Celestial Atlas
(NGC 5650 - 5699) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 5700 - 5749 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 5750 - 5799)
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Page last updated Dec 22, 2017
Checked updated Corwin positions, Steinicke physical database
Checked main Steinicke historical database
WORKING: Checking updated Steinicke JH database
NEXT: Check other historical references
Added Dreyer NGC entries (but check anyway?)
WORKING 5701: Add basic pix, tags

NGC 5700 (= PGC 52237)
Discovered (May 4, 1877) by
Lawrence Parsons, 4th Lord Rosse
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 37 01.7, Dec +48 32 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5700 (4th Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 14 32 13, NPD 40 53) is "extremely faint, small, mottled but not resolved, 11th magnitude star 4' to southwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.4 arcmin
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5700
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5700
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5700

NGC 5701 (= PGC 52365)
Discovered (Apr 29, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 10.9 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a?) in Virgo (RA 14 39 11.1, Dec +05 21 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5701 (= GC 3956 = JH 1854 = WH II 575, 1860 RA 14 32 13, NPD 84 01.8) is "considerably bright, pretty small, round, much brighter middle, 11th magnitude star 15 seconds of time to west".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.3 by 4.1 arcmin
Corwin lists a possible superimposed companion (PGC 214310) at RA 14 39 08.5, Dec +05 21 12

NGC 5702 (= PGC 52347)
Discovered (Apr 20, 1792) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 13.4 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 38 55.1, Dec +20 30 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5702 (= GC 3957 = WH III 894, 1860 RA 14 32 21, NPD 68 53.3) is "very faint, very small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.8 arcmin

NGC 5703 (=
NGC 5709 = PGC 52343)
Discovered (May 16, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5703)
Discovered (May 12, 1883) by ╔douard Stephan (and later listed as NGC 5709)
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 38 50.0, Dec +30 26 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5703 (= GC 3958 = WH III 128, 1860 RA 14 32 27, NPD 59 53.8) is "very faint, very small, irregularly round".
Discovery Notes: Although Herschel had the right of prior discovery, a one degree error made by his sister in the reduction of his observation made his observation a "lost" object until Dreyer discovered the error during a 1912 compilation of Herschel's work. As a result, Stephan's discovery was independent, and his accurate position led to the galaxy being called by the corresponding designation despite its later date. For that reason this entry will only contain historical information, and physical data and images will be posted at the entry for NGC 5709.

NGC 5704 (=
NGC 5708 = PGC 52315)
Discovered (Mar 18, 1787) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5704)
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5704)
Discovered (May 12, 1828) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5708)
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type Sd?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 38 16.3, Dec +40 27 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5704 (= GC 3959 = JH 1855 = WH II 649, 1860 RA 14 32 27, NPD 48 52.6) is "faint, considerably small, a little extended 0░▒".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.6 arcmin
Corwin suggests a possible alternate candidate for NGC 5704 (a magnitude 14.2 star) at RA 14 37 55.4, Dec +40 30 55
(so will have to discuss that as well)
He also lists another candidate (the star above plus the one to its souteast)
at RA 14 37 56.6, Dec +40 30 48
And Steinicke lists the double star as NGC 5708 (though that is definitely the galaxy above)

NGC 5705 (= PGC 52395)
Discovered (May 17, 1884) by
╔douard Stephan
A magnitude 12.7 spiral galaxy (type SBcd?) in Virgo (RA 14 39 49.7, Dec -00 43 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5705 (Stephan list XIII (#80), 1860 RA 14 32 39, NPD 90 07.0) is "extremely faint, large, a little extended, extremely faint diffuse nebulosity around".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0 by 1.9 arcmin
Corwin lists a possible companion (PGC 214313) at RA 14 39 56.2, Dec -00 44 39

