Celestial Atlas
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Page last updated Apr 9, 2017
Added discovery data for NGC 4831
WORKING: Check positions/identification (Corwin+), add physical data, check/add pictures/tags

NGC 4800 (= PGC 43931)
Discovered (Apr 1, 1788) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Canes Venatici (RA 12 54 37.8, Dec +46 31 53)
Apparent size 1.6 by 1.2 arcmin?
SDSS image of NGC 4800
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4800

NGC 4801 (= PGC 43946)
Discovered (Apr 26, 1789) by
William Herschel
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Ursa Major (RA 12 54 37.6, Dec +53 05 26)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin?

NGC 4802 (=
NGC 4804 = PGC 44087)
Discovered (Mar 27, 1786) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 4804)
Discovered (Apr 20, 1882) by Wilhelm Tempel (V-21) (and later listed as NGC 4802)
An 11th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Corvus (RA 12 55 49.6, Dec -12 03 17)
The second IC adds "Not found by Howe (one night). The description agrees with that of 4804, exactly 1 degree south. Tempel says it is 8 seconds following Lamont 1234 (10th magnitude), but this identification may be wrong". Apparent size 2.4 by 1.6 arcmin?

NGC 4803 (= PGC 44061)
Discovered (Mar 25, 1865) by
Albert Marth (245)
A 14th-magnitude compact galaxy (type C?) in Virgo (RA 12 55 33.7, Dec +08 14 24)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.3 arcmin?

NGC 4804 (=
NGC 4802 = PGC 44087)
Discovered (Mar 27, 1786) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 4804)
Discovered (Apr 20, 1882) by Wilhelm Tempel (and later listed as NGC 4802)
An 11th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Corvus (RA 12 55 49.6, Dec -12 03 17)
(This entry will contain primarily historical information; for anything else see NGC 4802.)

NGC 4805
Recorded (May 11, 1885) by
Guillaume Bigourdan (II-59)
A 15th-magnitude star in Coma Berenices (RA 12 55 24.3, Dec +27 58 49)

NGC 4806 (= PGC 44116)
Discovered (Mar 30, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Hydra (RA 12 56 12.4, Dec -29 30 10)
Apparent size 1.2 by 1.0 arcmin?

NGC 4807 (= PGC 44037)
Discovered (Apr 23, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 14th-magnitiude lenticular galaxy (type E/SB0?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 55 29.3, Dec +27 31 16)
Apparent size 1.0 by 0.8 arcmin?

PGC 214040 (= "NGC 4807A")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 4807A due to its promixity to
NGC 4807
A 15th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E5?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 55 30.8, Dec +27 32 38)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.2 arcmin?

NGC 4808 (= PGC 44086)
Discovered (Apr 17, 1786) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Virgo (RA 12 55 48.9, Dec +04 18 13)
Apparent size 2.8 by 1.1 arcmin?

NGC 4809 (= PGC 43969, and with
NGC 4810 = Arp 277)
Discovered (Apr 18, 1855) by R. J. Mitchell
A 14th-magnitude irregular galaxy (type Im? pec) in Virgo (RA 12 54 50.9, Dec +02 39 10)
Apparent size 1.7 by 0.7 arcmin? With NGC 4810, used by the Arp Atlas as an example of interacting galaxies.

NGC 4810 (= PGC 43971, and with
NGC 4809 = Arp 277)
Discovered (Apr 18, 1855) by R. J. Mitchell
A 14th-magnitude irregular galaxy (type Im? pec) in Virgo (RA 12 54 51.2, Dec +02 38 27)
Apparent size 1.3 by 0.5 arcmin? With NGC 4809, used by the Arp Atlas as an example of interacting galaxies.

NGC 4811 (= PGC 44201)
Discovered (Jun 8, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a?) in Centaurus (RA 12 56 52.3, Dec -41 47 51)
Apparent size 1.3 by 0.9 arcmin? An apparent companion of NGC 4812.

NGC 4812 (= PGC 44204)
Discovered (Jun 8, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Centaurus (RA 12 56 52.6, Dec -41 48 49)
Apparent size 1.2 by 0.4 arcmin? An apparent companion of NGC 4811.

NGC 4813 (= PGC 44160)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1789) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Virgo (RA 12 56 36.0, Dec -06 49 05)
Apparent size 1.3 by 0.5 arcmin?

NGC 4814 (= PGC 44025)
Discovered (Mar 17, 1790) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb? pec) in Ursa Major (RA 12 55 21.8, Dec +58 20 40)
Apparent size 3.3 by 2.4 arcmin?

NGC 4815 (= OCL 893)
Discovered (Mar 13, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 9th-magnitude open cluster (type I3m) in Musca (RA 12 57 58.3, Dec -64 57 42)
The second IC adds "According to Innes (7-inch refractor), a nebula involving, but to the south of two stars". Apparent size 5.0 arcmin?

