Celestial Atlas
(NGC 5200 - 5249) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 5250 - 5299 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 5300 - 5349)
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5250, 5251, 5252, 5253, 5254, 5255, 5256, 5257, 5258, 5259, 5260, 5261, 5262, 5263, 5264, 5265, 5266,
5267, 5268, 5269, 5270, 5271, 5272, 5273, 5274, 5275, 5276, 5277, 5278, 5279, 5280, 5281, 5282, 5283,
5284, 5285, 5286, 5287, 5288, 5289, 5290, 5291, 5292, 5293, 5294, 5295, 5296, 5297, 5298, 5299

Page last updated Aug 21, 2017
Added Steinicke 2016 historical data, checked Corwin's positions, Dreyer's NGC entries, PGC designations
Added Steinicke physical data
WORKING 5279: Clarify which Lord Rosse was the later observer

NGC 5250 (= PGC 47997)
Discovered (Apr 26, 1789) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 13.0 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Ursa Major (RA 13 36 07.3, Dec +51 14 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5250 (= GC 3617 = WH II 817, 1860 RA 13 30 50, NPD 38 01.5) is "pretty bright, small, round, very gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 4525 km/sec, NGC 5250 is about 210 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.3 by 0.95 arcmin(?), it is about 80 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of NGC 5250
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5250
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy; the star at upper left is 7th-magnitude HD 118557
SDSS image of region around NGC 5250

NGC 5251 (= PGC 48119)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.9 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Bo÷tes (RA 13 37 24.8, Dec +27 25 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5251 (= GC 3618 = JH 1652 = WH III 369, 1860 RA 13 30 53, NPD 61 51.8) is "very faint, small, very little extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 0.7 by 0.7 arcmin?

NGC 5252 (= PGC 48189)
Discovered (Feb 2, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.0 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Virgo (RA 13 38 15.9, Dec +04 32 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5252 (= GC 3619 = JH 1653 = WH III 505, 1860 RA 13 31 12, NPD 84 46.2) is "very faint, small, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 1.4 by 0.9 arcmin?

NGC 5253 (= PGC 48334)
Discovered (Mar 15, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 7, 1826) by James Dunlop
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 10.4 spiral galaxy (type S? pec) in Centaurus (RA 13 39 56.0, Dec -31 38 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5253 (= GC 3620 = JH 3526 = WH II 638, Dunlop 623, 1860 RA 13 32 00, NPD 120 55.6) is "bright, pretty large, extended 45░▒, pretty suddenly much brighter middle". The second IC notes "In 1895 a new star appeared at the northwest end of this nebula. See diagram in Publ. A. S. Pac., viii. p. 221".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 5.0 by 1.9 arcmin?

NGC 5254 (= PGC 48307)
Discovered (May 6, 1836) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.0 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Virgo (RA 13 39 37.9, Dec -11 29 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5254 (= GC 3621 = JH 3527, 1860 RA 13 32 14, NPD 100 47.0) is "pretty bright, large, pretty much extended, gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 3.2 by 1.5 arcmin? (Corwin notes an apparent companion (PGC 170441) at RA 13 39 24.7, Dec -11 32 49.)

NGC 5255 (= PGC 48124)
Discovered (Apr 17, 1789) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Ursa Major (RA 13 37 18.1, Dec +57 06 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5255 (= GC 3622 = WH III 803, 1860 RA 13 32 22, NPD 32 10.9) is "very faint, very small".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 0.8 by 0.2 arcmin?

NGC 5256 (= "PGC 3167706" = PGC 48192 + PGC 93123)
Discovered (May 12, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A pair of interacting galaxies in Ursa Major
PGC 48192 = A magnitude 13.5(?) spiral galaxy (type Sab? pec) at RA 13 38 17.8, Dec +48 16 41
PGC 93123 = A magnitude 15.5(?) galaxy (type Sbc? pec) at RA 13 38 17.3, Dec +48 16 32
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5256 (= GC 3623 = JH 1656 = WH III 673, 1860 RA 13 32 33, NPD 40 59.6) is "extremely faint, very small, round, gradually brighter middle". Though LEDA assigns PGC 3167706 to the combined structure called NGC 5256 leads to a page for PGC 3167706, a search for that designation returns no result.
Physical Information: Apparent size of 1.2 by 1.1 arcmin???