NGC 5706 (=
NGC 5699 = PGC 52334)
Discovered (May 16, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5699)
Discovered (May 12, 1883) by ╔douard Stephan (and later listed as NGC 5706)
A magnitude 14.8 elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 38 42.4, Dec +30 27 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5706 (Stephan list XIII (#78), 1860 RA 14 32 42, NPD 58 55.6) is "very faint, very small, round, very little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.3 arcmin
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 5706, which is also listed as NGC 5699; also shown is spiral galaxy NGC 5709, which is also listed as NGC 5703
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5706, also showing NGC 5709
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 5706, which is also listed as NGC 5699

NGC 5707 (= PGC 52266)
Discovered (1878) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 12.5 spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 37 30.8, Dec +51 33 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5707 (Swift list I (#36), 1860 RA 14 32 45, NPD 37 49.6) is "bright, pretty small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.5 by 0.5 arcmin. Apparently paired with a smaller elliptical galaxy, PGC 52269, but the "companion" is actually half a billion light years further away, so the "pair" is merely an optical double.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5707, also showing its optical double, PGC 55269
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5707, also showing PGC 52269
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5707

PGC 52269
Not an NGC object but listed here because an optical double of
NGC 5707
A magnitude 15.8 elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 37 35.2, Dec +51 34 59)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.3 by 0.3 arcmin. An apparent companion of NGC 5707, but actually half a billion light years further away.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy PGC 52269, also showing part of its apparent companion, NGC 5707
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 52269 and NGC 5707, which see for a wider view

NGC 5708 (=
NGC 5704 = PGC 52315)
Discovered (Mar 18, 1787) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5704)
Discovered (May 12, 1828) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5708)
Steinicke lists as a pair of stars at RA 14 37 55.7, Dec +40 30 49
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type Sd?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 38 16.3, Dec +40 27 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5708 (= GC 3960 = JH 1859, 1860 RA 14 32 46, NPD 48 56.8) is "faint, pretty large, extended 0░▒, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 5704 for anything else (??)

NGC 5709 (=
NGC 5703 = PGC 52343)
Discovered (May 16, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5703)
Discovered (May 12, 1883) by ╔douard Stephan (and later listed as NGC 5709)
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 38 50.2, Dec +30 26 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5709 (Stephan list XIII (#79), 1860 RA 14 32 49, NPD 58 57.0) is "very faint, small, irregular figure, extended east-west".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.4 arcmin

NGC 5710 (= PGC 52369)
Discovered (Apr 20, 1792) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel A magnitude 13.0 elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 39 16.2, Dec +20 02 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5710 (= GC 3961 = JH 1856 = WH III 895, 1860 RA 14 32 50, NPD 69 21.0) is "very faint, small, very gradually brighter middle, double star to east, western of 2", the other being NGC 5711.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 1.1 arcmin
Corwin lists a possible companion (PGC 214312) at RA 14 39 17.8, Dec +20 04 39

NGC 5711 (= PGC 52376)
Discovered (Mar 17, 1831) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 39 22.6, Dec +19 59 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5711 (= GC 3962 = JH 1858, 1860 RA 14 32 56, NPD 69 24.9) is "extremely extended, very small, double star attached, eastern of 2", the other being NGC 5710.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.6 arcmin

NGC 5712 (= PGC 51799)
Discovered (Dec 20, 1797) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 14.5 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Ursa Minor (RA 14 29 41.8, Dec +78 51 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3963 (= GC 3963 = WH III 950, 1860 RA 14 32 58, NPD 10 33.7) is "very faint, small, round, small cluster to west".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.7 arcmin

NGC 5713 (= PGC 52412 =
NGC 5651)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1787) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5713)
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5713)
Recorded (May 9, 1853) by George Bond (and later listed as NGC 5651)
A magnitude 11.2 spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Virgo (RA 14 40 11.5, Dec -00 17 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5713 (= GC 3964 = JH 1857 = WH I 182, 1860 RA 14 33 01, NPD 89 41.1) is "considerably bright, pretty large, round, pretty suddenly much brighter middle, mottled but not resolved". For a discussion of the duplicate entry, see NGC 5651.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.9 by 2.5 arcmin