NGC 4816 (= PGC 44114)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 56 12.3, Dec +27 44 43)
Apparent size 1.3 by 1.1 arcmin?

NGC 4817 (= PGC 83663)
Discovered (May 11, 1885) by
Guillaume Bigourdan (II-60)
A 15th-magnitude compact galaxy (type C?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 56 29.6, Dec +27 56 25)
The second IC adds "Not on Heidelberg plate (W. (Wolf?) list III)". Apparent size 0.5 by 0.5 arcmin?

NGC 4818 (= PGC 44191)
Discovered (Mar 3, 1786) by
William Herschel
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBab?) in Virgo (RA 12 56 48.9, Dec -08 31 30)
Apparent size 4.3 by 1.5 arcmin?

NGC 4819 (= PGC 44144)
Discovered (Apr 6, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 56 28.0, Dec +26 59 13)
Apparent size 1.2 by 0.8 arcmin?

NGC 4820 (= PGC 44227)
Discovered (1882) by
Wilhelm Tempel (V)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Virgo (RA 12 57 00.5, Dec -13 43 08)
Apparent size 1.0 by 0.2 arcmin?

NGC 4821 (= PGC 44148)
Discovered (Apr 6, 1864) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 15th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E4?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 56 29.3, Dec +26 57 25)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.3 arcmin?

NGC 4822 (= PGC 44236)
Discovered (Apr 21, 1882) by
Wilhelm Tempel (V-22)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Virgo (RA 12 57 03.6, Dec -10 45 44)
Apparent size 1.2 by 0.7 arcmin?

NGC 4823 (= PGC 44305)
Discovered (1882) by
Wilhelm Tempel (V)
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Virgo (RA 12 57 25.6, Dec -13 41 54)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.2 arcmin?

NGC 4824
Recorded (Apr 19, 1885) by
Guillaume Bigourdan (II-61)
A 15th-magnitude star in Coma Berenices (RA 12 56 36.2, Dec +27 26 01)

NGC 4825 (= PGC 44261)
Discovered (Mar 27, 1786) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Virgo (RA 12 57 12.2, Dec -13 39 52)
Apparent size 2.0 by 1.1 arcmin?

NGC 4826 (=
M64 = PGC 44182), the Black Eye Galaxy
Discovered (Mar 23, 1779) by Edward Pigott
Discovered (Apr 4, 1779) by Johann Bode
Discovered (Mar 1, 1780) by Charles Messier, and listed as M64
Also observed (Mar 26, 1830) by John Herschel
A magnitude 8.5 spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 56 43.8, Dec +21 40 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4826 (= GC 3321 = JH 1486, M64, 1860 RA 12 49 51, NPD 67 33.5) is a "remarkable object, very bright, very large, very much extended 120, brighter middle suddenly bright nucleus". The position precesses to RA 12 56 43.8, Dec +21 40 59, dead center on the galaxy listed above and the description fits, so the identification is certain.
Discovery Notes: Bode's observation was published in 1779 and Messier's in 1780, but Pigott's observation was not published until read at the Royal Society in London on Jan 11, 1781; as a result of its late report it was essentially ignored for centuries and only brought to modern notice by Bryn Jones in April 2002.
Physical Information: Apparent size 10.0 by 5.4 arcmin? Recent studies of this galaxy show that although the stars and gas in its central structure are moving in the direction expected from its spiral appearance (clockwise, in the views shown below), the gas in its outer regions is moving in the opposite direction. This is probably the result of a collision and subsequent merger with a smaller galaxy, a billion or so years ago; but whatever the reason, collisions of clouds of gas and dust within the boundary between the two regions have led to a chaotic burst of star formation, giving the core of the galaxy an unusually dramatic appearance.
SDSS image of NGC 4826, the Black Eye Galaxy, also known as M64
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image of M64 with North at the top
Below, a similar view with a shorter exposure shows more detail in the central regions
(Image Credit Anne Beiter and Jon Shallop/Adam Block/NOAO/AURA/NSF)
NOAO image of NGC 4826, the Black Eye Galaxy, also known as M64
Below, a closeup of the image above shows still more detail
NOAO detail of the central portion of NGC 4826, the Black Eye Galaxy, also known as M64
Below, a HST image shows the central core of M64 in even greater detail
(Image Credit Hubble Heritage Team (AURA/STScI), S. Smartt (IoA) & D. Richstone (U. Michigan) et al., NASA)
HST image of NGC 4826, the Black Eye Galaxy, also known as M64

NGC 4827 (= PGC 44178)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 56 43.7, Dec +27 10 43)
Apparent size 1.4 by 1.2 arcmin?

