Celestial Atlas
(NGC 4550 - 4599) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 4600 - 4649 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 4650 - 4699)
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Page last updated Jan 29, 2015
WORKING: Check positions/identifications (Corwin+), physical characteristics, add pix/tags

NGC 4600 (= PGC 42447)
Discovered (Apr 30, 1786) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Virgo (RA 12 40 22.9, Dec +03 07 04)
Apparent size 1.2 by 0.8 arcmin? Listed as a member (VCC 1834) of the Virgo Cluster.

NGC 4601 (= PGC 42492)
Discovered (Jun 8, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a?) in Centaurus (RA 12 40 46.6, Dec -40 53 37)
Apparent size 1.7 by 0.5 arcmin?

NGC 4602 (= PGC 42476)
Discovered (Apr 17, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Virgo (RA 12 40 36.8, Dec -05 07 57)
Apparent size 3.4 by 1.2 arcmin?

NGC 4603 (= PGC 42510)
Discovered (Jun 8, 1834) by
John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Centaurus (RA 12 40 55.0, Dec -40 58 34)
Apparent size 3.4 by 2.5 arcmin?

PGC 42369 (= "NGC 4603A")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 4603A due to general proximity to
NGC 4603
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Centaurus (RA 12 39 36.8, Dec -40 44 23)
Apparent size 1.9 by 0.6 arcmin?

PGC 42460 (= "NGC 4603B")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 4603B due to general proximity to
NGC 4603
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Centaurus (RA 12 40 29.6, Dec -41 04 12)
Apparent size 1.4 by 0.3 arcmin?

PGC 42640 (= "NGC 4603C")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 4603C due to general proximity to
NGC 4603
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBcd?) in Centaurus (RA 12 42 07.9, Dec -40 49 15)
Apparent size 1.5 by 1.1 arcmin?

PGC 42486 (= "NGC 4603D")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 4603D due to general proximity to
NGC 4603
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Centaurus (RA 12 40 43.0, Dec -40 45 50)
Apparent size 1.7 by 0.4 arcmin?

NGC 4604 (= PGC 42489)
Discovered (1883) by
Christian Peters
A 14th-magnitude irregular galaxy (type Im?) in Virgo (RA 12 40 44.9, Dec -05 18 10)
Apparent size 1.0 by 0.4 arcmin?

NGC 4605 (= PGC 42408)
Discovered (Mar 19, 1790) by
William Herschel
A 10th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc? pec) in Ursa Major (RA 12 39 59.3, Dec +61 36 30)
Apparent size 5.9 by 2.4 arcmin?

NGC 4606 (= PGC 42516)
Discovered (Mar 15, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Virgo (RA 12 40 57.5, Dec +11 54 43)
Apparent size 3.3 by 1.7 arcmin? Listed as a member (VCC 1859) of the Virgo Cluster.

NGC 4607 (= PGC 42544)
Discovered (Apr 24, 1854) by
R. J. Mitchell
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Virgo (RA 12 41 12.2, Dec +11 53 08)
Apparent size 2.9 by 0.7 arcmin? Listed as a member (VCC 1868) of the Virgo Cluster.

NGC 4608 (= PGC 42545)
Discovered (Mar 15, 1784) by
William Herschel
An 11th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Virgo (RA 12 41 13.2, Dec +10 09 20)
Apparent size 3.3 by 2.9 arcmin? Listed as a member (VCC 1869) of the Virgo Cluster.

NGC 4609 (= OCL 890)
Discovered (May 12, 1826) by
James Dunlop (272)
A 7th-magnitude open cluster (type II1p) in Crux (RA 12 42 19.8, Dec -62 59 38)
Apparent size 6.0 arcmin?

NGC 4610 (=
NGC 4470 = PGC 41189)
Discovered (Jan 23, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 4610)
Discovered (Dec 28, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 4470)
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Scd?) in Virgo (RA 12 29 37.9, Dec +07 49 26)
(This entry will contain only historical information; for anything else see NGC 4470.)