NGC 5257 (= PGC 48330, and with
NGC 5258 = Arp 240)
Discovered (May 13, 1793) by William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.4 spiral galaxy (type SBb? pec) in Virgo (RA 13 39 52.9, Dec +00 50 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5257 (= GC 3624 = JH 1654 = WH II 895, 1860 RA 13 32 45, NPD 88 26.9) is "very faint, small, round, brighter middle, western of double nebula", the other being NGC 5258.
Physical Information: Apparent size of 1.6 by 0.8 arcmin?

NGC 5258 (= PGC 48338, and with
NGC 5257 = Arp 240)
Discovered (May 13, 1793) by William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.3 spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Virgo (RA 13 39 57.7, Dec +00 49 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5258 (= GC 3625 = JH 1655 = WH II 896, 1860 RA 13 32 49, NPD 88 27.3) is "faint, small, irregularly round, eastern of double nebula", the other being NGC 5257.
Physical Information: Apparent size of 1.4 by 0.9 arcmin?

NGC 5259 (= PGC 48292)
Discovered (Apr 27, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 14.2 elliptical galaxy (type E4?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 39 24.7, Dec +30 59 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5259 (= GC 5749, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 13 33 00, NPD 58 18.1) is "very faint, small, irregularly round".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 1.1 by 0.7 arcmin? (Corwin notes two apparent companions: a brighter northwestern one (magnitude 15.7 "PGC 4379775", apparent size 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin?) at RA 13 39 23.1, Dec +30 59 32 and a much fainter southeastern one ("PGC 4581279") at RA 13 39 24.9, Dec +30 59 14.)

NGC 5260 (= PGC 48371)
Discovered (Apr 6, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 12.8 spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Hydra (RA 13 40 19.8, Dec -23 51 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5260 (Swift list I (#24), 1860 RA 13 33 08, NPD 113 10.5) is "extremely faint, pretty large, 3 stars to east in a line".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 1.6 by 1.4 arcmin?

NGC 5261 (= PGC 48360)
Discovered (Apr 17, 1830) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Virgo (RA 13 40 16.1, Dec +05 04 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5261 (= GC 3626 = JH 1657, 1860 RA 13 33 14, NPD 84 13.1) is "very faint, round, among pretty bright stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 0.8 by 0.4 arcmin?

NGC 5262 (= PGC 47923)
Discovered (May 5, 1831) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 14.2 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Ursa Minor (RA 13 35 38.6, Dec +75 02 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5262 (= GC 3627 = JH 1660, 1860 RA 13 33 14, NPD 14 14.2) is "extremely faint, small".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 1.2 by 0.7 arcmin? (Corwin notes an apparent companion (PGC 47875) at RA 13 35 10.0, Dec +75 01 42.)

NGC 5263 (= PGC 48333 = PGC 1834564)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 39 55.6, Dec +28 24 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5263 (= GC 3628 = JH 1658 = WH III 370, 1860 RA 13 33 25, NPD 60 53.5) is "considerably faint, small, much extended 0░▒, 9th magnitude star to southwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 1.6 by 0.4 arcmin?

NGC 5264 (= PGC 48467)
Discovered (Mar 30, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.0 irregular galaxy (type IBm?) in Hydra (RA 13 41 36.6, Dec -29 54 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5264 (= GC 3629 = JH 3528, 1860 RA 13 33 44, NPD 119 12.5) is "very faint, pretty large, round, very little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 3.6 by 3.2 arcmin (from the images below). Vr 480 km/sec (too small to ignore peculiar velocities), corresponding to about 22 million light years distance. Redshift-independent distance estimates of about 13.5 to 15.5 million light years; the Hubblesite news release states "just over 15 million light years away". A comparison of the distance estimates suggests that the object is moving away from us, and its Hubble distance is too large.
DSS image of region near irregular galaxy NGC 5264
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 5264
Below, a 4 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of irregular galaxy NGC 5264
Below, a 2.6 arcmin wide HST image of the galaxy (Image Credit ESA/Hubble & NASA)
HST image of irregular galaxy NGC 5264

NGC 5265 (= PGC 48354)
Discovered (May 1, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type SBcd?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 40 09.1, Dec +36 51 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5265 (= GC 3630 = JH 1659 = WH III 410, 1860 RA 13 33 59, NPD 52 25.5) is "faint, considerably small, very little extended, extremely mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 0.7 by 0.6 arcmin?

