Celestial Atlas
(NGC 5300 - 5349) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 5350 - 5399 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 5400 - 5449)
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5350, 5351, 5352, 5353, 5354, 5355, 5356, 5357, 5358, 5359, 5360, 5361, 5362, 5363, 5364, 5365, 5366,
5367, 5368, 5369, 5370, 5371, 5372, 5373, 5374, 5375, 5376, 5377, 5378, 5379, 5380, 5381, 5382, 5383,
5384, 5385, 5386, 5387, 5388, 5389, 5390, 5391, 5392, 5393, 5394, 5395, 5396, 5397, 5398, 5399

Page last updated Nov 18, 2017
Checked updated Corwin positions, Steinicke physical database, PGC identifications
NEXT: Check Dreyer NGC/IC entries, updated Steinicke historical database?
Updating page in preparation for posting HST image of NGC 5398
WORKING 5358: Add images

NGC 5350 (= PGC 49347 =
Hickson Compact Group 68C)
Discovered (Jan 14, 1788) by William Herschel
Also observed (May 13, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.3 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)b?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 53 21.6, Dec +40 21 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5350 (= GC 3688 = JH 1696 = WH II 713, 1860 RA 13 47 26, NPD 48 56.3) is "considerably faint, prettylarge, brighter middle, 7th magnitude star to west, 1st of 4", the others being NGC 5353, 5354 and 5555.
Physical Information: A Seyfert galaxy, and a member of the NGC 5353 group of galaxies, also known as Hickson Compact Group 68. Based on a recessional velocity of 2320 km/sec, NGC 5350 is about 110 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 90 to 125 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 3.2 by 2.3 arcmin, it is about 100 thousand light years across.
Misti Mountain image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5350
Above, a 12 arcmin wide image centered on NGC 5350; the nearby star is 6th magnitude HD 121197
(Image Credit & © Jim Misti, Misti Mountain Observatory; used by permission)
Below, a 3 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5350
Below, a 12 arcmin wide view of Hickson Compact Group 68 (= NGC 5350, 5353, 5354, 5355 and 5358)
(Image Credit & © Jim Misti, Misti Mountain Observatory; used by permission)
Misti Mountain image of NGC 5350, NGC 5353, NGC 5354, NGC 5355 and NGC 5358, comprising Hickson Compact Group 68

NGC 5351 (= PGC 49359)
Discovered (May 16, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 28, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.1 spiral galaxy (type S(rs)bc?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 53 27.7, Dec +37 54 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5351 (= GC 3689 = JH 1697 = WH II 697, 1860 RA 13 47 26, NPD 51 23.7) is "considerably faint, large, a little extended 90°, very gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5351
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5351, also showing NGC 5349
Below, a 3 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5351
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of the region between NGC 5351 and NGC 5349
(Image Credit Teresa Hawes and Philip Darling/Adam Block/NOAO/AURA/NSF)
NOAO image of region between spiral galaxy NGC 5351 and NGC 5349

NGC 5352 (= PGC 49370)
Discovered (May 1, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 24, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.0 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0? pec) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 53 38.4, Dec +36 08 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5352 (= GC 3692 = JH 1700 = WH II 415, 1860 RA 13 47 32, NPD 53 10.1) is "considerably faint, small, round, a little brighter middle, star 90" to northeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 1.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5352
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5352
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5352

NGC 5353 (= PGC 49356 =
Hickson Compact Group 68A)
Discovered (Jan 14, 1788) by William Herschel
Also observed (May 12, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.0 lenticular galaxy (type SAB0/a?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 53 26.7, Dec +40 16 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5353 (= GC 3693 = JH 1698 = WH II 714, 1860 RA 13 47 32, NPD 49 01.6) is "pretty bright, small, round, 2nd of 4", the others being NGC 5350, 5354 and 5355.
Physical Information: The brightest member of the NGC 5353 group of galaxies (also known as Hickson Compact Group 68), NGC 5353 is paired with NGC 5354. Based on a recessional velocity of 2325 km/sec, NGC 5353 is about 110 million light years away, in fair agreement with a redshift-independent distance estimate of 125 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 2.2 by 1.1 arcmin, it is about 70 thousand light years across.
Composite of Misti Mountain and background images of region near lenticular galaxies NGC 5353 and NGC 5354
Above, a 12 arcmin wide composite image centered on NGC 5353 and 5354
(the nearby star is 6th-magnitude HD 121197)
(Image Credit & © above and below Jim Misti, Misti Mountain Observatory on SDSS background; used by permission)
Below, a 3 arcmin wide image of NGC 5353 and 5354
Misti Mountain image of lenticular galaxies NGC 5353 and NGC 5354
Below, a 12 arcmin wide view of Hickson Compact Group 68 (= NGC 5350, 5353, 5354, 5355 and 5358)
(Image Credit © Jim Misti, Misti Mountain Observatory; used by permission)
Misti Mountain image of NGC 5350, NGC 5353, NGC 5354, NGC 5355 and NGC 5358, comprising Hickson Compact Group 68

