Celestial Atlas
(NGC 5050 - 5099) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 5100 - 5149 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 5150 - 5199)
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5100, 5101, 5102, 5103, 5104, 5105, 5106, 5107, 5108, 5109, 5110, 5111, 5112, 5113, 5114, 5115, 5116,
5117, 5118, 5119, 5120, 5121, 5122, 5123, 5124, 5125, 5126, 5127, 5128, 5129, 5130, 5131, 5132, 5133,
5134, 5135, 5136, 5137, 5138, 5139, 5140, 5141, 5142, 5143, 5144, 5145, 5146, 5147, 5148, 5149

Page last updated Aug 28, 2013
WORKING 5129: Add positions/physical data (per Steinicke)

NGC 5100 (=
NGC 5106 = PGC 46599)
Discovered (Jan 23, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5106)
Discovered (Mar 22, 1865) by Albert Marth (255) (and later listed as NGC 5100)
A pair of galaxies in Virgo
#1 = A 14th magnitude spiral galaxy (type S??) at RA 13 20 59.4, Dec +08 58 39
#2 = A 14th magnitude spiral galaxy (type S??) at RA 13 20 59.5, Dec +08 58 44
Apparent size of component 1 is 0.8 by 0.5 arcmin(?); of component 2 is 0.8 by 0.4 arcmin?

NGC 5101 (= PGC 46661)
Discovered (Mar 28, 1786) by
William Herschel
An 11th magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a?) in Hydra (RA 13 21 46.0, Dec -27 25 51)
Apparent size 5.4 by 4.6 arcmin?

NGC 5102 (= PGC 46674)
Discovered (Apr 21, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 10th magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Centaurus (RA 13 21 57.0, Dec -36 37 54)
Apparent size 8.6 by 2.7 arcmin(?). Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type SA0-.
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5102
Above, an 8 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5102 (the glare is from 3rd-magnitude ι Centauri)
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5102

NGC 5103 (= PGC 46552)
Discovered (Apr 9, 1787) by
William Herschel
A 13th magnitude spiral galaxy (type S??) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 20 30.0, Dec +43 05 04)
Apparent size 1.4 by 1.0 arcmin?

NGC 5104 (= PGC 46633)
Discovered (Apr 12, 1864) by
Albert Marth (256)
A 14th magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Virgo (RA 13 21 22.9, Dec +00 20 34)
Apparent size 1.2 by 0.4 arcmin?

NGC 5105 (= PGC 46664)
Discovered (Jun 3, 1886) by
Lewis Swift (3-70)
A 12th magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Virgo (RA 13 21 49.0, Dec -13 12 26)
Apparent size 2.0 by 1.5 arcmin?

NGC 5106 (=
NGC 5100 = PGC 46599)
Discovered (Jan 23, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5106)
Discovered (Mar 22, 1865) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 5100)
A pair of galaxies in Virgo
#1 = A 14th magnitude spiral galaxy (type S??) at RA 13 20 59.4, Dec +08 58 39
#2 = A 14th magnitude spiral galaxy (type S??) at RA 13 20 59.5, Dec +08 58 44
This entry will primarily contain historical information; for anything else see NGC 5100.

NGC 5107 (= PGC 46636)
Discovered (Mar 17, 1787) by
William Herschel
A 13th magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBcd?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 21 24.4, Dec +38 32 18)
Apparent size 1.7 by 0.5 arcmin?

NGC 5108 (= PGC 46774)
Discovered (Jun 3, 1836) by
John Herschel
A 14th magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Centaurus (RA 13 23 18.7, Dec -32 20 31)
Apparent size 1.2 by 0.3 arcmin?

NGC 5109 (=
NGC 5113 = PGC 46589)
Discovered (Mar 17, 1790) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5109)
Discovered (Apr 24, 1789) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5113)
A 13th magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Ursa Major (RA 13 20 52.6, Dec +57 38 32)
Apparent size 1.7 by 0.5 arcmin?

NGC 5110 (=
NGC 5111 = PGC 46737)
Discovered (May 11, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5111)
Discovered (Jun 3, 1886) by Lewis Swift (3-71) (and later listed as NGC 5110)
A 13th magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Virgo (RA 13 22 56.4, Dec -12 57 51)
Apparent size 2.0 by 1.7 arcmin?

NGC 5111 (=
NGC 5110 = PGC 46737)
Discovered (May 11, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5111)
Discovered (Jun 3, 1886) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 5110)
A 13th magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Virgo (RA 13 22 56.4, Dec -12 57 51)
This entry will primarily contain historical information; for anything else see NGC 5110.

NGC 5112 (= PGC 46671)
Discovered (Mar 17, 1787) by
William Herschel
A 12th magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 21 56.6, Dec +38 44 07)
Apparent size 4.0 by 2.9 arcmin?

NGC 5113 (=
NGC 5109 = PGC 46589)
Discovered (Mar 17, 1790) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5109)
Discovered (Apr 24, 1789) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5113)
A 13th magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Ursa Major (RA 13 20 52.6, Dec +57 38 32)
This entry will primarily contain historical information; for anything else see NGC 5109.

