Celestial Atlas
(NGC 4850 - 4899) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 4900 - 4949 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 4950 - 4999)
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Page last updated Nov 12, 2013
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NGC 4900 (= PGC 44797)
Discovered (Apr 30, 1786) by
William Herschel
An 11th magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)c) in Virgo (RA 13 00 39.0, Dec +02 30 04)
2.2 by 2.1 arcmin. Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type (R')SB(s)cd.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4900
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4900
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4900

NGC 4901 (= PGC 44684)
Discovered (Mar 7, 1831) by
John Herschel
A 15th magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1) in Canes Venatici (RA 12 59 56.3, Dec +47 12 22)
1.3 by 1.2 arcmin
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 4901
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4901
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 4901

NGC 4902 (= PGC 44847)
Discovered (Feb 8, 1785) by
William Herschel
An 11th magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(r)b) in Virgo (RA 13 00 59.6, Dec -14 30 50)
2.9 by 2.6 arcmin. Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type SB(rs)b.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4902
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4902
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4902

NGC 4903 (= PGC 44894)
Discovered (Mar 30, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 13th magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)c) in Centaurus (RA 13 01 22.7, Dec -30 56 06)
1.6 by 1.3 arcmin. A Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 2).
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4903
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4903
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 4905
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4903, also showing lenticular galaxy NGC 4905

NGC 4904 (= PGC 44846)
Discovered (Jan 1, 1786) by
William Herschel
A 12th magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(s)cd) in Virgo (RA 13 00 58.5, Dec -00 01 37)
2.2 by 1.5 arcmin. A starburst galaxy.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4904
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4904
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4904

NGC 4905 (= PGC 44902)
Discovered (Mar 30, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 13th magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0+(s) pec) in Centaurus (RA 13 01 30.6, Dec -30 52 03)
1.8 by 1.1 arcmin. (For now, see the wide-field image of NGC 4903.)

NGC 4906 (= PGC 44799)
Discovered (Apr 6, 1864) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 14th magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 00 39.8, Dec +27 55 26)
0.48 by 0.43 arcmin.

NGC 4907 (= PGC 44819)
Discovered (May 5, 1864) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 14th magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(r)b) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 00 48.8, Dec +28 09 25)
1.1 by 1.0 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4907
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4907
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 4040 and 4045
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4907, also showing spiral galaxy IC 4040 and elliptical galaxy IC 4045

NGC 4908 (probably = PGC 44832)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1785) by
William Herschel
Discovered (Apr 22, 1865) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A 13th magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 00 54.4, Dec +28 00 25)
Per Dreyer, NGC 4908 ("GC" 5704, d'Arrest), 1860 RA 12 54 05, NPD 61 13.1) is "very faint, very small" (Herschel's General Catalog (or GC) ended with GC 5079; "GC" refers to Dreyer's 1878 supplement to the GC). The position precesses to RA 13 00 50.2, Dec +28 01 35, which falls between two galaxies in the Coma Cluster of galaxies, the fainter northwestern of which has generally been listed as NGC 4908, and the brighter southeastern as IC 4051. However, per a suggestion by Malcolm, Corwin feels that this assignment is probably backwards, as discussed below; and there is also the question of why, if William Herschel observed the region (as listed above), Dreyer makes no mention of it in the NGC. As to the question of historical priority, Herschel recorded his observation of the area as (WH) III 363, that is, number 363 in a list of faint nebulae (he lists it as a "very faint" nebula at a position 6m 16s west and 23 arcmin north of 41 Comae Berenices). Unfortunately, John Herschel's catalog incorrectly assigned that observation to GC 3354 (= NGC 4894), which of course has a different position from NGC 4908, and although the NGC entry for NGC 4894 questions its identity with WH III 363, it does not reassign Herschel's observation to what became NGC 4908, nor could it correct the GC error during the period prior to the publication of the NGC; so d'Arrest was bound to think that he had discovered a previously unknown nebula, and it was quite reasonable for Dreyer to give him credit for that discovery. As to the question of which galaxy is which entry, we should first calculate Herschel's position. The 'current' (J2000.0) position of 41 Com precesses to RA 12 56 51.3, Dec +28 46 42 (relative to the Equinox corresponding to Herschel's observation of 1785), so Herschel's observation must have been at about 1785 RA 12 50 35.3, Dec +29 09 42. That precesses to 'current' RA 13 00 58.2, Dec +27 59 58, just southeast of the brighter southeastern galaxy mentioned above, so it appears reasonably certain that Herschel's observation was of that object (PGC 44832, as shown in the title for this entry). Malcolm and Corwin both feel that d'Arrest probably also observed the nearly half magnitude brighter southeastern galaxy, and if so, then the galaxy usually listed as IC 4051 should be called NGC 4908 (as in this entry), and vice-versa (as discussed at the entry for IC 4051). However, regardless of which galaxy corresponds to which listing, the fact that some references list the galaxies with one set of designations, and other references list them exactly the opposite way means that any reference to NGC 4908 or IC 4051 tells the reader almost nothing about which galaxy is under consideration; so it would be best to refer to them by more modern designations, such as the PGC listings used on this site, or by their positions. (Apparent size of PGC 44832 is 1.0 by 0.8 arcmin.)
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy PGC 44832, which is probably NGC 4908, but is often called IC 4051
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 44832, which is probably NGC 4908
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy;
also shown are PGC 44828, NGC 4906, IC 4040, 4041, 4042 and 4045
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy PGC 44832, which is probably NGC 4908, but is often called IC 4051, also showing elliptical galaxy PGC 44828, which is probably IC 4051, but is often called NGC 4908; also shown are elliptical galaxies NGC 4906, IC 4041 and 4045, spiral galaxy IC 4040 and lenticular galaxy IC 4042