NGC 5354 (= PGC 49354 =
Hickson Compact Group 68B)
Discovered (Jan 14, 1788) by William Herschel
Also observed (May 12, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.4 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 53 26.7, Dec +40 18 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5354 (= GC 3694 = JH 1699 = WH II 715, 1860 RA 13 47 32, NPD 49 00.4) is "pretty faint, small, round, 3rd of 4", the others being NGC 5350, 5353 and 5355.
Physical Information: A member of the NGC 5353 group of galaxies (also known as Hickson Compact Group 68), and paired with that galaxy (which see for images). Based on a recessional velocity of 2580 km/sec, NGC 5354 is about 120 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.4 by 1.3 arcmin, it is about 50 thousand light years across.

NGC 5355 (= PGC 49380 =
Hickson Compact Group 68D)
Discovered (Jan 14, 1788) by William Herschel
Also observed (May 12, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.1 lenticular galaxy (type S0(s)a?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 53 45.6, Dec +40 20 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5355 (= GC 3695 = JH 1702 = WH III 699, 1860 RA 13 47 45, NPD 48 57.6) is "very faint, pretty small, 4th of 4", the others being NGC 5350, 5353 and 5354.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 2345 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), NGC 5355 is about 110 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 1.05 by 0.6 arcmin (from the images below), it is about 30 to 35 thousand light years across. It is a member of the NGC 5353 group of galaxies (also known as Hickson Compact Group 68).
Misti Mountain image of NGC 5350, NGC 5353, NGC 5354, NGC 5355 and NGC 5358, comprising Hickson Compact Group 68
Above, a 12 arcmin wide image of Hickson Compact Group 68 (= NGC 5350, 5353, 5354, 5355 and 5358)
(Image Credit & © above and below: Jim Misti, Misti Mountain Observatory on SDSS background; used by permission)
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Composite of SDSS and Misti Mountain images)
Overlay of Misti Mountain image on SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5355

NGC 5356 (= PGC 49468)
Discovered (Feb 2, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 9, 1828) by John Herschel
Also observed (Apr 14, 1852) by Bindon Stoney
A magnitude 12.6 spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Virgo (RA 13 54 58.4, Dec +05 20 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5356 (= GC 3696 = GC 3698 = JH 1701 = WH III 506, 1860 RA 13 47 56, NPD 83 58.7) is "faint, pretty large, very much extended 17°, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.5 by 0.8 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5356
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5356
Below, a 4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5356

NGC 5357 (= PGC 49534)
Discovered (Mar 30, 1835) by
John Herschel
Looked for but not found (1899 - 1902) by Robert Innes
A magnitude 12.0 elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Centaurus (RA 13 55 59.6, Dec -30 20 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5357 (= GC 3697 = JH 3546, 1860 RA 13 47 58, NPD 119 38.9) is "pretty faint, small, round, gradually a little brighter middle, between two 10th magnitude stars". The second IC notes "Not found by Innes (7-inch refractor)".
SEE CORWIN NOTE FOR THIS OBJECT
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.4 arcmin?
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 5357
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 5357
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 5357
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide monochrome PanSTARRS image of the nucleus of the galaxy
Monochrome PanSTARRS image of the nucleus of elliptical galaxy NGC 5357