NGC 4611 (=
IC 805 = PGC 42564)
Discovered (May 17, 1881) by Édouard Stephan (and later listed as NGC 4611)
Discovered (Apr 20, 1889) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 805)
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type SABbc?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 41 25.4, Dec +13 43 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4611 (Stephan list XII (#49), 1860 RA 12 34 23, NPD 75 30.1) is "considerably faint, small, a little extended, between 2 very faint stars". The position precesses to RA 12 41 25.5, Dec +13 43 46, right on the galaxy listed above and the description fits, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 6120 km/sec, NGC 4611 is about 285 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 290 to 330 million light years. This is over 200 million light years beyond the Virgo Cluster, so although listed as a member of the cluster (VCC 1878) in the Virgo Cluster Catalog, it is merely in the same direction. Given that and its apparent size of 1.3 by 0.25 arcmin, it is about 110 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4611
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 4611
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4611

NGC 4612 (= PGC 42574)
Discovered (Jan 23, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Virgo (RA 12 41 32.8, Dec +07 18 53)
Apparent size 2.7 by 2.0 arcmin? Listed as a member (VCC 1883) of the Virgo Cluster.

NGC 4613 (= PGC 42570)
Discovered (May 9, 1864) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 41 29.0, Dec +26 05 18)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.5 arcmin?
SDSS image of NGC 4613
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4613; see NGC 4615 for a wide-field view

NGC 4614 (= PGC 42573)
Discovered (May 9, 1864) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 41 31.6, Dec +26 02 35)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.8 arcmin?
SDSS image of NGC 4614
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4614; see NGC 4615 for a wide-field view

NGC 4615 (= PGC 42584 =
Arp 34)
Discovered (May 9, 1864) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Scd?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 41 37.5, Dec +26 04 22)
Used by the Arp Atlas as an example of an S- or integral-sign shaped spiral galaxy. Based on its recessional velocity of 4715 km/sec, NGC 4615 is about 210 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.6 by 0.7 arcmin, it is about 100 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of NGC 4615
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4615
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy; also shown are NGC 4613 and 4614
SDSS image of region near NGC 4615

NGC 4616 (= PGC 42662)
Discovered (Jun 5, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Centaurus (RA 12 42 16.5, Dec -40 38 30)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.9 arcmin?

NGC 4617 (= PGC 42530)
Discovered (Feb 9, 1788) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Canes Venatici (RA 12 41 05.7, Dec +50 23 39)
Apparent size 2.9 by 0.5 arcmin?

NGC 4618 (= PGC 42575 =
IC 3667 = Arp 23)
Discovered (Apr 9, 1787) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 4618)
Discovered (Mar 21, 1903) by Max Wolf (and later listed as IC 3667)
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)m) in Canes Venatici (RA 12 41 33, Dec +41 09 04)
A member of an interacting pair (with NGC 4625, which see for a discussion of the results of that interaction), hence its use as an example of a one-armed spiral galaxy in the Arp Atlas. Its 545 km/sec recessional velocity is too small, in comparison to peculiar (non-Hubble-expansion) velocities, to provide a reliable distance estimate, but is in good agreement with a redshift-independent distance estimate of 25 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 4.2 by 3.4 arcmin, NGC 4625 is about 30 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of NGC 4618, also known as Arp 23
Above, a 4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4618
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near NGC 4618, also known as Arp 23
Below, a 6 arcmin wide GALEX ultraviolet image of the galaxy
GALEX image of NGC 4618
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region showing the relative positions of NGC 4618 and 4625
Wikisky image of region between NGC 4618 and 4625
Below, a more detailed image of the two galaxies (note the faint extended structure around NGC 4625)
(Image Credits: Tom Bash and John Fox/Adam Block/AURA/NSF/NOAO)
NOAO image of NGC 4618, also known as Arp 23, and NGC 4625

NGC 4619 (= PGC 42594)
Discovered (May 1, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb? pec) in Canes Venatici (RA 12 41 44.4, Dec +35 03 46)
Apparent size 1.3 by 1.3 arcmin?