NGC 4909 (= PGC 44949)
Discovered (Jun 5, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th magnitude spiral galaxy (type (R')SA(rs)a) in Centaurus (RA 13 02 01.7, Dec -42 46 18)
1.9 by 1.7 arcmin. Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type (R')SA(l)a.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4909
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4909
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4909

NGC 4910 (probably =
NGC 4845 = PGC 44392)
Discovered (Jan 24, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 4910)
Discovered (Feb 24, 1786) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 4845)
If NGC 4845, an 11th magnitude spiral galaxy (type SA(s)ab) in Virgo (RA 12 58 00.9, Dec +01 34 32)
Per Dreyer, NGC 4910 (GC 3363 = WH V 3, 1860 RA 12 54 10, NPD 87 35.5) is "extremely faint, very large, partially resolved, some stars seen". The position precesses to RA 13 01 18.6, Dec +01 39 12, but there is nothing there. Per Corwin, Dreyer quotes Herschel as stating "The place of this nebula is not determined with accuracy", and adds "No modern observations known", which would seem to make any identification difficult or impossible. However, Corwin adds that Herschel determined the position of V 3 relative to the same star as a nebula for which Dreyer states "RA 40 seconds too great", suggesting that Herschel might have placed the position well to the east of the actual nebula. If so, then the relatively bright galaxy listed as NGC 4845 is a tempting (and for that matter, the only) candidate for what Herschel observed; but Herschel's description of that object does not quite match his description of what became NGC 4910, so equating NGC 4910 with NGC 4845 is considered the most likely possibility, but by no means certain.

NGC 4911 (= PGC 44840)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 13th magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(r)bc) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 00 56.3, Dec +27 47 25)
Apparent size 1.2 by 1.1 arcmin. Probably a companion of PGC 83751.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4911 and lenticular galaxy PGC 83751, also known as NGC 4911A
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4911 and PGC 83751
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair, also showing NGC 4919
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4911 and lenticular galaxy PGC 83751, also known as NGC 4911A; also shown is lenticular galaxy NGC 4919

PGC 83751 (= "NGC 4911A")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 4911A due to its proximity to
NGC 4911
A 15th magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 00 54.0, Dec +27 47 04)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.2 arcmin. A probable companion of NGC 4911, which see for images.