WORKING HERE: Close-up image of the galaxy

NGC 5358 (= PGC 49389 =
Hickson Compact Group 68E)
Discovered (Jun 23, 1880) by Édouard Stephan
Also observed (Jun 3, 1883) by Hermann Vogel
A magnitude 13.6 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a??) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 54 00.4, Dec +40 16 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5358 (Stephan list XI (#1), Vogel, 1860 RA 13 48 05,, NPD 49 01.9) is "very faint, very small, round, 2 very faint stars involved".
Physical Information: A member of the NGC 5353 group of galaxies (also known as Hickson Compact Group 68). Based on a recessional velocity of 2400 km/sec, NGC 5358 is about 110 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.25 by 0.5 arcmin, it is about 40 thousand light years across.
Composite of Misti Mountain and background images of region near NGC 5358
Above, a 12 arcmin wide image centered on NGC 5358, also showing NGC 5353, 5354 and 5355
(Image Credit & © above and below Jim Misti, Misti Mountain Observatory on SDSS background; used by permission)
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide image of the galaxy
Overlay of Misti Mountain image on SDSS image of NGC 5358
Below, a 12 arcmin wide view of Hickson Compact Group 68 (= NGC 5350, 5353, 5354, 5355 and 5358)
(Image Credit & © Jim Misti, Misti Mountain Observatory; used by permission)
Misti Mountain image of NGC 5350, NGC 5353, NGC 5354, NGC 5355 and NGC 5358, comprising Hickson Compact Group 68

NGC 5359 (= "PGC 3518315")
Discovered (May 17, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.7(?) open cluster (or two) in Circinus (RA 14 00 06, Dec -70 23 06)
SEE CORWIN NOTE FOR THIS OBJECT
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5359 (= GC 3699 = JH 3545, 1860 RA 13 48 31, NPD 159 43.3) is "a cluster, very large, a little rich, a little compressed, stars of 11th magnitude". A search of the LEDA database for NGC 5359 yields the position above, identified as an open cluster, and saddled with the useless PGC designation shown in quotes.
Physical Information:
Corwin lists half a dozen positions for various parts of this group; need to refer to his note

NGC 5360 (probably =
IC 958 = PGC 49513)
Discovered (May 8, 1864) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 5360)
Discovered (Apr 19, 1890) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 958)
A magnitude 13.3 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a) in Virgo (RA 13 55 38.4, Dec +04 59 04)
SEE CORWIN NOTE FOR THIS OBJECT
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5360 (= GC 5751, Marth #268, 1860 RA 13 48 34, NPD 84 18) is "very faint, very small, a little extended".
Historical Note: The NGC entry is copied from Lassell's 1866 paper about observations at Malta, which included Marth's discoveries.
Physical Information:

NGC 5361 (= PGC 49441)
Discovered (May 16, 1787) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 54 35.2, Dec +38 26 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5361 (= GC 3700 = WH III 682, 1860 RA 13 48 39, NPD 50 52.9) is "extremely faint, considerably small, extended".
Physical Information:

NGC 5362 (= PGC 49464)
Discovered (Apr 9, 1787) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 12.3 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 54 53.3, Dec +41 18 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5362 (= GC 3701 = WH II 671, 1860 RA 13 48 59, NPD 48 03.4) is "pretty bright, pretty large, extended".
Physical Information:
Corwin lists "companion" PGC 4074750 (NED SDSS J135453.52+411835.8) at RA 13 54 53.5, Dec +41 18 32

NGC 5363 (= PGC 49547)
Discovered (Jan 19, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 9, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 10.1 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Virgo (RA 13 56 07.2, Dec +05 15 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5363 (= GC 3702 = JH 1703 = WH I 6, 1860 RA 13 49 05, NPD 84 03.5) is "bright, pretty large, round, pretty suddenly brighter middle, 8th magnitude star to northeast".
Physical Information:

NGC 5364 (=
NGC 5317 = PGC 49555))
Discovered (Feb 2, 1786) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5364)
Also observed (Apr 10, 1828) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5364)
Also observed (Apr 14, 1852) by Bindon Stoney (and later listed as NGC 5364)
Discovered (Apr 7, 1828) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5317)
A magnitude 10.5 spiral galaxy (type Sbc? pec) in Virgo (RA 13 56 12.0, Dec +05 00 54)
SEE CORWIN NOTE FOR THIS OBJECT
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5364 (= GC 3704 = GC 3703 = JH 1705 = WH II 534, 1860 RA 13 49 10, NPD 84 17.8) is "considerably faint, large, round, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information:

NGC 5365 (= PGC 49673)
Discovered (Mar 15, 1836) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.4 lenticular galaxy (type (R)E/SB0) in Centaurus (RA 13 57 50.6, Dec -43 55 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5365 (= GC 3705 = JH 3547, 1860 RA 13 49 16, NPD 133 14.7) is "pretty bright, considerably small, round, pretty gradually brighter middle, among stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.8 by 2.1 arcmin. Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type (R)SB0-.
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5365
Above, a 4.5 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5365
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5365

PGC 49586 (= PGC 49593 = "NGC 5365A")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 5365A
A magnitude 12.8 spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in
Centaurus (RA 13 56 39.6, Dec -44 00 34)
Physical Information:

PGC 49750 (= "NGC 5365B")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 5365B
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in
Centaurus (RA 13 58 39.6, Dec -43 57 50)
Physical Information:

NGC 5366 (= PGC 49569)
Discovered (Jun 8, 1855) by
George Bond
A magnitude 13.7 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Virgo (RA 13 56 24.9, Dec -00 14 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5366 (= GC 5074, G. P. Bond (#18, HN 14), 1860 RA 13 49 19, NPD 89 31.2) is "small, round, 9th magnitude star 2 arcmin distant".
Physical Information:
Corwin lists the position of PGC 49574 as RA 13 56 27.4, Dec -00 17 17

NGC 5367 (=
IC 4347 = "PGC 3517668")
Discovered (Jun 26, 1834) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5367)
Discovered (Dec 30, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 4347)
A reflection nebula in Centaurus (RA 13 57 44.0, Dec -39 58 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5367 (= GC 3706 = JH 3548, 1860 RA 13 49 21, NPD 129 17.7) is "a remarkable object, very bright, very large, very little then very suddenly much brighter middle like a double star". A search of the LEDA database for NGC 5367 returns the object above, with the useless PGC designation shown in quotes, but without any description save for an Aladin Lite image.
Physical Information:
Corwin lists various positions for the stars and nebulae in the region
SEE CORWIN NOTE FOR THIS OBJECT

NGC 5368 (= PGC 49431)
Discovered (Apr 14, 1789) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 2, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type (R)SB(rs)ab?) in Ursa Major (RA 13 54 29.2, Dec +54 19 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5368 (= GC 3707 = JH 1706 = WH III 786, 1860 RA 13 49 24, NPD 34 58.6) is "faint, considerably small, round, stellar, 16th magnitude star to northeast". The position precesses to RA 13 54 30.4, Dec +54 20 06, on the northeastern rim of the galaxy listed above, there is nothing else nearby and the (13th magnitude) star to the north northeast makes the identification certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 4655 km/sec, NGC 5368 is about 215 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.95 by 0.7 arcmin, it is about 60 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5368
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5368
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5368

NGC 5369 (= PGC 49583)
Discovered (Mar 5, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 16, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.4 elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Virgo (RA 13 56 37.6, Dec -05 28 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5369 (= GC 3708 = JH 1704 = WH III 285, 1860 RA 13 49 33, NPD 94 48.5) is "very faint, very small, round".
Physical Information:

NGC 5370 (= PGC 49408)
Discovered (Mar 19, 1790) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 14, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.2 lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Ursa Major (RA 13 54 09.4, Dec +60 40 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5370 (= GC 3709 = JH 1708 = WH II 843, 1860 RA 13 49 39, NPD 28 37.5) is "faint, small".
Physical Information:

SEE CORWIN NOTE FOR THIS OBJECT
NGC 5371 (probably =
NGC 5390 = PGC 49514)
Discovered (Jan 14, 1788) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5371)
Also observed (May 16, 1831) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5371)
Discovered (Mar 18, 1831) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5390)
A magnitude 10.6 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)bc) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 55 39.9, Dec +40 27 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5371 (= GC 3710 = JH 1707 = WH II 716, 1860 RA 13 49 47, NPD 48 49.7) is "pretty bright, large, round, brighter middle and faint nucleus".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 2560 km/sec, NGC 5371 is about 120 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 105 to 125 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 4.4 by 3.5 arcmin, it is about 150 thousand light years across. The core of the galaxy is relatively bright, and it is tentatively classified as a Seyfert galaxy (type Sy?). Given its more or less comparable distance, NGC 5371 is probably a wide member of the NGC 5353 galaxy group (the other members are also known as Hickson Compact Group 68).
Misti Mountain Observatory image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5371
Above, a 12 arcmin wide image centered on NGC 5371
(Image Credit and © above and below: Jim Misti, Misti Mountain Observatory; used by permission)
Below, a 5 arcmin wide image of the galaxy
Misti Mountain Observatory image of spiral galaxy NGC 5371

