Celestial Atlas
(NGC 4800 - 4849) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 4850 - 4899 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 4900 - 4949)
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4850, 4851, 4852, 4853, 4854, 4855, 4856, 4857, 4858, 4859, 4860, 4861, 4862, 4863, 4864, 4865, 4866,
4867, 4868, 4869, 4870, 4871, 4872, 4873, 4874, 4875, 4876, 4877, 4878, 4879, 4880, 4881, 4882, 4883,
4884, 4885, 4886, 4887, 4888, 4889, 4890, 4891, 4892, 4893, 4894, 4895, 4896, 4897, 4898, 4899

Page last updated Aug 8, 2014
WORKING 4871+: Add/change pix/format to current style, check Steinicke physical data

NGC 4850 (= PGC 44449)
Discovered (Apr 22, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 14.2 lenticular galaxy (type S0(rs)a?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 58 21.8, Dec +27 58 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4850 (= GC 5688, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 12 51 29, NPD 61 16.3) is "faint, small, round".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 6020 km/sec, NGC 4850 is about 280 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.65 by 0.6 arcmin, it is about 55 thousand light years across. NGC 4850 is part of galaxy cluster Abell 1656.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 4850
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 4850
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 4850

NGC 4851 (= PGC 44439 + PGC 83717)
Discovered (Apr 21, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A pair of galaxies in Coma Berenices
PGC 44439 = A magnitude 14.2 lenticular galaxy (type SAB0(rs)a?) at RA 12 58 21.7, Dec +28 08 55
PGC 83717 = A magnitude 15.0 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a?) at RA 12 58 22.2, Dec +28 09 07
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4851 (= GC 5689, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 12 51 33, NPD 61 05.3) is "faint, very small, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size of PGC 44439 is 0.35 by 0.25 arcmin; of PGC 83717 is 0.35 by 0.2 arcmin; overall size of the system is about 0.45 by 0.35
SDSS image of region near the pair of lenticular galaxies, PGC 44439 and PGC 83717, that comprise NGC 4851; also shown are NGC 4848 and IC 3943
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 4851, also showing NGC 4848 and IC 3943
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy pair
SDSS image of the pair of lenticular galaxies, PGC 44439 and PGC 83717, that comprise NGC 4851

NGC 4852 (= OCL 894)
Discovered (Apr 30, 1826) by
James Dunlop
A magnitude 8.9 open cluster (type II2p) in Centaurus (RA 13 00 09.0, Dec -59 36 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4852 (= GC 3335 = JH 3449, Dunlop 311, 1860 RA 12 51 45, NPD 148 50.6) is a "cluster, large, pretty rich, irregularly round, 10th magnitude stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 12 arcmin.
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 4852
Above, a 20 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 4852

NGC 4853 (= PGC 44481)
Discovered (Apr 13, 1831) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.6 lenticular galaxy (type (R')SA0(r)a?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 58 35.2, Dec +27 35 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4853 (= GC 3336 = JH 1496, 1860 RA 12 51 49, NPD 61 38.4) is "faint, small, round, pretty suddenly a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.55 by 0.5 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 4853, also showing NGC 4854
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 4853, also showing NGC 4854
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 4853

NGC 4854 (= PGC 44502)
Discovered (Apr 24, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 13.9 lenticular galaxy (type SA0?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 58 47.4, Dec +27 40 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4854 (= GC 5690, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 12 51 55, NPD 61 34.0) is "very faint, pretty large, cometic".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 4854, also showing NGC 4854, IC 3957 and IC 3963
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 4854, also showing NGC 4853, IC 3957 & 3963)
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 4854

NGC 4855 (= PGC 44572)
Discovered (Apr 19, 1882) by
Wilhelm Tempel
A magnitude 12.9 spiral galaxy (type (R')SB(s)ab pec?) in Virgo (RA 12 59 18.5, Dec -13 13 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4855 (Tempel list V (#26), 1860 RA 12 51 58, NPD 102 28.4) is "faint, small, star involved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0 by 1.5 arcmin. A starburst or Seyfert galaxy?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4855
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 4855
Below, a 4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4855

