Celestial Atlas
(NGC 5550 - 5599) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 5600 - 5649 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 5650 - 5699)
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Page last updated Mar 11, 2016
Updated all Steinicke historical/physical data, added Corwin positions, original NGC entries
WORKING 5620, 5632+, 5640+, 5649 Check Dreyer/WH/JH/Corwin references to confirm historical ID
Last stage: check notngc table

NGC 5600 (= PGC 51422)
Discovered (Apr 17, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 3, 1826) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.1 spiral galaxy (type (R)SB(rs)bc? pec) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 23 49.5, Dec +14 38 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5600 (= GC 3869 = JH 1797 = WH II 177, 1860 RA 14 17 08, NPD 74 43.2) is "pretty bright, pretty small, gradually brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 14 23 49.5, Dec +14 38 33, well within the northern rim of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 2320 km/sec, NGC 5600 is about 105 to 110 million light years away, in fair agreement with widely varying redshift-independent distance estimates of 125 to 345 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of about 1.4 by 1.25 arcmin, it is about 45 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5600
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5600
Below, a 1.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5600

NGC 5601 (= PGC 51370)
Discovered (Mar 27, 1867) by
Robert Ball
A magnitude 14.6 lenticular galaxy (type S0(r)?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 22 53.3, Dec +40 18 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5601 (= GC 5770, Ball using Lord Rosse's Leviathan, 1860 RA 14 17 08, NPD 49 03) is "very faint, between (WH) III 733 and 734", the latter galaxies being NGC 5598 and 5603. The position precesses to RA 14 22 46.3, Dec +40 18 41, about 1.3 arcmin west of the galaxy listed above, but the description is reasonable and its position relative to the nearby galaxies makes the identification certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5250 km/sec, NGC 5601 is about 245 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 0.9 by 0.35 arcmin, it is about 65 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5601, also showing NGC 5598 and NGC 5603
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5601, also showing NGC 5598 and 5603
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5601

NGC 5602 (= PGC 51340)
Discovered (May 15, 1787) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 12.7 lenticular galaxy (type (R)SAB0(r)a?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 22 18.8, Dec +50 30 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5602 (= GC 3870 = WH II 694, 1860 RA 14 17 17, NPD 38 49.5) is "pretty faint, pretty small, a little extended, much brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 14 22 15.7, Dec +50 32 10, about 2.1 arcmin north northwest of the galaxy listed above, but the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 2230 km/sec, NGC 5602 is about 100 to 105 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 1.4 by 0.75 arcmin, it is about 40 to 45 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5602
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5602
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5602

NGC 5603 (= PGC 51382)
Discovered (Apr 29, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 13, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.0 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 23 01.5, Dec +40 22 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5603 (= GC 3871 = JH 1800 = WH II 734, 1860 RA 14 17 24, NPD 48 58.7) is "considerably faint, pretty small, round, gradually brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 14 23 01.9, Dec +40 23 01, less than 0.4 arcmin north northeast of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5665 km/sec, NGC 5603 is about 260 to 265 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 1.0 by 1.0 arcmin, it is about 75 to 80 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5603, also showing NGC 5601
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5603, also showing NGC 5601
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5603

PGC 51372 (= "NGC 5603B")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 5603B
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in
Bo÷tes (RA 14 22 56.5, Dec +40 25 02)
Warning About Non-Standard Designations: The use of non-standard designations such as adding a letter to an NGC or IC designation should be discouraged, as that often leads to the same galaxy being given different names, and as a result, data for one galaxy being misattributed to another one. Fortunately that has not happened in this case, but there is still no good reason to call this object NGC 5603B.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5515 km/sec, PGC 51372 is about 255 to 260 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 1.75 by 1.45 arcmin, it is about 130 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 51372, also showing NGC 5598 and NGC 5603
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on PGC 51372, also showing NGC 5598 and 5603
Below, a 2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 51372

NGC 5604 (= PGC 51471)
Discovered (Apr 15, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 15, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.8 spiral galaxy (type Sa? pec) in Virgo (RA 14 24 42.8, Dec -03 12 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5604 (= GC 3872 = JH 1799 = WH III 668, 1860 RA 14 17 28, NPD 92 34.2) is "faint, pretty small, round, very gradually brighter starlike middle, mottled but not resolved". The position precesses to RA 14 24 43.7, Dec -03 12 23, on the northeastern rim of the galaxy listed above, the description is a reasonable fit and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 2750 km/sec, NGC 5604 is about 125 to 130 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 85 to 155 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of about 1.9 by 0.95 arcmin, it is about 70 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5604
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5604
Below, a 2.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5604

NGC 5605 (= PGC 51492)
Discovered (May 11, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 8, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.3 spiral galaxy (type (R)SA(rs)bc? pec) in Libra (RA 14 25 07.6, Dec -13 09 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5605 (= GC 3873 = JH 1798 = JH 3569 = WH III 120, 1860 RA 14 17 32, NPD 102 32.5) is "very faint, pretty large, round, very gradually brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 14 25 07.0, Dec -13 10 40, only about 0.9 arcmin south of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 3395 km/sec, NGC 5605 is about 155 to 160 million light years away, in reasonable agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 170 to 195 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of about 1.5 by 1.3 arcmin, it is about 70 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5605
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 5605
Below, a 1.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5605
Below, a roughly 1.1 arcmin wide image of the central part of the galaxy (Hubble Legacy Archive)
HST image of the central part of spiral galaxy NGC 5605

NGC 5606 (= OCL 922 = "PGC 3518666")
Discovered (May 8, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (Jul 6, 1836) by John Herschel
A magnitude 7.7 open cluster (type I1p) in Centaurus (RA 14 27 45.6, Dec -59 37 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5606 (= GC 3874 = JH 3568, Dunlop 313, 1860 RA 14 17 37, NPD 149 00.0) is a "cluster, small, pretty compressed, stars large and small" (meaning bright and faint). The position precesses to RA 14 27 51.2, Dec -59 38 00, nearly dead center on the cluster listed above, the description fits and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: NGC 5606 is about 5900 light years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 2.7 by 2.0 arcmin, the cluster is about 4 or 5 light years across. It is thought to be about 12 million years old. (Note: LEDA identifies NGC 5606 as "PGC 3518666", but a search of the database for that designation yields no result. The brightest star in the cluster, HD 126449, has its own designation, PGC 3047192; but a search of the database for that designation also yields no result.)
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 5606
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 5606

