Celestial Atlas
(NGC 5500 - 5549) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 5550 - 5599 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 5600 - 5649)
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5567, 5568, 5569, 5570, 5571, 5572, 5573, 5574, 5575, 5576, 5577, 5578, 5579, 5580, 5581, 5582, 5583,
5584, 5585, 5586, 5587, 5588, 5589, 5590, 5591, 5592, 5593, 5594, 5595, 5596, 5597, 5598, 5599

Page last updated Mar 8, 2017
finished Steinicke database updates, Corwin positions, Dreyer NGC entries
WORKING 5553: identification, physical information, pix
Once done with that: Check other historical references, clarify confused IDs, check notngc

NGC 5550 (= PGC 51108)
Discovered (Apr 4, 1831) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)bc? pec) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 18 28.0, Dec +12 52 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5550 (= GC 3840, JH 1774, 1860 RA 14 11 44, NPD 76 27.9) is "very faint, considerably small, pretty much extended". The position precesses to RA 14 18 29.9, Dec +12 53 13, just off the northeastern rim of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 7425 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that NGC 5550 is about 345 million light years away, in fair agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 360 to 405 million light years. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 335 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 340 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 1.1 by 0.75 arcmin, the galaxy is about 105 to 110 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5550
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5550
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5550

NGC 5551 (= PGC 51139)
Discovered (May 8, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 14.2 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)a?) in Virgo (RA 14 18 54.8, Dec +05 27 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5551 (=GC 5764, Marth 276, 1860 RA 14 11 53, NPD 83 55) is "3 stars in nebulosity". The position precesses to RA 14 18 52.8, Dec +05 26 09, just over an arcmin southwest of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 7500 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that NGC 5551 is about 350 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 340 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, nearly 345 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.55 by 0.5 arcmin, the galaxy is about 55 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5551
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5551
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5551

NGC 5552 (=
NGC 5558 = PGC 51140)
Discovered (May 8, 1864) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 5552)
Discovered (Jun 14, 1884) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 5558)
A magnitude 14.1 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Virgo (RA 14 19 03.9, Dec +07 01 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5552 (= GC 5765, Marth 277, 1860 RA 14 12 12, NPD 82 19) is "very faint, small". The position precesses to RA 14 19 08.8, Dec +07 02 11, about 1.2 arcmin east northeast of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and the only nearby object is accounted for by NGC 5554, discovered by Marth on the same night, so the identification is certain. (See NGC 5558 for a discussion of the duplicate entry.)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 7585 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that NGC 5552 is about 350 to 355 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 340 to 345 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 345 to 350 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.8 by 0.3 arcmin, the galaxy is about 80 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5552, also showing NGC 5554
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5552, also showing NGC 5554
Below, a 1 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5552

WORKING HERE: Historical Identifications, etc

NGC 5553 (= PGC 51105)
Discovered (May 6, 1831) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 14.1 lenticular galaxy (type S0(rs)a?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 18 29.7, Dec +26 17 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5553 (= GC 3841, JH 1775, 1860 RA 14 12 13, NPD 63 04.8) is "very faint, small, a little extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.3 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5553, also showing IC 4399
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5553, also showing IC 4399
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5553

NGC 5554 (=
NGC 5564 = PGC 51160)
Discovered (May 8, 1864) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 5554)
Discovered (Jun 14, 1884) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 5564)
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type S) in Virgo (RA 14 19 15.0, Dec +07 01 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5554 (= GC 5766, Marth #278, 1860 RA 14 12 19, NPD 82 19) is "extremely faint, small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.5? arcmin
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5554, also showing NGC 5552

NGC 5555 (= PGC 51124)
Discovered (1886) by
Ormond Stone
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Virgo (RA 14 18 48.1, Dec -19 08 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5555 (Ormond Stone list I (#202), 1860 RA 14 12 20, NPD 108 28.6) is "very faint, small, irregularly round, gradually brighter middle and nucleus".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.45 arcmin (from images below)
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5555
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 5555
Below, a 1 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5555