NGC 4856 (= PGC 44582)
Discovered (Feb 8, 1785) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 10.5 lenticular galaxy (type SB0(s)a?) in Virgo (RA 12 59 21.2, Dec -15 02 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4856 (= GC 3337 = JH 1497 = WH I 68, 1860 RA 12 52 00, NPD 104 17.0) is "bright, round, pretty suddenly much brighter middle, 13th magnitude star to northwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.7 by 1.6 arcmin.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 4856
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 4856
Below, a 4.4 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of lenticular galaxy NGC 4855

NGC 4857 (= PGC 44284)
Discovered (Apr 7, 1793) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)b?) in Draco (RA 12 57 18.4, Dec +70 12 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4857 (= GC 3339 = WH III 908, 1860 RA 12 52 02, NPD 19 01.5) is "extremely faint, very small, irregularly round, very little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.6 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4857
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 4857
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4857

NGC 4858 (= PGC 44535)
Discovered (Apr 21, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 15.2 spiral galaxy (type SBbc? pec) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 59 02.1, Dec +28 06 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4858 (= GC 5691, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 12 52 14, NPD 61 07.2) is "faint, very small, preceding (western) of double nebula", the other being NGC 4860.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.35 by 0.25 arcmin. A starburst galaxy. Although it appears to be close to NGC 4860, it is about 70 million light years more distant, so they are completely unrelated.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4858, also showing NGC 4860, NGC 4865 and IC 3943
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 4858, showing NGC 4860 and 4865, and IC 3943
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4858
Below, a 0.35 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
'Raw' HST image of spiral galaxy NGC 4858

NGC 4859 (= PGC 44534)
Discovered (Apr 21, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 13.6 lenticular galaxy (type S0(r)a?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 59 01.9, Dec +26 48 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4859 (= GC 5692, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 12 52 15, NPD 62 25.7) is "faint, very small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.45 by 0.75 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 4859
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 4859
Below, a 2.0 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 4859

NGC 4860 (= PGC 44539)
Discovered (Apr 21, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 13.5 elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 59 03.9, Dec +28 07 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4860 (= GC 5693, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 12 52 17, NPD 61 06.8) is "pretty faint, small, round, following (eastern) of double nebula", the other being NGC 4858.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.65 arcmin.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 4860, also showing NGC 4858
Above, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 4860, also showing NGC 4858 (which see)

NGC 4861 (=
IC 3961 = PGC 44536 = Arp 266)
Discovered (May 1, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 4861)
Discovered (Mar 21, 1903) by Max Wolf (and later listed as IC 3961)
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)m?) in Canes Venatici (RA 12 59 02.4, Dec +34 51 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4861 (= GC 3340 = JH 1499 = WH IV 30, 1860 RA 12 52 23, NPD 54 23.0) is "very faint, pretty large, very much extended 30, between 2 stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.8 by 1.5 arcmin. A starburst galaxy.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4861, also known as Arp 266
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 4861
Below, a 4.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4861, also known as Arp 266
Below, a 0.45 by 0.6 arcmin wide image of the southern part of the galaxy (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
'Raw' HST image of southern part of spiral galaxy NGC 4861, also known as Arp 266

NGC 4862 (=
IC 3999 = PGC 44610)
Discovered (Feb 26, 1886) by Francis Leavenworth (and later listed as NGC 4862)
Also observed by Herbert Howe (while already listed as NGC 4862)
Discovered (Apr 16, 1895) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 3999)
A magnitude 14.2 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)c?) in Virgo (RA 12 59 30.8, Dec -14 07 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4862 (Leavenworth list I (#194), 1860 RA 12 52 25, NPD 103 22.2) is "extremely faint, small, round". The second IC adds (per Howe) "RA is 12 52 09, another suspected about 5 arcmin south".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.15 by 0.7 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4862, also showing part of NGC 4863
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 4862, also showing part of NGC 4863
Above, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of NGC 4862
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4862