NGC 5266 (= PGC 48593 = PGC 490364)
Discovered (Jul 1, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.1 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Centaurus (RA 13 43 02.1, Dec -48 10 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5266 (= GC 3631 = JH 3529, 1860 RA 13 34 28, NPD 137 27.7) is "bright, pretty large, very little extended, very gradually a little brighter middle, 3 stars near".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 3.3 by 2.3 arcmin?

(PGC 48390 = PGC 488439 = "NGC 5266A")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 5266A
A magnitude 12.0 galaxy (type SBc? SAcd? pec) in
Centaurus (RA 13 40 37.1, Dec -48 20 31)
Physical Information: Apparent size of 3.1 by 2.5 arcmin?

NGC 5267 (= PGC 48393)
Discovered (Apr 28, 1827) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 40 40.0, Dec +38 47 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5267 (= GC 3632 = JH 1661, 1860 RA 13 34 33, NPD 50 30.0) is "faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle, small star to northwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 1.4 by 0.5 arcmin?

NGC 5268 (= "PGC 5067742")
Recorded (Jan 17, 1855) by
Edward Cooper
Also observed? (date?) by Arthur von Auwers
A magnitude 11.4 star in Virgo (RA 13 42 12.4, Dec -13 51 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5268 (= GC 3633, Markree Catalog, 1860 RA 13 34 44, NPD 103 09.1) is "a nebula (Auwers 32)". LEDA lists the star as PGC 5067742 (and states that it is a star), but a search of the database for that entry returns no result.
Physical Information:

NGC 5269 (= "PGC 3518310")
Discovered (Apr 24, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude ? open cluster (type ?) in Centaurus (RA 13 44 44.0, Dec -62 55 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5269 (= GC 3634 = JH 3530, 1860 RA 13 35 04, NPD 152 11.8) is "a cluster, poor, large, irregular figure, stars of 12th magnitude". LEDA lists the cluster as PGC 3518310 (and states that it is a cluster), but a search of the database for that entry returns no result.
Physical Information: Apparent size of 3.0 arcmin?

NGC 5270 (= PGC 48527)
Discovered (Apr 7, 1828) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Virgo (RA 13 42 10.9, Dec +04 15 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5270 (= GC 3635 = JH 1662, 1860 RA 13 35 06, NPD 85 01.7) is "extremely faint, small, between 2 stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 1.1 by 0.8 arcmin?

NGC 5271 (= PGC 48477)
Discovered (May 22, 1881) by
╔douard Stephan
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 41 42.4, Dec +30 07 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5271 (Stephan list XII (#50), 1860 RA 13 35 18, NPD 59 10.0) is "very faint, very small, round, gradually a very little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin?

NGC 5272 (=
M3 = GCL 25 = PGC 2802651)
Discovered (May 3, 1764) by Charles Messier
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 6.3 globular cluster (type VI) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 42 11.3, Dec +28 22 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5272 (= GC 3636 = JH 1663, M3, 1860 RA 13 35 44, NPD 60 54.9) is "a very remarkable object, a globular cluster, extremely bright, very large, very suddenly much brighter middle, stars from 11th magnitude". LEDA lists the cluster as PGC 2802651, but does not specify what kind of object it is.
Physical Information: Apparent size of 18.0 arcmin?
NOAO image of globular cluster NGC 5272, also known as M3
Above, an image of M3 (Image Credit: S. Kafka & K. Honeycutt (Indiana University), WIYN, NOAO, NSF)

NGC 5273 (= PGC 48521 =
IC 895)
Discovered (May 1, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5273)
Also observed (Apr 24, 1827) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5273)
Also observed (Sep 1, 1888) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 895)
A magnitude 11.6 lenticular galaxy (type SA(s)0) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 42 08.4, Dec +35 39 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5273 (= GC 3637 = JH 1664 = WH I 98, 1860 RA 13 35 54, NPD 53 38.3) is "considerably bright, pretty large, round, gradually then pretty suddenly much brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 13 42 07.4, Dec +35 39 14, right on the galaxy listed above and the description is a perfect fit, so the identification is certain.
Note About The Duplicate Entry: The equality with IC 895 (which see for a discussion of the duplicate entry) was not discovered until August 2017, and it may take a while for it to become common knowledge.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 1085 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), NGC 5273 is about 50 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of about 40 to 70 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of about 2.6 by 2.4 arcmin (from the images below), it is about 35 to 40 thousand light years across. The galaxy is used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type SA(s)0░.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5273, also showing NGC 5276
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5273, also showing NGC 5276
Below, a 3 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5273

