Celestial Atlas
(NGC 5600 - 5649) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 5650 - 5699 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 5700 - 5749)
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5650, 5651, 5652, 5653, 5654, 5655, 5656, 5657, 5658, 5659, 5660, 5661, 5662, 5663, 5664, 5665, 5666,
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Page last updated Mar 10, 2017
Added Dreyer NGC entries
WORKING 5651: Add basic pix, tags

NGC 5650 (=
NGC 5652 = PGC 51865)
Discovered (May 12, 1793) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5652)
Recorded (Apr 19, 1887) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 5650)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SABbc) in Virgo (RA 14 31 00.9, Dec +05 58 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5650 (Swift list VI (#67), 1860 RA 14 23 56, NPD 83 23.3) is "very faint, pretty small, round". Physical Information: For now, see NGC 5652

NGC 5651 (=
NGC 5713 = PGC 52412)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1787) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5713)
Recorded (May 9, 1853) by George Bond (and later listed as NGC 5651)
An 11th magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc) in Virgo (RA 14 40 11.3, Dec -00 17 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5651 (= GC 3912, G. P. Bond (#21, HN 12), 1860 RA 14 24 03, NPD 89 42.1) is a "nebula, round (Auwers 34)" (need to see if Auwers merely recorded, or also observed). One of three objects (NGC 5632, 5651 and 5658) observed by Bond on the same night, previously thought to be stars; but in 2015 Steinicke showed that if Bond misidentified the star, all three objects were duplicate observations of other NGC objects. A later iteration of this page will discuss the matter in more detail; but for now, the corrected identification shown above will have to do.
Physical Information: Given the late discovery of the duplicate entry, see NGC 5713 for anything else.

NGC 5652 (=
NGC 5650 = PGC 51865)
Discovered (May 12, 1793) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5652)
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5652)
Recorded (Apr 19, 1887) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 5650)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SABbc) in Virgo (RA 14 31 01.3, Dec +05 58 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5652 (= GC 3913 = JH 1825 = JH 891, 1860 RA 14 24 04, NPD 83 23.8) is "pretty bright, pretty large, very little extended, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 7495 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that NGC 5652 is about 335 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 350 to 370 milion light years. Given that and its apparent size of 2.0 by 1.4 arcmin, it is about 200 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5652
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5652
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5652

NGC 5653 (=
IC 1026 = PGC 51814)
Discovered (Mar 13, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5653)
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5653)
Discovered (May 11, 1866) by Truman Safford (and later listed as IC 1026)
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 30 10.3, Dec +31 12 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5653 (= GC 3914 = JH 1826 = WH II 330, 1860 RA 14 24 08, NPD 58 09.7) is "pretty faint, pretty small, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.3? arcmin

NGC 5654 (= PGC 51807)
Discovered (May 1, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 30 01.4, Dec +36 21 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5654 (= GC 3915 = JH 1828 = WH III 420, 1860 RA 14 24 15, NPD 53 00.8) is "faint, small, extended?, double star involved?".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 1.0? arcmin

NGC 5655 (= PGC 51857)
Discovered (Apr 4, 1831) by
John Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 30 51.0, Dec +13 58 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5655 (= GC 3916 = JH 1827, 1860 RA 14 24 18, NPD 75 27.9) is "most extremely faint, southeastern of 2", the other being NGC 5649. The second IC lists a corrected NPD (per Bigourdan) of 75 25. (Note: NGC 5655 is often erroneously called NGC 5649, which see for the reason and an image.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.9 arcmin.

NGC 5656 (= PGC 51831)
Discovered (May 1, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 30 25.4, Dec +35 19 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5656 (= GC 3917 = JH 1829 = WH II 421, 1860 RA 14 24 35, NPD 54 03.0) is "pretty faint, pretty large, round, much brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 1.5? arcmin

NGC 5657 (= PGC 51850)
Discovered (May 14, 1866) by
Truman Safford
Also observed (date?) by ╔douard Stephan
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 30 43.6, Dec +29 10 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5657 (Stephan list XI (#??), (Safford #16), 1860 RA 14 24 37, NPD 60 11.7) is "faint, small, irregular, several very faint stars involved, mottled but not resolved?". (Dreyer did not become aware of Safford's paper until he was nearly done editing the NGC, so Safford's contributions were only acknowledged in an appendix, and even then only partially.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 0.8? arcmin

