354 (= PGC 3763)
Discovered (Oct 24, 1881) by
Édouard Stephan (12-10)
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type SBb pec?) in Pisces (RA 01 03 16.3, Dec +22 20 34)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.4 arcmin?
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 354
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 354
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 354

NGC 355 (= PGC 3753)
Discovered (Sep 27, 1864) by
Albert Marth (#31)
A magnitude 15.3 lenticular galaxy (type SB0 pec?) in Cetus (RA 01 03 06.9, Dec -06 19 25)
Apparent size 1.0 by 0.4 arcmin?
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 355
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 355
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 357
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 355, also showing NGC 357

NGC 356 (= PGC 3754)
Discovered (Sep 27, 1864) by
Albert Marth (#32)
A magnitude 13.1 spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)bc pec?) in Cetus (RA 01 03 07.0, Dec -06 59 17)
Apparent size 1.8 by 1.2 arcmin?
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 356
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 356
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 356

NGC 357 (= PGC 3768)
Discovered (Sep 10, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 1magnitude 12.0 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a?(r)) in Cetus (RA 01 03 21.8, Dec -06 20 21)
Apparent size 2.5 by 1.7 arcmin?
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 357
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 357
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 355
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 357, also showing NGC 355

NGC 358
Recorded (Feb 4, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A group of stars in Cassiopeia (RA 01 05 10.8, Dec +62 01 16)
Per Dreyer, NGC 358 (GC 5143, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 00 56 28, NPD 28 42.7) is a "cluster, very little rich". The position precesses to RA 01 05 09.3, Dec +62 02 26, just north of a two arcmin wide group of four 11th to 12th magnitude stars arranged in a "trapezium" which is almost certainly d'Arrest's "cluster", although "very little rich" seems a bit of an understatement. Apparent size 2.5 arcmin?
DSS image of the group of stars listed as NGC 358
Above, a 6 arcmin wide image centered on NGC 358
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the group
DSS image of region near the group of stars listed as NGC 358

NGC 359 (= PGC 3817)
Discovered (Sep 2, 1864) by
Albert Marth (#33)
A magnitude 13.4 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Cetus (RA 01 04 16.9, Dec -00 45 52)
Apparent size 1.5 by 1.1 arcmin?
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 359
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 359
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 364
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 359, also showing NGC 364

NGC 360 (= PGC 3743)
Discovered (Nov 2, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.5 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Tucana (RA 01 02 51.5, Dec -65 36 32)
Apparent size 3.6 by 0.5 arcmin?
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 360
Above, a 3.6 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 360
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 360

NGC 361 (in the Small Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Sep 6, 1826) by
James Dunlop (54)
A magnitude 11 open cluster and emission nebula in Tucana (RA 01 02 11.1, Dec -71 36 24)
Apparent size 1.6 arcmin?
DSS image of NGC 361, an open cluster and emission nebula in the Small Magellanic Cloud
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 361
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the cluster
DSS image of region near NGC 361, an open cluster and emission nebula in the Small Magellanic Cloud

NGC 362 (= GCL 3)
Discovered (Aug 1, 1826) by
James Dunlop
A magnitude 6.8 globular cluster (type III) in Tucana (RA 01 03 14.3, Dec -70 50 52)
Per Dreyer, NGC 362 (GC 193 = JH 2375 = Dunlop 62, 1860 RA 00 57 29, NPD 161 36.0) is a "globular cluster, very bright, very large, very compact, very much brighter middle, stars from 13th to 14th magnitude". The second Index Catalog adds "minute of (1860) RA are 58 (error of reduction in GC)". The corrected position precesses to RA 01 03 14.9, Dec -70 50 51, right on the cluster, so the identification is certain. Apparent size 14 arcmin?
Observatorio Antilhue image of globular cluster NGC 362
Above, an approximately 15 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 362
(Credits and © above and below Daniel Verschatse, Observatorio Antilhue; used by permission)
Below, an approximately 30 arcmin wide region centered on the cluster
Observatorio Antilhue image of region near globular cluster NGC 362