NGC 5607 (=
IC 1005 = PGC 51182, and perhaps = NGC 5620)
Discovered (Mar 16, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5607)
Also observed (Jun 7, 1888) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 1005)
Probably also observed (Apr 3, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5620)
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type Sab? pec) in Ursa Minor (RA 14 19 26.8, Dec +71 35 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5607 (= GC 3875 = WH II 331, 1860 RA 14 17 44, NPD 17 47.5) is "pretty faint, considerably small, irregularly round, brighter middle, extremely mottled but not resolved". The position precesses to RA 14 19 29.1, Dec +71 34 02, about 1.3 arcmin south of the galaxy listed above, but the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 7595 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that NGC 5607 is about 350 to 355 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 340 to 345 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 345 to 350 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 1.3 by 1.25 arcmin, the galaxy is about 130 thousand light years across. It is a starburst galaxy, with an exceptionally bright nucleus in comparison to its disc.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5607
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 5607
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5607

NGC 5608 (= PGC 51396)
Discovered (Apr 9, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 6, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.3 irregular galaxy (type IBm?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 23 17.9, Dec +41 46 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5608 (= GC 3876 = JH 1801 = WH II 673, 1860 RA 14 17 48, NPD 47 35.2) is "faint, pretty large, a little extended, very gradually a little brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 14 23 21.0, Dec +41 46 33.4, well within the eastern outline of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 665 km/sec, NGC 5608 is about 30 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 30 to 55 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of about 2.4 by 1.2 arcmin, it is about 20 to 25 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near irregular galaxy NGC 5608
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5608
Below, a 2.7 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of irregular galaxy NGC 5608

NGC 5609 (= PGC 3088538)
Discovered (Mar 1, 1851) by
Bindon Stoney
A magnitude 15.7 spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 23 48.3, Dec +34 50 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5609 (= GC 3881, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 14 17 53, NPD 54 31) is "most extremely faint". The position precesses to RA 14 23 47.3, Dec +34 50 47, less than 0.3 arcmin northwest of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case Bindon Stoney.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 30155 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that NGC 5609 is about 1405 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 1250 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 1310 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.35 by 0.25 arcmin, it is about 125 to 130 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5609, also showing NGC 5613, NGC 5614 and NGC 5615
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5609, also showing NGC 5613, 5614 and 5615
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5609

NGC 5610 (= PGC 51450)
Discovered (May 19, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 22, 1830) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)ab?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 24 22.9, Dec +24 36 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5610 (= GC 3877 = JH 1802 = WH III 136, 1860 RA 14 18 04, NPD 64 45.6) is "very faint, small, pretty much extended 0░▒, 9th magnitude star to east". The position precesses to RA 14 24 24.1, Dec +24 36 14, less than 0.7 arcmin south southeast of the galaxy listed above, the description is a perfect fit and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5065 km/sec, NGC 5610 is about 235 million light years away, in reasonable agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 190 to 225 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of about 1.9 by 0.7 arcmin, it is about 130 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5610
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5610
Below, a 2.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5610

NGC 5611 (= PC 51431)
Discovered (Apr 29, 1827) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.6 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 24 04.8, Dec +33 02 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5611 (= GC 3878 = JH 1803, 1860 RA 14 18 06, NPD 56 19.0) is "faint, small, round, brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 14 24 05.2, Dec +33 02 49, right on the galaxy listed above, the description is reasonable and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 1970 km/sec, NGC 5611 is about 90 to 95 million light years away, in reasonable agreement with a pair of redshift-independent distance estimates of about 80 to 85 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of about 1.2 by 0.5 arcmin, it is about 30 to 35 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5611
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5611
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5611

NGC 5612 (= PGC 52057)
Discovered (May 23, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.1 spiral galaxy (type SA(s)ab?) in Apus (RA 14 34 01.2, Dec -78 23 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5612 (= GC 3879 = JH 3567, 1860 RA 14 18 10, NPD 167 46.0) is "very faint, extended, gradually brighter middle, mottled but not resolved". The position precesses to RA 14 34 08.0, Dec -78 23 36, just off the southeastern rim of the galaxy listed above, the description is a good fit and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 2700 km/sec, NGC 5612 is about 125 million light years away, in reasonable agreement with a single redshift-independent distance estimate of 110 to 115 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of about 1.9 by 0.95 arcmin, it is about 70 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5612
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 5612
Below, a 2.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5612

NGC 5613 (= PGC 51433, and with
NGC 5614 and 5615 = Arp 178)
Discovered (Mar 1, 1851) by Bindon Stoney
A magnitude 14.3 lenticular galaxy (type (R)SAB0(r)a?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 24 06.0, Dec +34 53 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5613 (= GC 3882, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 14 18 11, NPD 54 28.0) "extremely faint, pretty small, diffuse, 2 arcmin north of h1804", h1804 being NGC 5614. The position precesses to RA 14 24 05.0, Dec +34 53 49, less than 0.4 arcmin northwest of the nucleus of the galaxy listed above and well within its outer ring, the description fits and its position relative to NGC 5614 makes the identification certain.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case Bindon Stoney.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 8495 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that NGC 5613 is about 395 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 380 to 385 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 385 to 390 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 1.0 by 0.7 arcmin (counting its faint outer ring), the galaxy is about 110 thousand light years across. Although used by the Arp Atlas as part of an example of galaxies with counter-tails, NGC 5613 has no connection being the other galaxies in the group, being more than twice as far away as its apparent companions.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5613, also showing NGC 5609, NGC 5614 and NGC 5615
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5613, also showing NGC 5609, 5614 and 5615
Below, a 3.9 arcmin wide SDSS image of Arp 178
SDSS image of NGC 5609, NGC 5613 and NGC 5615, which comprise Arp 178
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5613

NGC 5614 (= PGC 51439, and with
NGC 5613 and 5615 = Arp 178)
Discovered (May 1, 1785) by William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 24, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.7 spiral galaxy (type SA(r)ab? pec) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 24 07.6, Dec +34 51 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5614 (= GC 3880 = JH 1804 = WH II 420, 1860 RA 14 18 12, NPD 54 29.9) is "pretty bright, small, round, suddenly much brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 14 24 06.1, Dec +34 51 55, on the northwestern rim of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 3890 km/sec, NGC 5614 is about 180 to 185 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 2.4 by 1.8 arcmin, it is about 125 to 130 thousand light years across. NGC 5614 and its apparent companions are used by the Arp Atlas as an example of a galaxy with a counter-tail, but although NGC 5615 may be related to the formation of the counter-tail, NGC 5613 is over twice as far away as its apparent companions, and therefore has nothing to do with them.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5614, also showing NGC 5609, NGC 5613 and NGC 5615
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5614, also showing NGC 5609, 5613 and 5615
Below, a 3.9 arcmin wide SDSS image of Arp 178
SDSS image of NGC 5609, NGC 5613 and NGC 5615, which comprise Arp 178
Below, a 2.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy, also showing NGC 5615
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5614, also showing NGC 5615