NGC 5714 (= PGC 52307)
Discovered (May 12, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 26, 1830) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 38 11.5, Dec +46 38 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5714 (= GC 3965 = JH 1861 = WH III 675, 1860 RA 14 33 03, NPD 42 44.5) is "very faint, pretty small, extended east-west, double star to north, 1st of 6", the others being NGC 5717, 5721, 5722, 5723 and 5724.
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.2 by 0.4 arcmin

NGC 5715 (= OCL 929)
Discovered (May 8, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 9.8 open cluster (type II2m) in Circinus (RA 14 43 35.0, Dec -57 34 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5715 (= GC 3966 = JH 3577, Dunlop 333, 1860 RA 14 33 15, NPD 146 56.8) is a "cluster, large, pretty rich, compressed middle, stars from 11th to 13th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 7.0 arcmin

NGC 5716 (= PGC 52458)
Discovered (May 7, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.6 spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Libra (RA 14 41 05.5, Dec -17 28 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5716 (= GC 3968 = JH 1860 = WH III 671, 1860 RA 14 33 19, NPD 106 52.0) is "very faint, pretty large, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 1.3 arcmin

NGC 5717 (= PGC 52332)
Discovered (Apr 26, 1830) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 38 37.6, Dec +46 39 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5717 (= GC 3969 = JH 1864, 1860 RA 14 33 29, NPD 42 42.5) is "very faint, small, round, double star near, 2nd of 6", the others being NGC 5714, 5721, 5722, 5723 and 5724.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.5 arcmin

NGC 5718 (= PGC 52441, and with
IC 1042 = Arp 171)
Discovered (Apr 30, 1786) by William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.9 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0? pec) in Virgo (RA 14 40 42.8, Dec +03 27 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5718 (= GC 3970 = JH 1862 = WH III 550, 1860 RA 14 33 40, NPD 85 56.0) is "very faint, small, round, very gradually a little brighter middle, 8th or 9th magnitude star to northeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 1.1 arcmin? Recessional velocity 8205 km/sec. Used by the Arp Atlas, with IC 1042, as an example of galaxies with diffuse counter-tails (all such examples happening to be the result of gravitational interaction between the galaxies).
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxies NGC 5718 and IC 1042, which comprise Arp 171, also showing IC 1039 and IC 1041
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on Arp 171, also showing IC 1039 and 1041
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5718 and IC 1042
SDSS image of lenticular galaxies NGC 5718 and IC 1042, which comprise Arp 171
Below, a 3 arcmin wide image of Arp 171
Unlabeled SDSS image of lenticular galaxies NGC 5718 and IC 1042, which comprise Arp 171

NGC 5719 (= PGC 52455 =
NGC 5658)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1787) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5719)
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5719)
Recorded (May 9, 1853) by George Bond (and later listed as NGC 5658)
A magnitude 12.2 spiral galaxy (type SBab? pec) in Virgo (RA 14 40 56.4, Dec -00 19 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5719 (= GC 3971 = JH 1863 = WH II 682, 1860 RA 14 33 46, NPD 89 41.0) is "pretty faint, small, a little extended, brighter middle". For a discussion of the duplicate entry, see NGC 5658.
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.2 by 1.2 arcmin
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5719
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5719
Below, a 4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5719
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of the core of the galaxy (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
HST image of the core of spiral galaxy NGC 5719

NGC 5720 (= PGC 52328)
Discovered (Jun 24, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 38 33.3, Dec +50 48 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5720 (Swift list VI (list IX #40), 1860 RA 14 33 48, NPD 38 34.1) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, round, between 2 stars".
Discovery Notes: Per a note by Swift in his list IX, he must have communicated the observation to Dreyer at the same time as the rest of his list VI, but "by an oversight" the observation was not included in the published version of list VI; so he finally published it (along with a number of others similarly overlooked) in his list IX.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 1.4 arcmin