NGC 363 (= PGC 3911)
Discovered (Nov 28, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth (I-23)
A magnitude 14.7 lenticular galaxy (type S0 pec?) in Cetus (RA 01 06 15.7, Dec -16 32 32)
Per Dreyer, NGC 363 (Leavenworth list I (#23), 1860 RA 00 57 30, NPD 107 18.7) is "extremely faint, extremely small, round". The second Index Catalog lists a corrected 1860 RA (per Howe) of 00 59 20. The corrected position precesses to RA 01 06 14.9, Dec -16 33 40, just over an arcmin south of the galaxy, and there is nothing else nearby so the identification is certain. Apparent size 0.6 by 0.5 arcmin?
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 363
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 363
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 363

NGC 364 (= PGC 3833)
Discovered (Sep 2, 1864) by
Albert Marth (#34)
A magnitude 13.1 lenticular galaxy (type (R)SB0(s)?) in Cetus (RA 01 04 40.8, Dec -00 48 10)
Apparent size 1.4 by 1.2 arcmin?
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 364
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 364
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 359
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 364, also showing NGC 359

NGC 365 (= PGC 3822)
Discovered (Nov 25, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type SB(r)bc pec?) in Sculptor (RA 01 04 18.6, Dec -35 07 20)
Apparent size 1.0 by 0.6 arcmin?
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 365
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 365
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 365

NGC 366 (= OCL 316)
Discovered (Oct 27, 1829) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 10 open cluster (type II3p) in Cassiopeia (RA 01 06 25.9, Dec +62 13 44)
Apparent size 4.0 arcmin?
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 366
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the cluster

NGC 367 (= PGC 3894)
Discovered (1886) by
Frank Muller (list II-299)
A magnitude 14.7 spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Cetus (RA 01 05 48.9, Dec -12 07 42)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.5 arcmin?
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 367
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 367
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 367

NGC 368 (= PGC 3826)
Discovered (Sep 5, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.8 lenticular galaxy (type (R')SAB0/a(rs)?) in Phoenix (RA 01 04 21.9, Dec -43 16 34)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.6 arcmin?
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 368
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 368
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 368

NGC 369 (= PGC 3856)
Discovered (Oct 9, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth (I-24)
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type SAB(r)b?) in Cetus (RA 01 05 08.8, Dec -17 45 33)
Per Dreyer, NGC 369 (Leavenworth list I (#24), 1860 RA 00 58 30, NPD 108 33.7) is "very faint, very small, round, gradually brighter middle". The second Index Catalog lists a corrected 1860 position (per Howe) of RA 00 58 15, NPD 108 30.6. The position precesses to RA 01 05 09.0, Dec -17 45 30, right on the galaxy, so the identification is certain. Apparent size 1.0 by 0.8 arcmin?
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 369
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 369
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 369

NGC 370 (? perhaps =
NGC 372 ?)
Recorded (Oct 7, 1861) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A lost or nonexistent object in Pisces (RA 01 06 34.9, Dec +32 24 44)
Per Dreyer, NGC 370 (GC 197, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 00 58 53, NPD 58 20.3) is "very faint, 13th magnitude star 15" south, diffuse". The position precesses to RA 01 06 34.9, Dec +32 24 44 (whence the position listed above), but there is nothing there. Corwin notes that NGC 372 (which see for an image of the region) is only a little to the northeast, and suggests that NGC 370 may be a duplication of that entry, or the western pair of stars in that triplet; but even he is not convinced by his argument, so barring further developments it seems best to consider NGC 370 as lost or nonexistent.

NGC 371 (in the Small Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Aug 1, 1826) by
James Dunlop (31)
An open cluster and emission nebula in Tucana (RA 01 03 30, Dec -72 03 30)
Apparent size 7.5 arcmin?
Wikisky cutout of region near NGC 371, an open cluster and emission nebula in the Small Magellanic Cloud
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 371
Below, another view of the same region
DSS image of region near NGC 371, an open cluster and emission nebula in the Small Magellanic Cloud

NGC 372 (? perhaps =
NGC 370 ?)
Recorded (Dec 12, 1876) by John Dreyer
Three stars in Pisces (RA 01 06 44.6, Dec +32 25 45)
Per Dreyer, NGC 372 (GC 5146, Dreyer using Lord Rosse's 72-inch telescope, 1860 RA 00 59 02, NPD 58 19.4) is "stellar, much brighter middle, mottled but not resolved into stars". The position precesses to RA 01 06 44.0, Dec +32 25 36, well within the triplet, so the identification seems certain. As noted at NGC 370, that may be a poorly recorded duplicate of NGC 372, or of the southwestern pair of stars in NGC 372; but the argument in favor of that is weak, and there can be no confidence placed in the supposed equivalence.
DSS image of region near the three stars listed as NGC 372, also showing d'Arrest's position for the lost or nonexistent NGC 370
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 372, also showing d'Arrest's position for NGC 370