NGC 5556 (= PGC 51245)
Discovered (May 8, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.8 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)cd?) in Hydra (RA 14 20 34.0, Dec -29 14 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5556 (= GC 3842 = JH 3564, 1860 RA 14 12 25, NPD 118 36.2) is "extremely faint, large, small star involved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.4 by 3.2 arcmin (from CIGS image)
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5556
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 5556
Below, a 4.6 by 4.8 arcmin wide image of the galaxy
(Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of spiral galaxy NGC 5556
Below, a 2.6 by 2.8 arcmin wide superposition of a 'raw' HST image on the image above
(Image Credit as above and Hubble Legacy Archive)
Superposition of a 'raw' HST image of part of spiral galaxy NGC 5556 on a Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of the galaxy

WORKING HERE: Adding Corwin positions

NGC 5557 (= PGC 51104)
Discovered (May 1, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 9, 1826) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.0 elliptical galaxy (type E1) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 18 25.7, Dec +36 29 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5557 (= GC 3843 = JH 1776 = WH I 99, 1860 RA 14 12 34, NPD 52 51.6) is "considerably bright, small, round, very suddenly brighter middle like a star".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.4 by 1.9 arcmin (? disagrees with listed ellipticity ?)

NGC 5558 (=
NGC 5552 = PGC 51140)
Discovered (May 8, 1864) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 5552)
Discovered (Jun 14, 1884) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 5558)
A magnitude 14.1 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Virgo (RA 14 19 03.9, Dec +07 01 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5558 (Swift list I (#32), 1860 RA 14 12 46, NPD 82 19.0) is "extremely faint, small, a little extended, northwestern of 2", the other being NGC 5564 and 5565.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 5552 for anything else.

NGC 5559 (= PGC 51155)
Discovered (Apr 10, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 18, 1832) by John Herschel
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type SBb) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 19 12.8, Dec +24 47 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5559 (= GC 3844 = JH 1777 = WH III 347, 1860 RA 14 12 51, NPD 64 32.7) is "very faint, small, very little extended, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.4? arcmin

NGC 5560 (= PGC 51223, and with
NGC 5566 and 5569 = Arp 286)
Discovered (Apr 30, 1786) by William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 9, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.4 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)b pec) in Virgo (RA 14 20 04.5, Dec +03 59 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5560 (= GC 3845 = JH 1778 = WH II 579, 1860 RA 14 13 02, NPD 85 21.8) is "pretty faint, considerably large, extended, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: With NGC 5566 and 5569, comprises Arp 286, a trio of gravitationally interacting galaxies (though as noted at its entry, NGC 5569 may not actually be interacting with the other two galaxies). Based on a recessional velocity of 1730 km/sec, NGC 5560 is about 80 million light years away. Since it appears to be gravitationally interacting with NGC 5566 and 5569, they should all be at about the same distance. A comparison of the redshift-based and redshift-independent distance estimates for the galaxies suggests an approximate distance for the trio of 70 million light years. Presuming that is correct, NGC 5560's apparent size of 3.7 by 0.7 arcmin would imply that it is about 75 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5560, part of Arp 286
Above, a 4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5560; see NGC 5566 for more views of the region

NGC 5561 (= PGC 2800986)
Discovered (May 11, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Ursa Major (RA 14 17 22.8, Dec +58 45 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5561 (Swift list I (#31), 1860 RA 14 13 04, NPD 30 36.2) is "extremely faint, pretty small, round, faint star close to west". PGC 51026 is sometimes misidentified as NGC 5561.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.45 by 0.3 arcmin. Recessional velocity 11890 km/sec; relativistic distance 530 million light years when light we now see was emitted, 540 million years ago.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5561, also showing PGC 51026, which is sometimes misidentified as NGC 5561
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5561, also showing PGC 51026
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5561

PGC 51026 (not =
NGC 5561)
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes misidentifed as NGC 5561
A magnitude 16(?) spiral galaxy (type SABm?) in Ursa Major (RA 14 17 16.7, Dec +58 42 35)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.5? arcmin.