NGC 4620 (= PGC 42619)
Discovered (Mar 29, 1830) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Virgo (RA 12 41 59.3, Dec +12 56 36)
Apparent size 1.8 by 1.5 arcmin? Listed as a member (VCC 1902) of the Virgo Cluster.

NGC 4621 (= PGC 42628 =
M59)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1779) by Johann Koehler
Discovered (Apr 15, 1779) by Charles Messier and recorded as M59
Also observed (Apr 10, 1825) by John Herschel
A magnitude 9.6 elliptical galaxy (type E5?) in Virgo (RA 12 42 02.2, Dec +11 38 50)
Apparent size 5.4 by 3.7 arcmin. Listed as a member (VCC 1903) of the Virgo Cluster of galaxies. Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type E5.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 4621, also known as M59
Above, a 7 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4621
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 4621, also known as M59

NGC 4622 (= PGC 42701)
Discovered (Jun 5, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Centaurus (RA 12 42 37.6, Dec -40 44 38)
Apparent size 1.7 by 1.6 arcmin?

PGC 42852 (= "NGC 4622B")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 4622B due to general proximity to
NGC 4622
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Centaurus (RA 12 43 49.0, Dec -40 42 52)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.5 arcmin?

PGC 42845 (= "NGC 4622A")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 4622A due to general proximity to
NGC 4622
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/SB0?) in Centaurus (RA 12 43 49.0, Dec -40 42 52)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.5 arcmin?

NGC 4623 (= PGC 42647)
Discovered (Apr 13, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a?) in Virgo (RA 12 42 10.6, Dec +07 40 35)
Apparent size 2.2 by 0.7 arcmin? Listed as a member (VCC 1913) of the Virgo Cluster.

NGC 4624 (=
NGC 4664 = NGC 4665 = PGC 42970)
Discovered (Feb 23, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 4664)
Discovered (1786) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 4665)
Discovered (Apr 9, 1828) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 4624)
An 11th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a?) in Virgo (RA 12 45 06.1, Dec +03 03 19)
See NGC 4664 for images

NGC 4625 (=
IC 3675 = PGC 42607)
Discovered (Apr 9, 1787) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 4625)
Discovered (Mar 21, 1903) by Max Wolf (and later listed as IC 3675)
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)m pec) in Canes Venatici (RA 12 41 52.5, Dec +41 16 25)
Until recently, NGC 4625 was thought to be a rather ordinary spiral galaxy; but a few years ago it was discovered that its interaction with NGC 4618 has created extended spiral arms around NGC 4625, so sparsely populated that they are barely noticeable in visible light, but stand out in ultraviolet images due to the intense radiation of their very hot young stars. In the "normal" visible light images below, there is only the faintest hint of the extensive spiral structure which lies beyond what appears to be the entire galaxy, although digitally stretching the visible-light image brightness shows fainter structure at the expense of detail in the brighter regions. GALEX ultraviolet images even more clearly show the extended structure, and adding radio imaging to the mix shows that both galaxies are surrounded by immense clouds of cool hydrogen gas which completely fill the region between and around the pair. (Note: This "invisible" spectacle is not an example of so-called "dark matter", which cannot be seen with any kind of radiation, visible or otherwise.) The 600 km/sec recessional velocity of NGC 4625 is too small, in comparison to peculiar (non-Hubble-expansion) velocities, to provide a reliable distance estimate, but is in good agreement with a redshift-independent distance estimate of 27 to 30 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 1.25 by 1.2 arcmin, the main body of NGC 4625 is only about 10 thousand light years across; but the outer structure is about 6 by 5 arcmin, which corresponds to about 45 thousand light years.
SDSS image of NGC 4625
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4625
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near NGC 4625
Below, a 6 arcmin wide GALEX ultraviolet image of the galaxy
GALEX image of NGC 4625
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region showing the relative positions of NGC 4618 and 4625

