Celestial Atlas
(NGC 4650 - 4699) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 4700 - 4749 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 4750 - 4799)
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Page last updated Nov 11, 2017
Checked Corwin positions/ids
Added HST image of nucleus of NGC 4736
Checked Steinicke's updated historical database
WORKING 4706: Adding Dreyer NGC entries
WORKING: Check positions/identification, add physical data, check/add pictures/tags

NGC 4700 (= PGC 43330)
Discovered (Mar 25, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Virgo (RA 12 49 08.1, Dec -11 24 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4700 (= GC 3230 = JH 1438 = JH 3426 = WH III 524, 1860 RA 12 41 50, NPD 100 38.3) is "faint, large, much extended 40°, a very little brighter middle, bright star to west".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.2 by 0.8 arcmin?

NGC 4701 (= PGC 43331)
Discovered (Apr 30, 1786) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Virgo (RA 12 49 11.6, De +03 23 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4701 (= GC 3231 = WH II 578, 1860 RA 12 42 02, NPD 85 50.7) is "faint, small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.8 by 2.1 arcmin?

SEE CORWIN NOTES
NGC 4702 (=
NGC 4692 = PGC 43200)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 4692)
Discovered (Mar 4, 1867) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 4702)
Also observed (date?) by Max Wolf (while listed as NGC 4702)
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 47 55.3, Dec +27 13 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4702 (= GC 5669, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 12 42 03, NPD 62 00.7) is "a cluster, faint, small, very much compressed". The second IC added (per W. (Wolf?) list III) "RA 12 42 11, NPD 62 03.7, pretty faint, small, very irregular figure".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.3 arcmin?

NGC 4703 (= PGC 43342)
Discovered (Mar 3, 1786) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Virgo (RA 12 49 19.0, Dec -09 06 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4703 (= GC 3232 = WH III 514, 1860 RA 12 42 06, NPD 98 21.7) is "extremely faint, considerably small, pretty much extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0 by 0.6 arcmin?

NGC 4704 (= PGC 43288)
Discovered (Apr 9, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc? pec) in Canes Venatici (RA 12 48 46.4, Dec +41 55 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4704 (= GC 3233 = JH 1439 = WH II 662, 1860 RA 12 42 09, NPD 47 18.7) is "considerably faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.9 arcmin?

NGC 4705 (= PGC 43350 =
IC 3807??)
Discovered (Feb 22, 1787) by William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Virgo (RA 12 49 25.0, Dec -05 11 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4705 (= GC 3238 = JH 1440 = WH III 610, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 12 42 12, NPD 94 26.1) is "considerably faint, pretty large, a little extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.1 by 1.0 arcmin?

WORKING HERE: Adding Dreyer NGC entries

NGC 4706 (= PGC 43411)
Discovered (Jun 5, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Centaurus (RA 12 49 54.2, Dec -41 16 46)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.5 arcmin?
Corwin notes an apparent companion (PGC 43412) at RA 12 49 56.3, Dec -41 15 36

SEE CORWIN NOTES
NGC 4707 (= PGC 43255)
Discovered (Apr 26, 1789) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sm?) in Canes Venatici (RA 12 48 23.2, Dec +51 09 48)
Corwin also lists "N4707 gal" at RA 12 48 23.0, Dec +51 09 58
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.2 by 2.1 arcmin?

NGC 4708 (= PGC 43382)
Discovered (Mar 11, 1788) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Virgo (RA 12 49 41.5, Dec -11 05 35)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.9 arcmin?
Corwin lists an apparent companion (PGC 970118) at RA 12 49 39.7, Dec -11 05 21

NGC 4709 (= PGC 43423)
Discovered (May 7, 1826) by
James Dunlop (511)
An 11th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Centaurus (RA 12 50 03.9, Dec -41 22 55)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.3 by 2.0 arcmin?
Corwin lists an apparent companion (PGC 43427) at RA 12 50 07.8, Dec -41 23 51

NGC 4710 (= PGC 43375)
Discovered (Mar 21, 1784) by
William Herschel
An 11th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 49 38.8, Dec +15 09 56)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.9 by 1.2 arcmin?