NGC 5114 (= PGC 46828)
Discovered (Jun 3, 1836) by
John Herschel
A 12th magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/SB0?) in Centaurus (RA 13 24 01.6, Dec -32 20 38)
Apparent size 1.8 by 1.0 arcmin?

NGC 5115 (= PGC 46754)
Discovered (Mar 25, 1887) by
Lewis Swift (6-54)
A 14th magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Virgo (RA 13 23 00.4, Dec +13 57 04)
Apparent size 1.4 by 0.7 arcmin?

NGC 5116 (= PGC 46744)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 13th magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 22 55.7, Dec +26 58 53)
Apparent size 2.0 by 0.7 arcmin?

NGC 5117 (= PGC 46746)
Discovered (Mar 30, 1827) by
John Herschel
A 13th magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 22 56.4, Dec +28 18 56)
Apparent size 2.2 by 1.0 arcmin?

NGC 5118 (=
IC 4236 = PGC 46782)
Discovered (May 12, 1793) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5118)
Discovered (May 22, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 4236)
A 14th magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Virgo (RA 13 23 27.4, Dec +06 23 34)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.7 arcmin?

NGC 5119 (= PGC 46826)
Discovered (May 6, 1836) by
John Herschel
A 13th magnitude spiral galaxy (type S??) in Virgo (RA 13 24 00.3, Dec -12 16 34)
Apparent size 1.3 by 0.4 arcmin?

NGC 5120 (= OCL 899)
Discovered (Jun 16, 1835) by
John Herschel
A group of stars in Centaurus (RA 13 25 40.3, Dec -63 27 29)
Apparent size 3.0 arcmin?

NGC 5121 (= PGC 46896)
Discovered (Jun 26, 1834) by
John Herschel
An 11th magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Centaurus (RA 13 24 45.4, Dec -37 40 57)
Apparent size 1.9 by 1.5 arcmin?

PGC 46960 (= "NGC 5121A")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 5121A since in general area of
NGC 5121
A 15th magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBd?) in Centaurus (RA 13 25 32.6, Dec -37 22 41)
Apparent size 1.7 by 0.5 arcmin?

NGC 5122 (= PGC 46848)
Discovered (Apr 24, 1887) by
Lewis Swift (6-56)
A 13th magnitude spiral galaxy (type S??) in Virgo (RA 13 24 14.9, Dec -10 39 16)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.3 arcmin?

NGC 5123 (= PGC 46767)
Discovered (Apr 9, 1787) by
William Herschel
A 13th magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 23 10.4, Dec +43 05 10)
Apparent size 1.3 by 1.1 arcmin?

NGC 5124 (=
IC 4233 = PGC 46902)
Discovered (May 5, 1834) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5124)
Discovered (Dec 31, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 4233)
A 12th magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E6?) in Centaurus (RA 13 24 50.2, Dec -30 18 29)
Apparent size 2.2 by 0.7 arcmin?

NGC 5125 (= PGC 46827)
Discovered (Jan 18, 1828) by
John Herschel
A 12th magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Virgo (RA 13 24 00.7, Dec +09 42 37)
Apparent size 1.7 by 1.3 arcmin?

NGC 5126 (= PGC 46910)
Discovered (May 6, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Centaurus (RA 13 24 53.4, Dec -30 20 01)
Apparent size 1.4 by 0.4 arcmin?

NGC 5127 (= PGC 46809)
Discovered (Mar 13, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 12th magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 23 45.2, Dec +31 33 55)
Apparent size 2.8 by 2.2 arcmin?

NGC 5128 (= PGC 46957 =
Arp 153), Centaurus A
Discovered (Apr 29, 1826) by James Dunlop (482)
A 7th magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0? pec) in Centaurus (RA 13 25 29.0, Dec -43 00 58)
Apparent size 25.7 by 20.0 arcmin? Used by the Arp Atlas as an example of a disturbed galaxy with interior absorption. (In the process of devouring a large spiral galaxy)
DSS image of NGC 5128, also known as Centaurus A and Arp 153
Above, a 24 arcmin wide "closeup" of Centaurus A
Below, a wide-field view of the region (Image Credits: Adam Block/AURA/NSF/NOAO)
NOAO image of the region near NGC 5128, also known as Centaurus A and Arp 153
Below, a HST image of the nucleus of Centaurus A (Image Credits: E.J. Schreier (STScI), and NASA)
HST image of the nucleus of NGC 5128, also known as Centaurus A and Arp 153
Below, a Spitzer infrared image of the nucleus of the galaxy ((SSC/Caltech) et al., JPL, Caltech, NASA)
Spitzer image of nucleus of NGC 5128, also known as Centaurus A and Arp 153
Below, a multispectral image of radio lobes due to (black hole?) jets (Image Credits:ESO/WFI (Optical); MPIfR/ESO/APEX/A.Weiss et al. (Submillimetre); NASA/CXC/CfA/R.Kraft et al. (X-ray), ESO
Multispectral ESO NASA image of NGC 5128, also known as Centaurus A and Arp 153

NGC 5129
Discovered (Mar 19, 1787) by
William Herschel

NGC 5130
Discovered (1886) by
Ormond Stone (I-198)