NGC 5721 (= PGC 52346)
Discovered (Apr 16, 1855) by
R. J. Mitchell
A magnitude 14.9 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 38 53.0, Dec +46 40 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5721 (= GC 3972, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 14 33 48, NPD 42 41) is "very faint, small, round, 'forms a trapezium with faint nebulosity connecting?' NGC 5722, 5723 and 5724". (The four objects in the trapezium are the 3rd through 6th members of the "Nth of 6", which includes NGC 5714 and 5717.)
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case R. J. Mitchell.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin

NGC 5722 (= PGC 52355)
Discovered (Apr 26, 1830) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 14.7 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 38 54.4, Dec +46 39 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5722 (= GC 3975 = JH 1865, 1860 RA 14 33 50, NPD 42 41) is "very faint, small, round, pretty suddenly brighter middle, 'forms a trapezium with faint nebulosity connecting?' NGC 5721, 5723 and 5724". (The four objects in the trapezium are the 3rd through 6th members of the "Nth of 6", which includes NGC 5714 and 5717.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.3 by 0.3 arcmin

NGC 5723 (= PGC 52354)
Discovered (Apr 16, 1855) by
R. J. Mitchell
A magnitude 14.6 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 38 57.9, Dec +46 41 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5723 (= GC 3973, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 14 33 50, NPD 42 40) is "very faint, small, round, 'forms a trapezium with faint nebulosity connecting?' NGC 5721, 5722 and 5724". (The four objects in the trapezium are the 3rd through 6th members of the "Nth of 6", which includes NGC 5714 and 5717.)
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case R. J. Mitchell.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.2 arcmin

NGC 5724 (= PGC 52360)
Recorded (Apr 16, 1855) by
R. J. Mitchell
A magnitude 16.4 star in Bo÷tes (RA 14 39 02.1, Dec +46 41 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5724 (= GC 3974, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 14 33 52, NPD 42 40) is "very faint, small, round, 'forms a trapezium with faint nebulosity connecting?' NGC 5721, 5722 and 5723". (The four objects in the trapezium are the 3rd through 6th members of the "Nth of 6", which includes NGC 5714 and 5717.)
Note About The PGC Designation: Although NGC 5724 is a star, (per NED) many references mistakenly assign it the characteristics of NGC 5424, which is a galaxy; as an example, although the position listed in LEDA is for the star listed above, that catalog calls it a galaxy with the PGC designation shown above, and assigns many values to its supposed characteristics that actually belong to NGC 5424. Such errors are more common than one might expect, and one of the reasons that I started work on this catalog.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case R. J. Mitchell.

NGC 5725 (= PGC 52456)
Recorded (Apr 27, 1862) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude spiral 13.7 galaxy (type SBcd?) in Virgo (RA 14 40 58.3, Dec +02 11 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5725 (= GC 3976, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 14 33 53, NPD 87 12.7) is "very faint, small, disc, 15th magnitude star 95" to south".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.8 arcmin

NGC 5726 (= PGC 52563)
Discovered (1886) by
Ormond Stone
A magnitude 12.7 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Libra (RA 14 42 56.0, Dec -18 26 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5726 (Ormond Stone list I (#205), 1860 RA 14 34 20, NPD 107 50.2) is "faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle, magnitude 10.5 star 3' to northwest". The first IC lists a corrected RA (per Ormond Stone) of 14 35 07.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.0 arcmin.