NGC 5615 (= PGC 51435, and with
NGC 5613 and 5614 = Arp 178)
Discovered (Mar 1, 1851) by Bindon Stoney
A magnitude 14.7 spiral galaxy (type S(l)a? pec) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 24 06.5, Dec +34 51 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, (= GC 3883, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 14 18 12, NPD 54 29.5) is "close north of h1804 (perhaps a very faint star)", h1804 being NGC 5614. The position precesses to RA 14 24 06.1, Dec +34 52 19, only 0.4 arcmin north northwest of the galaxy listed above, the description is reasonable and there is nothing else that could fit the described position, so the identification is certain.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case Bindon Stoney.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 3945 km/sec, NGC 5615 is about 180 to 185 million light years away, the same as its larger companion. Given that and its apparent size of about 0.2 by 0.1 arcmin, it is about 10 thousand light years across. NGC 5615 is used by the Arp Atlas as part of an example of a galaxy with a counter-tail (NGC 5614), and their relative position and essentially identical distance suggests that their interaction is probably the cause of that counter-tail.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5615, also showing part of NGC 5614
Above, a 0.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 5615, also showing part of NGC 5614, which see

NGC 5616 (= PGC 51448)
Discovered (May 1, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 11, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)bc? pec) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 24 20.7, Dec +36 27 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5616 (= GC 3884 = JH 1805 = WH III 419, 1860 RA 14 18 31, NPD 52 54.1) is "very faint, small, considerably extended, very gradually brighter middle, extremely mottled but not resolved". The position precesses to RA 14 24 20.4, Dec +36 27 45, right on the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 8435 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that NGC 5616 is about 390 to 395 million light years away, in fair agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 340 to 360 million light years. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 380 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 385 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 2.4 by 0.5 arcmin, it is about 265 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5616
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5616
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5616

NGC 5617 (= OCL 919)
Discovered (May 8, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (Apr 24, 1835) by John Herschel
A magnitude 6.3 open cluster (type I3m) in Centaurus (RA 14 29 49.0, Dec -60 42 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5617 (= GC 3885 = JH 3570, Dunlop 302, 1860 RA 14 19 23, NPD 150 05.3) is a "cluster, large, pretty rich, pretty compressed middle, stars of 8th magnitude and fainter". The position precesses to RA 14 29 47.6, Dec -60 43 04, near the center of the cluster listed above, the description fits and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: NGC 5617 is about 5000 light years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 11 by 10 arcmin, it is about 15 light years across. It must be a binary cluster with Trumpler 22, which lies about 0.6 degrees south southeast of NGC 5617, as both clusters have the same distance, a radial velocity of about -38 km/sec, an age of about 70 million years, and their stars have similar metallicity (the relative abundance of iron, compared to hydrogen), indicating that they were probably formed from the same clouds of interstellar dust.
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 5617, also showing Pismis 19
Above, a 24 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 5617, also showing Pismis 19
Below, a 30 by 50 DSS image showing NGC 5617, Pismis 19 and Trumpler 22
DSS image of region between the binary open clusters NGC 5617 and Trumpler 22, also showing Pismis 19

Pismis 19 (= OCL 921)
Not an NGC object but listed here since in same field of view as
NGC 5617
A magnitude 12.0 open cluster (type I1r?) in Centaurus (RA 14 30 41.4, Dec -60 53 18)
Physical Information: Pismis 19 is about 7800 light years away, and is considerably reddened by thick clouds of interstellar dust lying between us and it. Given that and its apparent isze of about 4 by 3 arcmin, it is about 10 light years across. Although apparently near NGC 5617, it lies nearly 3000 light years beyond it, and is about a billion (1000 million) years old, whereas NGC 5617 is only about 70 million years old; so the two clusters are completely separate objects.
DSS image of region near open cluster Pismis 19, also showing some outliers from NGC 5617
Above, a 6 arcmin wide DSS image centered on Pismis 19

Trumpler 22 (= OCL 920)
Not an NGC object but listed here since a binary system with
NGC 5617
A magnitude 7.9 open cluster in Centaurus (RA 14 31 02, Dec -61 10 00)
Physical Information: Trumpler 22 is about 5000 light years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 11 by 9 arcmin, it is about 5 light years across. It is a binary system with NGC 5617, which see for anything else.
DSS image of region near open cluster Trumpler 22
Above, a 15 arcmin wide DSS image centered on Trumpler 22; for wider-field images see NGC 5617

NGC 5618 (= PGC 51603 = PGC 1097100)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1789) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)c?) in Virgo (RA 14 27 11.8, Dec -02 15 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5618 (= GC 3886 = WH III 763, 1860 RA 14 20 01, NPD 91 37.5) is "extremely faint, small". The position precesses to RA 14 27 15.0, Dec -02 15 23, just off the eastern rim of the galaxy listed above, the description is reasonable and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 7130 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that NGC 5618 is about 330 to 335 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 255 to 360 million light years. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 320 to 325 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 325 to 330 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 1.8 by 1.3 arcmin, the galaxy is about 170 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5618
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5618
Below, a 2.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5618

NGC 5619 (= PGC 51610)
Discovered (Apr 10, 1828) by
John Herschel
Also observed (June? 1865) by Auguste Voigt
A magnitude 12.6 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)b?) in Virgo (RA 14 27 18.2, Dec +04 48 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5619 (= GC 3887 = JH 1806, 1860 RA 14 20 16, NPD 84 33.9) is "very faint, small, round, very gradually brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 14 27 16.5, Dec +04 48 14, on the western rim of the galaxy listed above, the description is a reasonable fit to the part of the galaxy visible in telescopes of the time and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 8385 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that 5619 is about 390 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 290 to 390 million light years. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 357 to 380 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 380 to 385 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 2.2 by 1.05 arcmin, the galaxy is about 240 to 245 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5619, also showing IC 1016 and PGC 51622
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5619, also showing IC 1016 and PGC 51622
Below, a 2.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5619

IC 1016 (= IC 4424 = "NGC 5619B" = PGC 51624)
Not an NGC object but listed here since often called NGC 5619B
Discovered (Apr 28, 1891) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 1016)
Discovered (May 23, 1892) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 4424)
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type S(rs)bc?) in Virgo (RA 14 27 32.4, Dec +04 49 18)
Non-Standard Designations: The use of non-standard designations such as NGC 5619B should be discouraged, particularly as in this case, where the object has a perfectly good IC designation of its own. Such non-standard usage is very hit-and-miss, and there are many cases where it has led to data belonging to one object being mistakenly attributed to another; and though that does not appear to have occurred here, there is no good reason to use designations that increase the chances of catalog errors.
Physical Information: See IC 1016 for anything else.