NGC 5658 (=
NGC 5719 = PGC 52455)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1787) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5719)
Recorded (May 9, 1853) by George Bond (and later listed as NGC 5658)
A 12th magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBab pec) in Virgo (RA 14 40 56.5, Dec -00 19 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5658 (= GC 3918, G. P. Bond (#22, HN 13), 1860 RA 14 24 48, NPD 89 45.1) is a "nebula, faint, extended (Auwers 35)". (Need to see if Auwers actually observed, or merely recorded.) One of three objects (NGC 5632, 5651 and 5658) observed by Bond on the same night, previously thought to be stars; but in 2015 Steinicke showed that if Bond misidentified the star, all three objects were duplicate observations of other NGC objects. A later iteration of this page will discuss the matter in more detail; but for now, the corrected identification shown above will have to do.
Physical Information: Given the late discovery of the duplicate entry, see NGC 5719 for anything else.

NGC 5659 (= PGC 51875)
Discovered (May 22, 1830) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 31 06.0, Dec +25 21 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5659 (= GC 3919 = JH 1831, 1860 RA 14 24 53, NPD 63 59.1) is "extremely faint".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.4? arcmin

NGC 5660 (= PGC 51795)
Discovered (May 15, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 29 48.7, Dec +49 37 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5660 (= GC 3920 = JH 1832 = WH II 695, 1860 RA 14 24 54, NPD 39 45.3) is "pretty bright, large, irregularly round, very gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.7 by 2.6? arcmin

NGC 5661 (= PGC 51921)
Discovered (May 12, 1793) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb) in Virgo (RA 14 31 57.3, Dec +06 15 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5661 (= GC 3921 = JH 1830 = WH II 892, 1860 RA 14 25 00, NPD 83 07.6) is "very faint, pretty small, irregularly extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.6? arcmin

NGC 5662 (= OCL 928)
Discovered (1751) by
Nicolas Lacaille
Also observed (date?) by James Dunlop
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 6th-magnitude open cluster (type II3m) in Centaurus (RA 14 35 30.8, Dec -56 39 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5662 (= GC 3922 = JH 3573, Lacaille III 8, Dunlop 342, 1860 RA 14 25 08, NPD 145 56.5) is a "cluster, large, pretty rich, a little compressed, stars from 9th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 30? arcmin

NGC 5663 (= PGC 52049)
Discovered (May 31, 1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Libra (RA 14 33 56.2, Dec -16 34 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5663 (Leavenworth list I (#203), 1860 RA 14 25 20, NPD 105 57.9) is "extremely faint, very small, round, gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.3? arcmin

NGC 5664 (=
IC 4455 = PGC 52033)
Discovered (Jun 6, 1885) by Francis Leavenworth (and later listed as NGC 5664)
Also observed (date?) by Ormond Stone (while listed as NGC 5664)
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe (while listed as NGC 5664)
Discovered (July, 1899) by DeLisle Stewart (and later listed as IC 4455)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa) in Libra (RA 14 33 43.7, Dec -14 37 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5664 (Leavenworth list I (#204), 1860 RA 14 25 20, NPD 103 57.9) is "pretty faint, small, extended, gradually brighter middle". The first IC lists a corrected RA (per Ormond Stone) of 14 27 05. The second IC adds "RA is 14 26 04 according to Howe, but Ormond Stone has 14 27 05". (Obviously a situation ripe for a multiple listing.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.3? arcmin.

NGC 5665 (=
Arp 49 = PGC 51953)
Discovered (Jan 30, 1784) by William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)c pec) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 32 25.6, Dec +08 04 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5665 (= GC 3923 = JH 1833 = WH II 27, 1860 RA 14 25 32, NPD 81 18.3) is "pretty bright, pretty large, round, gradually brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: NGC 5665 is one of Arp's examples of a spiral galaxy with a small bright companion. However, as shown by the box superimposed on the main galaxy image, the compact (0.08 by 0.07 arcmin) "companion" (SDSS J143227.33+080443.3, or "NGC 5665A") may simply be a brighter part of the larger galaxy. Its recessional velocity is within the error bar for the recessional velocity of NGC 5665, and it lies along one of the spiral arms, where hot bright clusters of stars might be expected to lie. In fact, there is a large population of such regions in NGC 5665, which suggest an episode of "starburst" formation, presumably due to an interaction with some other galaxy about half a billion years ago. Based on a recessional velocity of 2230 km/sec, NGC 5665 is about 105 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 65 to 115 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 2.05 by 1.1 arcmin, it is about 60 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5665, also known as Arp 49
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5665
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy; the box at left shows the location of "NGC 5665A"
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5665, also known as Arp 49