NGC 4863 (= PGC 44650)
Discovered (Feb 26, 1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
A magnitude 13.7 lenticular galaxy (type SB0(rs)a?) in Virgo (RA 12 59 42.4, Dec -14 01 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4863 (Leavenworth list I (#195), 1860 RA 12 52 25, NPD 103 17.2) is "extremely faint, small, much extended 45, suddenly brighter middle and nucleus".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.75 by 0.25 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4863, also showing part of NGC 4862
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 4863, also showing part of NGC 4862
Above, a 2.0 arcmin wide DSS image of NGC 4863
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4863

NGC 4864 (= PGC 44566)
Discovered (Apr 13, 1831) by
John Herschel
Also observed by Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 13.6 elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 59 13.1, Dec +27 58 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4864 (= GC 3343 = JH 1500, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 12 52 27, NPD 61 16.0) is "faint, small, preceding (western) of 2", the other being NGC 4867.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.45 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 4864, also showing NGC 4867, NGC 4869, NGC 4871, NGC 4872, NGC 4873, NGC 4874, NGC 4875, IC 3955 and IC 3973
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 4864
Also shown are NGC 4867, 4869, 4871, 4872, 4873, 4874 and 4875, and IC 3955 and 3973
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 4864
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 4864

NGC 4865 (= PGC 44578)
Discovered (Apr 22, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 13.7 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 59 19.9, Dec +28 05 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4865 (= GC 5694, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 12 52 29, NPD 61 09.5) is "very faint, very small, 7.8 magnitude star 13 seconds of time to east".
Discovery Notes: This is #282 in d'Arrest's list from A. N. 1537. (1865AN65-1537-1_D'Arrest.pdf)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.35 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 4865, also showing NGC 4858, NGC 4860, part of NGC 4873, and IC 3955
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 4865
Also shown are NGC 4858, 4860 and 4873, and IC 3955
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 4865

NGC 4866 (= PGC 44600)
Discovered (Jan 14, 1787) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 11.2 lenticular galaxy (type SA0(r)a?) in Virgo (RA 12 59 27.1, Dec +14 10 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4866 (= GC 3342 = JH 1498 = WH I 162, 1860 RA 12 52 29, NPD 75 04.4) is "bright, pretty large, much extended 90, suddenly brighter middle and nucleus, small star involved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 5.8 by 0.95 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 4866
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 4866
Below, a 6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 4866
Below, a 3.3 by 1.4 arcmin wide image of the central portion of the galaxy (North is on the right)
(Image Credit NASA/ESA/HST, Acknowledgement: Gilles Chapdelaine)
HST image of part of lenticular galaxy NGC 4866

NGC 4867 (= PGC 44568)
Discovered (May 10, 1863) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
Also observed (Apr 28, 1885) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 14.5 elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 59 15.3, Dec +27 58 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4867 (d'Arrest, Bigourdan, 1860 RA 12 52 32, NPD 61 15) is "very faint, very small, stellar, following (to east of) h 1500", h 1500 being NGC 4864.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 4864
Above, a 0.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 4867; for a wider view, see NGC 4864

NGC 4868 (= PGC 44557)
Discovered (Mar 17, 1787) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 12.2 spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Canes Venatici (RA 12 59 08.9, Dec +37 18 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4868 (= GC 3341 = WH II 644, 1860 RA 12 52 36, NPD 51 56.5) is "pretty bright, small, round, much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.45 by 1.3 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4868
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 4868
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4868

NGC 4869 (= PGC 44587)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed by Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 13.8 elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 59 23.4, Dec +27 54 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4869 (= GC 3344 = JH 1501 = WH II 388, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 12 52 37, NPD 61 19.8) is "considerably faint, small, round, 7th magnitude star to north".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.6 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 4869
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 4869
Below, a labeled version of the same image, also showing NGC 4864, 4867,
4871, 4872, 4873, 4874, 4875 and 4876, IC 3949, 3955, 3960, 3973, 3976 and 3998
Labeled SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 4869, also showing NGC 4864, NGC 4867, NGC 4869, NGC 4871, NGC 4872, NGC 4873, NGC 4874, NGC 4875, NGC 4876, IC 3949, IC 3955, IC 3960, IC 3973, IC 3976 and IC 3998
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 4869