PGC 51622 (= "NGC 5619C")
Not an NGC object but listed here since often called NGC 5619C
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)bc?) in
Virgo (RA 14 27 29.6, Dec +04 46 47)
Non-Standard Designations: PGC 51622 is usually called NGC 5619C, due to (per Corwin) Holmberg's listing the two galaxies east of NGC 5619 with non-standard designations. Since non-standard designations often lead to data for one galaxy being mistakenly applied to another their use should be discouraged, but when (as in this case) the non-standard designation is the best part of a century old, it is often the most common way of referring to the object in question.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 8250 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 51622 is about 385 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 370 to 375 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 375 to 380 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 1.1 by 1.05 arcmin, the galaxy is about 120 thousand light years across. (Note: A second recessional value of 9120 km/sec (z = 0.030418) listed in the NED, if correct, would correspond to a disance of about 410 million light years and a size of about 130 thousand light years.) PGC 51622 is listed as a Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 2).
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 51622, which is often called NGC 5619C; also shown are NGC 5619 and IC 1016
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on PGC 51622, also showing IC 1016 and NGC 5619
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 51622, which is often called NGC 5619C

WORKING HERE

NGC 5620 (probably =
NGC 5607 = IC 1005 = PGC 51182)
Recorded (Apr 3, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5620)
Probably also observed (Mar 16, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5607)
Probably also observed (Jun 7, 1888) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 1005)
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type Sab? pec) in Ursa Minor (RA 14 19 26.8, Dec +71 35 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5620 (= GC 3888 = WH III 319, 1860 RA 14 20 18, NPD 17 44.4) is "extremely faint, very small". The position precesses to RA 14 21 56.9, Dec +71 37 25, but there is nothing there. Efforts to identify Herschel's III 319 have led to three different results. Until 2007, NGC 5620 was almost always identified as PGC 51356, but that is certainly incorrect; however, because of the relatively long time during which that identification was in use, it still shows up in catalogs in one way or another (for instance, as of late 2015 Steinicke identified NGC 5620 as a duplicate of NGC 5607 in all his databases, but used the position and physical information for PGC 51356 in his "Historical NGC"), so although certainly not NGC 5620, that galaxy is discussed immediately following the current candidates, which are PGC 51326 (discussed immediately below) and as covered by this entry, a duplicate observation of NGC 5607.
Discovery Notes:
Physical Information: Since probably a duplicate of NGC 5607, see that entry for anything else.

PGC 51326 (possibly but probably not =
NGC 5620)
Probably not an NGC object but listed here since a possible candidate for NGC 5620
A magnitude 15(?) spiral galaxy (type S?) in Ursa Minor (RA 14 22 03.8, Dec +71 50 42)
Historical Identification: See NGC 5620.
Physical Information: Vr 9521 z 0.031759, Apparent size about 0.55 by 0.3 arcmin
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 51326
Above, need 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 51326
Below, need ?? arcmin wide DSS image of PGC 51326
DSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 51326

PGC 51356 (not =
NGC 5620)
Not an NGC object but listed here since previously and sometimes still misidentified as NGC 5620
A magnitude 14.1 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Ursa Minor (RA 14 22 40.5, Dec +69 35 43)
Historical Identification: See NGC 5620.
Physical Information: Apparent size about 0.55 by 0.55 arcmin Vr 9170 z 0.030588
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy PGC 51356, often misidentified as NGC 5620
Above, need 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 51356
Below, a ?? arcmin wide DSS image of PGC 51356
DSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 51356, often misidentified as NGC 5620

NGC 5621 (= "PGC 5067508")
Recorded (Jan 30, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 17, 1830) by John Herschel
Three stars in Bo÷tes (RA 14 27 49.7, Dec +08 14 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5621 (= GC 3889 = JH 1807 = WH III 14, 1860 RA 14 20 55, NPD 81 07.4) is "most extremely faint, large, mottled but not resolved". The position precesses to RA 14 27 48.7, Dec +08 14 48, less than 0.4 arcmin northwest of the group of stars listed above, the description is a reasonable fit for such a group observed under less than ideal conditions, and there is nothing else that either Herschel could have seen anywhere in the region, so the identification is considered certain. (Per Corwin, there is nothing at all at William Herschel's position, which is not entirely surprising since his paper states that the position was not verified, but his description fits John Herschel's observation, so the younger Herschel's decision that his 1807 was the same as his father's III 14 was almost certainly correct.)
Physical Information: Two 16th magnitude stars bracketing a 19th magnitude star. Listed in LEDA as PGC 5067508, but a search of the database for that designation returns no result.
SDSS image of region near the three stars listed as NGC 5621
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on the three stars listed as NGC 5621

NGC 5622 (= PGC 51541)
Discovered (May 15, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 13, 1830) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 26 12.2, Dec +48 33 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5622 (= GC 3890 = JH 1809 = WH III 677, 1860 RA 14 21 04, NPD 40 48.8) is "very faint, pretty small, very little extended, very gradually a little brighter middle". The position precesses to 14 26 08.7, Dec +48 33 19, about 0.8 arcmin southwest of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 3865 km/sec, NGC 5622 is about 180 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 125 to 245 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of about 1.7 by 0.8 arcmin, it is about 90 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5622
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5622
Below, a 2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5622

NGC 5623 (= PGC 51598)
Discovered (Mar 13, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 29, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.5 lenticular galaxy (type E/SB0?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 27 08.7, Dec +33 15 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5623 (= GC 3891 = JH 1808 = WH II 329, 1860 RA 14 21 13, NPD 56 07.2) is "considerably faint, small, round, very suddenly much brighter middle, mottled but not resolved". The position precesses to RA 14 27 10.2, Dec +33 14 59, on the eastern rim of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 3355 km/sec, NGC 5623 is about 155 to 160 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 1.6 by 1.1 arcmin, it is about 70 to 75 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5623
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5623
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5623

NGC 5624 (= PGC 51568)
Discovered (May 9, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
Also observed (May 30, 1899) by Guillaume Bigourdan
Also observed (July 1899 to June 1900) by Herbert Howe
A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type Sdm?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 26 35.4, Dec +51 35 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5624 (Swift list VI (#66), 1860 RA 14 21 23, NPD 37 45.4) is "extremely faint, small, a little extended". The second IC lists a corrected 1860 RA (per Bigourdan and Howe) of 14 21 43. The corrected position precesses to RA 14 26 32.8, Dec +51 36 47, about 1.8 arcmin north northwest of the galaxy listed above, but the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer only used Bigourdan and Howe's positions to correct Swift's RA, Howe's (1900) position of RA 14 23 09, Dec +52 02.1 precesses to dead center on the galaxy, so the apparent error noted above is due entirely to Dreyer's making only the minimum required correction.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 1925 km/sec, NGC 5624 is about 90 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 1.2 by 0.8 arcmin, it is about 30 to 35 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5624
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5624
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5624