NGC 4912
Recorded (Apr 24, 1865) by
Lawrence Parsons, 4th Lord Rosse
A lost or nonexistent object in Canes Venatici (RA 13 00 46.3, Dec +37 22 41)
Per Dreyer, NGC 4912 ("GC" 5705, 4th Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 12 54 12, NPD 51 52), is one of "two nebulae (the other being NGC 4913), north of and in line with h1514(?)", h1514 being NGC 4914 (Herschel's General Catalog (or GC) ended with GC 5079; "GC" refers to Dreyer's 1878 supplement to the GC). The position precesses to RA 13 00 46.3, Dec +37 22 41, which is north of NGC 4914, but there is nothing there save for NGC 4914. The simplest conclusion is that neither NGC 4912 nor 4913 represent real objects, but per Corwin, Lord Rosse did make a sketch of the area, and it looks nothing like the field near NGC 4914, so it is more likely that he misidentified the "reference" galaxy, and observed a completely different region (hence Dreyer's decision to put a question mark next to the reference to h1514). In that case the observations may represent real objects, but considerable efforts to identify the field of view have been fruitless, and it appears most likely that what Lord Rosse saw will never be determined. (Refer to Corwin)

NGC 4913
Recorded (Apr 24, 1865) by
Lawrence Parsons, 4th Lord Rosse
A lost or nonexistent object in Canes Venatici (RA 13 00 46.4, Dec +37 20 41)
Per Dreyer, NGC 4913 ("GC" 5706, 4th Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 12 54 12, NPD 51 54), is one of "two nebulae (the other being NGC 4912), north of and in line with h1514(?)", h1514 being NGC 4914 (Herschel's General Catalog (or GC) ended with GC 5079; "GC" refers to Dreyer's 1878 supplement to the GC). The second IC notes "Not seen with certainty on Heidelberg plate (Wolf list V). (only seen once at Birr)". The position precesses to RA 13 00 46.4, Dec +37 20 41, which is just north of NGC 4914, but there is nothing there save for NGC 4914. The simplest conclusion is that neither NGC 4912 nor 4913 represent real objects, but per Corwin, Lord Rosse did make a sketch of the area, and it looks nothing like the field near NGC 4914, so it is more likely that he misidentified the "reference" galaxy, and observed a completely different region (hence Dreyer's decision to put a question mark next to the reference to h1514). In that case the observations may represent real objects, but considerable efforts to identify the field of view have been fruitless, and it appears most likely that what Lord Rosse saw will never be determined.

NGC 4914 (= PGC 44807)
Discovered (Mar 17, 1787) by
William Herschel
A 12th magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E4) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 00 42.9, Dec +37 18 53)
Per Dreyer, NGC 4914 (GC 3365 = JH 1514 = WH II 645, 1860 RA 12 54 12, NPD 51 55.8) is "pretty bright, considerably small, round, suddenly much brighter middle, 17th magnitude star to northwest". The position precesses to RA 13 00 46.4, Dec +37 18 53, right on the galaxy, so the identification is certain. Apparent size 3.5 by 2.1 arcmin.

NGC 4915 (= PGC 44891)
Discovered (Mar 11, 1787) by
William Herschel
A 12th magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2) in Virgo (RA 13 01 28.1, Dec -04 32 46)
Apparent size 1.6 by 1.3 arcmin.

NGC 4916
Recorded (Apr 24, 1865) by
Lawrence Parsons, 4th Lord Rosse
A lost or nonexistent object in Canes Venatici (RA 13 00 54.5, Dec +37 21 40)
Per Dreyer, NGC 4916 ("GC" 5707, 4th Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 12 54 20, NPD 51 53), is a "nebula, northeast of h1514(?)", h1514 being NGC 4914 (Herschel's General Catalog (or GC) ended with GC 5079; "GC" refers to Dreyer's 1878 supplement to the GC). The position precesses to RA 13 00 54.2, Dec +37 21 42, a few arcmin northeast of NGC 4914, but there is nothing there save for NGC 4914 (the situation is similar to NGC 4912 and 4913, which were recorded by Lord Rosse on the same night). The simplest conclusion is that NGC 4916 does not represent a real object, but per Corwin, Lord Rosse did make a sketch of the area, and it looks nothing like the field near NGC 4914, so it is more likely that he misidentified the "reference" galaxy, and observed a completely different region (hence Dreyer's decision to put a question mark next to the reference to h1514). In that case the observation may represent a real object, but considerable efforts to identify the field of view have been fruitless, and it appears most likely that what Lord Rosse saw will never be determined.