NGC 5727 (= PGC 52424)
Discovered (Jun 10, 1882) by
╔douard Stephan
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type Sd?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 40 26.1, Dec +33 59 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5727 (Stephan list XII (#66), 1860 RA 14 34 37, NPD 55 24.1) is "extremely faint, pretty large, round, diffuse".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.3 by 1.2 arcmin

NGC 5728 (= PGC 52521)
Discovered (May 7, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.4 spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Libra (RA 14 42 23.9, Dec -17 15 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5728 (= GC 3977 = JH 1866 = WH I 184, 1860 RA 14 34 38, NPD 106 38.6) is "pretty faint, pretty large, pretty much extended 45░▒, much brighter middle, 10th magnitude star to south".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.2 by 1.9 arcmin

NGC 5729 (= PGC 52507)
Discovered (Apr 25, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.2 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Libra (RA 14 42 06.9, Dec -09 00 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5729 (= GC 3978 = JH 3578 = WH III 508, 1860 RA 14 34 40, NPD 98 24.1) is "faint, pretty large, extended, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.6 by 0.7 arcmin

NGC 5730 (= PGC 52396)
Discovered (Apr 9, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 6, 1828) by John Herschel
Also observed (May 13, 1896) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type Sm?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 39 52.2, Dec +42 44 32)
A Problematic Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5730 (= GC 3979 = JH 1867 = WH III 657, 1860 RA 14 34 42, NPD 46 36.2) is "very faint, considerably small, extended 90░▒". The second IC adds "5730 = Bigourdan 322, RA 14 34 57, NPD 46 39 (h.'s place approximate only)". The (supposedly) corrected position precesses to RA 14 40 16.4, Dec +42 44 52, which falls nearly 25 seconds of time to the east of the galaxy listed above, which would be an extraordinary error for Bigourdan to have made. However, Bigourdan's "big book" shows that he measured the difference in right ascension between NGC 5730 and 5731 as about 17 seconds of time, which is correct; so if there is an error in his position for NGC 5730 he should have made the same error for both of them. This suggests that he made an error in the identification of his comparison star (which was the same for both objects), so I consider that possibility in the following paragraph.
Analysis of Bigourdan's Measurements for NGC 5730: Bigourdan lists his comparison star as 10th magnitude BD+43 2427, at (1900) RA 14 35 50.9, Dec +43 12 12. This precesses to (J2000) RA 14 39 39.2, Dec +42 46 24, which falls almost exactly on the modern position of the star, so his position for the comparison star was correct. Adding the average offsets of eight positions measured for NGC 5730 (+13.1 seconds of time in right ascension and -1' 49" in declination) to the comparison star's (1900) position, Bigourdan's position for NGC 5730 should have been (1900) RA 14 36 04.0, Dec +43 10 23, which precesses to (1860) RA 14 34 32.7, Dec +43 20 48, and (J2000) RA 14 39 52.3, Dec +42 44 36, which falls right on the galaxy listed above. In other words, Bigourdan's measurements for NGC 5730 (and, given his measurement of their relative positions, for NGC 5731 as well) are perfectly accurate, but nearly 25 seconds of time smaller than the value quoted in the second IC, which was taken from Bigourdan's published position for his #322. (?!?)
Historical Identification Confirmed: As of this writing I have no idea how Bigourdan's perfect position for NGC 5730 became the incorrect position published for his #322. Some sort of blunder must have been made, but what that was is neither clear nor of any consequence. Since the actual position Bigourdan measured for IC 5730 falls right on the galaxy listed above, and its description and that of its companion fit the actual galaxies in the region, the identification of IC 5730 as the galaxy listed above must be considered certain.
Discovery Note: William Herschel gave only a single position for WH III 657 (= NGC 5730) and 658 (= NGC 5731), but his second catalog states "Two. Both very faint, very small, extended in different directions, 2 or 3 arcmin distant on the parallel (that is, east-west of each other and separated by 2 or 3 arcmin), each south of a small star." This perfectly fits the pair, and although the designations of the two are (unfortunately) sometimes confused (perhaps because of the error made for Bigourdan's #322), since the NGC is arranged by right ascension the lesser right ascension of NGC 5730 in the original NGC (taken by Dreyer from John Herschel's GC) means that even if its position were incorrect the western of the two galaxies (PGC 52396) must retain the lower number.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 2535 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), NGC 5730 is about 115 to 120 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 2.1 by 0.4 arcmin (from the images below), it is about 70 to 75 thousand light years across. NGC 5730 is listed as a starburst galaxy. Since it and NGC 5731 have identical recessional velocities and are presumably at about the same distance from us, they are almost certainly a gravitationally bound pair.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5730, also showing NGC 5731
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5730, also showing NGC 5731
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5730