NGC 5625 (= PGC 51592)
Discovered (Apr 28, 1827) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type Sbc? pec) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 27 02.3, Dec +39 57 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5625 (= GC 3892 = JH 1810, 1860 RA 14 21 26, NPD 49 25.0) is "very faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 14 27 03.0, Dec +39 57 12, on the southeastern rim of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 7650 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that NGC 5625 is about 355 to 360 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 345 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 350 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.95 by 0.7 arcmin, the galaxy is about 95 thousand light years across. (Note: NED lists the star-forming region in the western arm of NGC 5625 as a supposedly separate galaxy, and therefore lists NGC 5625 as a pair of galaxies; but the images below show that is a mistake.)
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5625
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5625
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5625

NGC 5626 (= PGC 51794)
Discovered (Mar 30, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.9 lenticular galaxy (type SA0(s)a?) in Hydra (RA 14 29 49.1, Dec -29 44 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5626 (= GC 3893 = JH 3571, 1860 RA 14 21 35, NPD 119 07.5) is "extremely faint, small, round". The position precesses to RA 14 29 48.0, Dec -29 45 08, on the southwestern rim of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 6890 km/sec, NGC 5626 is about 315 to 320 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 1.3 by 1.1 arcmin, it is about 120 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5626
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 5626
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5626

NGC 5627 (= PGC 51705)
Discovered (Apr 4, 1831) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.3 lenticular galaxy (type S0? in Bo÷tes (RA 14 28 34.3, Dec +11 22 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5627 (= GC 3894 = JH 1811, 1860 RA 14 21 48, NPD 77 59.2) is "very faint, very small, round, 9th magnitude star to southwest". The position precesses to RA 14 28 35.4, Dec +11 23 06, less than half an arcmin northeast of the galaxy listed above, the description fits (including the star to the west southwest) and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 8015 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that NGC 5627 is about 370 to 375 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 360 to 365 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 365 to 370 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 1.3 by 0.9 arcmin, the galaxy is about 135 to 140 thousand light years across. (If a second recessional velocity of 8210 km/sec listed in the NED is correct, the galaxy is about 370 million light years away, and about 140 thousand light years across.)
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5627
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5627
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy, also showing "PGC 4114155"
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5627
Below, the 12 arcmin wide SDSS image at top, also showing some PGC objects (to be covered later)
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5627

"PGC 4114155"
Not an NGC object but listed here as a possible companion of
NGC 5627
A magnitude 16.5(?) lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 28 32.8, Dec +11 22 46)
Physical Information: "PGC 4114155" is superimposed on the image of NGC 5627, and may be a physical companion of the larger galaxy, as the difference in their recessional velocities is within the normal range of peculiar (non-Hubble-expansion) velocities; but given the lack of any obvious interaction between the two, they are probably merely an optical double. Based on a recessional velocity of 7895 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that "PGC 4114155" is about 365 to 370 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 355 to 360 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 360 to 365 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time), or about 5 million light years in front of its apparent companion. Given that and its apparent size of about 0.1 by 0.03 arcmin, the galaxy is about 10 thousand light years across. (Listed in NED as SDSSJ142832.77+112245.7; listed in LEDA with the same designation and as PGC 4114155, but a search of the database for the PGC designation returns no result.)
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 4114155, also showing part of NGC 5627
Above, a 0.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of "PGC 4114155", also showing part of NGC 5627, which see

NGC 5628 (= PGC 51699)
Discovered (May 6, 1883) by
╔douard Stephan
A magnitude 13.3 elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 28 25.8, Dec +17 55 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5628 (Stephan list XIII (#75), 1860 RA 14 21 53, NPD 71 26.7) is "pretty faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle and nucleus equivalent to 14th magnitude star". The position precesses to RA 14 28 26.8, Dec +17 55 36, on the northeastern rim of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5775 km/sec, NGC 5628 is about 265 to 270 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 0.85 by 0.6 arcmin, it is about 65 to 70 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 5628
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5628
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 5628

NGC 5629 (= PGC 51681)
Discovered (May 6, 1831) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.1 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 28 16.4, Dec +25 50 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5629 (= GC 3895 = JH 1812, 1860 RA 14 22 00, NPD 63 31.5) is "pretty faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 14 28 15.9, Dec +25 50 48, right on the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 4500 km/sec, NGC 5629 is about 210 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 205 to 285 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of about 1.8 by 1.6 arcmin, it is about 110 thousand light years across. The galaxy has a similar recessional velocity to IC 1017, and they are therefore thought to be a physical pair.
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 5629
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5629, also showing IC 1017 and 1018
The glare at left is from magnitude 6.7 variable star DX Boo (= HD 127093)
Below, a 2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 5629

NGC 5630 (= PGC 51635)
Discovered (Apr 9, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 1, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type SBd?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 27 36.7, Dec +41 15 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5630 (= GC 3896 = JH 1814 = WH II 674, 1860 RA 14 22 04, NPD 48 06.8) is "faint, small, extended 90░▒, gradually brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 14 27 36.3, Dec +41 15 28, right on the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 2655 km/sec, NGC 5630 is about 120 to 125 million light years across, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 85 to 135 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of about 2.05 by 0.6 arcmin, it is about 70 to 75 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5630
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5630
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5630

NGC 5631 (= PGC 51564)
Discovered (Apr 17, 1789) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 1, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.5 lenticular galaxy (type SA0(r)a?) in Ursa Major (RA 14 26 33.3, Dec +56 34 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5631 (= GC 3897 = JH 1820 = WH I 236, 1860 RA 14 22 12, NPD 32 47.2) is "bright, small, round, pretty suddenly brighter middle and nucleus". The position precesses to RA 14 26 33.2, Dec +56 35 01, right on the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 1945 km/sec, NGC 5631 is about 90 million light years across, in good agreement with widely varying redshift-independent distance estimates of 35 to 105 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of about 2.5 by 2.3 arcmin, it is about 65 thousand light years across. NGC 5631 is listed as a Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 2).
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5631
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5631
Below, a 3.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5631

WORKING HERE

NGC 5632 (=
NGC 5691 = PGC 52291)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1787) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5691)
Recorded (May 9, 1853) by George Bond (and later listed as NGC 5632)
Also observed (date?) by Arthur von Auwers (and later listed as NGC 5632)
A magnitude 11.8 spiral galaxy (type SBa?? pec) in Virgo (RA 14 37 53.3, Dec -00 23 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5632 (= GC 3898, G. P. Bond (#20, HN 11), 1860 RA 14 22 12, NPD 89 49.1) is a "nebula, 11th magnitude star 150 seconds to east (Auwers 33)". The position precesses to RA 14 29 22.6, Dec -00 26 43, but there is nothing there save a completely stellar field; as a result, until very recently, one of those stars was thought to be what Herschel and Bond observed (note to self: need to add an image of the stellar field corresponding to the "traditional" NGC 5632). However, in 2015 Yann Pothier suggested and Steinicke showed that if Bond misidentified his 11th magnitude reference star, then the three apparently stellar objects he observed on the same night (NGC 5632, 5651 and 5658) were actually duplicates of other NGC objects (in this case, NGC 5691).
Discovery Notes: A later iteration of this page will discuss the situation (per Corwin) in some detail, and bring everything for this entry up to date. To make matters worse, for reasons currently not at all obvious, SIMBAD misidentifies NGC 5632 as PGC 51693, so that object is also discussed below.
Physical Information: Given the very late discovery of the duplicate entry, see NGC 5691 for anything else.