Per Corwin, companion to east = RA 14 17 36.2, Dec +58 44 58

NGC 5562 (= PGC 51227)
Discovered (Jun 28, 1883) by
Wilhelm Tempel
A magnitude 13.6 lenticular galaxy (type SAB0(rs)a?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 20 11.1, Dec +10 15 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5562 (Tempel list VIII, 1860 RA 14 13 15, NPD 79 22) is "very faint, small, very faint star 3 seconds of time to east". The position precesses to RA 14 20 06.2, Dec +09 59 18, but there is nothing there. However, the galaxy listed above lies almost directly north of the position, and perfectly fits Tempel's description of the region ("there is an 11th magnitude star 3 arcmin to the south and west, and a very faint star 3 seconds of time to the east of the nebula"), as there is a magnitude 11.7 star southwest of the galaxy and a magnitude 14.3 star 3.7 seconds of time east southeast of it; and as there is nothing else in the region, the identification is essentially certain despite the unfortunate error in Tempel's declination.
Discovery Notes: Although the object is described in Tempel's paper, it is not in the ordered list provided at the start of the paper, but in the extensive notes following that list.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.75 by 0.75 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5562
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5562
Below, a 1 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5562

NGC 5563 (= PGC 51226)
Discovered (May 8, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type S) in Virgo (RA 14 20 13.1, Dec +07 03 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5563 (Marth #279, 1860 RA 14 13 16, NPD 82 17) is "extremely faint, small, a little extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.4? arcmin

NGC 5564 (=
NGC 5554 = PGC 51160)
Discovered (May 8, 1864) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 5554)
Discovered (Jun 14, 1884) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 5564)
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type S) in Virgo (RA 14 19 15.0, Dec +07 01 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5564 (Swift list I (#33), 1860 RA 14 13 17, NPD 82 20.0) is "extremely faint, small, probably = Marth 279". It is indeed a duplicate observation, but of Marth 278 = NGC 5554, not Marth 279 = NGC 5563.
Physical Information: (this entry will only contain historical information; see NGC 5554 for physical data and images)

NGC 5565
Recorded (Jun 14, 1884) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 15.5(?) star in Virgo (RA 14 19 18.5, Dec +06 59 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5565 (Swift list I (#34), 1860 RA 14 13 17, NPD 82 20.5) is "extremely faint, small, very difficult, probably = Marth 279", Marth 279 being NGC 5563. If it were a Marth object, it would undoubtedly be connected with Marth 278, as in the case of NGC 5564; but instead, it appears to be a star; however Corwin seems uncertain about identification with the star listed above. So this entry needs considerable work before being in any way finalized.
if correctly identified, near NGC 5554; so add to that image if proves correct

NGC 5566 (= PGC 51233, and with
NGC 5560 and 5569 = Arp 286)
Discovered (Apr 30, 1786) by William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 9, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 10.6 spiral galaxy (type SB(r)ab) in Virgo (RA 14 20 19.9, Dec +03 56 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5566 (= GC 3846 = JH 1779 = WH I 144, 1860 RA 14 13 18, NPD 85 24.3) is "bright, pretty large, round, pretty suddenly brighter middle, mottled but not resolved, 12th magnitude star 1.5 arcmin to east".
Physical Information: With NGC 5560 and 5569, comprises Arp 286, a trio of gravitationally interacting galaxies. Based on a recessional velocity of 1505 km/sec, NGC 5566 is about 70 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 65 to 85 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 6.6 by 2.2 arcmin, NGC 5566 is about 135 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5566, part of Arp 286
Above, a 6 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5566
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5566, part of Arp 286
Below, an ultraviolet image of the galaxies shows where hot, bright young stars have recently formed within them. The central bar of NGC 5566 does not show up in this image because it consists of older, cooler stars; but the ring of stars around the nucleus and the extensive star formation in the arms are obvious, as is the distortion of NGC 5560 due to its gravitational interaction with the larger galaxy. There is similar evidence of accelerated star formation throughout NGC 5569, so despite a much greater uncertainty in its distance, it is probably a physical part of Arp 286. (Image credit: NASA, JPL-Caltech, GALEX)
GALEX image of spiral galaxies NGC 5560, 5566 and 5569, also known as Arp 286
Below, a relatively natural-color image of Arp 286 (rotated to correct orientation, with North at the top)
(Image Credit: Susan Hopkins/Adam Block/AURA/NSF/NOAO)
NOAO image of spiral galaxies NGC 5560, 5566 and 5569, also known as Arp 286