NGC 5274 (= PGC 48536)
Discovered (May 25, 1881) by
╔douard Stephan
A magnitude 14.6 elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 42 23.3, Dec +29 50 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5274 (Stephan list XII (#51), 1860 RA 13 35 59, NPD 59 26.7) is "very faint, very small, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 0.4 by 0.4 arcmin? (Corwin notes an apparent companion (PGC 48566) at RA 13 42 37.0, Dec +29 51 16)

NGC 5275 (= PGC 48544)
Discovered (May 25, 1881) by
╔douard Stephan
A magnitude 14.2 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 42 23.6, Dec +29 49 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5275 (Stephan list XII (#52), 1860 RA 13 35 59, NPD 59 28.1) is "faint, small, round, gradually much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 0.7 by 0.7 arcmin? (Corwin lists two apparent companions: northeastern PGC 4382115 at RA 13 42 24.7, Dec +29 49 48, and western PGC 2800981 at RA 13 42 22.1, Dec +29 49 33)

NGC 5276 (= PGC 48542)
Discovered (Mar 27, 1856) by
R. J. Mitchell
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 42 22.0, Dec +35 37 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5276 (= GC 3638, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 13 36 09, NPD 53 37.8) is "faint, small".
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case R. J. Mitchell.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.5 arcmin? (For now, see NGC 5273's wide-field view)

NGC 5277 (= PGC 48563)
Discovered (May 23, 1881) by
╔douard Stephan
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 42 38.4, Dec +29 57 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5277 (Stephan list XII (#53), 1860 RA 13 36 14, NPD 59 20.4) is "extremely faint, small, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 0.6 by 0.4 arcmin?

NGC 5278 (= PGC 48473, and with
NGC 5279 = Arp 239)
Discovered (Apr 14, 1789) by William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.9 spiral galaxy (type Sb? pec) in Ursa Major (RA 13 41 39.6, Dec +55 40 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5278 (= GC 3639 = JH 1665 = WH II 798, 1860 RA 13 36 25, NPD 33 37.4), is "pretty faint, round, very small nebula 40 arcsec to east, star to north", the nebula to the east being NGC 5279.
Physical Information: Apparent size of 1.3 by 1.0 arcmin? Interacting with NGC 5279. (Corwin notes two apparent companions: PGC 48450 at RA 13 41 24.3, Dec +55 38 35, and PGC 48439 at RA 13 41 19.6, Dec +55 40 40)

WORKING HERE: Query about which Lord Rosse also observed NGC 5279

NGC 5279 (= PGC 48482, and with
NGC 5278 = Arp 239)
Discovered (May 4, 1831) by John Herschel
Also observed (May 2, 1872) by Lawrence Parsons, 4th Lord Rosse
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type SBa? pec) in Ursa Major (RA 13 41 43.7, Dec +55 40 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5279 (= JH 1665a, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 13 36 30, NPD 33 37.2) is "faint, very small, eastern of 2", the other being NGC 5278.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer identifies William Parsons, the 3rd Lord Rosse, as a later observer, Steinicke states that it was his son, the 4th Lord Rosse, as shown above. This could be a simple matter of Dreyer's omitting the asterisk used to identify the 4th Lord Rosse, or it may represent a mistake of a different sort; so the "also observed by" above should be viewed with uncertainty until I alter or remove this note.
Physical Information: Apparent size of 0.7 by 0.4 arcmin? Interacting with NGC 5278.
To be added: (For a wide-field image, see NGC 5278)

NGC 5280 (= PGC 48580)
Discovered (May 23, 1881) by
╔douard Stephan
A magnitude 13.6 elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 42 55.5, Dec +29 52 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5280 (Stephan list XII (#54), 1860 RA 13 36 32, NPD 59 25.5) is "faint, very small, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 0.8 by 0.8 arcmin? (Corwin notes an apparent companion: PGC 48579 at RA 13 42 53.5, Dec +29 51 28)

NGC 5281 (= OCL 911 = "PGC 3518311")
Discovered (1751) by
Nicolas Lacaille
Also observed (Jul 1, 1826) by James Dunlop
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 5.9 open cluster (type I3m) in Centaurus (RA 13 46 35.0, Dec -62 55 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5281 (= GC 3640 = JH 3531, Lacaille I 7, Dunlop 273, 1860 RA 13 36 55, NPD 152 11.8) is "a cluster, bright, small, pretty compressed, irregularly round, stars from 10th to 12th magnitude". LEDA lists the cluster as PGC 3518311, but does not state its nature, and a search of the database for that designation returns no result.
Physical Information: Apparent size of 8.0 arcmin? (The position above is Corwin's estimate for the "core" of the cluster; he lists the "central" position as RA 13 46 23.0, Dec -62 55 00)
DSS image of NGC 5281
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on open cluster NGC 5281