Below, a more detailed image of the two galaxies (note the faint extended structure around NGC 4625)
(Image Credits: Tom Bash and John Fox/Adam Block/AURA/NSF/NOAO)
NOAO image of NGC 4618, also known as Arp 23, and NGC 4625
Below, an enhanced version of the above image shows part of the outer structure of NGC 4625
(Image Credits: Tom Bash and John Fox/Adam Block/AURA/NSF/NOAO; digital reprocessing by Courtney Seligman)
NOAO image of NGC 4618 and 4625, digitally stretched to show the extended structure of NGC 4625
Below, a multispectral (and of necessity, false-color) image of NGC 4625 and its companion, NGC 4618, combines radio imaging of cool hydrogen gas (in purple) with a visible light image (in red) and near and far ultraviolet radiation (in green and blue, respectively). (Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech, Carnegie Observatories, WSRT, Planetary Photojournal)
Multispectral image of NGC 4618 and 4625

NGC 4626 (= PGC 42680)
Discovered (Mar 20, 1789) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Virgo (RA 12 42 25.4, Dec -07 02 41)
Apparent size 1.4 by 0.5 arcmin?

NGC 4627 (= PGC 42620, and with
NGC 4631 = Arp 281)
Discovered (Mar 20, 1787) by William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E4 pec) in Canes Venatici (RA 12 41 59.6, Dec +32 34 26)
Per Dreyer, NGC 4627 (= John Herschel's GC 3159, 1860 RA 12 35 11, NPD 56 39.1) is "faint, small, round, northwest of 2" (the other being NGC 4631). The position precesses to RA 12 42 00.9, Dec +32 34 47, about 0.5 arcmin northeast of the center of the galaxy, but well within its outline, and it is northwest of its companion (which see for wide-field images), so the identification is certain. With NGC 4631, used by the Arp Atlas as an example of a galaxy with infall and attraction. Based on a recessional velocity of 540 km/sec, NGC 4627 is about 25 million light years away. For such a small recessional velocity, peculiar (non-Hubble expansion) velocities could be a large part of the motion, leading to a poor result; but as it happens, the calculated distance is in good agreement with a redshift-independent distance estimate of 30 million light years. Given that and the galaxy's apparent size of 2.6 by 1.8 arcmin, NGC 4627 is about 25 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of NGC 4627 and part of NGC 4631
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4627 and part of its much larger companion, NGC 4631


NGC 4628 (= PGC 42681)
Discovered (Mar 20, 1789) by
William Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Virgo (RA 12 42 25.3, Dec -06 58 15)
Apparent size 1.7 by 0.5 arcmin?

NGC 4629 (= PGC 42692)
Discovered (Feb 19, 1863) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sm?) in Virgo (RA 12 42 32.7, Dec -01 21 03)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.8 arcmin?

NGC 4630 (= PGC 42688)
Discovered (Feb 2, 1786) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude irregular galaxy (type IBm?) in Virgo (RA 12 42 31.1, Dec +03 57 31)
Apparent size 1.7 by 1.2 arcmin? Listed as a member (VCC 1923) of the Virgo Cluster.