NGC 5567 (= PGC 51161)
Discovered (Apr 3, 1831) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.7 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 19 17.6, Dec +35 08 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5567 (= GC 3847 = JH 1780, 1860 RA 14 13 21, NPD 54 13.9) is "pretty faint, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.9? arcmin
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5567, also showing NGC 5568

Per Corwin, companion to east is at RA 14 19 24.8, Dec +35 07 43
Per Corwin, companion to south is at RA 14 19 17.5, Dec +35 07 54

NGC 5568 (= PGC 51168)
Discovered (May 27, 1886) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 14.7 spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 19 21.3, Dec +35 05 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5568 (Bigourdan (list II #72), 1860 RA 14 13 22, NPD 54 16) is "very faint, small, very diffuse".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.6? arcmin
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5568, also showing NGC 5567

NGC 5569 (= PGC 51241, and with
NGC 5560 and 5566 = Arp 286)
Discovered (Apr 26, 1849) by George Stoney
A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)cs?) in Virgo (RA 14 20 32.2, Dec +03 59 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5569 (= GC 3848, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 14 13 30, NPD 85 24) is "extremely faint, pretty large, round".
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case George Stoney.
Physical Information: With NGC 5560 and 5566, comprises Arp 286, a trio of gravitationally interacting galaxies. Based on a recessional velocity of 1780 km/sec, NGC 5569 is about 83 million light years away, in poor agreement with a redshift-independent distance estimate of 55 million light years. Still, the two values bracket the approximate distance of its "companions", and if it is part of a physically interacting trio it must be at about that same distance. As shown in the GALEX image of NGC 5566 (which see), there is strong evidence of accelerated star formation in NGC 5569, so it probably is interacting with the other galaxies, and is equally likely to be at their distance of about 70 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 1.7 by 1.5 arcmin, NGC 5569 should be about 35 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5569
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5569; see NGC 5566 for more views of the region

NGC 5570 (=
NGC 5519 = PGC 50865)
Discovered (Jan 23, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5570)
Also observed (May 9, 1828) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5570)
Discovered (Apr 26, 1865) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 5519)
A magnitude 13.1 spiral galaxy (type Sa) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 14 20.9, Dec +07 30 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5570 (= GC 3849 = JH 1781 = WH III 12, 1860 RA 14 13 32, NPD 81 50.4) is "faint, small, irregularly round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.0? arcmin; Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 5519 for anything else.

NGC 5571
Recorded (May 27, 1886) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
Four stars in Bo÷tes (RA 14 19 32.4, Dec +35 08 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5571 (Bigourdan (list II #73), 1860 RA 14 13 37, NPD 54 12) is a "small cluster of faint stars in nebulosity".
Just east of NGC 5567, which see if on 12 arcmin wide SDSS image

NGC 5572 (= PGC 51196)
Discovered (May 13, 1883) by
╔douard Stephan
A magnitude 14.2 spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 19 35.3, Dec +36 08 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5572 (Stephan list XIII (#73), 1860 RA 14 13 44, NPD 53 12.8) is "extremely faint, very small, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7? arcmin

NGC 5573 (= PGC 51257)
Discovered (May 8, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type S) in Virgo (RA 14 20 41.5, Dec +06 54 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5573 (= GC 5768, Marth #280, 1860 RA 14 13 46, NPD 82 27) is "very faint, small, a little extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.2? arcmin

NGC 5574 (= PGC 51270)
Discovered (Apr 30, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 10, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.4 lenticular galaxy (type E/SB0?) in Virgo (RA 14 20 56.0, Dec +03 14 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5574 (= GC 3850 = JH 1782 = WH I 145, 1860 RA 14 13 53, NPD 86 07.2) is "pretty faint, pretty small, a little extended, western of 2", the other being NGC 5576.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 1.1 arcmin.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5574
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5574
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy; also shown is NGC 5576
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5574, also showing elliptical galaxy NGC 5576