SEE CORWIN NOTES
NGC 4711 (=
IC 3804 = PGC 43286)
Discovered (May 1, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 4711)
Also observed (Mar 21, 1903) by Max Wolf (and later listed as IC 3804)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb) in Canes Venatici (RA 12 48 45.9, Dec +35 19 58)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.8 arcmin?
SDSS image of NGC 4711
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4711
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of NGC 4711

NGC 4712 (= PGC 43368)
Discovered (Mar 28, 1832) by
John Herschel
Discovered (Sep 3, 1850) by George Stoney
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 49 34.2, Dec +25 28 12)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.3 by 0.9 arcmin?

NGC 4713 (= PGC 43413)
Discovered (Apr 17, 1786) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBcd?) in Virgo (RA 12 49 57.9, Dec +05 18 41)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.9 by 1.8 arcmin?

SEE CORWIN NOTES
NGC 4714 (= PGC 43442)
Discovered (Mar 27, 1786) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Corvus (RA 12 50 19.2, Dec -13 19 28)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.2 arcmin?

NGC 4715 (= PGC 43399)
Discovered (May 10, 1863) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 49 57.9, Dec +27 49 21)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.1 arcmin?

NGC 4716 (= PGC 43464)
Discovered (Apr 12, 1882) by
Wilhelm Tempel (V-19)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0^0 pec) in Virgo (RA 12 50 33.1, Dec -09 27 04)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 4475 km/sec, NGC 4716 is about 210 million light years away. It is thought to be in a triple system with NGC 4717 and PGC 43465, in which case they would share a common distance between 210 and 220 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.0 by 0.7 arcmin, NGC 4716 is about 60 thousand light years across.
Wikisky image of NGC 4716 and 4717
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4716 and 4717
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair, also showing PGC 43465
Wikisky image of region near NGC 4716 and 4717

NGC 4717 (= PGC 43467)
Discovered (Apr 12, 1882) by
Wilhelm Tempel (V-19)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)a pec) in Virgo (RA 12 50 34.4, Dec -09 27 47)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 4675 km/sec, NGC 4717 is about 220 million light years away. It is thought to be in a triple system with NGC 4716 and PGC 43465, in which case they would share a common distance between 210 and 220 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.4 by 0.5 arcmin, NGC 4717 is about 85 thousand light years across. See NGC 4716 for images.

PGC 43465
Listed here because part of a triple system with
NGC 4716 and 4717
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sd pec edge-on) in Virgo (RA 12 50 34.7, Dec -09 31 12)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 4695 km/sec, PGC 43465 is about 220 million light years away. It is thought to be in a triple system with NGC 4716 and NGC 4717, in which case they would share a common distance between 210 and 220 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.2 by 0.4 arcmin, PGC 43465 is about 75 thousand light years across.
Wikisky image of PGC 43465
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 43465 and a foreground star; see NGC 4716 for a wide-field view

SEE CORWIN NOTES
NGC 4718 (= PGC 43463 =
IC 825??)
Discovered (Feb 19, 1830) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Virgo (RA 12 50 32.6, Dec -05 16 55)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 0.6 arcmin?

NGC 4719 (= PGC 43428)
Discovered (May 3, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Canes Venatici (RA 12 50 08.7, Dec +33 09 33)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.1 arcmin?

NGC 4720 (= PGC 43478)
Discovered (Feb 22, 1787) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Virgo (RA 12 50 42.8, Dec -04 09 21)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.5 arcmin?

NGC 4721 (= PGC 43437)
Discovered (Apr 24, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 50 19.9, Dec +27 19 26)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.3 arcmin?

SEE CORWIN NOTES
NGC 4722 (?? =
IC 3833 = PGC 43560)
Discovered (1882) by Wilhelm Tempel (V) (and later listed as NGC 4722)
Discovered (Apr 15, 1895) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 3833)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a) in Corvus (RA 12 51 32.4, Dec -13 19 48)
Historical Identification: The second IC notes for NGC 4722-23, "Howe has only one, RA 12 44 14, NPD 102 34.0, with an 11.5 magnitude star 4 seconds east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 0.7 arcmin?
Corwin lists another (very uncertain) candidate (PGC 43501) for NGC 4722 at RA 12 50 56.7, Dec -13 27 24