NGC 373 (= PGC 3946)
Discovered (Dec 12, 1876) by
John Dreyer
A magnitude 14.9 elliptical galaxy (type E0) in Pisces (RA 01 06 58.3, Dec +32 18 32)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.4 arcmin? Although in the same general area as the numerous galaxies included in Arp 331, NGC 373 was not included in the "galaxy chain" by Arp, because it is too far to the west of the line of galaxies.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 373
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 373
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 375, 382, 384 and 385
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 373, also showing NGC 375, NGC 382, NGC 384 and NGC 385

NGC 374 (= PGC 3952)
Discovered (Oct 7, 1861) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 13.5 lenticular galaxy (type (R)S0/a?) in Pisces (RA 01 07 05.8, Dec +32 47 41)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.5 arcmin?.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 374
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 374
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 374

NGC 375 (= PGC 3953,
and with
NGC 379, 380, 382, 383, 384, 385, 386, 387 and 388 = Arp 331)
Discovered (Dec 1, 1874) by Lawrence Parsons, 4th Earl of Rosse
A magnitude 14.5 elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Pisces (RA 01 07 05.8, Dec +32 20 55)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.5 arcmin? Used by the Arp Atlas as part of an example of a chain of galaxies.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 375
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 375
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
Also shown are NGC 373, NGC 382, NGC 383, NGC 384, NGC 385, NGC 386 and NGC 387
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 375, also showing NGC 373, NGC 382, NGC 383, NGC 384, NGC 385, NGC 386 and NGC 387
Below, a 12 by 17.5 arcmin wide region showing the galaxies that comprise Arp 331
SDSS image of NGC 375, NGC 379, NGC 380, NGC 382, NGC 383, NGC 384, NGC 385, NGC 386, NGC 387 and NGC 388, collectively known as galaxy chain Arp 331, and NGC 373, which is not part of the Arp chain

NGC 376 (in the Small Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Sep 2, 1826) by
James Dunlop
A magnitude 10.9 open cluster in Tucana (RA 01 03 53.4, Dec -72 49 26)
Per Dreyer, NGC 376 (GC 200 - JH 2378 = Dunlop 36 ??, 1860 RA 00 59 27, NPD 163 34.4) is a "globular cluster, bright, small, round". The second Index Catalog notes (per Delisle Stewart): "Only a double star, position 270 degrees, distance 10 arsec". The position precesses to RA 01 03 52.7, Dec -72 49 18, right on the cluster, so the identification is certain. Apparent size 1.0 arcmin?
DSS image of NGC 376, an open cluster in the Small Magellanic Cloud
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide view of NGC 376
Above, a 1.2 arcmin wide closeup of the cluster (Image Credits: Hubble Legacy Archive)
HST image of NGC 376, an open cluster in the Small Magellanic Cloud
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the cluster
DSS image of region near NGC 376, an open cluster in the Small Magellanic Cloud

NGC 377 (= PGC 3931)
Discovered (Oct 15, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth
A magnitude 15.1 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Cetus (RA 01 06 35.1, Dec -20 19 53)
Per Dreyer, NGC 377 (Leavenworth list I (#25), 1860 RA 00 59 30, NPD 110 47.7) is "very faint, very small, much extended, suddenly brighter middle and nucleus". The position precesses to RA 01 06 21.4, Dec -20 02 40, but there is nothing there. However, per Corwin, although the object was missed by previous efforts to identify it (implying that it was "lost" for a very long time), a copy of Leavenworth's sketch of the region allows a certain identification of NGC 377 with PGC 3931, a galaxy about 17 arcmin nearly due south of the NGC position. (Note: The ESO catalog misidentifies PGC 3931 as NGC 412; see the linked entry for a discussion of that mistake.) Apparent size 0.8 by 0.2 arcmin?
DSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 3931, now considered to be NGC 377
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 3931, now considered to be NGC 377
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 3931, now considered to be NGC 377

NGC 378 (= PGC 3907)
Discovered (Sep 28, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.1 spiral galaxy (type SB(r)c?) in Sculptor (RA 01 06 12.0, Dec -30 10 41)
Apparent size 1.5 by 1.1 arcmin?
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 378
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 378
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 378