NGC 4917 (= PGC 44838)
Discovered (Mar 20, 1828) by
John Herschel
A 14th magnitude spiral galaxy (type (R')SB(s)b) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 00 55.5, Dec +47 13 21)
Apparent size 1.5 by 1.0 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4917
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4917
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4917

NGC 4918 (= PGC 44934)
Discovered (1886) by
Francis Leavenworth (II-457)
A 14th magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a) in Virgo (RA 13 01 50.7, Dec -04 30 02)
1.1 by 0.5 arcmin

NGC 4919 (= PGC 44885)
Discovered (May 5, 1864) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 14th magnitude lenticular galaxy (type (R')SA0?(r)) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 01 17.6, Dec +27 48 31)
1.1 by 0.7 arcmin

NGC 4920 (=
IC 4134 = PGC 44958)
Discovered (1882) by Wilhelm Tempel (V) (and later listed as NGC 4920)
Discovered (Apr 16, 1895) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 4134)
A 14th magnitude irregular galaxy (type IB(s)m) in Virgo (RA 13 02 04.2, Dec -11 22 42)
Apparent size 1.0 by 0.7 arcmin. Also known as IC 4134 (which see for a discussion of the duplicate listing).
DSS image of irregular galaxy NGC 4920
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4920
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near irregular galaxy NGC 4920

NGC 4921 (= PGC 44899)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 12th magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)ab) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 01 26.3, Dec +27 53 08)
2.4 by 2.1 arcmin
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4921
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4921
Below, a detailed view of the galaxy (Image Credits: NASA/ESA/K. Cook (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory)
HST image of spiral galaxy NGC 4921
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 4919 and 4923
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4921, also showing lenticular galaxies NGC 4919 and 4923

NGC 4922 (= PGC 44896)
Discovered (Apr 19, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 13th magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1 pec) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 01 24.7, Dec +29 18 28)
Apparent size 1.3 by 1.2 arcmin. Apparently interacting with PGC 86794 (which see for images).

PGC 86794 (= "NGC 4922A")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 4922A due to its proximity to
NGC 4922
A 14th magnitude spiral galaxy (type S? pec) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 01 25.3, Dec +29 18 47)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.5 arcmin. A Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 2). Apparently interacting with NGC 4922.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 86794, also known as NGC 4922A, and elliptical galaxy NGC 4922
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 86794 and NGC 4922
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 86794, also known as NGC 4922A, and elliptical galaxy NGC 4922

NGC 4923 (= PGC 44903)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 14th magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/SB0) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 01 31.8, Dec +27 50 49)
0.8 by 0.8 arcmin

NGC 4924 (= PGC 44977)
Discovered (May 8, 1831) by
John Herschel
A 13th magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a) in Virgo (RA 13 02 12.9, Dec -14 58 09)
1.9 by 1.3 arcmin

NGC 4925 (= PGC 44967)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1789) by
William Herschel
A 13th magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Virgo (RA 13 02 07.3, Dec -07 42 38)
1.0 by 0.7 arcmin

NGC 4926 (= PGC 44938)
Discovered (Apr 6, 1864) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 13th magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 01 53.9, Dec +27 37 28)
Apparent size 1.1 by 1.0 arcmin. (For now, see the wide-field image of PGC 44968.)

PGC 44968 (= "NGC 4926A")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 4926A since in general vicinity of
NGC 4926
A 14th magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0 pec?) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 02 08.1, Dec +27 38 53)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.4 arcmin.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 44968, also known as NGC 4926A
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 44968
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 4926 and PGC 83758
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy PGC 44968, also known as NGC 4926A; also shown are lenticular galaxy PGC 83758, also known as NGC 4926B, and lenticular galaxy NGC 4926

PGC 83758 (= "NGC 4926B")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 4926B since in general vicinity of
NGC 4926
A 15th magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 02 00.9, Dec +27 39 13)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.3 arcmin.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 83758, also known as NGC 4926B
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 83758; for a wide-field view, see PGC 44968

NGC 4927 (= PGC 44945)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 14th magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 01 57.6, Dec +28 00 22)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.4 arcmin.