SDSS J143227.33+080443.3 (= "NGC 5665A", and with
NGC 5665 = Arp 49)
Not an NGC object but often called NGC 5665A because of its association with NGC 5665
A 15th-magnitude stellar birthplace in Bo÷tes (RA 14 32 27.4, Dec +08 04 43)
Warning About Non-Standard Usage: This is a good example of the problems involved in assigning non-standard designations to NGC/IC objects. In this case, a brighter than normal region in one of the spiral arms of NGC 5665 is often referred to as NGC 5665A; but that same designation is almost as frequently (and pointlessly) used for the entire galaxy, making it unclear which "object" is being discussed. Because of the lack of any standards for adding letters to NGC/IC objects, and the frequent resulting confusion, such non-standard designations should never be used, even when (as in this case) the only suitable replacement is a series of numbers designating a position.
Physical Information: NGC 5665 is one of Arp's examples of a spiral galaxy with a small bright companion, said companion usually being incorrectly called NGC 5665A. However, as shown by the box superimposed on the closeup of NGC 5665 above, the compact (0.08 by 0.07 arcmin) "companion" is almost certainly merely a brighter part of the larger galaxy. Its recessional velocity is within the error bar for the recessional velocity of NGC 5665, and it lies along one of the spiral arms where hot bright clusters of stars might be expected to lie. In fact, there is a large population of such regions in NGC 5665, which suggest an episode of "starburst" formation, presumably due to an interaction with some other galaxy about half a billion years ago. The recessional velocity for the "object" suggests a distance of about 110 million light years, essentially the same as for NGC 5665. Given that and its apparent size, it is less than 2 thousand light years across, which is far more likely to make it a stellar birthplace within NGC 5665 than a separate galaxy.

NGC 5666 (= PGC 51995)
Discovered (May 9, 1825) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 33 09.3, Dec +10 30 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5666 (= GC 3924 = JH 1834, 1860 RA 14 26 20, NPD 78 51.6) is "very faint, very small, round, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.8? arcmin

NGC 5667 (= PGC 51830)
Discovered (Apr 17, 1789) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc) in Draco (RA 14 30 22.7, Dec +59 28 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5667 (= GC 3925 = WH II 807, 1860 RA 14 26 23, NPD 29 54.1) is "pretty bright, pretty small, extended 0░".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.1? arcmin

NGC 5668 (= PGC 52018)
Discovered (Apr 29, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sd) in Virgo (RA 14 33 24.2, Dec +04 27 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5668 (= GC 3926 = JH 1835 = JH 574, 1860 RA 14 26 23, NPD 84 55.9) is "faint, pretty small, very little extended, 14th magnitude star involved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0 by 3.0? arcmin

NGC 5669 (= PGC 51973)
Discovered (Mar 19, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Guillaume Bigourdan
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 32 44.0, Dec +09 53 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5669 (= GC 3927 = WH II 79, 1860 RA 14 26 28, NPD 79 28.2) is "faint, large, round, a little brighter middle, mottled but not resolved". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Bigourdan) of 14 25 53.
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.0 by 2.8? arcmin

NGC 5670 (= PGC 52161)
Discovered (Jul 1, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Lupus (RA 14 35 36.1, Dec -45 58 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5670 (= GC 3928 = JH 3574, 1860 RA 14 26 28, NPD 135 20.5) is "very faint, small, considerably extended, between 2 stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.7? arcmin

NGC 5671 (= PGC 51641)
Discovered (May 6, 1791) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb) in Ursa Minor (RA 14 27 42.3, Dec +69 41 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5671 (= GC 3929 = WH III 882, 1860 RA 14 26 35, NPD 19 44.1) is "very faint, pretty large, round, brighter middle". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Bigourdan) of 14 25 39.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.2? arcmin