NGC 4828 (= PGC 44176)
Discovered (Apr 22, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 56 42.8, Dec +28 01 15)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.7 arcmin?

NGC 4829 (= PGC 44299)
Discovered (1882) by
Wilhelm Tempel (V)
A 15th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Virgo (RA 12 57 24.5, Dec -13 44 14)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.3 arcmin?

NGC 4830 (= PGC 44313)
Discovered (May 26, 1880) by
Wilhelm Tempel (IV-9, V-23)
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/SB0?) in Virgo (RA 12 57 27.9, Dec -19 41 28)
Apparent size 2.2 by 1.4 arcmin?

NGC 4831 (= PGC 44340)
Discovered (Apr 9, 1793) by
William Herschel
Discovered (Mar 22, 1836) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/SB0?) in Hydra (RA 12 57 36.6, Dec -27 17 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4831 (= GC 3322 = JH 3447, (W. Herschel), 1860 RA 12 50 06, NPD 116 32.2) is "faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle".
Discovery Notes: William Herschel observed this object with his 40-foot telescope, but never published the observation, so it does not appear in the GC or NGC. Wolfgang Steinicke found the observation while analyzing the elder Herschel's 40-foot sweep data (hence its being in parentheses in the NGC entry shown here).
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 0.9 arcmin?

NGC 4832 (= PGC 44361)
Discovered (Jun 5, 1834) by
John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Centaurus (RA 12 57 47.4, Dec -39 45 43)
Apparent size 1.8 by 1.2 arcmin?

NGC 4833 (= GCL 21)
Discovered (1751) by
Nicolas Lacaille
Also observed (date?) by James Dunlop
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
An 8th-magnitude globular cluster (type VIII) in Musca (RA 12 59 35.0, Dec -70 52 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4833 (= GC 3325 = JH 3444, Lacaille list I #4, Dunlop 164, 1860 RA 12 50 08, NPD 160 06.9) is "a globular cluster, bright, large, round, gradually, then very suddenly brighter middle, stars of 12th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 14.0 arcmin? Distance about 22,000 light years (per Hubble site).
DSS image of region near globular cluster NGC 21
Above, a 12 arcmin wide image centered on NGC 4833
(Image Credit & © Daniel Verschatse, Observatorio Antilhue, Chile; used by permission)
Below, a ? arcmin wide HST image of part of the cluster (Image Credit ESA/Hubble/NASA)
(Orientation may not be quite right; to be fixed in next iteration of this page)
HST image of part of globular cluster NGC 21

NGC 4834 (= PGC 44136)
Discovered (Apr 26, 1789) by
William Herschel
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Canes Venatici (RA 12 56 25.1, Dec +52 17 45)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.3 arcmin?

NGC 4835 (= PGC 44409)
Discovered (Jun 3, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Centaurus (RA 12 58 07.7, Dec -46 15 54)
Apparent size 4.0 by 0.9 arcmin?

PGC 44271 (= "NGC 4835A")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 4835A due to general proximity to
NGC 4835
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Centaurus (RA 12 57 13.0, Dec -46 22 38)
Apparent size 2.5 by 0.4 arcmin?

NGC 4836 (= PGC 44328)
Discovered (Apr 19, 1882) by
Wilhelm Tempel (V-24)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy in Virgo (RA 12 57 34.2, Dec -12 44 37)
Apparent size 1.4 by 1.1 arcmin?

NGC 4837 (= PGC 44188 + PGC 44198)
Discovered (Mar 7, 1831) by
John Herschel
A pair of galaxies in Canes Venatici
PGC 44188 = A 13th-magnitude peculiar galaxy (type pec?) at RA 12 56 47.8, Dec +48 17 46)
PGC 44198 = A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sd?) at RA 12 56 49.8, Dec +48 18 00
Apparent size of PGC 44188 is 1.1 by 0.5 arcmin? of PGC 44198 is 1.0 by 0.4 arcmin?

NGC 4838 (= PGC 44383)
Discovered (May 9, 1831) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Virgo (RA 12 57 56.1, Dec -13 03 37)
Apparent size 1.6 by 1.4 arcmin?

NGC 4839 (= PGC 44298)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E5?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 57 24.4, Dec +27 29 51)
(NED notes that at least one source misidentifies NGC 4839 as PGC 83677, hence its entry directly below)
Apparent size 4.0 by 1.9 arcmin?