NGC 5372 (= PGC 49451)
Discovered (Apr 24, 1789) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 1, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Ursa Major (RA 13 54 46.0, Dec +58 40 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer NGC 5372 (= GC 3711 = JH 1709 = WH III 809, 1860 RA 13 49 49, NPD 30 39.6) is "considerably faint, small, extended, double star involved?"
Physical Information:

NGC 5373 (= PGC 49620)
Discovered (May 8, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 14.4 compact galaxy (type C?) in Virgo (RA 13 57 07.5, Dec +05 15 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5373 (= GC 5752, Marth #269, 1860 RA 13 50 05, NPD 84 03) is "very faint, very small, stellar".
Historical Note: The NGC entry is copied from Lassell's 1866 paper about observations at Malta, which included Marth's discoveries.
Physical Information:

NGC 5374 (= PGC 49650)
Discovered (May 12, 1793) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 11, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.5 spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Virgo (RA 13 57 29.6, Dec +06 05 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5374 (= GC 3712 = JH 1710 = WH II 889, 1860 RA 13 50 29, NPD 83 12.9) is "considerably faint, pretty large, round, very gradually brighter middle, 11th magnitude star to northwest".
Physical Information:

NGC 5375 (=
NGC 5396 = PGC 49604)
Discovered (May 16, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5396)
Discovered (May 15, 1830) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5375)
SEE CORWIN NOTE FOR THIS OBJECT
A magnitude 11.5 spiral galaxy (type SB(r)ab) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 56 56.0, Dec +29 09 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5375 (= GC 3713 = JH 1711, 1860 RA 13 50 37, NPD 60 09.0) is "pretty bright, pretty large, round, a little brighter middle".
Historical Note: Herschel suspected this was the same object observed by his father (NGC 5396), but gave it a different listing in case he was wrong, so Dreyer followed his lead.
Physical Information:

NGC 5376 (= PGC 49489)
Discovered (Apr 24, 1789) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 12.1 spiral galaxy (type SBab?) in Ursa Major (RA 13 55 16.0, Dec +59 30 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5376 (= GC 3714 = GC 3715 = WH II 844 = WH I 238, 1860 RA 13 50 37, NPD 29 48.4) is "considerably bright, pretty large, very little extended, very gradually much brighter middle".
Physical Information:

NGC 5377 (= PGC 49563)
Discovered (May 12, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 20, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.3 spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 56 16.7, Dec +47 14 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5377 (= GC 3716 = JH 1712 = WH I 187, 1860 RA 13 50 44, NPD 42 05.5) is bright, large, much extended 42°, suddenly much brighter middle and nucleus".
Physical Information:

NGC 5378 (= PGC 49598)
Discovered (Mar 11, 1831) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.5 spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 56 51.0, Dec +37 47 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5378 (= GC 3717 = JH 1713, 1860 RA 13 50 47, NPD 51 31.6) is "pretty bright, a little extended, very gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information:

NGC 5379 (= PGC 49508)
Discovered (Apr 24, 1789) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 12.9 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a?) in Ursa Major (RA 13 55 34.3, Dec +59 44 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5379 (= GC 3720 = WH I 239, 1860 RA 13 50 56, NPD 29 34.5) is "pretty bright, pretty small, extended, much brighter middle".
Physical Information:

NGC 5380 (= PGC 49605 = PGC 2105148)
Discovered (May 16, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 9, 1826) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.3 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 56 56.7, Dec +37 36 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5380 (= GC 3718 = JH 1714 = WH II 698, 1860 RA 13 50 57, NPD 51 42.3) is "faint, considerably small, round, suddenly much brighter middle".
Physical Information:

NGC 5381 (= OCL 915 = "PGC 3518316")
Discovered (May 3, 1835) by
John Herschel
An open cluster (type II2p) in Centaurus (RA 14 00 48.0, Dec -59 34 24)
Corwin lists the position of a star in(?) the cluster as RA 14 00 25.0, Dec -59 37 23
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5381 (= GC 3719 = JH 3549, 1860 RA 13 50 58, NPD 148 54.5) is "a cluster, rich, very compressed, pretty large, stars from 11th to 12th magnitude". A search of the LEDA database for NGC 5381 returns the object above, listed as a cluster, accompanied by the useless PGC designation shown in quotes.
Physical Information:

NGC 5382 (= PGC 49711)
Discovered (Apr 29, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 9, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.6 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Virgo (RA 13 58 14.9, Dec +06 15 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5382 (= GC 3721 = JH 1715 = WH III 546, 1860 RA 13 51 16, NPD 83 03.7) is "very faint, very small, mottled but not resolved, stellar".
NGC Note: "There is no 'R. nova' near, only h 1710, h 1715, h 1716 seen at Birr. GC 3722 struck out."
Physical Information:

NGC 5383 (= PGC 49618)
Discovered (Apr 9, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 6, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.4 spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 57 05.0, Dec +41 50 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5383 (= GC 3723 = JH 1717 = WH I 181, 1860 RA 13 51 18, NPD 47 28.3) is "considerably bright, considerably large, round, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information:
Corwin lists the position of PGC 49624 as RA 13 57 07.0, Dec +41 47 35

NGC 5384 (= PGC 49707)
Discovered (May 8, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 13.1 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Virgo (RA 13 58 12.9, Dec +06 31 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5384 (= GC 5753, Marth #270, 1860 RA 13 51 18, NPD 82 49) is "faint, very small, stellar".
Historical Note: The NGC entry is copied from Lassell's 1866 paper about observations at Malta, which included Marth's discoveries.
Physical Information:

NGC 5385 (= "PGC 5067503")
Discovered (May 5, 1831) by
John Herschel
SEE CORWIN NOTE FOR THIS OBJECT
A group of stars in Ursa Minor (RA 13 52 25.0, Dec +76 09 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5385 (= GC 3724 = JH 1721, 1860 RA 13 51 19, NPD 13 08.0) is "a cluster, poor, small". A search of the LEDA database for NGC 5385 returns the group listed above, designated "S+" (meaning several stars), and accompanied by the useless PGC designation shown in quotes.
Physical Information:
Corwin lists the position of galaxy PGC 49199 as RA 13 51 39.2, Dec +76 08 28)

NGC 5386 (= PGC 49719)
Discovered (Apr 29, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 9, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.2 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Virgo (RA 13 58 22.3, Dec +06 20 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5386 (= GC 3725 = JH 1716 = WH III 547, 1860 RA 13 51 23, NPD 82 58.6) is "very faint, very small, binuclear, mottled but not resolved, stellar".
Physical Information:

NGC 5387 (= PGC 49724)
Discovered (May 8, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Virgo (RA 13 58 24.8, Dec +06 04 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5387 (= GC 5754, Marth #271, 1860 RA 13 51 24, NPD 83 15) is a "very faint ray, 2 arcmin long".
Historical Note: The NGC entry is copied from Lassell's 1866 paper about observations at Malta, which included Marth's discoveries.
Physical Information:

NGC 5388 (= "PGC 5067504")
Discovered (May 4, 1886) by
Frank Muller
SEE CORWIN NOTE FOR THIS OBJECT
A lost or nonexistent object in Virgo (RA 13 58 56, Dec -14 09.1) ?
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5388 (Muller list I (#199), 1860 RA 13 51 25, NPD 103 28.1) is "faint, small, round, very gradually brighter middle". A search of the LEDA database for NGC 5388 returns a position close to the one above, for an "unknown" object, with the useless PGC designation shown above in quotes.
Physical Information:

NGC 5389 (= PGC 49548)
Discovered (Apr 24, 1789) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 14, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.0 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a?) in Ursa Major (RA 13 56 06.3, Dec +59 44 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5389 (= GC 3726 = JH 1719 = WH I 240, 1860 RA 13 51 30, NPD 29 34.3) is "pretty bright, pretty large, extended, much brighter middle and nucleus".
Physical Information:

NGC 5390 (= PGC 49514, and probably =
NGC 5371)
Discovered (Jan 14, 1788) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5371)
Discovered (Mar 18, 1831) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5390)
A magnitude 10.6 spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 55 39.9, Dec +40 27 42)
SEE CORWIN NOTE FOR THIS OBJECT
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5390 (= GC 3727 = JH 1718, 1860 RA 13 51 31, NPD 48 52.6) is "faint, large, very gradually brighter middle, 9th magnitude star to northeast".
Physical Information:

NGC 5391 (= PGC 49609?)
Discovered (Jun 16, 1884) by
Lewis Swift
A lost or nonexistent object in Canes Venatici (RA 13 57 37, Dec +46 19.5) ?
SEE CORWIN NOTE FOR THIS OBJECT
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5391 (Swift list I (#26), 1860 RA 13 52 03, NPD 42 59.5) is "faint, very small, star close".
Physical Information:
Very uncertain identification as (PGC 2281757) at RA 13 57 42.8, Dec +46 28 10
Equally? uncertain identification as (PGC 49609) at RA 13 57 04.7, Dec +46 15 51
(the latter is actually listed as NGC 5391 in LEDA)

NGC 5392 (= PGC 49792)
Discovered (Apr 15, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 15, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.4 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Virgo (RA 13 59 24.8, Dec -03 12 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5392 (= GC 3728 = JH 1720 = WH III 666, 1860 RA 13 52 11, NPD 92 31.4) is "very faint, considerably small, round, gradually brighter middle".
NGC Note: "Per JH, h 1720 = III 666. Auwers, finding H - h = +52 seconds in RA, supposes a mistake of 1 minute [by WH]. Examined sweep 146 (h) and found all clearly writen and correctly reduced."
Physical Information:
Corwin lists the position of (NED SDSS J135925.19-031228.9 = "PGC 5950897") as RA 13 59 25.2, Dec -03 12 29
(Listed in NED as part of NGC 5392, in which case it would be binuclear
but listed in LEDA as a slightly background or foreground companion

NGC 5393 (= PGC 49863)
Discovered (Mar 30, 1835) by
John Herschel
SEE CORWIN NOTE FOR THIS OBJECT
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Hydra (RA 14 00 32.0, Dec -28 52 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5393 (= GC 3729 = JH 3550, 1860 RA 13 52 33, NPD 118 11.3) is "very faint, small, round, gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin.

NGC 5394 (= PGC 49739, and with
NGC 5395 = Arp 84)
Discovered (May 16, 1787) by William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 28, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)b? pec) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 58 33.6, Dec +37 27 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5394 (= GC 3730 = JH 1722 = WH I 191, 1860 RA 13 52 35, NPD 51 52.1) is "considerably faint, small, northwestern of 2", the other being NGC 5395, with which it comprises Arp 84.
Physical Information: NGC 5394 and 5395 are an interacting pair of spiral galaxies, also known as Arp 84. As discussed at the entry for NGC 5395, their recessional velocities imply a distance of about 160 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 1.9 by 1.3 arcmin, NGC 5394 is about 90 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5394 and part of spiral galaxy NGC 5395, collectively known as Arp 84
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5394 and part of NGC 5395, which see for wider-field images
Corwin lists the position of apparent companion PGC 2101092 as RA 13 58 26.2, Dec +37 27 09

NGC 5395 (= PGC 49747, and with
NGC 5394 = Arp 84)
Discovered (May 16, 1787) by William Herschel
Also observed (May 9, 1826) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.4 spiral galaxy (type SA(s)b? pec) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 58 38.0, Dec +37 25 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5395 (= GC 3731 = JH 1723 = WH I 190, 1860 RA 13 52 38, NPD 51 53.9) is "considerably faint, considerably large, extended 15°, a little brighter middle, southeastern of 2", the other being NGC 5394, with which it comprises Arp 84.
Physical Information: NGC 5395 and 5394 are an interacting pair of spiral galaxies, also known as Arp 84. Even without their nearly identical recessional velocities (3510 km/sec for NGC 5395 and 3450 km/sec for NGC 5394) their obvious interaction would make it clear that they are at the same distance. Based on their recessional velocities, that distance is about 160 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 3.0 by 1.3 arcmin, NGC 5395 is about 140 thousand light years across. It is a Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 2).
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5395 and part of spiral galaxy PGC 5394, collectively also known as Arp 84
Above, a 3.6 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5395
Below, a 3.0 by 4.5 arcmin wide region centered on it and its companion, NGC 5394
SDSS image of spiral galaxies NGC 5394 and NGC 5395, also known as Arp 84
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair, also showing IC 4356
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxies NGC 5394 and NGC 5395, also known as Arp 84; also shown is compact galaxy IC 4356