NGC 5575 (=
NGC 5578 = PGC 51272)
Observed (May 12, 1793) by William Herschel
Discovered (May 8, 1864) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 5575)
Discovered (May 22, 1884) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 5578)
A magnitude 13.3 lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Virgo (RA 14 20 59.4, Dec +06 12 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5575 (= GC 5769, Marth #281, 1860 RA 14 14 00, NPD 83 08) is "faint, very small, or nebulous star". Herschel never published his observation because the nebulosity he thought he detected at low power disappeared at higher power; but per Corwin and Steinicke, there is no doubt he also observed the object.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.9? arcmin

NGC 5576 (= PGC 51275)
Discovered (Apr 30, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 10, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.0 elliptical galaxy (type E3) in Virgo (RA 14 21 03.7, Dec +03 16 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5576 (= GC 3851 = JH 1783 = WH I 146, 1860 RA 14 14 01, NPD 86 05.1) is "bright, small, round, very suddenly much brighter middle, eastern of 2", the other being NGC 5574.
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.8 by 2.7 arcmin
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 5576
Above, a 4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5576; also shown is part of NGC 5574
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 5576; also shown is NGC 5574
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 5576, also showing lenticular galaxy NGC 5574

NGC 5577 (= PGC 51286)
Discovered (Apr 26, 1849) by
George Stoney
Also observed (Apr 26, 1865) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 12.6 spiral galaxy (type Sbc) in Virgo (RA 14 21 13.1, Dec +03 26 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5577 (= GC 3855, 3rd Lord Rosse, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 14 14 09, NPD 85 54.9) is "pretty faint, pretty large, very much extended 53░".
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case George Stoney.
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.2 by 0.9? arcmin

NGC 5578 (=
NGC 5575 = PGC 51272)
Observed (May 12, 1793) by William Herschel
Discovered (May 8, 1864) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 5575)
Discovered (May 22, 1884) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 5578)
A magnitude 13.3 lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Virgo (RA 14 20 59.4, Dec +06 12 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5578 (Swift list I (#35), 1860 RA 14 14 16, NPD 83 09.0) is "very faint, very small, a little extended, much brighter middle and nucleus".
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 5575 for anything else.

NGC 5579 (= PGC 51236 = and with
PGC 214249 = Arp 69)
Discovered (May 1, 1785) by William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 27, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type SABcd) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 20 26.6, Dec +35 11 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5579 (= GC 3852 = JH 1784 = WH III 415, 1860 RA 14 14 32, NPD 54 09.8) is "very faint, considerably large, western of 2", the other being NGC 5580.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 3600 km/sec, NGC 5579 is about 165 million light years away, considerably further than redshift-independent distance estimates of 110 to 115 million light years. However, the general consensus seems to be that the larger distance is correct, and the redshift-independent estimates are based on less than ideal methods. Assuming the larger distance is correct, its apparent size of 1.75 by 1.15 arcmin suggests that it is about 85 thousand light years across. It is probably physically interacting with PGC 214249, with which it comprises Arp 69.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5579 and its companion PGC 212249, also known as Arp 69
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5579 and PGC 214249
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5579 and its companion PGC 212249, also known as Arp 69

PGC 214249 (with
NGC 5579 = Arp 69)
Not an NGC object but listed here since its association with NGC 5579 is the basis for Arp 69
A magnitude 17(?) lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 20 27.9, Dec +35 09 38)
Physical Information: The 3645 km/sec recessional velocity of PGC 214249 is essentially the same as that of NGC 5579 (which see for images), with which it forms Arp 69; and odds are that they are at the same distance (of about 165 million light years), and a physically interacting pair. Given that, its apparent size of 0.35 by 0.15 arcmin corresponds to a physical size of about 15 thousand light years.