NGC 5731 (= PGC 52409, but not =
IC 1045?)
(Corwin lists the identity with IC 1045 with a colon and Steinicke, without; need to re-evaluate line above this)
Discovered (Apr 9, 1787) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5731)
Also observed (May 6, 1828) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5731)
Also observed (May 13, 1896) by Guillaume Bigourdan (while listed as NGC 5731)
Not observed?? (Sep 1, 1888) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 1045)
A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type SBcd?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 40 09.2, Dec +42 46 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5731 (= GC 3980 = JH 1868 = WH III 658, 1860 RA 14 34 52, NPD 46 37.7) is "very faint, extremely small, a little extended". The position precesses to RA 14 40 11.3, Dec +42 46 09, only 0.7 arcmin southeast of the center of the galaxy listed above and just off its southeastern rim, the description fits and there is nothing comparable nearby save for NGC 5730, which is otherwise accounted for, so the identification is certain.
Discovery Note 1: William Herschel gave only a single position for WH III 657 (= NGC 5730) and 658, but his second catalog states "Two. Both very faint, very small, extended in different directions, 2 or 3 arcmin distant on the parallel (that is, east-west of each other and separated by 2 or 3 arcmin), each south of a small star." This perfectly fits the pair, and although the designations of the two are (unfortunately) sometimes confused, since the NGC is arranged by right ascension the lesser right ascension of NGC 5730 in the original NGC (taken by Dreyer from John Herschel's GC) means that even if its position were incorrect the western of the two galaxies must retain the lower number.
Note About Incorrect "Duplicate" Entry: For many years it was thought that IC 1045 (which see for more about this topic) was a duplicate observation of NGC 5731; but in August 2017 it was shown that this is incorrect, hence the disclaimer here and in the list of observers at the start of this entry.
Discovery Note 2: Bigourdan observed virtually every NGC object visible from Paris in an effort to improve their positions (or to see if there had been a change in them as a result of proper motion), but I normally list one of his observations only if it was mentioned by Dreyer. In this case I broke that rule, to show that all three observers (William Herschel, John Herschel and Bigourdan) who are known to have observed either NGC 5730 or NGC 5731 also observed the other one. This is related to the mistaken attribution of Swift's observation of Sep 1, 1888 to NGC 5731, as he noted only a single object in his observation, lending additional support to the idea that he observed neither of the NGC objects, and his observation must have been of a completely different object.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 2535 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), NGC 5731 is about 115 to 120 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 1.75 by 0.35 arcmin (from the images below), it is about 60 thousand light years across. Since NGC 5731 and 5730 have identical recessional velocities and are presumably at about the same distance from us, they are almost certainly a gravitationally bound pair.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5731, also showing NGC 5730
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5731, also showing NGC 5730
Below, a 2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5731

NGC 5732 (= PGC 52438)
Discovered (May 16, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 40 39.0, Dec +38 38 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5732 (= GC 3981 = JH 1869 = WH III 686, 1860 RA 14 35 03, NPD 50 45.2) is "very faint, small, round, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.7 arcmin

NGC 5733 (= PGC 52550)
Discovered (Apr 12, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Virgo (RA 14 42 45.9, Dec -00 21 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5733 (= GC 5773, Marth #283, 1860 RA 14 35 35, NPD 89 45) is "very faint, small, much extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.4 arcmin
Corwin lists a possible companion (PGC 135860) at RA 14 43 00.4, Dec -00 23 00
=
NGC 5734 (= PGC 52678)
Discovered (Jun 3, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A magnitude 12.6 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Libra (RA 14 45 09.0, Dec -20 52 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5734 (Leavenworth list I (#206), 1860 RA 14 36 20, NPD 110 17.2) is "very faint, small, a little extended, gradually a little brighter middle". The second IC lists a corrected position (per Howe) of RA 14 37 13, NPD 110 16.6.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 1.0 arcmin.

