Celestial Atlas
(NGC 5100 - 5149) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 5150 - 5199 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 5200 - 5249)
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5150, 5151, 5152, 5153, 5154, 5155, 5156, 5157, 5158, 5159, 5160, 5161, 5162, 5163, 5164, 5165, 5166,
5167, 5168, 5169, 5170, 5171, 5172, 5173, 5174, 5175, 5176, 5177, 5178, 5179, 5180, 5181, 5182, 5183,
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Page last updated Nov 14, 2017
Checked current Steinicke physical data, Corwin positions
WORKING: Add Dreyer NGC entries

NGC 5150 (= PGC 47169)
Discovered (May 5, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.8 spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Hydra (RA 13 27 36.6, Dec -29 33 54)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 3885 km/sec, NGC 5150 is about 180 million light years away. It may be a member of a small group with the interacting pair NGC 5152 and 5153, in which case their common distance would be about 190 to 200 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 1.3 by 1.0 arcmin, NGC 5150 is about 75 thousand light years across..
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5150
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5150
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 5152 and 5153
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5150, also showing its possible companions, spiral galaxy NGC 5152 and elliptical galaxy NGC 5153

NGC 5151 (= PGC 47056)
Discovered (May 8, 1826) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.9 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a? pec) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 26 40.8, Dec +16 52 26)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 8165 km/sec, NGC 5151 is about 380 million light years away. Given that, the 0.75 by 0.75 arcmin apparent size of its central region corresponds to about 85 thousand light years, while its 1.8+ by 1.4 arcmin outer regions extend across more than 200 thousand light years.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5151
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5151
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5151

NGC 5152 (= PGC 47187)
Discovered (May 5, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.4 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)b? pec) in Hydra (RA 13 27 51.2, Dec -29 37 07)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 4165 km/sec, NGC 5152 is about 195 million light years away, in poor agreement with a single redshift-independent distance estimate of 285 million light years. However, its obvious interaction with NGC 5153 shows that they must be at about the same distance, and the average of their redshift-independent distance measurements (about 215 million light years) is in good agreement with their recessional velocity distance average of about 200 million light years. The pair is probably part of a small group with NGC 5150, and if so their common distance of about 190 to 200 million light years and its apparent size of 1.9 by 0.7 arcmin implies that NGC 5152 is about 110 thousand light years across.
DSS image of interacting pair spiral galaxy NGC 5152 and elliptical galaxy NGC 5153
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5152 and 5153
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair, also showing NGC 5150
DSS image of region near interacting pair spiral galaxy NGC 5152 and elliptical galaxy NGC 5153, also showing their possible companion, spiral galaxy NGC 5150

NGC 5153 (= PGC 47194)
Discovered (May 8, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.8 elliptical galaxy (type E1? pec) in Hydra (RA 13 27 54.4, Dec -29 37 05)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 4320 km/sec, NGC 5153 is about 200 million light years away, in poor agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 135 to 155 million light years. However, its obvious interaction with NGC 5152 (which see for images) shows that they must be at about the same distance, and the average of their redshift-independent distance measurements (about 215 million light years) is in good agreement with their recessional velocity distance average of about 200 million light years. The pair is probably part of a small group with NGC 5150, and if so their common distance of about 190 to 200 million light years and its apparent size of 1.5 by 1.3 arcmin implies that NGC 5153 is about 85 thousand light years across.

NGC 5154 (= PGC 47041)
Discovered (May 1, 1785) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type Scd?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 26 28.5, Dec +36 00 37)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5580 km/sec, NGC 5154 is about 260 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.4 by 1.2 arcmin, it is about 105 thousand light years across. NGC 5154 may be a companion of its nearest apparent neighbor, NGC 5149.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5154
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5154
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 5149
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5154, also showing spiral galaxy NGC 5149

NGC 5155 = "PGC 5067709"
Discovered (Jun 16, 1835) by
John Herschel
A star cloud in Centaurus (RA 13 28 18.0, Dec -63 28 00)
Historical Identification: (refer to Corwin).
Designation Notes: LEDA gives the position as RA 13 29 35.4, Dec -63 25 29, but the poorly defined nature of the "object" makes a determination of its exact position impossible. Also, as in the case of many non-galaxian objects, the PGC designation only reflects a desire to have the object in the catalog and a search for that designation returns no result, so it is shown in quotes above.
Physical Information: About 60 arcmin wide?