NGC 5580 (=
NGC 5590 = PGC 51312)
Discovered (May 1, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5590)
Also observed (May 9, 1826) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5590)
Discovered (Apr 27, 1827) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5580)
A magnitude 12.3 lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 21 38.4, Dec +35 12 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5580 (= GC 3853 = JH 1785, 1860 RA 14 14 45, NPD 54 08.9) is "pretty bright, small, eastern of 2", the other being NGC 5579.
Physical Information: (this entry may only contain historical information; for physical data and images see NGC 5590)

NGC 5581 (= PGC 51282)
Discovered (May 6, 1883) by
╔douard Stephan
A magnitude 14.1 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 21 16.3, Dec +23 28 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5581 (Stephen list XIII (#74), 1860 RA 14 14 54, NPD 65 52.2) is a "very faint star in very faint, very small, round nebulosity".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.7? arcmin

NGC 5582 (= PGC 51251)
Discovered (Apr 29, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 28, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.6 elliptical galaxy (type E4) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 20 43.1, Dec +39 41 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5582 (= GC 3854 = JH 1786 = WH II 754, 1860 RA 14 15 02, NPD 49 39.8) is "pretty bright, pretty small, round, brighter middle and faint nucleus, star to southwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.8 by 1.7? arcmin

NGC 5583 (= PGC 51313)
Discovered (Jun 4, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type S) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 21 40.5, Dec +13 13 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5583 (Swift list III (#80), 1860 RA 14 15 03, NPD 76 08.7) is "very faint, pretty small, round, pretty bright star near".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.6? arcmin

NGC 5584 (= PGC 51344)
Possibly discovered (date?) by
Wilhelm Tempel
Discovered (Jul 27, 1881) by Edward Barnard
A magnitude 11.4 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)cd?) in Virgo (RA 14 22 23.8, Dec -00 23 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5584 (Barnard (d), 1860 RA 14 15 12, NPD 89 44.7) is "faint, large, much extended, diffuse, gradually a little brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 14 22 22.4, Dec -00 23 09, right on the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identity is certain.
Discovery Notes: Although Barnard has been listed as the discoverer for more than a century, his article in A.N.1884v108p369 states that the object had been previously seen by several observers including Tempel, hence the attribution above. However, Steinicke has not been able to find any reference to the object in any of Tempel's papers, and essentially proposes that Dreyer's decision not to give credit to Tempel implies that Barnard was probably mistaken in thinking that there had been previous observations of this nebula (hence "possibly discovered", instead of "discovered").
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 1640 km/sec, NGC 5584 is about 75 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 65 to 90 million light years (the most recent and presumably most accurate value, based on measurements of over 600 Cepheid variable stars, is 72 million light years). Given that and its apparent size of 2.45 by 1.65 arcmin, the galaxy is about 50 thousand light years across. It is listed in NED as an isolated galaxy (not a member of any known group or cluster).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5584
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5584
Below, a 3 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5584
Below, a ? arcmin wide HST image of most of NGC 5584 (North at upper left to allow for more detail; Image Credit ESA, A. Riess (STScI/JHU), L. Macri (Texas A&M University), and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) NASA)
HST image of central part of spiral galaxy NGC 5584
Below, the 12 arcmin wide SDSS image with the HST image superimposed to show its correct orientation
Composite of SDSS and HST images of spiral galaxy NGC 5584

NGC 5585 (= PGC 51210)
Discovered (Apr 17, 1789) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 1, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 10.7 spiral galaxy (type SBcd) in Ursa Major (RA 14 19 48.2, Dec +56 43 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5585 (= GC 3856 = JH 1790 = WH I 235, 1860 RA 14 15 18, NPD 32 38.1) is "pretty faint, large, irregularly round, very gradually much brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 5.8 by 3.6? arcmin
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5585
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5585

NGC 5586
Recorded (Jun 4, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A lost or nonexistent object in Bo÷tes (RA 14 22 06, Dec +13 11 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5586 (Swift list III (#81), 1860 RA 14 15 23, NPD 76 10.5) is "extremely faint, very small, round".

