Celestial Atlas
(NGC 5150 - 5199) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 5200 - 5249 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 5250 - 5299)
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5200, 5201, 5202, 5203, 5204, 5205, 5206, 5207, 5208, 5209, 5210, 5211, 5212, 5213, 5214, 5215, 5216,
5217, 5218, 5219, 5220, 5221, 5222, 5223, 5224, 5225, 5226, 5227, 5228, 5229, 5230, 5231, 5232, 5233,
5234, 5235, 5236, 5237, 5238, 5239, 5240, 5241, 5242, 5243, 5244, 5245, 5246, 5247, 5248, 5249

Page last updated Dec 29, 2014
WORKING: Add positions/physical data (per Steinicke)

NGC 5200
Recorded (Apr 30, 1859) by
Sidney Coolidge (16, HN 18)
A pair of stars in Virgo (RA 13 31 42.4, Dec -00 01 47)

NGC 5201
Discovered (Apr 14, 1789) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in Ursa Major (RA 13 29 16.2, Dec +53 04 54)
SDSS image of NGC 5201
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5201
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy; the star at the top is 7th magnitude HD 117449
SDSS image of region near NGC 5201

NGC 5202
Discovered (Apr 12, 1864) by
Albert Marth (262)

NGC 5203
Discovered (Feb 4, 1786) by
William Herschel

NGC 5204
Discovered (Apr 24, 1789) by
William Herschel

NGC 5205
Discovered (May 18, 1887) by
Lewis Swift (6-59)

NGC 5206
Discovered (Jul 2, 1834) by
John Herschel

NGC 5207
Discovered (Mar 19, 1787) by
William Herschel

NGC 5208
Discovered (Jan 23, 1784) by
William Herschel

NGC 5209
Discovered (Jan 23, 1784) by
William Herschel

NGC 5210
Discovered (Apr 13, 1784) by
William Herschel

NGC 5211
Discovered (Apr 14, 1828) by
John Herschel

NGC 5212
Discovered (Apr 24, 1830) by
John Herschel

NGC 5213
Discovered (Apr 30, 1864) by
Albert Marth (263)

NGC 5214
Discovered (Apr 9, 1787) by
William Herschel

NGC 5215
Discovered (Jun 3, 1836) by
John Herschel

NGC 5216 (= PGC 47598, and with
NGC 5218 = Keenan's System = Arp 104)
Discovered (Mar 19, 1790) by William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2 pec) in Ursa Major (RA 13 32 07.1, Dec +62 42 03)
A gravitationally interacting pair with NGC 5218, referred to as Keenan's System, or Arp 104. (The pair is used in the Arp Atlas as an example of an elliptical galaxy connected to a spiral galaxy.) A Seyfert galaxy (type Sy1). Based on a recessional velocity of 2940 km/sec, NGC 5216 is about 135 million light years away, in fair agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 155 to 185 million light years. Whatever the actual distance, the galaxy must be at essentially the same distance as its companion, NGC 5218, so I have adopted a common distance of 160 million light years for comparison purposes. Given that and its apparent size of 2.6 by 1.9 arcmin, NGC 5216 is about 120 thousand light years across. The overall extent of Keenan's system, including the trails of gas extending between and beyond the pair, is about 250 thousand light years. (This pair was featured as the Astronomy Picture of the Day for July 2, 2010. Unfortunately, the accompanying description of the system contains a factor of ten error in distances and dimensions, and reverses the NGC identifications. This is an example of an all-too-common propagation of incorrect data across the Internet; but LEDA and NED make it clear that the system is much more distant than usually stated, and even the NOAO site, although also giving incorrect dimensions and reversing the NGC identifications, correctly states that it is well over 100 million light years away. The APoD caption also incorrectly states that Keenan discovered the system. William Herschel was the first to record the nebulae; Keenan discovered the bridge of stellar material connecting the pair.)
SDSS image of NGC 5216
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5216
Below, a 12 arcmin wide view of the region near the galaxy, faintly showing its interaction with NGC 5218
(See NGC 5218 for more views of the two galaxies)
SDSS image of the region near NGC 5216, also showing its interaction with NGC 5218

NGC 5216A (= PGC 47854)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in
Ursa Major (RA 13 34 41.5, Dec +61 59 35)
Based on a recessional velocity of 3080 km/sec, PGC 47854 is about 145 million light years away, in reasonable agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 145 to 150 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 1.35 by 0.45 arcmins, it is about 55 thousand light years across. (Unlike many NGC"A" or "B" galaxies, which are close companions of the original NGC object, NGC 5216A has no obvious connection to NGC 5216, being separated from it by a full degree. However, if it happens to be at the same distance, it would be only a couple of million light years away from Keenan's System; so although that is only a possibility, perhaps the appellation is not entirely unwarranted.)
SDSS image of PGC 47854, sometimes referred to as NGC 5216A
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 47854
Below, a 12 arcmin wide view of the region near the galaxy
SDSS image of region near PGC 47854, sometimes referred to as NGC 5216A

NGC 5217 (= PGC 47793)
Discovered (May 7, 1826) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 34 05.9, Dec +17 51 26)
Based on a recessional velocity of 8045 km/sec, NGC 5217 is about 375 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.5 by 1.4 arcmin, it is about 160 thousand light years across.
DSS image of NGC 5217
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5217
Below, a 12 arcmin wide view of the region near the galaxy
SDSS image of region near NGC 5217