NGC 4631 (= PGC 42637, and with
NGC 4627 = Arp 281), The Whale Galaxy
Discovered (Mar 20, 1787) by William Herschel
A 9th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(s)d) in Canes Venatici (RA 12 42 07.6, Dec +32 32 30)
Per Dreyer, NGC 4631 (= John Herschel's GC 3165, 1860 RA 12 35 22, NPD 56 40.8) is "remarkable, very bright, very large, extremely extended 70° or so, bright middle nucleus, 12th magnitude star attached on north". The position precesses to RA 12 42 11.9, Dec +32 33 06, a little over 1 arcmin to the northeast of the center of the galaxy, but well within the outline of the "very large" galaxy, which matches Herschel's description in every respect; so the identification is certain. With NGC 4627, used by the Arp Atlas as an example of a galaxy with infall and attraction. Based on a recessional velocity of 605 km/sec, NGC 4631 is about 28 million light years away. Given the small radial velocity, peculiar (non-Hubble expansion) velocities could substantially effect the quality of the result; but as it happens, the distance is in reasonable agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 18 to 24 million light years. Assuming a distance of about 25 million light years, the galaxy's apparent size of 15.5 by 2.7 arcmins corresponds to about 120 thousand light years. The galaxy is a gravitationally bound companion of the dwarf elliptical NGC 4627, which lies just above it, and of NGC 4656, which lies about half a degree to the southeast, and depending upon its distance from us, could be within half a million light years of its neighbor.
SDSS image of NGC 4631 and 4627
Above, an 18 arcmin wide "closeup" of NGC 4631 and its nearby companion, NGC 4627
Below, a "thumbnail" view of a very large HST composite image of NGC 4631
(Image Credit: Hubble Legacy Archive, ESA, NASA, Nikolaus Sulzenauer apod100517)
Thumbnail view of HST image of NGC 4631; click here to view a much larger version
Below, a 45 arcmin wide region between NGC 4631 and NGC 4656
SDSS image of region between NGC 4631 and 4656

NGC 4632 (= PGC 42689)
Discovered (Feb 22, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Virgo (RA 12 42 32.3, Dec -00 04 50)
Apparent size 3.0 by 1.2 arcmin?

NGC 4633 (=
IC 3688 = PGC 42699)
Discovered (Apr 27, 1887) by Edward Swift (6-46) (and later listed as NGC 4633)
Discovered (Nov 23, 1900) by Arnold Schwassmann (and later listed as IC 3688)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBd?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 42 37.1, Dec +14 21 25)
Apparent size 2.0 by 0.9 arcmin? Listed as a member (VCC 1929) of the Virgo Cluster. In the same field of view as NGC 4634.

NGC 4634 (= PGC 42707)
Discovered (Jan 14, 1787) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 42 40.8, Dec +14 17 46)
Apparent size 2.9 by 0.9 arcmin? Listed as a member (VCC 1932) of the Virgo Cluster. In the same field of view as NGC 4633.

NGC 4635 (= PGC 42704)
Discovered (Mar 17, 1831) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBcd?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 42 38.7, Dec +19 56 48)
Apparent size 1.9 by 1.4 arcmin?

NGC 4636 (= PGC 42734)
Discovered (Feb 23, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 10th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Virgo (RA 12 42 49.7, Dec +02 41 14)
Apparent size 5.9 by 4.6 arcmin? Listed as a member (VCC 1939) of the Virgo Cluster.

NGC 4637 (= PGC 42744)
Discovered (Mar 1, 1854) by
R. J. Mitchell
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Virgo (RA 12 42 54.2, Dec +11 26 17)
The second IC adds (per Schwassmann) "considerably bright, small, like a 10th-magnitude star; place agrees." Apparent size 1.2 by 0.5 arcmin? Listed as a member (VCC 1945) of the Virgo Cluster.

NGC 4638 (=
NGC 4667 = PGC 42728)
Discovered (Mar 15, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 4638)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1830) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 4667)
An 11th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Virgo (RA 12 42 47.3, Dec +11 26 33)
Apparent size 2.2 by 1.4 arcmin? Listed as a member (VCC 1938) of the Virgo Cluster.

NGC 4639 (= PGC 42741)
Discovered (Apr 12, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Virgo (RA 12 42 52.3, Dec +13 15 26)
Apparent size 2.9 by 2.0 arcmin? Listed as a member (VCC 1943) of the Virgo Cluster.

NGC 4640 (= PGC 42753)
Discovered (Apr 17, 1887) by
Lewis Swift (6-47)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB??) in Virgo (RA 12 42 57.8, Dec +12 17 12)
Apparent size 1.4 by 0.8 arcmin? Listed as a member (VCC 1949) of the Virgo Cluster.

PGC 214021 (= "NGC 4640B")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 4640B due to its apparent proximity to
NGC 4640
A 16th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Virgo (RA 12 43 01.5, Dec +12 17 08)
Apparent size 0.2 by 0.1 arcmin? Approximately ten times further away than NGC 4640, so merely an optical companion.