NGC 5587 (= PGC 51332)
Discovered (Apr 17, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 4, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.5 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 22 10.7, Dec +13 55 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5587 (= GC 3857 = JH 1787 = WH III 110, 1860 RA 14 15 30, NPD 75 26.6) is "faint, considerably small, very little extended, 8th magnitude star to southeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.6 by 0.8? arcmin

NGC 5588 (=
NGC 5589 = PGC 51300)
Discovered (May 1, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5589)
Also observed (Apr 24, 1827) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5589)
Discovered (May 9, 1826) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5588)
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type SBa) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 21 25.1, Dec +35 16 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5588 (= GC 3858 = JH 1789, 1860 RA 14 15 31, NPD 54 14.0) is "very faint, round, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: (this entry will only contain historical information; for physical data and images see NGC 5589)

NGC 5589 (=
NGC 5588 = PGC 51300)
Discovered (May 1, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5589)
Also observed (Apr 24, 1827) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5589)
Discovered (May 9, 1826) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5588)
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type SBa) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 21 25.1, Dec +35 16 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5589 (= GC 3859 = JH 1788 = WH III 416, 1860 RA 14 15 31, NPD 54 05.2) is "very faint, small, round, northwestern of 2", the other being NGC 5590.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 1.1? arcmin
NGC 5590 is in wide-field view (call 5589 = 5588? see usual terminology)

NGC 5590 (=
NGC 5580 = PGC 51312)
Discovered (May 1, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5590)
Also observed (May 9, 1826) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5590)
Discovered (Apr 27, 1827) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5580)
A magnitude 12.3 lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 21 38.4, Dec +35 12 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5590 (= GC 3860 = JH 1791 = WH III 417, 1860 RA 14 15 43, NPD 54 09.3) is "considerably faint, small, round, brighter middle like a star, southeastern of 2", the other being NGC 5589.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 1.8? arcmin
in same wide-field view as 5588/89

NGC 5591 (= PGC 51360)
Recorded (Jun 4, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type SABc pec) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 22 33.3, Dec +13 43 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5591 (= Swift III (#82), 1860 RA 14 15 43, NPD 75 40.7) is "extremely faint, small, round, pretty bright star near to southeast". The position precesses to RA 14 22 26.7, Dec +13 40 52, about 2 arcmin to the southwest of the galaxy, but there is nothing else nearby and there is an 11th-magnitude star (which in comparison to the nebula would be "pretty bright") to the southeast, so the identification is certain. The object consists of two interacting spiral galaxies, but the description as "round" suggests that what Swift saw was only the core of the brighter galaxy, so it is listed as the NGC object, and the fainter, more diffuse eastern member of the pair (PGC 93125) is listed as a companion, instead of as part of the NGC object.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 7670 km/sec, NGC 5591 is about 360 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.5 by 0.7 arcmin, it is about 150 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5591 and its companion, peculiar spiral galaxy PGC 93125
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5591 and its companion, PGC 93125
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5591 and its companion, peculiar spiral galaxy PGC 93125

PGC 93125
Listed here because physically interacting with (and sometimes listed as part of)
NGC 5591
A magnitude 14.2 spiral galaxy (type Sc pec) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 22 34.8, Dec +13 43 03)
Discovery Notes: A physically intercting companion of NGC 5591, and sometimes listed as part of that NGC object (although as discussed at that entry, it was probably not actually observed by Swift).
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 7530 km/sec, PGC 93125 its about 350 million light years away, which is essentially the same distance as its obvious companion, and confirms that they are a physical pair 350 to 360 million light years distant. Given that and its apparent size of 1.25 by 0.5 arcmin, PC 93125 is about 130 thousand light years across (most of which is a distended region presumably caused by the interaction of the two galaxies). For images, see NGC 5591.