NGC 379 (= PGC 3966,
and with
NGC 375, 380, 382, 383, 384, 385, 386, 387 and 388 = Arp 331)
Discovered (Sep 12, 1784) by William Herschel
A magnitude 12.8 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Pisces (RA 01 07 15.7, Dec +32 31 13)
Apparent size 1.4 by 0.7 arcmin?
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 379
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 379
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 380 and NGC 383
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 379, also showing NGC 380 and NGC 383
Below, a 12 by 17.5 arcmin wide region showing the galaxies that comprise Arp 331
SDSS image of NGC 375, NGC 379, NGC 380, NGC 382, NGC 383, NGC 384, NGC 385, NGC 386, NGC 387 and NGC 388, collectively known as galaxy chain Arp 331, and NGC 373, which is not part of the Arp chain

NGC 380 (= PGC 3969,
and with
NGC 375, 379, 382, 383, 384, 385, 386, 387 and 388 = Arp 331)
Discovered (Sep 12, 1784) by William Herschel
A magnitude 12.5 elliptical galaxy (type E2) in Pisces (RA 01 07 17.6, Dec +32 28 58)
Apparent size 1.4 by 1.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 380
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 380
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 379, 382, 383 and 387
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 380, also showing NGC 379, NGC 382, NGC 383 and NGC 387
Below, a 12 by 17.5 arcmin wide region showing the galaxies that comprise Arp 331
SDSS image of NGC 375, NGC 379, NGC 380, NGC 382, NGC 383, NGC 384, NGC 385, NGC 386, NGC 387 and NGC 388, collectively known as galaxy chain Arp 331, and NGC 373, which is not part of the Arp chain

NGC 381 (= OCL 317)
Discovered (Nov 3, 1787) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 9.3 open cluster (type III2p) in Cassiopeia (RA 01 08 20.0, Dec +61 35 00)
Apparent size 7.0 arcmin?
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 381
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 381

NGC 382 (= PGC 3981,
and with
NGC 375, 379, 380, 383, 384, 385, 386, 387 and 388 = Arp 331)
Discovered (Nov 4, 1850) by Bindon Stoney
A magnitude 13.2 elliptical galaxy (type E0) in Pisces (RA 01 07 23.9, Dec +32 24 12)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.7 arcmin?
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 382, also showing NGC 383
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 382, also showing most of NGC 383
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
Also shown are NGC 373, 375, 380, 383, 385, 386, 387, and 388
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 382, also showing NGC 373, NGC 375, NGC 380, NGC 383, NGC 385, NGC 386, NGC 387 and NGC 388
Below, a 12 by 17.5 arcmin wide region showing the galaxies that comprise Arp 331
SDSS image of NGC 375, NGC 379, NGC 380, NGC 382, NGC 383, NGC 384, NGC 385, NGC 386, NGC 387 and NGC 388, collectively known as galaxy chain Arp 331, and NGC 373, which is not part of the Arp chain

NGC 383 (= PGC 3982,
and with
NGC 375, 379, 380, 382, 384, 385, 386, 387 and 388 = Arp 331)
Discovered (Sep 12, 1784) by William Herschel
A magnitude 12.2 lenticular galaxy (type E/SA0?) in Pisces (RA 01 07 24.9, Dec +32 24 44)
Apparent size 2.0 by 1.7 arcmin?
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 383, also showing NGC 382 and NGC 387
Above, a 4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 383, also showing NGC 387 and 382 (which see for wider views)

NGC 384 (= PGC 3983,
and with
NGC 375, 379, 380, 382, 383, 385, 386, 387 and 388 = Arp 331)
Discovered (Nov 4, 1850) by Bindon Stoney
A magnitude 13.1 lenticular galaxy (type E/SB0?) in Pisces (RA 01 07 25.0, Dec +32 17 34)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.8 arcmin?
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 384
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 384
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 373, 375, 385, 386, 387 and 388
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 384, also showing NGC 373, NGC 375, NGC 385, NGC 386, NGC 387 and NGC 388
Below, a 12 by 17.5 arcmin wide region showing the galaxies that comprise Arp 331
SDSS image of NGC 375, NGC 379, NGC 380, NGC 382, NGC 383, NGC 384, NGC 385, NGC 386, NGC 387 and NGC 388, collectively known as galaxy chain Arp 331, and NGC 373, which is not part of the Arp chain