NGC 5156 (= PGC 47283)
Discovered (Mar 31, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.5 spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Centaurus (RA 13 28 44.1, Dec -48 55 00)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:

NGC 5157 (= PGC 47131)
Discovered (Mar 20, 1787) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type (R)SBa?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 27 16.8, Dec +32 01 51)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:

NGC 5158 (= PGC 47180)
Discovered (May 7, 1826) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.8 spiral galaxy (type SBab?) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 27 47.0, Dec +17 46 44)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:

NGC 5159 (= PGC 47235)
Discovered (Apr 30, 1864) by
Albert Marth (258)
A magnitude 14.2 spiral galaxy (type Scd?) in Virgo (RA 13 28 16.2, Dec +02 58 58)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:

NGC 5160
Recorded (Feb 7, 1862) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A pair of stars in Virgo (RA 13 28 21.5, Dec +05 59 45)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Magnitudes 14.4 (southwestern star) and 14.6 (northeastern star).

NGC 5161 (= PGC 47321)
Discovered (Jun 3, 1836) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.2 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Centaurus (RA 13 29 13.9, Dec -33 10 26)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:

NGC 5162 (= PGC 47346 =
NGC 5174)
Discovered (Mar 15, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5174)
Discovered (Apr 19, 1887) by Lewis Swift (6-58) (and later listed as NGC 5162)
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Virgo (RA 13 29 25.9, Dec +11 00 28)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:

NGC 5163 (= PGC 47096)
Discovered (Apr 26, 1789) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 13.6 elliptical galaxy (type E4?) in Ursa Major (RA 13 26 54.3, Dec +52 45 13)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:

NGC 5164 (= PGC 47124)
Discovered (Apr 14, 1789) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Ursa Major (RA 13 27 11.9, Dec +55 29 14)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:

NGC 5165 (= PGC 47281)
Discovered (May 5, 1883) by
Wilhelm Tempel (2)
A magnitude 13.7 galaxy (type S0/a?) in Virgo (RA 13 28 39.2, Dec +11 23 14)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:

NGC 5166 (= PGC 47234)
Discovered (Apr 29, 1827) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.5 galaxy (type Sb?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 28 15.1, Dec +32 01 56)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:

PGC 47268 (= "NGC 5166B")
Not an NGC object but listed here since often called NGC 5166B
A magnitude 14.8 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in
Canes Venatici (RA 13 28 33.1, Dec +32 04 10)
Physical Information:

NGC 5167 (= PGC 47277)
Discovered (Jun 7, 1883) by
Wilhelm Tempel (VII)
A magnitude 13.8 galaxy (type Sc?) in Virgo (RA 13 28 40.2, Dec +12 42 40)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:

NGC 5168 (= OCL 905)
Discovered (Jun 16, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 9.1 open cluster (type I3p) in Centaurus (RA 13 31 05.5, Dec -60 56 46)
Historical Identification:
 Corwin also lists the 10th magnitude double star at RA 13 31 14.4, Dec -60 56 02, presumably as a marker for the cluster?
Physical Information:

NGC 5169 (= PGC 47231)
Discovered (Apr 26, 1830) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 28 10.0, Dec +46 40 20)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:

NGC 5170 (= PGC 47394 = PGC 47396)
Discovered (Feb 7, 1785) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 11.1 spiral galaxy (type Sab? Sc?) in Virgo (RA 13 29 48.8, Dec -17 57 59)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:
Corwin lists an apparent companion (PGC 47400) at RA 13 29 51.6, Dec -17 55 03
and another (PGC 873674 = PGC 873723) at RA 13 29 48.7, Dec -18 02 13

NGC 5171 (= PGC 47339)
Discovered (May 5, 1883) by
George Hough (3)
A magnitude 12.8 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Virgo (RA 13 29 21.6, Dec +11 44 06)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:
Corwin lists an apparent companion
(SDSS J132920.66+114424.2 = "PGC 3556007") at RA 13 29 20.7, Dec +11 44 24
and another (SDSS J132924.62+114337.6 = "PGC 3556015") at RA 13 29 24.6, Dec +11 43 38

NGC 5172 (= PGC 47330)
Discovered (May 7, 1826) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.9 spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 29 19.2, Dec +17 03 06)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:

NGC 5173 (= PGC 47257)
Discovered (May 12, 1787) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 12.2 elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 28 25.3, Dec +46 35 30)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:

NGC 5174 (= PGC 47346 =
NGC 5162)
Discovered (Mar 15, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5174)
Discovered (Apr 19, 1887) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 5162)
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Virgo (RA 13 29 25.9, Dec +11 00 28)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:

NGC 5175
Recorded (Mar 15, 1784) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 15.2 star in Virgo (RA 13 29 26.3, Dec +10 59 43)
Corwin also lists another candidate at RA 13 29 24.8, Dec +11 01 00
(both are stars superimposed on NGC 5174)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Steinicke lists this as a magnitude 12 star at RA 13 29 31.0, Dec +11 02 30