NGC 4870 (= PGC 44569)
Discovered (Apr 1, 1878) by
Lawrence Parsons, 4th Lord Rosse
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type S(rs)a?) in Canes Venatici (RA 12 59 17.8, Dec +37 02 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4870 (4th Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 52 40, NPD 52 15) is "pretty faint, a little extended, between 2 stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.25 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4870
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 4870
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4870

WORKING HERE: add pix, fit to new format (check d'Arrest's entries for objects in this region: 1865AN65-1537-1_D'Arrest.pdf)

NGC 4871 (= PGC 44606)
Discovered (May 10, 1863) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
Also observed (May 16, 1885) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 14.2 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 59 30.0, Dec +27 57 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4871 (d'Arrest, Bigourdan, 1860 RA 12 52 45, NPD 61 17.0) is "very faint, very small, stellar nucleus".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.5? arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4871
Above, a ? arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 4871; for a wider view, see NGC 4874

NGC 4872 (= PGC 44624)
Discovered by
Heinrich d'Arrest
Not discovered by William Herschel
A magnitude 14.4 lenticular galaxy (type SB0??) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 59 34.3, Dec +27 56 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4872 (= GC 3347 = JH 1502 = WH II 389, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 12 52 49, NPD 61 17.0) is "pretty faint, pretty small, round".
Discovery Notes: The identification of this object is based on d'Arrest's observation, as the Herschels' positions were too crude to state which of the numerous objects in this region corresponded to their observations. There is little doubt that GC 3347 = JH 1502 = WH II 389 is actually the much brighter NGC 4874, meaning that d'Arrest is the discoverer of NGC 4872, not one of the Herschels. This does not alter the identification of NGC 4872 or NGC 4874, as the order of entries in the NGC was based on the positions of the objects, but does create confusion about who discovered which objects.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.3? arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4872
Above, a ? arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 4872; for a wider view, see NGC 4874

NGC 4873 (= PGC 44621)
Discovered (May 10, 1863) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
Also observed (May 16, 1885) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 14.1 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 59 32.9, Dec +27 59 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4873 (d'Arrest, Bigourdan, 1860 RA 12 52 49, NPD 61 15.5) is "very faint, very small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.6? arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4873
Above, a ? arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 4873; for a wider view, see NGC 4874

NGC 4874 (= PGC 44628)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed byJohn Herschel
Also observed by Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 11.7 elliptical galaxy (type E0??) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 59 35.8, Dec +27 57 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4874 (= GC 5695, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 12 52 53, NPD 61 17.1) is "faint, h 1501 and 1502 preceding (to the west)", h1501 and 1502 being NGC 4869 and 4872, respectively. (Some confusion has recently arisen about the identification of this object, so the following note is meant to reassure readers that there is no doubt about the identification shown here, and its long usage in the astronomical literature is secure. The final version of this entry will be less technical, but equally insistent on the accuracy of the identification.) [This is #159 in d'Arrest's paper (1865AN63-1500-177), which states "Faint. Near h. 1502, 1503." That was changed to "Near h1501, 1502" by JH in his entry for GC 5695. Dreyer changed that to "h1501 and 1502 preceding", meaning that using d'Arrest's positions for those objects, the position of NGC 4874 was to the east of the other entries. d'Arrest's 1861 position precesses to RA 12 59 38.9, Dec +27 57 34, within the eastern outline of the galaxy listed above, and given Dreyer's specification of the relative positions of the GC/NGC objects, the identification of NGC 4874 with giant elliptical PGC 44628 is absolutely certain.]
Discovery Notes: As in the case of NGC 4872, the identification of this object is based on d'Arrest's observation, as the Herschels' positions were too crude to state which of the numerous objects in this region corresponded to their observations. There is little doubt that GC 3347 = JH 1502 = WH II 389, which Dreyer assigned to NGC 4872, is actually the much brighter NGC 4874, meaning that d'Arrest is the discoverer of NGC 4872, not one of the Herschels, and William Herschel is the discoverer of NGC 4874, not d'Arrest. This does not alter the identification of NGC 4872 or NGC 4874, as the order of entries in the NGC was based on the positions of the objects, but does create confusion about who discovered which objects.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 1.9? arcmin. Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type E+0 (gE).
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 4874, also showing lenticular galaxies NGC 4871, 4872 and 4873
Above, a 3.6 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4874, also showing NGC 4871, 4872 and 4873
Below, an unlabeled 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, showing numerous other galaxies
Unlabeled SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 4874, showing numerous Coma Cluster galaxies
Below, the same view, but showing labels for NGC 4864, 4867, 4869,
4871, 4872, 4873, 4874, 4875, 4876 and 4883, and for IC 3973 and 3998
Labeled SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 4874, also showing elliptical galaxies NGC 4864, 4867, 4869 and 4876, lenticular galaxies NGC 4871, 4872, 4873, 4875 and 4883, and lenticular galaxies IC 3973 and 3998