PGC 83677 (= PGC 1807135, but not =
NGC 4839)
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes misidentified as NGC 4839
A magnitude 15.5(?) lenticular galaxy (type (R)S0/a?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 57 10.8, Dec +27 24 18)
Historical Misidentification: There should be no question about the identity of NGC 4839, but it is not uncommon for galaxies to be misidentified in one place or another, and as noted in the entry for NGC 4839, it has been misidentified as PGC 83677, hence my placing this entry here, instead of on its appropriate PGC page (though a link to this entry is on that page).
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 6215 km/sec (and H = 70 km/sec), PGC 83677 is about 290 million light years away, in good agreement with a Hubble Space Telescope website distance estimate (presumably based on its cluster membership) of about 300 million light years. The apparent size of the outer ring is about 0.75 by 0.7 arcmin, while the brighter central region spans about 0.35 by 0.3 arcmin (sizes are based on the images below). Given that and its distance, the outer ring spans about 60 to 65 thousand light years, and the brighter central region about 30 thousand light years. The galaxy's core is so bright (it is classified as a type S1 Seyfert galaxy) because it is the site of a "monstrous" black hole that is spewing out huge amounts of ultraviolet and X-radiation (as well as the visible light shown in the images below).
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy PGC 83677, also showing NGC 4839
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on PGC 83677, also showing NGC 4839
Below, a 3.4 arcmin wide HST/DSS composite image of the region near the galaxy
(Image Credit ESA/Hubble & NASA; Acknowledgement Judy Schmidt)
HST image of region near lenticular galaxy PGC 83677 overlaid on a DSS background to fill in missing areas
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide HST image of the galaxy (Image Credit as above)
HST image of lenticular galaxy PGC 83677

NGC 4840 (= PGC 44324)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 57 32.8, Dec +27 36 38)
The second IC lists a corrected NPD (per W. (Wolf?) III) of 61 29.5. Apparent size 0.7 by 0.7 arcmin?

NGC 4841 (= PGC 44323 + PGC 44329)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1785) by
William Herschel
A pair of galaxies in Coma Berenices
PGC 44323 = A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E4?) at RA 12 57 32.0, Dec +28 28 35
PGC 44329 = A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3?) at RA 12 57 34.0, Dec +28 28 56
Apparent size of PGC 44323 is 1.6 by 1.0 arcmin? of PGC 44329 is 1.0 by 0.7 arcmin?

NGC 4842 (= PGC 44337 + PGC 44338)
Discovered (Apr 24, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A pair of galaxies in Coma Berenices
PGC 44337 = A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0?) at RA 12 57 36.0, Dec +27 29 35
PGC 44338 = A 15th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3?) at RA 12 57 36.4, Dec +27 29 04
Apparent size of PGC 44337 is 0.4 by 0.4 arcmin? of PGC 44338 is 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin?

NGC 4843 (= PGC 44388)
Discovered (Mar 11, 1787) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Virgo (RA 12 58 00.9, Dec -03 37 17)
Apparent size 2.1 by 0.5 arcmin?

NGC 4844
Recorded (Apr 19, 1882) by
Wilhelm Tempel (V-25)
A 15th-magnitude star in Virgo (RA 12 58 08.4, Dec -13 04 46)

NGC 4845 (= PGC 44392 and probably =
NGC 4910)
Discovered (Jan 24, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 4910)
Discovered (Feb 24, 1786) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 4845)
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SA(s)ab) in Virgo (RA 12 58 00.9, Dec +01 34 32)
Apparent size 5.2 by 1.3. A Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 2). (See NGC 4910 for a discussion of the double listing.)
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4845
Above, a 6 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4845
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4845

NGC 4846 (= PGC 44362)
Discovered (Mar 11, 1831) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Canes Venatici (RA 12 57 47.7, Dec +36 22 12)
The second IC notes "NPD 52 52 (not 51 degrees), per Wolf list V (#95). (h. had only one observation)" . Apparent size 1.3 by 0.6 arcmin?

NGC 4847 (= PGC 44464)
Discovered (Apr 19, 1882) by
Wilhelm Tempel (V-25)
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Virgo (RA 12 58 28.9, Dec -13 08 28)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.5 arcmin?

NGC 4848 (= PGC 44405)
Discovered (Apr 21, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 58 05.7, Dec +28 14 33)
Apparent size 1.6 by 0.5 arcmin?

NGC 4849 (=
IC 3935 = PGC 44424)
Discovered (Mar 4, 1867) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 4849)
Discovered (Jun 12, 1895) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 3935)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 58 12.7, Dec +26 23 47)
The first IC lists a corrected position (per Spitaler) of RA 12 51 24, NPD 62 52. Apparent size 1.9 by 1.4 arcmin?

IC 838 (= "NGC 4849A")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called 4849A due to general proximity to NGC 4849
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (SB??) in
Coma Berenices (RA 12 58 13.9, Dec +26 25 34)
Since the object has a perfectly good IC listing (which see for anything else), it is pointless and confusing to call it NGC 4849A.
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 4750 - 4799) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 4800 - 4849     → (NGC 4850 - 4899)