NGC 5672 (=
IC 1030 = PGC 51964)
Discovered (Mar 13, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5672)
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5672)
Discovered (May 4, 1866) by Truman Safford (and later listed as IC 1030)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 32 38.5, Dec +31 40 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5672 (= GC 3930 = JH 1836 = WH III 310, 1860 RA 14 26 40, NPD 57 43.4) is "very faint, very large, irregularly round, a little brighter middle, double star to west".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.5? arcmin

NGC 5673 (= PGC 51901)
Discovered (May 15, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 31 30.6, Dec +49 57 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5673 (= GC 3931 = JH 1838 = WH II 696, 1860 RA 14 26 42, NPD 39 26.2) is "faint, small, considerably extended, 15th magnitude star to northwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.4 by 0.6? arcmin

NGC 5674 (= PGC 52042)
Discovered (May 12, 1793) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc) in Virgo (RA 14 33 52.2, Dec +05 27 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5674 (= GC 3932 = JH 1837 = WH II 893, 1860 RA 14 26 54, NPD 83 55.0) is "considerably faint, pretty small, round, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 1.0? arcmin

NGC 5675 (= PGC 51965)
Discovered (May 1, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 32 39.7, Dec +36 18 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5675 (= GC 3933 = JH 1839 = WH II 422, 1860 RA 14 26 54, NPD 53 04.6) is "faint, pretty small, extended, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.8 by 1.0? arcmin

NGC 5676 (= PGC 51978)
Discovered (May 15, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 32 46.4, Dec +49 27 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5676 (= GC 3935 = JH 1842 = WH I 189, 1860 RA 14 27 52, NPD 39 55.3) is "bright, large, extended 45░▒, pretty gradually brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.9 by 1.8? arcmin

NGC 5677 (= PGC 52072)
Discovered (Feb 17, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 34 12.6, Dec +25 28 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5677 (= GC 3936 = JH 1840 = WH III 283, 1860 RA 14 27 55, NPD 63 54.9) is "very faint, very small, round, mottled but not resolved, 3 stars of 9th and 10th magnitude to northwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7? arcmin

NGC 5678 (= PGC 51932)
Discovered (Apr 17, 1789) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb) in Draco (RA 14 32 05.5, Dec +57 55 23)
Historical Identification:
Per Dreyer, NGC 5678 (= GC 3934 = JH 1843 = WH I 237, 1860 RA 14 27 59, NPD 31 27.6) is "bright, large, a little extended 0░, very gradually much brighter middle". Physical Information: Apparent size 3.3 by 1.4? arcmin

NGC 5679 (= PGC 52132,
and with
PGC 52130 and PGC 52129 = Arp 274)
Discovered (Feb 12, 1793) by William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Virgo (RA 14 35 08.7, Dec +05 21 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5679 (= GC 3937 = JH 1841 = WH II 894, 1860 RA 14 28 09, NPD 84 01.1) is "very faint, small, round, 12th magnitude star attached".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.7 arcmin. Recessional velocity 8655 km/sec. Moving away from us at nearly a thousand km/sec relative to its supposed companions, so probably the best part of 50 million light years beyond them, and only an optical companion.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxies NGC 5679 and PGC 52130 (also known as NGC 5679A) and compact galaxy PGC 52129 (also known as NGC 5679C), collectively known as Arp 274
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5679 (part of Arp 274)
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy and its "companions", PGC 52129 and 52130
SDSS image of spiral galaxies NGC 5679 and PGC 52130 (also known as NGC 5679A) and compact galaxy PGC 52129 (also known as NGC 5679C), collectively known as Arp 274
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of Arp 274 (Credits: ESA/Hubble Heritage Team, NASA)
(Rotated counter-clockwise, with North on the left and East on the bottom, to allow more detail to be shown)
HST image of spiral galaxies NGC 5679 and PGC 52130 (also known as NGC 5679A) and compact galaxy PGC 52129 (also known as NGC 5679C), collectively known as Arp 274

PGC 52130 (= "NGC 5679A",
and with
NGC 5679 and PGC 52129 = Arp 274)
Not an NGC object but often called NGC 5679A due to its apparent proximity to NGC 5679
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Virgo (RA 14 35 06.4, Dec +05 21 23)
Warning About Non-Standard Usage:
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.4 arcmin. Recessional velocity 7675 km/sec. Probably a physical companion of PGC 52129, but merely an optical double with NGC 5679 (which see for images).