NGC 4641 (= PGC 42769)
Discovered (Apr 17, 1887) by
Lewis Swift (6-48)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Virgo (RA 12 43 07.6, Dec +12 03 05)
Apparent size 1.2 by 1.0 arcmin? Listed as a member (VCC 1955) of the Virgo Cluster.

NGC 4642 (= PGC 42791)
Discovered (Jan 1, 1786) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Virgo (RA 12 43 17.6, Dec -00 38 42)
Apparent size 1.9 by 0.5 arcmin?

NGC 4643 (= PGC 42797)
Discovered (Jan 24, 1784) by
William Herschel
An 11th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a?) in Virgo (RA 12 43 20.1, Dec +01 58 41)
Apparent size 3.1 by 2.5 arcmin?

NGC 4644 (= PGC 42708)
Discovered (Apr 14, 1789) by
William Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb? pec) in Ursa Major (RA 12 42 42.6, Dec +55 08 43)
Apparent size 1.6 by 0.5 arcmin?

PGC 42725 (= "NGC 4644B")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 4644B due to its proximity to
NGC 4644
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Ursa Major (RA 12 42 52.8, Dec +55 08 44)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.2 arcmin? At about the same distance as NGC 4644, so probably a physical companion.

NGC 4645 (= PGC 42879)
Discovered (Jun 8, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E4?) in Centaurus (RA 12 44 09.9, Dec -41 44 59)
Apparent size 2.2 by 1.4 arcmin?

PGC 42764 (= "NGC 4645A")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 4645A due to its rough proximity to
NGC 4645
An 11th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Centaurus (RA 12 43 05.6, Dec -41 21 34)
Apparent size 2.8 by 0.8 arcmin?

PGC 42813 (= "NGC 4645B")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 4645B due to its rough proximity to
NGC 4645
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Centaurus (RA 12 43 31.1, Dec -41 21 45)
Apparent size 1.9 by 0.7 arcmin?

NGC 4646 (= PGC 42740)
Discovered (Mar 24, 1791) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Ursa Major (RA 12 42 52.1, Dec +54 51 24)
Apparent size 1.0 by 0.8 arcmin?

NGC 4647 (= PGC 42816, and with
NGC 4649 = Arp 116)
Discovered (Mar 15, 1784) by William Herschel
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Virgo (RA 12 43 32.5, Dec +11 34 58)
Apparent size 2.9 by 2.3 arcmin? Listed as a member (VCC 1972) of the Virgo Cluster. Used by the Arp Atlas as an example of an elliptical galaxy (NGC 4649, which see for images) close to and perturbing a spiral galaxy.

NGC 4648 (= PGC 42595)
Discovered (Nov 22, 1797) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Draco (RA 12 41 44.4, Dec +74 25 20)
Apparent size 1.8 by 1.2 arcmin?

NGC 4649 (=
M60 = PGC 42831, and with NGC 4647 = Arp 116)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1779) by Johann Koehler
Discovered (Apr 12, 1779) by Barnaba Oriani
Observed/recorded (Apr 15, 1779) by Charles Messier as M60
Also observed (Apr 11, 1825) by John Herschel
A magnitude 8.8 elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Virgo (RA 12 43 39.8, Dec +11 33 11)
M60 is a 120 thousand light-year wide elliptical galaxy listed as a member (VCC 1978) of the Virgo Cluster, 60 million light years away. It is a massive galaxy, with thousands of globular clusters in addition to the trillions of stars in the galaxy itself. (Apparent size 7.6 by 6.2 arcmin.) Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type E+2/SA0-. Used by the Arp Atlas as an example of an elliptical galaxy close to and perturbing a spiral galaxy (NGC 4647).
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 4649, also known as M60; also shown is NGC 4647
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 4649; also shown is the more distant NGC 4647
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 4550 - 4599) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 4600 - 4649     → (NGC 4650 - 4699)