NGC 4875 (= PGC 44640)
Discovered (May 16, 1885) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 14.7 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 59 38.1, Dec +27 54 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4875 (Bigourdan (list II #65), 1860 RA 12 52 53, NPD 61 19) is "very faint, very small, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.3? arcmin. (For now, see wide-field image of NGC 4874.)

NGC 4876 (= PGC 44658)
Discovered (May 16, 1885) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 14.4 elliptical galaxy (type E5??) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 59 44.6, Dec +27 54 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4876 (Bigourdan (list II #66), 1860 RA 12 53 02, NPD 61 19) is "very faint, very small, no nucleus".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.4? arcmin. (For now, see wide-field image of NGC 4874.)
*see HLA*

NGC 4877 (= PGC 44761)
Discovered (Feb 8, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed by Wilhelm Tempel
A magnitude 12.4 spiral galaxy (type Sab??) in Virgo (RA 13 00 26.4, Dec -15 16 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4877 (= GC 3338 = WH II 299, Tempel list V, 1860 RA 12 53 03, NPD 104 31.7) is "pretty bright, pretty large, much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.2 by 1.0? arcmin.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4877
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4877
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4877

NGC 4878 (= PGC 44747)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1789) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 12.9 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a?) in Virgo (RA 13 00 20.1, Dec -06 06 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4878 (= GC 3345 = WH III 758, 1860 RA 12 53 06, NPD 95 21.0) is "very faint, very small, preceding (western) of 2", the other being NGC 4879.
As noted at NGC 4879, there is little doubt that the galaxy listed here as NGC 4878 is an object that Herschel discovered in 1789, but whether it should be called NGC 4878 or 4879 is unknown. For the reasons discussed there, I have adopted the current uncertain consensus that PGC 44747 should be listed as NGC 4878, and what if anything NGC 4879 might be is left for that object's historical discussion. Apparent size 1.5 by 1.3 arcmin.
DSS image of lenticular galaxy adopted as NGC 4878
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4878
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 4888 (also see NGC 4879)
DSS image of region lenticular galaxy adopted as NGC 4878, also showing spiral galaxy NGC 4888; also shown is the star listed as NGC 4879, but for reasons discussed at that entry, its position is not indicated in this image

NGC 4879 (not =
NGC 4888)
Recorded (Mar 23, 1789) by William Herschel
A magnitude 16(?) star in Virgo (RA 13 00 25.6, Dec -06 06 40)
Per Dreyer, NGC 4879 (= GC 3346 = WH III 759, 1860 RA 12 53 08, NPD 95 20) is "very faint, very small, following (eastern) of 2", the other being NGC 4878. The listed positions put NGC 4879 about an arcmin north (give or take a bit) of NGC 4878, and 2s of time to its east. This difference in position was not listed by Herschel, who gave only a single position for the two "very faint, very small" nebulae he saw at the position. But there is only one galaxy in the area (the one listed as NGC 4878, above), so if Herschel did see two objects, the second should be one of the two faint stars near that galaxy. Per Corwin, that could be either the star preceding the galaxy (at RA 13 00 14.5, Dec -06 07 07), in which case it would be NGC 4878 and the galaxy would become NGC 4879; or it could be the star following the galaxy (at the position listed above), in which case NGC 4878 would remain the galaxy and the star would be NGC 4879. (Added Jul 21, 2012: Steinicke informs me that his recent reevaluation of Herschel's notes convinces him that the galaxy should be NGC 4878, and the following star NGC 4879, and that is what I have adopted here.) But since the galaxy has been identified as NGC 4878 for some time, even if the reverse were true, it would reduce any future confusion to keep NGC 4878 as the identity for the galaxy, regardless of how NGC 4879 is treated. To point out the need for such an approach, LEDA lists NGC 4879 as a nonexistent spiral galaxy (PGC 44787) at the same position as a double star that confirms the identity of NGC 4888, and there have been times when NGC 4879 was stated to be the same as NGC 4888 (which being impossible, led to my decision to note that in the title line for each entry). (Lest the reader think such caution excessive, it should be noted that even when publications were carefully proofread, errors were not that infrequent; and in the Internet age, misinformation is scattered far more widely and quickly than ever before.)
DSS image of region lenticular galaxy NGC 4878, also showing spiral galaxy NGC 4888, and the position of the star listed as NGC 4879
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 4878, also showing NGC 4888;
also shown is a box surrounding the star listed as NGC 4879