NGC 5131
Discovered (Apr 24, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest

NGC 5132
Discovered (Apr 8, 1866) by
Heinrich d'Arrest

NGC 5133
Discovered (Apr 23, 1881) by
Édouard Stephan (11a-19)

NGC 5134
Discovered (Mar 10, 1785) by
William Herschel

NGC 5135
Discovered (May 8, 1834) by
John Herschel

NGC 5136 (=
IC 888)
Discovered (Apr 12, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5136)
Discovered (May 3, 1889) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 888)
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E) in Virgo (RA 13 24 51.4, Dec +13 44 17)

NGC 5137
Discovered (Apr 17, 1887) by
Lewis Swift (6-57)

NGC 5138
Discovered (May 26, 1826) by
James Dunlop (312)

NGC 5139 =
ω Centauri
Discovered (1677) by Edmond Halley
A 4th-magnitude globular cluster in Centaurus (RA 13 26 47.0, Dec -47 28 51)
Per Dreyer, NGC 5139 (1860 RA 13 18 24, NPD 136 34.8) is "a magnificent object(!!!), a globular cluster, ω Centauri". The second IC adds "NPD is 136 44.8 (error of reduction in the GC). The corrected position precesses to RA 13 26 45.3, Dec -47 28 35, nearly dead center on this most spectacular of all globular clusters, but given the use of its name, the identification would be certain even if the position were considerably in error. Bright enough to appear as a fuzzy star to the unaided eye in a dark southern sky, Omega Centauri is the largest, most massive and brightest globular cluster in our galaxy. For reasons discussed below, it has even been suggested that it is not a true globular cluster, but the core of a dwarf galaxy captured by our own galaxy, and stripped of its outer regions. The cluster is about 15 thousand light years from Earth, yet still appears larger than the full moon (its outer regions covering a region nearly 40 arcmin across), and packs over ten million stars into its 150 light year diameter. Most of the still visible stars are low-mass, faint stars, as even stars like the Sun would be getting close to the end of their lives after the nearly twelve billion years since the cluster formed. Still, the cluster does contain a number of much brighter "red giants" (particularly notable in the HST image below), the result of stars at the end of their lives swelling to planetary orbital sizes before collapsing to faint white dwarfs (more massive stars could become neutron stars or black holes, but all such stars which once filled the cluster with their brilliant light must have died many billions of years ago). It also has a substantial number of "blue stragglers", relatively bright, hot stars with about twice the mass of their far more numerous companions, created by the collision of two stars in the dense central parts of the cluster (in regions such as the Solar neighborhood, such collisions are impossible, because stars are so small compared to their separations; but in the cores of globular clusters, where tens of thousands of stars occupy the space normally occupied by only one or two stars, collisions are hundreds of millions of times more likely). The cluster is unique in several respects, one of which is its rotational velocity. Most globular clusters have no net rotation, the stars they contain simply moving around in random directions, under the influence of the overall gravity of the cluster and their nearest neighbors; but Omega Centauri is rotating at about 8 km/sec, and should complete one rotation every 15 to 20 million years. It also contains stars of varying chemical composition, suggesting that some were formed earlier, when the Universe contained virtually nothing but hydrogen and helium, and others later, after the death of earlier generations of stars seeded the space between them with the ashes of their destruction. This is consistent with the hypothesis that the cluster is a captured galaxy, in which star formation went on for some time; the more normal situation for globular clusters is for virtually all of the stars to form in a relatively short time, and have nearly identical chemical composition.
ESO image of core of NGC 5139, also known as Omega Centauri
Above, a half degree wide view of the core of NGC 5139 (Image Credits: ESO)
Below, a one degree wide region centered on the cluster
Wikisky image of region near Omega Centauri
Below, the center of Omega Centauri, where stars are packed ten thousand times more densely than in the Solar neighborhood. (Adrienne Cool (SFSU) et al., Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA), NASA, apod011010)
HST image of core of NGC 5139, also known as Omega Centauri

NGC 5140
Discovered (May 1, 1834) by
John Herschel

NGC 5141
Discovered (May 1, 1785) by
William Herschel

NGC 5142
Discovered (May 1, 1785) by
William Herschel

NGC 5143
Discovered (Apr 17, 1855) by
R. J. Mitchell

NGC 5144
Discovered (May 6, 1791) by
William Herschel

NGC 5145
Discovered (Apr 9, 1787) by
William Herschel

NGC 5146
Discovered (May 9, 1784) by
William Herschel

NGC 5147
Discovered (Jan 24, 1784) by
William Herschel

NGC 5148
Discovered (Apr 30, 1864) by
Albert Marth (257)

NGC 5149 (= PGC 47011)
Discovered (May 1, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 26 09.1, Dec +35 56 04)
Based on a recessional velocity of 5650 km/sec, NGC 5149 is about 265 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.6 by 0.9 arcmin, it is about 120 thousand light years across. NGC 5149 may be a companion of its nearest apparent neighbor, NGC 5154.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5149
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5149
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 5154
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5149, also showing spiral galaxy NGC 5154
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 5050 - 5099) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 5100 - 5149     → (NGC 5150 - 5199)