NGC 5282 (= PGC 48614)
Discovered (May 22, 1881) by
╔douard Stephan
A magnitude 13.3 elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 43 24.9, Dec +30 04 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5282 (Stephan list XII (#55), 1860 RA 13 37 01, NPD 59 13.5) is "faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle equivalent to 14th magnitude star".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 1.1 by 0.8 arcmin?

NGC 5283 (= PGC 48425)
Discovered (Oct 7, 1866) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 13.2 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Draco (RA 13 41 05.7, Dec +67 40 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5283 (= GC 5750, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 13 37 09, NPD 21 37.3) is "faint, small, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 1.1 by 1.0 arcmin?

NGC 5284 (= "PGC 3518312")
Discovered (Jun 7, 1837) by
John Herschel
An open cluster (type ?) in Centaurus (RA 13 47 06.0, Dec -59 13 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5284 (= GC 3641 = JH 3532, 1860 RA 13 37 15, NPD 148 29.4) is "a cluster, large, very rich, stars from 7th to 16th magnitude". LEDA lists the cluster as PGC 3518312 (and lists it as a cluster), but a search of the database for that designation returns no result.
Physical Information: Apparent size of 30 by 20 arcmin? (The position above is Steinicke's position. Corwin lists RA 13 46 58.0, Dec -59 07 18 for the most likely position/grouping (a few arcmin from JH's position), and RA 13 47 24.0, Dec -59 08 00 for a less likely one; therefore, I need to check his notes, the historical record and the DSS image database before "confirming" any position.)

NGC 5285 (= PGC 48688)
Discovered (Apr 29, 1881) by
╔douard Stephan
A magnitude 13.9 elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Virgo (RA 13 44 25.8, Dec +02 06 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5285 (Stephan list XI (#20), 1860 RA 13 37 19, NPD 87 11.1) is "extremely faint, very small, round, gradually a very little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 0.8 by 0.8 arcmin?

NGC 5286 (= GCL 26 = PGC 2802652)
Discovered (Apr 29, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 7.4 globular cluster (type V) in Centaurus (RA 13 46 26.8, Dec -51 22 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5286 (= GC 3642 = JH 3533, Dunlop 388, 1860 RA 13 37 38, NPD 140 40.1) is "a globular cluster, very bright, pretty large, round, well resolved, clearly consisting of stars of 15th magnitude". LEDA lists the cluster as PGC 2802652, but does not specify its nature.
Physical Information: Apparent size of 11 arcmin?

NGC 5287 (= PGC 48741)
Discovered (May 25, 1881) by
╔douard Stephan
A magnitude 15.3 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 44 52.5, Dec +29 46 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5287 (Stephan list XII (#56), 1860 RA 13 38 30, NPD 59 31.4) is "faint, small, irregular, mottled but not resolved?".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 0.7 by 0.3 arcmin? (Corwin lists an apparent companion, PGC 1877482 at RA 13 44 58.3, Dec +29 46 06)

NGC 5288 (= OCL 910 = "PGC 3518313")
Discovered (Apr 3, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.8 open cluster (type II2p) in Circinus (RA 13 48 46.1, Dec -64 41 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5288 (= GC 3643 = JH 3534, 1860 RA 13 38 48, NPD 153 59.3) is "a cluster, small, compressed, irregularly round, stars of 14th magnitude". LEDA lists the cluster as PGC 3518313 (and states that it is a cluster), but a search of the database for that designation returns no result.
Physical Information: Apparent size of 3.0 arcmin?

NGC 5289 (= PGC 48749)
Discovered (Apr 9, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type SBab?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 45 08.7, Dec +41 30 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5289 (= GC 3644 = JH 1666 = WH II 668, 1860 RA 13 39 10, NPD 47 47.6) is "very faint, very small, a little extended 90░▒, suddenly brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 1.9 by 0.6 arcmin?

NGC 5290 (= PGC 48767)
Discovered (Mar 18, 1787) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 12.5 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 45 19.2, Dec +41 42 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5290 (= GC 3645 = WH I 170, 1860 RA 13 39 20, NPD 47 34.5) is "considerably bright, pretty large, extended 90░▒, brighter middle and nucleus".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 3.7 by 1.0 arcmin?