"PGC 5067941" (not =
NGC 5632)
Not an NGC object but listed here since previously misidentified as NGC 5632
A star in Virgo (RA 14 29 19.5, Dec -00 26 51)
Historical Misidentification: See NGC 5632 for a discussion of the previous misidentification of this star as that NGC entry. (Note: Although LEDA lists this object as PGC 5067941, a search of the database for that designation returns no result.)
SDSS image of region near the star previously misidentified as NGC 5632
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on the star previously misidentified as NGC 5632

PGC 51693 (not =
NGC 5632)
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes misidentified as NGC 5632
A magnitude 15(?) spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)bc?) in Virgo (RA 14 28 20.3, Dec -00 12 16)
Historical Misidentification: To be discussed in the next iteration of this page.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 7240 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 51693 is about 335 to 340 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 325 to 330 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 330 to 335 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.8 by 0.6 arcmin, the galaxy is about 75 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 51693, which is sometimes misidentified as NGC 5632
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on PGC 51693
Below, a 1 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 51693, which is sometimes misidentified as NGC 5632

NGC 5633 (= PGC 51620 = PGC 2276143)
Discovered (May 11, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 26, 1830) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.4 spiral galaxy (type (R)SA(rs)b?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 27 28.4, Dec +46 08 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5633 (= GC 3899 = JH 1818 = WH I 185, 1860 RA 14 22 14, NPD 43 13.4) is "considerably bright, pretty small, round, pretty gradually a little brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 14 27 28.0, Dec +46 08 52, right on the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 2335 km/sec, NGC 5633 is about 105 to 110 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 75 to 175 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of about 2.2 by 1.2 arcmin, it is about 70 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5633
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5633
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5633

NGC 5634 (= GCL 28)
Discovered (Mar 5, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 16, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 9.5 globular cluster (type IV) in Virgo (RA 14 29 37.3, Dec -05 58 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5634 (= GC 3900 = JH 1813 = WH I 70, 1860 RA 14 22 16, NPD 95 21.0) is a "globular cluster, very bright, considerably large, round, gradually brighter middle, well resolved, clearly consisting of stars, stars of 19th magnitude, 8th magnitude star to southeast". The position precesses to RA 14 29 37.3, Dec -05 58 36, right on the cluster listed above, the description fits and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: NGC 5634 is about 85 to 90 thousand light years away, and about 70 thousand light years from our Galaxy's center. Given that and its apparent size of about 5 arcmin, it is about 130 light years across. It is thought that the cluster may once have been part of the Sagittarius Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy, but is now part of the Sagittarius "stream" of material pulled from that galaxy by the tidal force of our own galaxy.
Observatorio Antilhue image of region near globular cluster NGC 5634
Above, a 12 arcmin wide image centered on NGC 5634
(Image Credit & © above and below Daniel Verschatse, Observatorio Antilhue, Chile; used by permission)
Below, a 6 arcmin wide image of the cluster
Observatorio Antilhue image of globular cluster NGC 5634
Below, a 2.2 arcmin wide image of the northwestern part of the cluster (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)HST image of part of globular cluster NGC 5634

NGC 5635 (= PGC 51706 = PGC 1807264)
Discovered (May 17, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 30, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.6 spiral galaxy (type Sab? pec) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 28 31.7, Dec +27 24 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5635 (= GC 3901 = JH 1815 = WH III 132, 1860 RA 14 22 21, NPD 61 58.0) is "faint, small, extended, suddenly brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 14 28 33.0, Dec +27 24 20, on the southeastern rim of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 4315 km/sec, NGC 5635 is about 200 million light years away, in fair agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 220 to 265 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 2.25 by 0.85 arcmin, the main galaxy is about 130 to 135 thousand light years across. However, the galaxy has a large region of extended material spread across its northern rim, particularly on its western margin, and a faint counter tail curling northwestward on its eastern end, whence its designation as a peculiar galaxy. The main region of extended material spans about 3.6 by 1.5 arcmin, corresponding to about 210 thousand light years, and with the much fainter northeastern extension the galaxy spans about 4.1 by 2.5 arcmin, corresponding to about 240 thousand light years. The galaxy is listed as a Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 3).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5635
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5635
Below, a 4.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy, emphasizing its outer extensions
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5635, emphasizing its outer extensions
Below, a 3.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the main galaxy and its brighter extensionsSDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5635

NGC 5636 (= PGC 51785)
Discovered (Apr 30, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 9, 1828) by John Herschel
Also observed (Apr 25, 1848) by William Parsons, 3rd Lord Rosse
A magnitude 12.7 lenticular galaxy (type SB0(rs)a?) in Virgo (RA 14 29 39.0, Dec +03 15 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5636 (= GC 3902 = GC 3905 = JH 1816 = WH II 580, 1860 RA 14 22 35, NPD 86 06.0) is "extremely faint, considerably large, round, northwestern of 2", the other being NGC 5638. The position precesses to RA 14 29 38.3, Dec +03 16 25, just off the northwestern rim of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing nearby save for its aforementioned neighbor, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 1745 km/sec, NGC 5636 is about 80 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 1.3 by 0.9 arcmin, it is about 30 thousand light years across. Although listed as a lenticular galaxy, the star-formation activity observed throughout its ring and the hint of spiral arms on its northeastern and southwestern borders put it between a true lenticular and a peculiar spiral. Since the recessional velocities of NGC 5636 and 5638 are very similar, it is possible that they are a physically interacting pair, which might explain the peculiar appearance of the smaller galaxy.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5636, also showing NGC 5638
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5636, also showing NGC 5638
Below, a 1.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5636

NGC 5637 (= PGC 51736)
Discovered (Apr 10, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 22, 1830) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)bc?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 28 59.6, Dec +23 11 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5637 (= GC 3903 = JH 1819 = WH II 357, 1860 RA 14 22 36, NPD 66 11.1) is "very faint, small, round, very gradually brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 14 28 58.0, Dec +23 11 17, only about 0.4 arcmin southwest of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5245 km/sec, NGC 5637 is about 245 million light years away, in reasonable agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 190 to 230 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of about 0.95 by 0.6 arcmin, it is about 65 to 70 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5637
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5637
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5637