PGC 52129 (= "NGC 5679C",
and with
NGC 5679 and PGC 52130 = Arp 274)
Not an NGC object but often called NGC 5679C due to its apparent proximity to NGC 5679
A 16th-magnitude compact galaxy (type C) in Virgo (RA 14 35 11.0, Dec +05 21 16)
Warning About Non-Standard Usage:
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin. Recessional velocity 7790 km/sec. Probably a physical companion of PGC 52130, but merely an optical double with NGC 5679 (which see for images). Listed in NED as NGC 5679 NED03.

NGC 5680 (= PGC 52173)
Discovered (Apr 12, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Virgo (RA 14 35 44.6, Dec -00 00 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5680 (= GC 5771, Marth #282, 1860 RA 14 28 34, NPD 89 23) is "very faint, very small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.6? arcmin

NGC 5681 (= PGC 52169)
Discovered (May 1, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 35 43.0, Dec +08 18 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5681 (= GC 5772, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 14 28 47, NPD 81 05.0) is "faint, small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7? arcmin

NGC 5682 (= PGC 52107)
Discovered (Apr 13, 1850) by
George Stoney
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 34 45.1, Dec +48 40 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5682 (= GC 3943, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 14 29 40, NPD 40 43) is "faint, pretty small, extended".
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case George Stoney.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.6? arcmin

NGC 5683 (= PGC 52114)
Discovered (Apr 13, 1850) by
George Stoney
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 34 52.4, Dec +48 39 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5683 (= GC 3944, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 14 29 50, NPD 40 43) is "faint, very small, a little extended".
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case George Stoney.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.3? arcmin

NGC 5684 (= PGC 52179)
Discovered (May 1, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 35 50.0, Dec +36 32 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5684 (= GC 3938 = JH 1844 = WH III 421, 1860 RA 14 30 07, NPD 52 51.0) is "faint, considerably small, round, brighter middle, western of 2", the other being NGC 5686.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 1.3? arcmin

NGC 5685 (= PGC 52192)
Discovered (May 11, 1883) by
╔douard Stephan
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 36 15.3, Dec +29 54 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5685 (Stephan list XIII (#76), 1860 RA 14 30 13, NPD 59 28.8) is "very faint, very small, round, gradually brighter middle and nucleus equal to 15th magnitude (star)".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 1.2? arcmin

NGC 5686 (= PGC 52189)
Discovered (Apr 9, 1828) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 36 02.5, Dec +36 30 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5686 (= GC 3939 = JH 1845, 1860 RA 14 30 19, NPD 52 53.0) is "very faint, small, round, eastern of 2", the other being NGC 5684.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.6? arcmin

NGC 5687 (= PGC 52116)
Discovered (Apr 24, 1789) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 34 52.2, Dec +54 28 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5687 (= GC 3940 = JH 1849 = WH II 808, 1860 RA 14 30 27, NPD 34 53.9) is "pretty faint, small, irregular figure, mottled but not resolved, 10th magnitude star to east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.5 by 1.9? arcmin

NGC 5688 (= PGC 52381)
Discovered (Jun 1, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc) in Lupus (RA 14 39 35.1, Dec -45 01 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5688 (= GC 3941 = JH 3575, 1860 RA 14 30 28, NPD 134 25.8) is "faint, small, very gradually brighter middle, among stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.1 by 1.9? arcmin

NGC 5689 (= PGC 52154)
Discovered (May 12, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 35 29.6, Dec +48 44 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5689 (= GC 3942 = JH 1848 = WH I 188, 1860 RA 14 30 33, NPD 40 38.7) is "considerably bright, pretty large, extended 87░, pretty suddenly much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.3 by 1.0? arcmin

NGC 5690 (= PGC 52273)
Discovered (Apr 30, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Virgo (RA 14 37 41.1, Dec +02 17 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5690 (= GC 3946 = JH 1846 = WH II 582, 1860 RA 14 30 40, NPD 87 06.1) is "very faint, much extended 138░, faint star attached on southeast, 7th magnitude star 4 arcmin to west".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.4 by 1.0? arcmin