NGC 5176 (= PGC 47338)
Discovered (Jun 29, 1883) by
Ernst Hartwig (4)
A magnitude 14.4 elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Virgo (RA 13 29 25.0, Dec +11 46 53)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:
Corwin lists an apparent companion
(2MASX J13292822+1146255 = "PGC 3808809") at RA 13 29 28.2, Dec +11 46 25

NGC 5177 (= PGC 47337)
Discovered (Jun 29, 1883) by
Ernst Hartwig (5)
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Virgo (RA 13 29 24.3, Dec +11 47 49)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:
Corwin lists an apparent companion (2MASX J13292460+1148165 = "PGC 3808789") at RA 13 29 24.6, Dec +11 48 16
and another (PGC 1399011) at RA 13 29 27.7, Dec +11 48 18

NGC 5178 (= PGC 47358)
Discovered (May 11, 1883) by
Wilhelm Tempel (VII, VIII-3)
A magnitude 13.8 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Virgo (RA 13 29 29.3, Dec +11 37 29)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:
Corwin lists an apparent companion (2MASX J13293420+1138105 = "PGC 3556025") at RA 13 29 34.2, Dec +11 38 10
and another (PGC 47341) at RA 13 29 23.2, Dec +11 39 27

NGC 5179 (= PGC 47363)
Discovered (May 5, 1883) by
Sherburne Burnham (4)
A magnitude 14.2 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Virgo (RA 13 29 30.9, Dec +11 44 45)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:

NGC 5180 (= PGC 47352)
Discovered (Mar 21, 1784) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 13.0 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 29 27.0, Dec +16 49 33)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:

NGC 5181 (= PGC 47373)
Discovered (Mar 29, 1830) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.9 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Virgo (RA 13 29 42.0, Dec +13 18 15)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:

NGC 5182 (= PGC 47489)
Discovered (May 13, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.4 spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Hydra (RA 13 30 41.1, Dec -28 09 01)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:

NGC 5183 (= PGC 47432 = PGC 1111814)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1787) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 12.7 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Virgo (RA 13 30 06.1, Dec -01 43 14)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:

NGC 5184 (= PGC 47438)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1787) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 12.8 spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Virgo (RA 13 30 11.5, Dec -01 39 47)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:

NGC 5185 (= PGC 47422)
Discovered (Mar 19, 1787) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Virgo (RA 13 30 02.2, Dec +13 24 58)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:

NGC 5186 (= PGC 47426)
Discovered (Jun 29, 1883) by
Ernst Hartwig (1)
A magnitude 14.8 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Virgo (RA 13 30 03.9, Dec +12 10 31)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:

NGC 5187 (= PGC 47393)
Discovered (Mar 20, 1787) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 29 48.2, Dec +31 07 48)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:

NGC 5188 (= PGC 47549)
Discovered (May 1, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.1 spiral galaxy (type SBbc? pec) in Centaurus (RA 13 31 28.2, Dec -34 47 40)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:

NGC 5189 (=
IC 4274 = "PGC 3517770")
Discovered (Jul 1, 1826) by James Dunlop (252) (and later listed as NGC 5189)
Discovered (1901) by Williamina Fleming (and later listed as IC 4274)
A magnitude 10 planetary nebula in Musca (RA 13 33 32.9, Dec -65 58 27)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.1 by 2.4 arcmin. The central star is a magnitude 14.5 white dwarf.
HST image of planetary nebula NGC 5189
Above, an HST closeup of the nebula (Image Credits: NASA, ESA and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA))
(Antilhue Observatory wide-field image also available, to be posted in next iteration of page)

NGC 5190 (= PGC 47482)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1827) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 30 38.6, Dec +18 08 04)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:

NGC 5191 (= PGC 47498)
Discovered (May 5, 1883) by
George Hough (5)
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Virgo (RA 13 30 47.4, Dec +11 12 03)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:

NGC 5192 (= PGC 47503)
Discovered (Apr 12, 1864) by
Albert Marth (259)
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Virgo (RA 13 30 51.7, Dec -01 46 43)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:

NGC 5193 (= PGC 47582)
Discovered (Jun 3, 1836) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.6 elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Centaurus (RA 13 31 53.5, Dec -33 14 04)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:
Corwin lists the apparent companion (PGC 159173) at RA 13 31 39.8, Dec -33 14 34

PGC 47568 (= "NGC 5193A")
Not an NGC object but listed here since often called NGC 5193A
A magnitude 13.0 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in
Centaurus (RA 13 31 49.1, Dec -33 14 22)

NGC 5194 (= PGC 47404 =
M51), The Whirlpool Galaxy
(also, with NGC 5195 = Arp 85)