NGC 5735 (= PGC 52535)
Discovered (May 17, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.3 spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 42 33.2, Dec +28 43 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5735 (= GC 3982 = JH 1870 = WH III 133, 1860 RA 14 36 29, NPD 60 40.8) is "very faint, large, irregularly round, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.4 by 1.9 arcmin

NGC 5736 (= PGC 52597)
Discovered (Apr 19, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 43 30.8, Dec +11 12 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5736 (Swift list VI (#68), 1860 RA 14 36 43, NPD 78 12.1) is "most extremely faint, small, a little extended, very difficult".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.7 arcmin

NGC 5737 (= PGC 52582)
Discovered (Apr 20, 1792) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 43 11.8, Dec +18 52 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5737 (= GC 3983 = JH 1871 = WH III 896, 1860 RA 14 36 43, NPD 70 31.1) is "very faint, considerably small, round, very gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.8 arcmin

NGC 5738 (= PGC 52614)
Discovered (Apr 12, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 13.9 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Virgo (RA 14 43 56.4, Dec +01 36 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5738 (= GC 5774, Marth #284, 1860 RA 14 36 49, NPD 87 48) is "faint, small, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.3 arcmin

NGC 5739 (= PGC 52531 =
IC 1028)
Discovered (Mar 18, 1787) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5739)
Also observed (May 1, 1828) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5739)
Also observed (Sep 1, 1888) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 1028)
A magnitude 12.1 lenticular galaxy (type SAB0(rs)a? pec) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 42 28.9, Dec +41 50 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5739 (= GC 3984 = JH 1873 = WH I 171, 1860 RA 14 37 13, NPD 47 34.4) is "pretty bright, small, round, suddenly much brighter middle, mottled but not resolved, star near". The position precesses to RA 14 42 34.6, Dec +41 49 46, only about 1.3 arcmin south southeast of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Note About The Duplicate Entry: For a long time it was thought that IC 1028 (which see for a discussion of the duplicate listing) might be PGC 52005. It is now known that IC 1028 is actually a misrecorded observation of NGC 5739; but since this wasn't discovered until August 2017, it will take some time for it to become general knowledge.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5375 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), NGC 5739 is about 250 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 3.9 by 2.8 arcmin (from the images below, counting its widely scattered outer regions), it is about 285 thousand light years across. Given the galaxy's distorted appearance (and scattered fragments), it has probably undergone some kind of collision or at least a very near passage with another galaxy at some time in the relatively recent past.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5739
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5739
Below, a 4.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5739
Below, a 2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the inner portion of the galaxy
SDSS image of inner portion of lenticular galaxy NGC 5739

NGC 5740 (= PGC 52641)
Discovered (Feb 24, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.9 spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Virgo (RA 14 44 24.4, Dec +01 40 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5740 (= GC 3985 = JH 1872 = WH II 538, 1860 RA 14 37 18, NPD 87 43.3) is "pretty bright, large, irregularly round, gradually brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.8 by 1.5 arcmin

NGC 5741 (= PGC 52718)
Discovered (Jun 12, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (date?) by Ormond Stone
A magnitude 13.6 elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Libra (RA 14 45 51.7, Dec -11 54 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5741 (Leavenworth list I (#207), 1860 RA 14 37 20, NPD 101 20.3) is "very faint, very small, round, suddenly brighter middle and nucleus". The first IC lists a corrected RA (per Ormond Stone) of 14 38 17.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 1.1 arcmin.
Corwin lists a possible companion (PGC 960422) at RA 14 45 51.2, Dec -11 53 32
and another (2MASX J14455132-1155297 = "PGC 3833249") at RA 14 45 51.3, Dec -11 55 30