NGC 5691 (= PGC 52291 =
NGC 5632)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1787) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5691)
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5691)
Recorded (May 9, 1853) by George Bond (and later listed as NGC 5632)
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa pec) in Virgo (RA 14 37 53.4, Dec -00 23 53)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5691 (= GC 3947 = JH 1847 = WH II 681, 1860 RA 14 30 43, NPD 89 46.8) is "pretty bright, pretty small, a little extended, gradually brighter middle". For a discussion of the duplicate entry, see NGC 5632
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 1.4? arcmin
SDSS image of region near peculiar spiral galaxy NGC 5691
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5691
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of peculiar spiral galaxy NGC 5691

NGC 5692 (= PGC 52317)
Discovered (May 13, 1883) by
╔douard Stephan
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in Virgo (RA 14 38 18.0, Dec +03 24 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5692 (Stephan list XIII (#77), 1860 RA 14 31 16, NPD 85 58.8) is "pretty bright, very small, round, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.6? arcmin

NGC 5693 (= PC 52194)
Discovered (Apr 13, 1850) by
George Stoney
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBd) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 36 11.3, Dec +48 35 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5693 (= GC 3945, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 14 31 20, NPD 40 51) is "faint, pretty large, 13th magnitude star attached on south".
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case George Stoney.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 1.5? arcmin

NGC 5694 (= GCL 29)
Discovered (May 22, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Heinrich d'Arrest
Also observed (date?) by Basilius Engelhardt
A 10th-magnitude globular cluster (type VII) in Hydra (RA 14 39 36.5, Dec -26 32 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5694 (= GC 3954 = JH 3576 = WH II 196, d'Arrest, Engelhardt, 1860 RA 14 31 28, NPD 115 55.8) is "considerably bright, considerably small, round, pretty suddenly brighter middle, mottled but not resolved, 9.5 magnitude star to southwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.3? arcmin

NGC 5695 (= PGC 52261)
Discovered (May 1, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 37 22.0, Dec +36 34 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5695 (= GC 3948 = JH 1851 = WH II 423, 1860 RA 14 31 38, NPD 52 49.6) is "pretty bright, considerably small, round, brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 1.1? arcmin

NGC 5696 (= PGC 52235)
Discovered (Mar 18, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 36 57.0, Dec +41 49 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5696 (= GC 3951 = JH 1850 = WH II 648, 1860 RA 14 31 38▒, NPD 47 36.0) is "considerably faint, considerably small, round, a little brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0 by 1.5? arcmin

NGC 5697 (=
IC 4471 = PGC 52207)
Discovered (Apr 9, 1787) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5697)
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5697)
Discovered (Jun 6, 1894) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 4471)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 36 32.0, Dec +41 41 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5697 (= GC 3952 = JH 1853 = WH II 675, 1860 RA 14 31 39▒, NPD 47 46▒) is "faint, very small, round, brighter middle, 4 bright stars to west".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.7? arcmin

NGC 5698 (= PGC 52251)
Discovered (May 16, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 37 14.6, Dec +38 27 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5698 (= GC 3953 = JH 1852 = WH II 700, 1860 RA 14 31 39, NPD 50 56.0) is "considerably faint, considerably small, a little extended, in triangle of stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 0.9? arcmin
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5698
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5698
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5698

NGC 5699 (=
NGC 5706 = PGC 52334)
Discovered (May 16, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5699)
Discovered (May 12, 1883) by ╔douard Stephan (and later listed as NGC 5706)
A 15th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 38 42.4, Dec +30 27 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5699 (= GC 3955 = WH III 127, 1860 RA 14 32 13, NPD 59 53.8) is "extremely faint, very small".
Discovery Notes: Although Herschel was the prior observer, a one degree error in his sister's reduction of his observations meant that his object was essentially "lost" until Dreyer discovered the error during a 1912 compilation of Herschel's observations. So Stephan's discovery was completely independent, and due to his more accurate position, the galaxy came to be known as NGC 5706 despite that designation referring to the later observation.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 5706 for anything else.
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 5600 - 5649) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 5650 - 5699     → (NGC 5700 - 5749)