NGC 4928 (= PGC 45052)
Discovered (Apr 25, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 13th magnitude spiral galaxy (type SA(s)bc pec) in Virgo (RA 13 03 00.5, Dec -08 05 05)
Apparent size 1.1 by 0.9 arcmin.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4928
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4928
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4928

NGC 4929 (= PGC 45027)
Discovered (Apr 20, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 13th magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 02 44.5, Dec +28 02 43)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.75 arcmin.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 4929
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4929
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 4931, IC 4106 and IC 4111
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 4929, also showing lenticular galaxies NGC 4931 and IC 4111 and spiral galaxy IC 4106

NGC 4930 (= PGC 45155)
Discovered (Jun 8, 1834) by
John Herschel
An 11th magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)b) in Centaurus (RA 13 04 05.1, Dec -41 24 41)
Apparent size 4.4 by 3.6 arcmin. Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type SB(rs)bc.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4930
Above, a 5 arcmin wide closeup of spiral galaxy NGC 4930
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4930

NGC 4931 (= PGC 45055)
Discovered (May 10, 1863) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 14th magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 03 01.1, Dec +28 01 55)
Apparent size 1.6 by 0.6 arcmin.

NGC 4932 (= PGC 45015)
Discovered (Apr 26, 1789) by
William Herschel
A 14th magnitude spiral galaxy (type SA(r)c) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 02 37.5, Dec +50 26 21)
Apparent size 1.5 by 1.3 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4932
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4932
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4932

NGC 4933 (=
IC 4176 = PGC 45146, and with IC 4173 = Arp 176)
Discovered (May 9, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 4933)
Discovered (Apr 16, 1895) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 4176)
A 12th magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a pec) in Virgo (RA 13 03 56.7, Dec -11 29 51)
(See IC 4176 for a discussion of the double listing.) Apparent size 2.0 by 1.1 arcmin. Vr 2965 km/sec. Interacting with and tidally distorted by IC 4173, with which it forms Arp 176, and probably part of a group with PGC 45143, which appears to be at about the same distance. Note: IC 4176 and NGC 4933 are often interchangeably called NGC 4933A, and equally often called NGC 4933B, so those terms should never be used to refer to either galaxy.
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 4933 and elliptical galaxy IC 4173 (sometimes called NGC 4933B or even NGC 4933A), collectively known as Arp 176; also shown is irregular galaxy PGC 45143, which is sometimes called NGC 4933C
Above, 3.0 arcmin wide DSS image of NGC 4933, IC 4173 and PGC 45143
Below, a more detailed image (Image Credit Arp Atlas of Peculiar Galaxies)
Arp Atlas image of lenticular galaxy NGC 4933 and elliptical galaxy IC 4173 (sometimes called NGC 4933B or even NGC 4933A), collectively known as Arp 176; also shown is irregular galaxy PGC 45143, which is sometimes called NGC 4933C
Below, a sharper image of the group (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
(The original image label has been removed because it used the inappropriate "NGC 4933B" designation)
Carnegie-Irvine Southern Sky Survey 'sample' image of NGC 4933, IC 4173 and PGC 45143
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the group, also showing PGC 45169
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 4933 and elliptical galaxy IC 4173 (sometimes called NGC 4933B or even NGC 4933A), collectively known as Arp 176; also shown are irregular galaxy PGC 45143, which is sometimes called NGC 4933C, and spiral galaxy PGC 45169, which is sometimes misidentified as IC 4134

"NGC 4933A" (a term that should never be used)
As noted at the entry for IC 4173 (immediately below), the term NGC 4933A is sometimes used to refer to that galaxy, and sometimes to refer to NGC 4933 itself (immediately above). Therefore, to avoid confusion, the term NGC 4933A should never be used to refer to either galaxy.

IC 4173 = PGC 45142 (= "NGC 4933B"), and with NGC 4933 = Arp 176)
Properly discussed at its IC entry, but noted here since sometimes referred to as NGC 4933B
A 14th magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2 pec) in Virgo (RA 13 03 54.5, Dec -11 30 18)
Although properly referred to as IC 4173 (which see for anything else), this galaxy is sometimes referred to as NGC 4933B, hence this brief entry. Also, unfortunately, sometimes referred to as NGC 4933A (for instance, in the NED), a term used in other places to refer to NGC 4933 (which see for images); as a result, the term NGC 4933A should never be used to refer to either galaxy, as it is bound to lead to confusion.