SEE CORWIN NOTES
NGC 4723 (= PGC 43508??)
Discovered (1882) by
Wilhelm Tempel (V)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sm?) in Corvus (RA 12 51 03.0, Dec -13 14 12)
Corwin lists this as a very uncertain candidate, and also suggests that it might = NGC 4748 at RA 12 52 12.7, Dec -13 24 46
Historical Identification: The second IC notes for NGC 4722-23, "Howe has only one, RA 12 44 14, NPD 102 34.0, with an 11.5 magnitude star 4 seconds east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.7 arcmin?
Along with his suggestion that NGC 4723 may = NGC 4748, Corwin lists various "companions" of that galaxy

SEE CORWIN NOTES
NGC 4724 (= PGC 43494)
Discovered (Feb 8, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Corvus (RA 12 50 53.6, Dec -14 19 55)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.6 arcmin?

NGC 4725 (= PGC 43451)
Discovered (Apr 6, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 9th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBab? pec) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 50 26.6, Dec +25 30 03)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 10.7 by 7.6 arcmin?
image of spiral galaxy NGC 4725
Above, a 12 arcmin wide "closeup" of NGC 4725

SEE CORWIN NOTES
NGC 4726 (= PGC 926789)
Discovered (1882) by
Wilhelm Tempel (V)
A magnitude 15(?) spiral galaxy (type S??) in Corvus (RA 12 50 46.1, Dec -14 16 07)
Historical Identification: The second IC lists a corrected position of RA 12 44 12, NPD 103 27.5 (no reference given). Also, a note (per Howe and Swift) states that 4740 = 4726. (Perhaps that was a typographical error for 4740 = 4727?)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.25 arcmin?

SEE CORWIN NOTES
NGC 4727 (=
NGC 4740? = PGC 43499)
Discovered (Feb 8, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 4727)
Discovered (Apr 27, 1887) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 4740)
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc) in Corvus (RA 12 50 57.2, Dec -14 19 59)
Historical Identification: The second IC states (per Howe and Swift) that 4740 = 4726. (Perhaps that was a typographical error for 4740 = 4727?)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.2 arcmin?
Presuming the duplicate entry, Corwin lists a companion (PGC 925924 = 2MASXJ12510128-1420038) at RA 12 51 01.3, Dec -14 20 04
and another (6dFGS gJ125057.4-142020, Vr 7525 km/sec) at RA 12 50 57.4, Dec -14 20 21

NGC 4728 (= PGC 43455)
Discovered (Mar 3, 1867) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 50 28.1, Dec +27 26 06)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.7 arcmin?

PGC 43462 (= "NGC 4728B")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 4728B
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in
Coma Berenices (RA 12 50 37.5, Dec +27 25 29)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.4 arcmin?

PGC 214033 (= "NGC 4728C")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 4728C
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S??) in
Coma Berenices (RA 12 50 37.0, Dec +27 28 59)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.3 arcmin?

SEE CORWIN NOTES
NGC 4729 (= PGC 43591)
Discovered (Jun 8, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Centaurus (RA 12 51 46.3, Dec -41 07 56)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.6 arcmin?

SEE CORWIN NOTES
NGC 4730 (= PGC 43611)
Discovered (Jun 8, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Centaurus (RA 12 52 00.5, Dec -41 08 49)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 1.0 arcmin?

NGC 4731 (= PGC 43507 = PGC 1033347)
Discovered (Apr 25, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(s)cd) in Virgo (RA 12 51 01.2, Dec -06 23 35)
Historical Identification: The first IC adds "William Herschel in 1784 described it as 'a little brighter middle', not 'suddenly brighter middle', as in the GC. There has apparently not been any change; it is diffused, without condensation. The RA in NGC (per John Herschel) is correct (Armagh, 2 observations)".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 1490 km/sec, NGC 4731 is about 70 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance measurements of 45 to 85 million light years in diameter. This probably makes it a member of the Virgo Cluster of galaxies, even though it is not listed in the Virgo Cluster Catalog. Given its probable distance and its apparent size of 6.6 by 3.2 arcmins, the galaxy is about 125 thousand light years across. The distortion of NGC 4731's spiral arms is believed to be due to gravitational interaction with giant elliptical galaxy NGC 4697, shown in the widest-field image below.
Wikisky image of NGC 4731
Above, an 8 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4731
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
Wikisky image of region near NGC 4731
Below, a 1 degree wide region centered between NGC 4731 and NGC 4697
Wikisky image of region between NGC 4731 and NGC 4697
(The view above is centered at RA 12 49 50, Dec -06 04 45)