NGC 5396 (=
NGC 5375 = PGC 49604 = "PGC 5066607")
Discovered (May 16, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5396)
Discovered (May 15, 1830) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5375)
SEE CORWIN NOTE FOR THIS OBJECT
A magnitude 11.5 spiral galaxy (type SB(r)ab) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 56 56.0, Dec +29 09 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5396 (= GC 3732 = WH III 125, 1860 RA 13 52 39, NPD 60 11.5) is "very faint, small, irregularly round, suddenlybrighter middle like a star".
Historical Note: William Herschel's position was poor, and although John suspected their observations were of the same object he gave them different listings, in case he was wrong; and Dreyer followed his lead, hence the double listing.
About The Odd PGC Designation: A search of the LEDA database for NGC 5376 returns two results, both of which refer to NGC 5375, but with slightly different positions. The one labeled [MK2011]NGC5375 is assigned the otherwise useless PGC designation shown in quotes.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 2385 km/sec, NGC 5396 (= NGC 5375) is about 110 million light years away, in reasonable agreement with a redshift-independent distance estimate of 125 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 3.2 by 2.8 arcmin, it is about 110 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of NGC 5396, also known as NGC 5375
Above, a 3.6 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5396
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near NGC 5396, also known as NGC 5375

NGC 5397 (= PGC 49908)
Discovered (Jun 8, 1837) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.6 lenticular galaxy (type E/SB0?) in Centaurus (RA 14 01 10.5, Dec -33 56 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5397 (= GC 3733 = JH 3551, 1860 RA 13 52 56, NPD 123 16.4) is "very faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information:

NGC 5398 (= PGC 49923)
Discovered (Jun 3, 1836) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.2 spiral galaxy (type (R)SB(s)dm? pec) in Centaurus (RA 14 01 21.8, Dec -33 03 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5398 (= GC 3734 = JH 3552, 1860 RA 13 53 11, NPD 122 23.3) is "pretty bright, pretty large, round, very gradually brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 14 01 20.2, Dec -33 04 05, on a bright knot (a star-forming region) on the western side of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 1220 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), NGC 5398 is about 55 to 60 million light years away, in good agreement with widely varying redshift-independent distance estimates of about 20 to 60 million light years (the HST press release quotes 55 million light years). Given that and its apparent size of about 3.3 by 1.8 arcmin (from the images below), it is about 55 thousand light years across. The star-forming region on the galaxy's southwestern rim (which corresponds to Herschel's position for the object) is about 5000 by 4000 light years across, and contains at least seven young star clusters. The two brightest clumps (called Tol 89A and 89B) represent bursts of star formation about 4 million and less than 3 million years ago, respectively. Tol 89A is thought to contain numerous Wolf-Rayet stars, which are exceptionally bright stars characterized by very high temperatures and extreme stellar winds. But since we see the galaxy as it was about 55 million years ago, such massive stars must have all gone supernova during the time it took their light to reach us, and only their "dead" remnants remain.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5398
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 5398
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5398
Below, a 1.5 by 2.25 arcmin wide HST image of the central portion of the galaxy
(Image Credit ESA/Hubble & NASA)
HST image of central portion of spiral galaxy NGC 5398

NGC 5399 (= PGC 49799)
Discovered (May 1, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 24, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 59 31.4, Dec +34 46 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5399 (= GC 3735 = JH 1724 = WH III 411, 1860 RA 13 53 25, NPD 54 32.6) is "extremely faint, very small, pretty much extended 90°".
Physical Information:
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 5300 - 5349) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 5350 - 5399     → (NGC 5400 - 5449)