NGC 385 (= PGC 3984,
and with
NGC 375, 379, 380, 382, 383, 384, 386, 387 and 388 = Arp 331)
Discovered (Nov 4, 1850) by Bindon Stoney
A magnitude 13.0 lenticular galaxy (type E/SA0?) in Pisces (RA 01 07 27.2, Dec +32 19 10)
Apparent size 1.1 by 1.0 arcmin?
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 385
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 385; for wider views, see NGC 384

NGC 386 (= PGC 3989,
and with
NGC 375, 379, 380, 382, 383, 384, 385, 387 and 388 = Arp 331)
Discovered (Nov 4, 1850) by Bindon Stoney
A magnitude 14.3 elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Pisces (RA 01 07 31.2, Dec +32 21 45)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.3 arcmin?
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 386
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 386; for wider views see NGC 382

NGC 387 (= PGC 3987,
and with
NGC 375, 379, 380, 382, 383, 384, 385, 386 and 388 = Arp 331)
Discovered (Dec 10, 1873) by Lawrence Parsons, 4th Earl of Rosse
A magnitude 15.5 elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Pisces (RA 01 07 33.0, Dec +32 23 27)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.4 arcmin? Although not in the current NED list of Arp 331 galaxies, NGC 387 was included in Arp's original paper, so it is included here as well.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 387
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 387; for wider views see NGC 382

NGC 388 (= PGC 4005,
and with
NGC 375, 379, 380, 382, 383, 384, 385, 386 and 387 = Arp 331)
Discovered (Nov 4, 1850) by Bindon Stoney
A magnitude 14.3 elliptical galaxy (type E5?) in Pisces (RA 01 07 47.1, Dec +32 18 38)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.3 arcmin?
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 388
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 388
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
Also shown are NGC 382, 383, 384, 385, 386 and 387
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 388, also showing NGC 382, NGC 383, NGC 384, NGC 385, NGC 386 and NGC 387
Below, a 12 by 17.5 arcmin wide region showing the galaxies that comprise Arp 331
SDSS image of NGC 375, NGC 379, NGC 380, NGC 382, NGC 383, NGC 384, NGC 385, NGC 386, NGC 387 and NGC 388, collectively known as galaxy chain Arp 331, and NGC 373, which is not part of the Arp chain

NGC 389 (= PGC 4054)
Discovered (Sep 6, 1885) by
Lewis Swift (2-12)
A 1magnitude 14.0 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Andromeda (RA 01 08 29.8, Dec +39 41 42)
Apparent size 1.3 by 0.4 arcmin?
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 389
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 389
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 393
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 389, also showing NGC 393

NGC 390
Recorded (Nov 19, 1884) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 14.9 star in Pisces (RA 01 07 53.7, Dec +32 26 01)
Per Dreyer, NGC 390 (Bigourdan (list I #9), 1860 RA 01 00 13, NPD 58 18.5) is "very faint, very small, stellar". The position precesses to RA 01 07 55.6, Dec +32 26 28, but there is nothing there save scattered stars. Bigourdan's description of the object as stellar means that NGC 390 could well be one of those stars, and the simplest assumption would be the nearest and brightest of them, which is only half an arcmin to the southwest of the NGC position, and being a double star might have appeared somewhat nebulous; but in the absence of any further information, no matter how reasonable that might seem, it would be impossible to prove that it is correct. However, per Corwin, if Bigourdan's original measurements are used instead of the NGC position, they point exactly to that star; so the most reasonable assumption is also the most likely to be correct, and the identification seems reasonably certain. However, as is common in such situations, other suggestions have been made, and as a result a galaxy to the east of Bigourdan's position (PGC 4021) is often misidentified as NGC 390. (Note: Although NED lists NGC 390 as the star in question, LEDA identifies the NGC object as a nonexistent spiral galaxy (PGC 3325902) with the same position as the star.)
SDSS image of region near the star listed as NGC 390, also showing NGC 383, NGC 386, NGC 387, and PGC 4021, which is sometimes misidentified as NGC 390
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 390, also showing NGC 383, 386 and 387, and PGC 4021

PGC 4021 (almost certainly not =
NGC 390)
Not an NGC object, but sometimes misidentified as NGC 390
A magnitude 15 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Pisces (RA 01 08 13.0, Dec +32 27 13)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.25 arcmin?
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 4021, which is sometimes misidentified as NGC 390
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 4021
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 390
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 4021, which is sometimes misidentified as NGC 390; also shown is the star actually listed as NGC 390