NGC 5638 (= PGC 51787)
Discovered (Apr 30, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 9, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.2 elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Virgo (RA 14 29 40.4, Dec +03 14 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5638 (= GC 3904 = JH 1817 = WH II 581, 1860 RA 14 22 37, NPD 86 08.4) is "considerably bright, pretty large, round, southeastern of 2", the other being NGC 5636. The position precesses to RA 14 29 40.4, Dec +03 14 01, right on the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing nearby save for its aforementioned neighbor, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: ased on a recessional velocity of 1675 km/sec, NGC 5638 is about 75 to 80 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 50 to 95 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of about 2.4 by 2.1 arcmin, it is about 55 thousand light years across. Since the recessional velocities of NGC 5636 and 5638 are very similar, it is possible that they are a physically interacting pair, which might explain the peculiar appearance of the smaller galaxy.
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 5638, also showing NGC 5636
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5638, also showing NGC 5636
Below, a 3 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 5638

NGC 5639 (= PGC 51730)
Discovered (May 15, 1830) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 28 46.6, Dec +30 24 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5639 (= GC 3906 = JH 1821, 1860 RA 14 22 41, NPD 58 58.3) is "very faint, round, 7th magnitude star to west, 11th magnitude star to south". The position precesses to RA 14 28 45.3, Dec +30 24 04, less than 0.8 arcmin south southwest of the galaxy listed above, there is nothing else nearby and the description of the nearby starfield makes the identification certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 3555 km/sec, NGC 5639 is about 165 million light years away, in fair agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of about 185 to 220 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of about 1.4 by 0.75 arcmin, it is about 65 to 70 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5639
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5639
Below, a 1.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5639

PGC 1902505 (= "NGC 5639B")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 5639B
A magnitude 15.4 spiral galaxy (type (R)Sa? pec) in
Bo÷tes (RA 14 28 57.1, Dec +30 24 24)
Warning About Non-Standard Designations: In general, the use of non-standard designations (such as obtained by adding a letter to an NGC designation) should be avoided, as they are not officially assigned and different references sometimes use the same designation for different galaxies, increasing the chance that data belonging to one galaxy are accidentally attributed to another.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 20685 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 1902505 is about 965 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 885 to 890 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 920 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.35 by 0.25 arcmin, the galaxy is about 90 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 1902505, which is sometimes called NGC 5639B, also showing NGC 5639
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on PGC 1902505, also showing NGC 5639
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 1902505, which is sometimes called NGC 5639B

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NGC 5640 (= PGC 51263)
Discovered (Dec 20, 1797) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 14.7 spiral galaxy (type Sa??) in Camelopardalis (RA 14 20 40.8, Dec +80 07 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5640 (= GC 3907 = WH III 949, 1860 RA 14 23 03, NPD 09 18.2) is "extremely faint, small, a little extended". The position precesses to RA 14 19 35.1, Dec +80 03 38, over 4.6 arcmin southwest of the galaxy listed above, and though the identification is considered the most likely, it is quite possible that it is wrong. (See Corwin)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.4 arcmin

NGC 5641 (= PGC 51758)
Discovered (Jun 4, 1880) by
╔douard Stephan
A magnitude 12.5 spiral galaxy (type (R)SB(rs)ab?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 29 16.6, Dec +28 49 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5641 (Stephan list XI (#4), 1860 RA 14 23 09, NPD 60 33.0) is "pretty bright, pretty small, a little extended, much brighter middle, mottled but not resolved?". The position precesses to RA 14 29 17.2, Dec +28 49 26, well within the eastern outline of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 4345 km/sec, NGC 5641 is about 200 to 205 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of about 120 to 240 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of about 2.4 by 1.4 arcmin, it is about 140 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5641
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5641
Below, a 2.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5641

NGC 5642 (= PGC 51751)
Discovered (May 16, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 30, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.6 elliptical galaxy (type E4? pec) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 29 13.5, Dec +30 01 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5642 (= GC 3908 = JH 1822 = WH III 126, 1860 RA 14 23 11, NPD 59 21.6) is "considerably faint, small, star involved, 12th magnitude star to northeast". The position precesses to RA 14 29 16.1, Dec +30 00 50, just under an arcmin southeast of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, save for the star to the east that makes the identification certain.
Physical Information: NGC 5642 is a very distorted apparently elliptical galaxy, hence its designation here as a peculiar elliptical. Based on a recessional velocity of 4305 km/sec, it is about ? million light years away, in ? agreement with a pair of redshift-independent distance estimates of 200 to 205 million light years. Given that, the about 1.75 by 1.1 arcmin apparent size of the main galaxy corresponds to about ? thousand light years, while the approximately 4 by 2 arcmin apparent size of its northwest-southeast extensions span about ? thousand light years. The galaxy to its north (PGC 51748) is at a similar distance, and the odd appearance of the two galaxies may represent a physical interaction between them.
SDSS image of region near peculiar elliptical galaxy NGC 5642
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5642, also showing PGC 51748
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy and its outer extensions
SDSS image of peculiar elliptical galaxy NGC 5642

PGC 51748
Not an NGC object, but listed here since possibly interacting with
NGC 5642
A magnitude spiral galaxy (type (R)SBc?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 29 11.7, Dec +30 04 38)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 4630 km/sec, PGC 51748 is about 215 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 0.65 by 0.55 arcmin, it is about 40 thousand light years across. The galaxy to its south (NGC 5642) is at a similar distance, and the odd appearance of the two galaxies may represent a physical interaction between them.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 51748, also showing NGC 5642
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on PGC 51748, also showing NGC 5642
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 51748

NGC 5643 (= PGC 51969)
Possibly observed (May 10, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Jun 1, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 10.0 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)bc?) in Lupus (RA 14 32 40.7, Dec -44 10 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5643 (= GC 3909 = JH 3572, Dunlop 469, 1860 RA 14 23 40, NPD 133 34.5) is "pretty bright, large, round, very gradually a little brighter middle, star involved". The position precesses to RA 14 32 38.7, Dec -44 11 50, within the southwestern outline of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 1200 km/sec, NGC 5643 is about 55 million light years away, in good agreement with a single redshift-independent distance estimate of about 55 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of about 5.8 by 4.75 arcmin, it is about 95 thousand light years across. It is listed as a Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 2).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5643
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 5643
Below, a 6.0 by 5.4 arcmin wide image of the galaxy
(Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of spiral galaxy NGC 5643
Below, a 5.2 arcmin wide false-color image of the galaxy, emphasizing star-forming regions
(Image Credit & © Capella Observatory; used by permission)
Capella Observatory image of spiral galaxy NGC 5643
Below, a 2.2 by 2.5 arcmin wide image of part of the galaxy (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
HST image of part of spiral galaxy NGC 5643