PGC 43526 (= "NGC 4731A")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 4731A
A 13th-magnitude irregular galaxy (type Irr?) in
Virgo (RA 12 51 13.3, Dec -06 33 33)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.1 arcmin?

SEE CORWIN NOTES
NGC 4732 (= PGC 43430)
Discovered (Apr 26, 1789) by
William Herschel
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E5?) in Ursa Major (RA 12 50 07.1, Dec +52 51 00)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.6 arcmin?

NGC 4733 (= PGC 43516)
Discovered (Mar 15, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Virgo (RA 12 51 06.8, Dec +10 54 44)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.2 by 2.2 arcmin? Listed as a member (VCC 2087) of the Virgo Cluster.

NGC 4734 (= PGC 43525)
Discovered (Apr 7, 1828) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Virgo (RA 12 51 12.9, Dec +04 51 32)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.8 arcmin?

NGC 4735 (= PGC 43509)
Discovered (May 9, 1885) by
Guillaume Bigourdan (II-56)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 51 01.7, Dec +28 55 41)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.3 arcmin?

SEE CORWIN NOTES
NGC 4736 (=
M94 = PGC 43495)
Discovered (Mar 22, 1781) by Pierre Méchain
Observed/recorded (Mar 24, 1781) by Charles Messier as M94
Also observed (Apr 28, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 8.2 spiral galaxy (type (R)SA(r)ab?) in Canes Venatici (RA 12 50 53.1, Dec +41 07 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4736 (= GC 3258 = JH 1456, Méchain, M94, 1860 RA 12 44 17, NPD 48 07.0) is "very bright, large, irregularly round, very suddenly very much bright middle and bright nucleus, mottled but not resolved". The position precesses to RA 12 50 53.2, Dec +41 07 14, essentially dead center on the galaxy listed above and the description fits, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: The 310 km/sec recessional velocity of M94 is too small in comparison to peculiar (non-Hubble expansion) velocities to provide a reliable distance indicator, but as it happens, does suggest a distance in line with redshift-independent distance estimates of 14 to 21 million light years. Using the most commonly accepted distance of 15 million light years, the galaxy's 11 by 9 arcmin wide central region corresponds to about 50 thousand light years, but the outer ring, which covers the best part of 18 arcmin, extends another 30 thousand light years or so. Recent infrared and ultraviolet studies show that the outer ring is only the most visible portion of a complex system of spiral arms, presumably caused by self-induced gravitational instabilities (M94 appears to be a "field" galaxy, with no nearby galaxies which could provide a signficant gravitational interaction). The core of the galaxy contains a 7000 light year wide ring of exceptionally hot, bright young stars which must have formed in a "starburst" less than 10 million years ago. Because of the intense radiation of this central ring, M94 is classified as a Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 2).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4736, also known as M94
Above, a slightly "digitally stretched" image of a half-degree wide region centered on M94
Below, a 16 arcmin wide SDSS image of M94
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4736, also known as M94
Below, a digitally stretched version of the image above shows the outer regions in more detail
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4736, also known as M94
Below, an NOAO image of the central portion of M94 (Image Credit Adam Block, AURA, NSF, NOAO)
NOAO image of spiral galaxy NGC 4736, also known as M94
Below, a detail of the image above (Image Credit as above)
NOAO image of the core of spiral galaxy NGC 4736, also known as M94
Below, a multispectral composite of infrared and ultraviolet images of M94. Red, blue and green are used to represent various infrared wavelengths, and purple is used for ultraviolet radiation. The yellow circle near the center represents a combination of ultraviolet radiation from hot young stars and infrared radiation from clouds of gas and dust near the stars. (Image Credit Spitzer Legacy Program, GALEX Nearby Galaxy Survey & R. Jay GaBany, Cosmotography
Composite Spitzer and GALEX image of spiral galaxy NGC 4736, also known as M94
Below, a 1.8 by 2 arcmin wide HST image of the central ring (Image Credit ESA/Hubble & NASA)
HST image of the central ring of NGC 4736, also known as M94

NGC 4737 (= PGC 43490)
Discovered (Jan 2, 1786) by
William Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Canes Venatici (RA 12 50 52.9, Dec +34 09 25)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.6 arcmin?