NGC 391 (= PGC 3976)
Discovered (Jan 8, 1853) by
George Bond (3, HN8)
A magnitude 14.5 lenticular galaxy (type (R')E/SA0?) in Cetus (RA 01 07 22.5, Dec +00 55 33)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin?
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 391
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 391
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 391

NGC 392 (= PGC 4042)
Discovered (Sep 12, 1784) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 12.7 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Pisces (RA 01 08 23.3, Dec +33 08 00)
Apparent size 1.2 by 0.9 arcmin? Probably paired with NGC 394.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 392 and lenticular galaxy NGC 394
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 392 and NGC 394
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair, also showing NGC 397
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 392 and lenticular galaxy NGC 394, also showing NGC 397

NGC 393 (= PGC 4061)
Discovered (Oct 5, 1784) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 12.5 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Andromeda (RA 01 08 36.9, Dec +39 38 38)
Apparent size 1.7 by 1.4 arcmin?
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 393
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 393
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 389
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 393, also showing NGC 389

NGC 394 (= PGC 4049)
Discovered (Oct 26, 1854) by
R. J. Mitchell
A magnitude 13.8 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Pisces (RA 01 08 26.1, Dec +33 08 52)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.3 arcmin? Probably paired with NGC 392 (which see for images).

NGC 395 (in the Small Magellanic Cloud)
Discovered (Aug 1, 1826) by
James Dunlop (34, 35)
An open cluster and emission nebula in Tucana (RA 01 05 07.3, Dec -71 59 39)
Per Dreyer, NGC 394 (GC 216 = JH 2379, 1860 RA 01 00 46, NPD 162 44.6) is "very faint, pretty large, round, gradually little brighter middle". The second Index Catalog adds "Group of about 10 stars, no nebulosity (per Delisle Stewart)". The position precesses to RA 01 05 16.6, Dec -71 59 34, on the eastern edge of the cluster, so the identification is certain. Apparent size 4 arcmin?
Wikisky cutout of NGC 395, an open cluster and emission nebula in the Small Magellanic Cloud
Above, a 7 arcmin wide view of NGC 395
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the cluster, also showing part of NGC 371
DSS image of region near NGC 395, an open cluster and emission nebula in the Small Magellanic Cloud, also showing part of NGC 371

NGC 396 (= PGC 99944)
Discovered (Oct 27, 1864) by
Albert Marth (#35)
A magnitude 15.7 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a pec?) in Pisces (RA 01 08 08.5, Dec +04 31 51)
Per Dreyer, NGC 396 (GC 5150, Marth 35, 1860 RA 01 00 49, NPD 86 13) is "extremely faint, small, a little extended". The position precesses to RA 01 08 03.0, Dec +04 31 57, a few seconds west of a faint galaxy and an equally faint star. Given the description, it seems most likely that the galaxy is the object Marth saw, as per Corwin, Marth could have seen it with the 48" telescope he was using; so the identification seems reasonably certain, and as far as I can tell has been universally accepted. Apparent size 0.4 by 0.3 arcmin? (Note: A Wikisky search for NGC 396 shows the correct object, but without any label showing what it is.)
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 396
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 396
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 396

NGC 397 (= PGC 4051)
Discovered (Dec 6, 1866) by
Robert Ball
A magnitude 14.8 elliptical galaxy (type E?) in Pisces (RA 01 08 31.0, Dec +33 06 35)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.5 arcmin? A possible companion of NGC 392 and 394.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 397
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 397
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 392 and 394
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 397, also showing NGC 392 and NGC 394

NGC 398 (= PGC 4090)
Discovered (Oct 28, 1886) by
Guillaume Bigourdan (I-10)
A magnitude 14.5 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Pisces (RA 01 08 53.6, Dec +32 30 54)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.5 arcmin?
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 398
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 398
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 398

NGC 399 (= PGC 4096)
Discovered (Oct 7, 1874) by
Lawrence Parsons, 4th Earl of Rosse
A magnitude 13.5 lenticular galaxy (type (R)SB0/a?) in Pisces (RA 01 08 59.1, Dec +32 38 01)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin?
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 399
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 399
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 399
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 300 - 349) →     NGC Objects: NGC 350 - 399     → (NGC 400 - 449)