PGC 45143 (= "NGC 4933C")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 4933C due to its proximity to
NGC 4933
A 15th magnitude irregular galaxy (type Im pec) in Virgo (RA 13 04 01.2, Dec -11 29 27)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.4 arcmin. Vr 3190 km/sec. Probably part of a group with NGC 4933 (which see for images) and IC 4173, which comprise Arp 176.

NGC 4934 (= PGC 45082)
Discovered (Apr 20, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 14th magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 03 16.3, Dec +28 01 48)
Apparent size 1.0 by 0.2 arcmin.

NGC 4935 (= PGC 45093)
Discovered (Apr 17, 1887) by
Lewis Swift (6-50)
A 13th magnitude spiral galaxy (type (R')SAB(s)b) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 03 21.2, Dec +14 22 41)
Apparent size 1.2 by 1.0 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4935
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4935
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4935

NGC 4936 (= PGC 45174)
Discovered (May 6, 1834) by
John Herschel
An 11th magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1) in Centaurus (RA 13 04 17.0, Dec -30 31 36)
Apparent size 2.7 by 2.3 arcmin.

NGC 4937
Discovered (Mar 3, 1837) by
John Herschel
A star group in Centaurus (RA 13 04 51.9, Dec -47 13 08)
Per Dreyer, NGC 4937 (GC 3379 = JH 3455, 1860 RA 12 56 43, NPD 136 28.0) is "most extremely faint, small, round, preceding of 2", the other being NGC 4940 (which see for an image of the group). The position precesses to RA 13 04 45.5, Dec -47 13 09, a few seconds west of a compact group of just over half a dozen very faint stars. Per Corwin, the position relative to NGC 4940, although not exact, is adequate to establish the identity of the group. Apparent size 0.5 arcmin.

NGC 4938 (= PGC 45044)
Discovered (Feb 17, 1831) by
John Herschel
A 14th magnitude spiral galaxy (type SABa?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 02 57.4, Dec +51 19 09)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.7 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4938
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4938
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4938

NGC 4939 (= PGC 45170)
Discovered (Mar 25, 1786) by
William Herschel
An 11th magnitude spiral galaxy (type SA(s)bc) in Virgo (RA 13 04 14.3, Dec -10 20 24)
Apparent size 5.5 by 2.8 arcmin. A Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 2). Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type SAB(r)bc.
NOAO image of spiral galaxy NGC 4939
Above, a 6 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4939 (Image Credits: Adam Block/NOAO/AURA/NSF)
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy (Image Credits as above)
NOAO image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4939 overlaid on a DSS background to fill in missing areas

NGC 4940 (= PGC 45235)
Discovered (Mar 3, 1837) by
John Herschel
A 12th magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa) in Centaurus (RA 13 05 00.2, Dec -47 14 13)
Apparent size 1.0 by 1.0 arcmin.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4940
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4940
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 4937
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4940; also shown, just to the northwest of the galaxy, is the compact group of faint stars listed as NGC 4937

NGC 4941 (= PGC 45165)
Discovered (Apr 24, 1784) by
William Herschel
An 11th magnitude spiral galaxy (type (R)SAB(r)ab?) in Virgo (RA 13 04 13.0, Dec -05 33 05)
Apparent size 4.2 by 2.7 arcmin. A Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 2).
NOAO image of spiral galaxy NGC 4941
Above, a 4.5 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4941 (Image Credits: George Seitz/Adam Block/NOAO/AURA/NSF)
Below, a detailed view of its central regions (Image Credits: Hubble Legacy Archive, Wikimedia Commons)
Partially processed HST image of central portion of spiral galaxy NGC 4941
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy (Image Credits as for top image)
NOAO image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4941 superimposed on a DSS background to fill in missing areas