WORKING HERE: Checking transcription of Steinicke physical information

NGC 4880 (= PGC 44719)
Discovered (Apr 12, 1784) by
William Herschel
An 11th magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a) in Virgo (RA 13 00 10.5, Dec +12 29 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4880 (= GC 3348 = JH 1503 = WH III 83, 1860 RA 12 53 09, NPD 76 46.3) is "considerably faint, pretty large, round, very gradually a little brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.1 by 2.5 arcmin.

NGC 4881 (= PGC 44686)
Discovered (Apr 22, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 14th magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 59 57.9, Dec +28 14 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4881 (= GC 5696, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 12 53 11, NPD 60 59.9) is "faint, small, a little extended, 9th magnitude star to southwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 1.0 arcmin.
*see HLA*

NGC 4882 (=
NGC 4886 = PGC 44698)
Discovered (Apr 6, 1864) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 4886)
Discovered (Apr 22, 1865) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 4882)
A 14th magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 00 04.6, Dec +27 59 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4882 (= GC 5697, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 12 53 12, NPD 61 16.0) is "very faint, small, others near".
Physical Information: (this entry will probably contain only historical information; for anything else see NGC 4886)

NGC 4883 (= PGC 44682)
Discovered (Apr 22, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
Also observed (May 16, 1885) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 14th magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 59 56.2, Dec +28 02 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4883, (d'Arrest, Bigourdan, 1860 RA 12 53 13, NPD 61 12) is "very faint, small, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.3 arcmin. (For now, see wide-field image of NGC 4874.)
*see HLA*

NGC 4884 (=
NGC 4889 = PGC 44715)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 4889)
Discovered (Apr 22, 1865) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 4884)
Not found by Max Wolf (while listed as NGC 4884)
A 12th magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 00 08.3, Dec +27 58 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4884 (= GC 5698, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 12 53 15, NPD 61 16.3) is the "chief one of multiple nebulae". The second IC adds "Not on Heidelberg plate (W. (= Wolf) III)". (this entry will probably only contain historical information; for anything else see NGC 4889)

NGC 4885 (= PGC 44781)
Discovered (Feb 19, 1830) by
John Herschel
A 14th magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa? pec) in Virgo (RA 13 00 33.8, Dec -06 51 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4885 (= GC 3349 = JH 1504, 1860 RA 12 53 17, NPD 96 05.8) is "very faint, small, extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.4 arcmin.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4885
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4885
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4885

NGC 4886 (=
NGC 4882 = 44698)
Discovered (Apr 6, 1864) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 4886)
Discovered (Apr 22, 1865) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 4882)
A 14th magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 00 04.6, Dec +27 59 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4886 (= GC 5699, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 12 53 18, NPD 61 15.9) is "faint, small, round, II 391 four seconds of time to east", (WH) II 391 being NGC 4889.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.6 arcmin.
*see HLA*

NGC 4887 (= PGC 44796)
Discovered (Apr 21, 1882) by
Wilhelm Tempel
A 14th magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a) in Virgo (RA 13 00 39.3, Dec -14 40 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4887 (Tempel list V (#27), 1860 RA 12 53 18, NPD 103 54.7) is "very faint, I 69 to northeast", (WH) I 69 being NGC 4902.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.6 arcmin.