NGC 5218 (= PGC 47603, and with
NGC 5216 = Keenan's System = Arp 104)
Discovered (Mar 19, 1790) by William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(s)b? pec) in Ursa Major (RA 13 32 10.2, Dec +62 46 05)
A gravitationally interacting pair with NGC 5216, referred to as Keenan's System, or Arp 104. (The pair is used in the Arp Atlas as an example of an elliptical galaxy connected to a spiral galaxy.) Based on a recessional velocity of 2935 km/sec, NGC 5218 is about 130 million light years away, in fair agreement with a redshift-independent distance of 165 million light years. Whatever the actual distance, the galaxy must be at essentially the same distance as its companion, NGC 5216, so I have adopted a common distance of 160 million light years for comparison purposes. Given that and its apparent size of 1.7 by 1.4 arcmin, NGC 5218 is about 80 thousand light years across. The overall extent of Keenan's system, including the trails of gas extending between and beyond the pair, is about 250 thousand light years. (This pair was featured as the Astronomy Picture of the Day for July 2, 2010. Unfortunately, the accompanying description of the system contains a factor of ten error in distances and dimensions, and reverses the NGC identifications. This is an example of an all-too-common propagation of incorrect data across the Internet; but LEDA and NED make it clear that the system is much more distant than usually stated, and even the NOAO site, although also giving incorrect dimensions and reversing the NGC identifications, correctly states that it is well over 100 million light years away. The APoD caption also incorrectly states that Keenan discovered the system. William Herschel was the first to record the nebulae; Keenan discovered the bridge of stellar material connecting the pair.)
SDSS image of NGC 5218
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5218
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, faintly showing its interaction with NGC 5216
SDSS image of the region near NGC 5218, also showing its interaction with NGC 5216
Below, a 12 arcmin wide image centered on NGC 5216 and 5218, processed to emphasize their interaction
SDSS image centered between NGC 5216 and 5218, also known as Keenan's System, or Arp 104
Below, another image of the pair (Credit: Sid Leach and Wil Milan/Adam Block/AURA/NSF/NOAO)
NOAO image of NGC 5216 and 5218, also known as Keenan's System, or Arp 104

NGC 5219 (=
NGC 5244)
Discovered (Jun 1, 1834) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5244)
Discovered (Jun 3, 1834) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5219)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Centaurus (RA 13 38 41.8, Dec -45 51 17)

NGC 5220
Discovered (Jun 3, 1836) by
John Herschel

NGC 5221
Discovered (Apr 12, 1784) by
William Herschel

NGC 5222
Discovered (Apr 12, 1784) by
William Herschel

NGC 5223
Discovered (May 1, 1785) by
William Herschel

NGC 5224
Discovered (May 12, 1793) by
William Herschel

NGC 5225
Discovered (Apr 26, 1789) by
William Herschel

NGC 5226
Discovered (Apr 5, 1877) by
John Dreyer

NGC 5227
Discovered (May 13, 1793) by
William Herschel

NGC 5228
Discovered (May 1, 1785) by
William Herschel

NGC 5229
Discovered (Jan 1, 1886) by
Lewis Swift (3-72)

NGC 5230
Discovered (Apr 12, 1784) by
William Herschel

NGC 5231
Discovered (Apr 30, 1864) by
Albert Marth (264)

NGC 5232
Discovered (May 30, 1864) by
Albert Marth (265)

NGC 5233
Discovered (May 3, 1785) by
William Herschel

NGC 5234
Discovered (Jul 6, 1834) by
John Herschel

NGC 5235
Discovered (Apr 13, 1784) by
William Herschel

NGC 5236 (=
M83)
Discovered (1751) by Nicolas Lacaille
Observed/Recorded (Feb 17, 1781) by Charles Messier as M83
Also observed (Apr 29, 1826) by James Dunlop
Also observed (May 5, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 7.5 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Hydra (RA 13 37 00.2, Dec -29 52 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5236 (= GC 3606 = JH 3523, M83, Lacaille list I #6, Dunlop #628, 1860 RA 13 29 09, NPD 119 09.0) is a "very remarkable object, (per William and John Herschel) very bright, very large, extended 55, extremely suddenly bright middle and nucleus; (per Lacaille) 3 branched spiral". (Since William Herschel is not listed among the discoverers, "per William and John Herschel" presumably means "per the General Catalog".) The position precesses to RA 13 37 01.1, Dec -29 51 58, dead center on the galaxy listed above and the description fits, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information:
ESO image of spiral galaxy NGC 5236, also known as M83
Above, an overall view of the galaxy (Image Credit FORS Team, 8.2-meter VLT Antu, ESO)
Below, a closeup of star-forming regions and new star clusters
(Image Credit ESA and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA); Acknowledgement: R. O'Connell (U. Virginia), NASA)
HST closeup of a portion of spiral galaxy NGC 5236, also known as M83

NGC 5237
Discovered (Jun 3, 1834) by
John Herschel

NGC 5238
Discovered (Apr 26, 1789) by
William Herschel

NGC 5239
Discovered (Apr 13, 1784) by
William Herschel

NGC 5240
Discovered (May 1, 1785) by
William Herschel

NGC 5241
Discovered (Mar 29, 1886) by
Lewis Swift (3-73)

NGC 5242
Discovered (Apr 10, 1828) by
John Herschel

NGC 5243
Discovered (Mar 17, 1787) by
William Herschel

NGC 5244 (=
NGC 5219)
Discovered (Jun 1, 1834) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5244)
Discovered (Jun 3, 1834) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5219)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Centaurus (RA 13 38 41.8, Dec -45 51 17)

NGC 5245
Discovered (Apr 30, 1864) by
Albert Marth (266)

NGC 5246
Discovered (Apr 30, 1864) by
Albert Marth (267)

NGC 5247
Discovered (Feb 7, 1785) by
William Herschel

NGC 5248
Discovered (Apr 15, 1784) by
William Herschel

NGC 5249
Discovered (Mar 21, 1784) by
William Herschel
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 5150 - 5199) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 5200 - 5249     → (NGC 5250 - 5299)