NGC 5592 (= PGC 51428)
Discovered (May 5, 1793) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 30, 1835) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.8 spiral galaxy (type SBbc) in Hydra (RA 14 23 55.0, Dec -28 41 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5592 (= GC 3861 = JH 3565 = WH III 924, 1860 RA 14 15 48, NPD 118 01.9) is "faint, small, extended, gradually a very little brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.8 arcmin (from images below)
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5592
Above, 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 5592
Below, a 2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5592

NGC 5593 (= OCL 926)
Discovered (Jun 5, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (Jul 8, 1834) by John Herschel
An open cluster (type III1p) in Lupus (RA 14 25 40.0, Dec -54 47 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5593 (= GC 3862 = JH 3566, Dunlop 357, 1860 RA 14 16 13, NPD 144 09.9) is a "cluster, very little rich, very little compressed, stars of 10th magnitude". (Some reference apparently also lists as Dunlop 350, but Steinicke only lists as D357, so need to check my references.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 6? arcmin
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 5593
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 5593

NGC 5594 (=
IC 4412 = PGC 51391)
Discovered (May 19, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5594)
Discovered (Jul 14, 1895) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 4412)
A magnitude 14.2 elliptical galaxy (type E?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 23 10.3, Dec +26 15 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5594 (= GC 3863 = WH III 135, 1860 RA 14 16 25, NPD 62 58.6) is "extremely faint, very small, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.6? arcmin

Per Corwin, companion of NGC 5594 is at RA 14 23 09.3, Dec +26 16 02

NGC 5595 (= PGC 51445)
Discovered (May 14, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 14, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.0 spiral galaxy (type SBc) in Libra (RA 14 24 13.4?, Dec -16 43 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5595 (= GC 3864 = JH 1792 = WH III 121, 1860 RA 14 16 33, NPD 106 05.1) is "faint, pretty large, round, very gradually brighter middle, western of 2", the other being NGC 5597
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 1.2 arcmin (from images below)
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5595, also showing NGC 5597
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 5595, also showing NGC 5597
Below, a 6 arcmin wide image centered between the two galaxies
(Image Credit & © Capella Observatory; used by permission)
Capella Observatory image of region near spiral galaxies NGC 5595 and NGC 5597
Below, a 2.1 arcmin wide image of NGC 5595 (Image Credit as above)
Capella Observatory image of spiral galaxy NGC 5595

NGC 5596 (= PGC 51355)
Discovered (May 1, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 11, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.5 lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 22 28.7, Dec +37 07 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5596 (= GC 3865 = JH 1795 = WH III 418, 1860 RA 14 16 41, NPD 52 14.4) is "extremely faint, small, round, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.8? arcmin

NGC 5597 (= PGC 51456)
Discovered (May 14, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 14, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.0 spiral galaxy (type SBbc? pec) in Libra (RA 14 24 27.4, Dec -16 45 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5597 (= GC 3866 = JH 1793 = WH III 122, 1860 RA 14 16 47, NPD 106 07.6) is "very faint, large, very little extended, very gradually a little brighter middle, eastern of 2", the other being NGC 5595.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.2 by 1.5 arcmin. Binuclear, so its structure probably represents a late stage in the merger of two galaxies.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5597, also showing NGC 5595
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 5597, also showing NGC 5595
Below, a 6 arcmin wide image centered between the two galaxies
(Image Credit & © Capella Observatory; used by permission)
Capella Observatory image of region near spiral galaxies NGC 5595 and NGC 5597
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide image of NGC 5597 (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of spiral galaxy NGC 5597

NGC 5598 (= PGC 51354)
Discovered (Apr 29, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 12, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.0 lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 22 28.3, Dec +40 19 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5598 (= GC 3867 = JH 1796 = WH III 733, 1860 RA 14 16 50, NPD 49 02.5) is "faint, very small, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.1? arcmin
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5598, also showing NGC 5601
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5598, also showing NGC 5601

NGC 5599 (= PGC 51423)
Discovered (May 12, 1793) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 9, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Virgo (RA 14 23 50.6, Dec +06 34 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5599 (= GC 3868 = JH 1794 = WH III 927, 1860 RA 14 16 54, NPD 82 46.8) is "faint, small, a little extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.5? arcmin
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5599
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5599
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5599
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 5500 - 5549) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 5550 - 5599     → (NGC 5600 - 5649)