NGC 4888 (= PGC 44766, and not =
NGC 4879)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1789) by William Herschel
A 13th magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Virgo (RA 13 00 36.2, Dec -06 04 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4888 (= GC 3350 = JH 1505 = WH II 778, 1860 RA 12 53 21, NPD 95 19.0) is "pretty faint, considerably small, extended, pretty suddenly brighter middle, double star to northwest".
Additional Note: NGC 4879 is sometimes misidentified as a duplicate observation of NGC 4888; but as noted above, the two entries refer to completely different objects.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.4 arcmin.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4888
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4888
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 4878
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4888, also showing lenticular galaxy NGC 4878

NGC 4889 (=
NGC 4884 = PGC 44715)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 4889)
Discovered (Apr 22, 1865) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 4884)
A 12th magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 00 08.3, Dec +27 58 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4889 (= GC 3351 = JH 1507 = WH II 391, 1860 RA 12 53 22, NPD 61 16.0) is "pretty bright, pretty much extended, brighter middle, 7th magnitude star to north".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.8 by 2.0 arcmin. Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type E+4.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 4889, also showing lenticular galaxy NGC 4894, elliptical galaxies NGC 4886 and IC 4011, and part of the elliptical pair of galaxies listed as NGC 4898
Above, a 4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4889, also showing NGC 4886, 4894 and 4898 and IC 4011
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 4889, showing numerous Coma Cluster galaxies
Unlabeled SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 4889, showing numerous Coma Cluster galaxies
Below, the same region with labels for NGC 4876, 4883, 4886, 4889, 4894 and 4898,
and for IC 3998, IC 4011, IC 4021, and IC 4026
Labeled SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 4889, also showing lenticular galaxies NGC 4883, NGC 4894, IC 3998 and IC 4026, elliptical galaxies NGC 4876, NGC 4886, IC 4011, IC 4021 and the pair of elliptical galaxies listed as NGC 4898
*see HLA*

NGC 4890 (= PGC 44793)
Discovered (Mar 11, 1787) by
William Herschel
A 13th magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sm) in Virgo (RA 13 00 38.9, Dec -04 36 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4890 (= GC 3352 = JH 1506 = WH III 614, 1860 RA 12 53 24, NPD 93 50.1) is "considerably faint, small, irregularly round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4890
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4890
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4890

NGC 4891
Recorded (Apr 21, 1882) by
Wilhelm Tempel
A 15th magnitude star in Virgo (RA 13 00 47.0, Dec -13 25 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4891 (Tempel list V (#28), 1860 RA 12 53 24, NPD 102 40.0) is a "faint nebulous star".

NGC 4892 (= PGC 44697)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 14th magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 00 03.6, Dec +26 53 53)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4892 (= GC 3353 = JH 1508 = WH II 390, 1860 RA 12 53 28, NPD 62 21.1) is "very faint".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.3 arcmin.

NGC 4893 (=
IC 4015 = PGC 44690)
Discovered (Apr 24, 1865) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 4893)
Also observed by Lawrence Parsons, 4th Lord Rosse (and later listed as NGC 4893)
Discovered (Mar 21, 1903) by Max Wolf (and later listed as IC 4015)
A 14th magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Canes Venatici (RA 12 59 59.6, Dec +37 11 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4893 (= GC 5700, d'Arrest, 4th Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 12 53 29, NPD 52 03.5) is "very faint, 20th magnitude star to southwest, 17th magnitude star to northeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.3 arcmin. (Note: The classification seems uncertain, but the images suggest it is an elliptical.) Part of an interacting pair with IC 4016.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 4893, also showing spiral galaxy IC 4016, which is sometimes called NGC 4893A
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4893, also showing IC 4016
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 4893, also showing spiral galaxy IC 4016, which is sometimes called NGC 4893A

IC 4016 (= PGC 44696 = "NGC 4893A")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 4893A due to its proximity to NGC 4893
A 15th magnitude spiral galaxy (type S??) in Canes Venatici (RA 12 59 59.9, Dec +37 11 14)
Since it has a perfectly good IC designation, it is pointlessly confusing to call PGC 44696 anything other than IC 4016, which see for anything else.