NGC 4942 ( = PGC 45177, and probably =
IC 4136)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1789) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 4942)
Discovered (July, 1899) by DeLisle Stewart (and later listed as IC 4136)
A 13th magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)d?) in Virgo (RA 13 04 19.0, Dec -07 38 56)
(see IC 4136 for a discussion of the probable duplicate listing) Apparent size 1.6 by 1.3 arcmin. (Note: The VST image shown below is a preliminary image from a new survey of the Southern skies intended to eventually provide coverage for those regions similar to that of the Northern sky by the SDSS; it is presented as an example of the improvement in image quality that should soon be readily available for regions currently covered only by much older images obtained with now "ancient" technology.)
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4942
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4942
Below, a preliminary image from a new survey (Image Credits: VST)
Preliminary VST survey sample: image of spiral galaxy NGC 4942
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4942

NGC 4943 (= PGC 45129)
Discovered (Apr 20, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 14th magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SAB0) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 03 45.0, Dec +28 05 01)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.3 arcmin.

NGC 4944 (= PGC 45133)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 13th magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 03 50.0, Dec +28 11 07)
Apparent size 1.5 by 0.5 arcmin.

NGC 4945 (= PGC 45279)
Discovered (Apr 29, 1826) by
James Dunlop (411)
An 8th magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(s)cd?) in Centaurus (RA 13 05 26.1, Dec -49 27 46)
Apparent size 19.8 by 4.0 arcmin.
ESO image of spiral galaxy NGC 4945
Above, an 18 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4945 (Image Credits above and below: ESO)
Below, a 30 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing PGC 45380
ESO image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4945 overlaid on a DSS background to fill in missing areas; also shown in spiral galaxy PGC 45380, also known as NGC 4945A

PGC 45380 (= "NGC 4945A")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 4945A due to its proximity to
NGC 4945
A 12th magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(s)m?) in Centaurus (RA 13 06 33.7, Dec -49 41 30)
Apparent size 2.5 by 1.6 arcmin. 113767
DSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 45380, also known as NGC 4945A
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 45380 (nearly lost in glare from 8th magnitude HD 113767)
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy (also see the wide-field image of NGC 4945)
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 45380, also known as NGC 4945A

NGC 4946 (= PGC 45283)
Discovered (Jun 3, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3) in Centaurus (RA 13 05 29.2, Dec -43 35 30)
Apparent size 1.6 by 1.2 arcmin.

NGC 4947 (=
IC 3974 = PGC 45269)
Discovered (May 1, 1834) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 4947)
Discovered (Mar 28, 1898) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 3974)
A 12th magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(r)b pec) in Centaurus (RA 13 05 20.2, Dec -35 20 13)
(see IC 3974 for a discussion of the duplicate listing) Apparent size 2.4 by 1.2 arcmin.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4947
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4947
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4947

PGC 45180 (= PGC 651661 = "NGC 4947A")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 4947A since in general area of
NGC 4947
A 15th magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(s)m?) in Centaurus (RA 13 04 20.7, Dec -35 13 42)
Apparent size 1.7 by 0.7 arcmin.
DSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 45180, also known as NGC 4947A
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 45180
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 45180, also known as NGC 4947A

NGC 4948 (= PGC 45224, and probably =
IC 4156)
Discovered (May 25, 1887) by Lewis Swift (6-51) (and later listed as NGC 4948)
Discovered (July, 1899) by DeLisle Stewart (and later listed as IC 4156)
A 13th magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(s)dm?) in Virgo (RA 13 04 55.8, Dec -07 56 47)
(See IC 4156 for a discussion of the probable duplicate listing) Apparent size 2.0 by 0.7 arcmin.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4948
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4948
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4948

PGC 45242 (= "NGC 4948A")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 4948A since in general area of
NGC 4948
A 14th magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(s)dm) in Virgo (RA 13 05 05.8, Dec -08 09 38)
Apparent size 1.35 by 0.95 arcmin.
DSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 45242, also known as NGC 4948A
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 45242
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 45242, also known as NGC 4948A

NGC 4949 (= PGC 45161)
Discovered (Apr 19, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 15th magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb pec) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 04 18.1, Dec +29 01 45)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.3 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4949
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4949
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4949
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 4850 - 4899) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 4900 - 4949     → (NGC 4950 - 4999)