Discovered (Oct 13, 1773) by Charles Messier
Discovered (Jan 5, 1774) by Johann Bode
Recorded (Jan 11, 1774) by Charles Messier as M51
Also observed (Mar 17, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 8.4 spiral galaxy (type SA(s)bc? pec) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 29 52.7, Dec +47 11 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5194 (= GC 3572 = JH 1622, M51, 1860 RA 13 23 58, NPD 42 04.9) is "a magnificent or otherwise interesting object, Great Spiral nebula". The position precesses to RA 13 29 52.5, Dec +47 11 39, practically dead center on the galaxy listed above and the description fits, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: NGC 5194's recessional velocity of 465 km/sec is too small to provide a reliable distance indication, but happens to provide a relatively accurate result of 22 million light years. Redshift-independent distance estimates have ranged from 19 to 30 million light years, but observations of a 2005 supernova in NGC 5195 slightly lowered the estimated distance to 23 ± 4 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 11.2 by 6.9 arcmin, the galaxy is about 70 thousand light years across. Its spectacular spiral structure is believed to be due to its interaction with NGC 5195, with which it forms Arp 85. (Note: The history of discovery implies that M51 should apply only to NGC 5195, but it is not uncommon for NGC 5194 to be referred to as M51A and for NGC 5195 to be referred to as M51B, as though they had both discovered by Messier.) NGC has a bright central nucleus, making it a Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 2). An extensive bridge of stars, gas and dust connects M51 with its smaller companion. Clusters of hot, bright young stars, and gases heated by their radiation illuminate the spiral arms, and clearly define them. Thick dust lanes straddle the arms, sweep across the "bridge" and partially obscure the companion. The Whirlpool Galaxy was the first nebula observed to have a spiral structure, by the 3rd Lord Rosse, using the 72-inch Leviathan (the largest telescope in the world for many decades) at Birr Castle in 1845.
Misti Mountain Observatory image of spiral galaxy NGC 5914, the Whirlpool Galaxy, also known as M51, and of its lenticular companion, NGC 5915; collectively the pair is also known as Arp 85
Above, a 12 arcmin wide "closeup" of NGC 5194 and 5195
Below, a labeled view of the same image (Image Credits & © Jim Misti, Misti Mountain Observatory; used by permission)
Labeled Misti Mountain Observatory image of spiral galaxy NGC 5914, the Whirlpool Galaxy, also known as M51, and of its lenticular companion, NGC 5915; collectively the pair is also known as Arp 85
Below, a detailed false-color image of the pair of galaxies (Image Credits: S. Beckwith (STScI) Hubble Heritage Team, (STScI/AURA), ESA, NASA, postprocessing by Robert Gendler)
HST image of spiral galaxy NGC 5914, the Whirlpool Galaxy, also known as M51, and of its lenticular companion, NGC 5915; collectively the pair is also known as Arp 85

NGC 5195 (= PGC 47413, and with
NGC 5194 = Arp 85)
Discovered (Mar 21, 1781) by Pierre Méchain
A 1magnitude 9.6 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a? pec) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 29 59.5, Dec +47 15 58)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Recessional velocity and redshift-independent distance estimates for NGC 5195 are identical to those of its companion, NGC 5194 (which see for that discussion). In any event their obvious interaction means they share the same distance, in the range of 22 or so million light years. Given that and the 3.0 by 2.5 arcmin apparent size of the brighter core of NGC 5195, it is about 20 thousand light years across; but due to its interaction with NGC 5194, its stars are scattered across a region nearly 6 arcmin across, which corresponds to about 40 thousand light years. (As noted at NGC 5194, NGC 5195 is sometimes referred to as M51B, even though it was not part of Messier's original discovery.)
NOAO image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5195, also known as part of Arp 85
Above, a 3.6 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5195 (Image Credits: Mike & Connie Cerminaro, Flynn Haase, AOP, NOAO)
See NGC 5194 for wider=field views

NGC 5196 (= PGC 47540)
Discovered (Apr 12, 1864) by
Albert Marth (260)
A magnitude 14.2 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Virgo (RA 13 31 19.7, Dec -01 36 54)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:

NGC 5197 (= PGC 47546)
Discovered (Apr 12, 1864) by
Albert Marth (261)
A magnitude 15.1 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Virgo (RA 13 31 25.1, Dec -01 41 35)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:
Corwin lists an apparent companion (PGC 215038 = PGC 1112818) at RA 13 31 26.3, Dec -01 41 07

NGC 5198 (= PGC 47441)
Discovered (May 12, 1787) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 11.8 elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 30 11.4, Dec +46 40 15)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:

NGC 5199 (= PGC 47492)
Discovered (May 1, 1785) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 13.6 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 30 42.8, Dec +34 49 50)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:
Celestial Atlas
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