NGC 4894 (= PGC 44732)
Discovered (Mar 30, 1827) by
John Herschel
A 15th magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 00 16.7, Dec +27 58 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4894 (= GC 3354 = JH 1510 = WH III 363?, 1860 RA 12 53 30, NPD 61 17.2) is "pretty faint, small, round". (As suggested by query, apparently not WH III 363.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.1 arcmin. (For now, see NGC 4898 for images.)

NGC 4895 (= PGC 44737)
Discovered (May 5, 1864) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 13th magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 00 18.0, Dec +28 12 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4895 (= GC 5701, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 12 53 30, NPD 61 02.5) is "very faint, small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 0.6 arcmin.

PGC 44717 (= "NGC 4895A")
Not an NGC object, but sometimes called NGC 4895A due to its proximity to
NGC 4895
A 15th magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E5) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 00 09.3, Dec +28 10 12)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.3 arcmin.

NGC 4896 (= PGC 44768)
Discovered (May 12, 1885) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A 14th magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 00 30.9, Dec +28 20 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4896 (Bigourdan (list II #68), 1860 RA 12 53 31, NPD 60 56) is "very faint, very small, round, much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.6 arcmin.

NGC 4897 (= PGC 44829)
Discovered (Apr 21, 1882) by
Wilhelm Tempel
A 12th magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(r)bc?) in Virgo (RA 13 00 52.9, Dec -13 26 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4897 (Tempel list V (#28), 1860 RA 12 53 31, NPD 102 41.9) is "faint".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.7 by 2.3 arcmin. A Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 2).
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4897
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4897
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4897
*KudzudeVaucouleurs image available*

NGC 4898 (= PGC 44736 + PGC 3098454)
Discovered (Apr 6, 1864) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
Also observed (May 15, 1885) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A pair of galaxies in Coma Berenices
PGC 44736 = A 14th magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3) at RA 13 00 17.7, Dec +27 57 20
PGC 3098454 = A 14th magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0) at RA 13 00 18.3, Dec +27 57 27
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4898 (d'Arrest, Bigourdan, 1860 RA 12 53 32, NPD 61 18) is "very faint, small, close to h 1510", h 1510 = JH 1510 being NGC 4894.
Physical Information: Apparent size of PGC 44736 is 0.6 by 0.4 arcmin; of PGC 3098454 is 0.4 by 0.4 arcmin.
SDSS image of the pair of elliptical galaxies, PGC 44736 and PGC 3098454, that comprise NGC 4898; also shown is lenticular galaxy NGC 4894
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4898, also showing NGC 4894
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair, showing numerous Coma Cluster galaxies
Unlabeled SDSS image of region near the pair of elliptical galaxies, PGC 44736 and PGC 3098454, that comprise NGC 4898, showing numerous Coma Cluster galaxies
Below, the same region with labels for NGC 4883, 4886, 4889, 4894, 4898 and 4906,
and IC 4011, 4021, 4026, 4041 and 4042
Labeled SDSS image of region near the pair of elliptical galaxies, PGC 44736 and PGC 3098454, that comprise NGC 4898. Also shown are lenticular galaxies NGC 4883, NGC 4894, IC 4026 and IC 4042, and elliptical galaxies NGC 4886, NGC 4889, NGC 4906, IC 4011, IC 4021 and IC 4041
*see HLA*

NGC 4899 (= PGC 44841)
Discovered (Feb 8, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 12th magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc) in Virgo (RA 13 00 56.5, Dec -13 56 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4899 (= GC 3355 = WH II 300, 1860 RA 12 53 34, NPD 103 11.5) is "pretty faint, extremely large".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.4 by 1.4 arcmin.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4899
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4899
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4899
*Carnegie image available here
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 4800 - 4849) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 4850 - 4899     → (NGC 4900 - 4949)