NGC 5291 (= PGC 48893)
Discovered (May 8, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 14.1 elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Centaurus (RA 13 47 24.5, Dec -30 24 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5291 (= GC 3646 = JH 3535, 1860 RA 13 39 26, NPD 119 41.2) is "very faint, round, a very little brighter middle, double star to west".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 1.2 by 0.8 arcmin? (Corwin lists an almost certain companion, PGC 48894 at RA 13 47 23.2, Dec -30 25 04)

PGC 48894
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes listed as part of
NGC 5291
A magnitude 14.7 spiral galaxy (type S? pec) in Centaurus (RA 13 47 23.1, Dec -30 25 02)
Physical Information: Apparent size of 0.8 by 0.4 arcmin?

NGC 5292 (= PGC 48909)
Discovered (Mar 30, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.8 spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Centaurus (RA 13 47 40.1, Dec -30 56 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5292 (= GC 3647 = JH 3536, 1860 RA 13 39 41, NPD 120 13.2) is "pretty faint, small, round, 2 stars near".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 1.8 by 1.6 arcmin?

NGC 5293 (= PGC 48854)
Discovered (Mar 21, 1784) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 13.1 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Bo÷tes (RA 13 46 52.7, Dec +16 16 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5293 (= GC 3648 = WH V 6, 1860 RA 13 39 56, NPD 72 59.2) is "extremely faint, very large, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 1.8 by 1.5 arcmin?

NGC 5294 (= PGC 48761)
Discovered (Apr 14, 1789) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 14.3 elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Ursa Major (RA 13 45 18.0, Dec +55 17 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5294 (= GC 3649 = JH 1667 = WH III 785, 1860 RA 13 39 57, NPD 34 00.4) is "extremely faint, 2 stars attached or involved".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 0.6 by 0.5 arcmin?

NGC 5295 (= PGC 48215)
Discovered (Dec 20, 1797) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 14.3 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Camelopardalis (RA 13 38 39.4, Dec +79 27 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5295 (= GC 3650 = WH III 946, 1860 RA 13 40 21, NPD 09 52.1) is "very faint, very small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 0.4 by 0.4 arcmin?

NGC 5296 (= PGC 48811 = PGC 48812)
Discovered (May 3, 1850) by
George Stoney
A magnitude 14.4 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 46 18.7, Dec +43 51 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5296 (= GC 3651, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 13 40, NPD 45 28▒) is "round, brighter middle, is southwest of h 1668", (JH) 1668 being NGC 5297.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case George Stoney.
Physical Information: Apparent size of 0.9 by 0.6 arcmin? (Corwin lists an apparent companion, PGC 2230517 at RA 13 46 18.2, Dec +43 50 38)

NGC 5297 (= PGC 48815)
Discovered (Apr 9, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.8 spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 46 23.7, Dec +43 52 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5297 (= GC 3652 = JH 1668 = WH I 180, 1860 RA 13 40 32, NPD 45 27.5) is "considerably bright, large, pretty much extended 142░, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 5.6 by 1.3 arcmin?

NGC 5298 (= PGC 48985)
Discovered (Mar 30, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.1 spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Centaurus (RA 13 48 36.5, Dec -30 25 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5298 (= GC 3653 = JH 3538, 1860 RA 13 40 40, NPD 119 44.4) is "faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 1.4 by 0.6 arcmin? (Corwin lists an apparent companion, PGC 717597 at RA 13 48 35.6, Dec -30 24 42, and a possible alternate identification, PGC 48950 at RA 13 48 11.2, Dec -30 27 07)

NGC 5299 (= "PGC 5067502")
Discovered (Jun 7, 1837) by
John Herschel
A star cloud in Centaurus (RA 13 50 48.0, Dec -60 24 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5299 (= GC 3654 = JH 3537, 1860 RA 13 40 52, NPD 149 14.7) is "a cluster, very large, very rich". LEDA lists the cluster as PGC 5067502 (and lists it as an open cluster), but a search of the database for that designation returns no result.
Physical Information: Apparent size of 30 arcmin? (The position above is Steinicke's; but the actual position of the star cloud (and for that matter, exactly what part of it Herschel took for his cluster) is very uncertain. Corwin lists it at RA 13 50 32.0, Dec -60 26 18.)
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 5200 - 5249) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 5250 - 5299     → (NGC 5300 - 5349)