NGC 4738 (= PGC 43517)
Discovered (Mar 1, 1851) by
Bindon Stoney
Also observed (Mar 9, 1885) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 51 08.9, Dec +28 47 17)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 0.3 arcmin?

NGC 4739 (= PGC 43571)
Discovered (Mar 3, 1786) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Virgo (RA 12 51 37.1, Dec -08 24 37)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.2 arcmin?

SEE CORWIN NOTES
NGC 4740 (=
NGC 4727? = PGC 43499)
Discovered (Feb 8, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 4727)
Discovered (Apr 27, 1887) by Lewis Swift (6-49) (and later listed as NGC 4740)
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Corvus (RA 12 50 57.2, Dec -14 19 59)
Historical Identification: The second IC states (per Howe and Swift) that 4740 = 4726. (Perhaps that was a typographical error for 4740 = 4727?)
Physical Information:
Presuming NGC 4740 = NGC 4727, Corwin lists the apparent companions noted there

NGC 4741 (= PGC 43504)
Discovered (Mar 9, 1788) by
William Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Canes Venatici (RA 12 50 59.5, Dec +47 40 18)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.7 arcmin?
Corwin lists an apparent companion (PGC 2302717) at RA 12 51 00.0, Dec +47 41 44

NGC 4742 (= PGC 43594)
Discovered (Mar 25, 1786) by
William Herschel
An 11th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E4?) in Virgo (RA 12 51 48.0, Dec -10 27 17)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.6 by 1.5 arcmin?

SEE CORWIN NOTES
NGC 4743 (= PGC 43653)
Discovered (Jun 8, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Centaurus (RA 12 52 16.0, Dec -41 23 26)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.5 arcmin?

SEE CORWIN NOTES
NGC 4744 (= PGC 43661)
Discovered (Jun 8, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a?) in Centaurus (RA 12 52 19.6, Dec -41 03 36)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 1.0 arcmin?

NGC 4745 (= PGC 43539)
Discovered (Apr 24, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 51 26.2, Dec +27 25 16)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.8 arcmin?

PGC 43529 (= "NGC 4745B")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 4745B
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in
Coma Berenices (RA 12 51 22.0, Dec +27 26 38)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.2 arcmin?

NGC 4746 (= PGC 43601)
Discovered (Mar 29, 1830) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Virgo (RA 12 51 55.3, Dec +12 04 58)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 0.6 arcmin?

SEE CORWIN NOTES
NGC 4747 (= PGC 43586 =
Arp 159)
Discovered (Apr 6, 1785) by William Herschel
Also observed (Feb 26, 1851) by Bindon Stoney
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBcd?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 51 45.6, Dec +25 46 31)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.3 by 1.3 arcmin? Used by the Arp Atlas as an example of a disturbed galaxy with interior absorption.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4747, also known as Arp 159
Above, a 4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4747

SEE CORWIN NOTES
NGC 4748 (= PGC 43643 + PGC 3797560)
Discovered (Mar 27, 1786) by
William Herschel
Corwin suggests this may be a duplicate of NGC 4723
A pair of galaxies in Corvus (RA 12 52 12.7, Dec -13 24 46)
PGC 43643 = magnitude 14(?) spiral galaxy (type Sa?) at RA 12 52 12.5, Dec -13 24 53
PGC 3797560 (= 2MASX J12521292-1324388) at RA 12 52 12.9, Dec -13 24 39
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.7 arcmin?

NGC 4749 (= PGC 43527)
Discovered (Apr 7, 1793) by
William Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Draco (RA 12 51 12.3, Dec +71 38 06)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: 1.7 by 0.3 arcmin apparent size?
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4749
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4749
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4749
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 4650 - 4699) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 4700 - 4749     → (NGC 4750 - 4799)