NGC 5644 (= PGC 51834)
Discovered (Jun 11, 1880) by
╔douard Stephan
A magnitude 12.5 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 30 25.6, Dec +11 55 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5644 (Stephan list XI (#6), 1860 RA 14 23 40, NPD 77 27.0) is "pretty bright, pretty small, round, gradually much brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 14 30 26.0, Dec +11 55 32, right on the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 7670 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that NGC 5644 is about 355 to 360 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 345 to 350 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 350 to 355 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 1.9 by 1.8 arcmin, the galaxy is about 190 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5644, also showing NGC 5647
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5644, also showing NGC 5647
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5644

NGC 5645 (= PGC 51846)
Discovered (Apr 13, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 8, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.5 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)cd? pec) in Virgo (RA 14 30 39.5, Dec +07 16 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5645 (= GC 3910 = JH 1823 = WH II 150, 1860 RA 14 23 44, NPD 82 05.9) is "considerably faint, pretty large, irregularly round, gradually brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 14 30 39.4, Dec +07 16 39, right on the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 1370 km/sec, NGC 5645 is about 60 to 65 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 40 to 80 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of about 2.3 by 1.3 arcmin, it is about 40 to 45 thousand light years across. The galaxy has an apparent companion on its eastern rim (PGC 4419839), but that galaxy is more than six times further away, so they are merely an optical double.
SDSS image of region near peculiar spiral galaxy NGC 5645
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5645
Below, a 2.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy and PGC 4419839
SDSS image of peculiar spiral galaxy NGC 5645, also showing PGC 4419839
Below, the 12 arcmin wide SDSS image at the top, also showing PGC 5523597
SDSS image of region near peculiar spiral galaxy NGC 5645, also showing PGC 5523597

"PGC 4419839"
Not an NGC object but listed here since an apparent companion of
NGC 5645
A magnitude 17(?) lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Virgo (RA 14 30 41.7, Dec +07 16 12)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 8215 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 4419839 is about 380 to 385 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 370 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 375 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.4 by 0.15 arcmin, the galaxy is about 40 to 45 thousand light years across. Although an apparent companion to NGC 5645, PGC 4419839 is over six times further away, so they are merely an optical double. (Note: NED lists this galaxy as AGC 249298, while LEDA lists it as AGC 249298 and as PGC 4419839; however, a search of the database for the PGC designation returns no result.)
SDSS image of the lenticular galaxy PGC 4419839, superimposed on part of NGC 5645
Above, a 0.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of "PGC 4419839", also showing part of NGC 5645, which see

NGC 5646 (= PGC 51779)
Discovered (Apr 29, 1881) by
╔douard Stephan
A magnitude 14.2 spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 29 34.0, Dec +35 27 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5646 (Stephan list XI (#5), 1860 RA 14 23 44, NPD 53 54.8) is "extremely faint, extended southwest-northeast, 45 arcsec long". The position precesses to RA 14 29 33.8, Dec +35 27 41, right on the galaxy listed above, the description is a reasonable fit and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 8575 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that NGC 5646 is about 400 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 385 to 390 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 390 to 395 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 2.0 by 0.45 arcmin (counting its extended outer arms), the galaxy is about 225 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5646
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5646
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5646

NGC 5647 (= PGC 51843)
Discovered (Jun 11, 1880) by
╔douard Stephan
A magnitude 14.6 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 30 36.1, Dec +11 52 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5647 (Stephan list XI (#7), 1860 RA 14 23 50, NPD 77 30.0) is "faint, small, round, very little brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 14 30 36.1, Dec +11 52 33, right on the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 7330 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that NGC 5647 is about 340 to 345 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 330 to 335 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 335 to 340 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 1.05 by 0.25 arcmin, the galaxy is about 100 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5647, also showing NGC 5644
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5647, also showing NGC 5644
Below, a 1.4 arcmin SDSS image of the galaxy and its apparent "companions",
PGC 51844, PGC 4126457 and J143037.48+115234.8
None of these appear to be really connected to NGC 5647 so they are covered elsewhere
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5647, also showing spiral galaxy PGC 51844 and compact galaxies PGC 4126457 and SDSS J143037.48+115234.8

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NGC 5648 (=
NGC 5649 = PGC 51840)
Supposedly discovered (Mar 19, 1787) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5649)
Discovered (Apr 4, 1831) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5649)
Discovered (May 23, 1887) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as NGC 5648)
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)bc? pec) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 30 32.6, Dec +14 01 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5648 (Bigourdan (list II #74), 1860 RA 14 23 50, NPD 75 21) is "very faint, small, no nucleus, h1824 near", h1824 being NGC 5649. The position precesses to RA 14 30 31.7, Dec +14 01 33, just off the northwestern rim of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing nearby, so the identification is certain. See NGC 5649 for a discussion of the duplicate listing.
Discovery Notes: An earlier version of the database stated that the discovery of NGC 5649 was made by William Herschel on Mar 19, 1787; I need to see if that was merely an error in transcribing Steinicke's database, or if there was some historical confusion involved.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5155 km/sec, NGC 5648 is about 240 million light years away, in fair agreement with a single redshift-independent distance estimate of 195 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of about 0.95 by 0.55 arcmin, it is about 65 to 70 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5648, which is also listed as NGC 5649; also shown is NGC 5655, which is often erroneously called NGC 5649
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5648, also showing NGC 5655
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5648, which is also listed as NGC 5649

NGC 5649 (=
NGC 5648 = PGC 51840)
Supposedly discovered (Mar 19, 1787) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5649)
Discovered (Apr 4, 1831) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5649)
Discovered (May 23, 1887) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as NGC 5648)
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)bc? pec) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 30 32.6, Dec +14 01 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5649 (= GC 3911 = JH 1824 = WH III 645, 1860 RA 14 23 54, NPD 75 22.3) is "extremely faint, very small, northwestern of 2", the other being NGC 5655. The position precesses to RA 14 30 35.7, Dec +14 00 15, about 1.4 arcmin southeast of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing nearby save for the aforementioned neighbor, so the identification is certain.
Discovery Notes: When Bigourdan first observed the object the difference between his position and Herschel's misled him and Dreyer into presuming that NGC 5648 was a "nova"; but later observations convinced Bigourdan that his II #74 was the same as Herschel's GC 3911, and the second IC states (per Bigourdan) "5648 = 5649", so the duplication of the two entries has been known for more than a century. Despite that, although NGC 5648/49 is usually correctly referred to as NGC 5648, the galaxy to its southeast (which is NGC 5655) is usually misidentified as NGC 5649 (one example of why I am being so thorough in discussing the historical identifications of the NGC/IC objects).
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 5648 for anything else.
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 5550 - 5599) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 5600 - 5649     → (NGC 5650 - 5699)