NGC 5742 (= PGC 52707)
Discovered (Jun 12, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (date?) by Ormond Stone
A magnitude 13.0 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Libra (RA 14 45 36.9, Dec -11 48 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5742 (Leavenworth list I (#208), 1860 RA 14 37 20, NPD 101 14.3) is "faint, pretty small, pretty much extended, gradually brighter middle and nucleus". The first IC lists a corrected RA (per Ormond Stone) of 14 38 02.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.5 arcmin.

NGC 5743 (= PGC 52680)
Discovered (Jun 3, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A magnitude 12.9 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Libra (RA 14 45 11.0, Dec -20 54 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5743 (Leavenworth list I (#209), 1860 RA 14 37 20, NPD 110 17.3) is "faint, small, much extended, suddenly much brighter middle and nucleus". The second IC lists a corrected position (per Howe) of RA 14 37 15, NPD 110 19.2.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.5 arcmin.

NGC 5744 (= PGC 52761)
Discovered (1886) by
Ormond Stone
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Libra (RA 14 46 38.4, Dec -18 30 47)
Corwin lists an alternate candidate (PGC 52612) at RA 14 43 55.9, Dec -18 29 02
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5744 (Ormond Stone list I (#210), 1860 RA 14 37 20, NPD 107 53.3) is "extremely faint, very small, nebulous?".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.7 arcmin

NGC 5745 (= PGC 52669 = VV098a/b)
Discovered (Jun 5, 1836) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type Sa? pec) in Libra (RA 14 45 01.9, Dec -13 56 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5745 (= GC 3986 = JH 3579, 1860 RA 14 37 23, NPD 103 20.8) is "very faint, small, extended, pretty suddenly a little brighter middle".
Note About VV098: Vorontsov-Velyaminov object 098 has a confusing set of designations, presumably due to the poor quality of older images of the region. Apparently Vorontsov-Velyaminov thought that the bright galaxy was two galaxies separated by a small north-south distance, and labeled the brighter (southern) galaxy as VV098a and the fainter (northern) galaxy as VV098b. In reality, they are a single galaxy with a dark dust lane running just above the nucleus of the galaxy. A probable companion to the southwest of the nucleus was designated as VV098c, and a magnitude 13.7 star to the southwest of the system was erroneously classified as a galaxy (and still is in several references), and designated VV098d. The star is otherwise ignored in this catalog, but the bright galaxy (NGC 5745) and its smaller companion (VV 098c) are covered in this and the following entry.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.2 arcmin. Almost certainly interacting with VV098c, as discussed in the following entry.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5745
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 5745
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5745 and a superimposed compact galaxy, VV098c
Below, a 2 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy and its apparent companion, VV 098c
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5745 and its apparent companion, VV098c

VV 098c (= 6dFGS gJ144501.1-135655)
Not an NGC object but listed here since an apparent companion of
NGC 5745
A magnitude 15.0 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Libra (RA 14 45 01.0, Dec -13 56 56)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.3 by 0.3 arcmin? Recessional velocity unknown, so whether it is a physical companion of NGC 5745 or merely an optical double; but the distorted shape of the larger galaxy is almost certainly caused by an interaction between the two, so they are probably at the same distance, and have similar recessional velocities.

NGC 5746 (= PGC 52665)
Discovered (Feb 24, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 10.3 spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Virgo (RA 14 44 55.9, Dec +01 57 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5746 (= GC 3987 = JH 1874 = WH I 126, 1860 RA 14 37 50, NPD 87 27.1) is "bright, large, very much extended 170░, brighter middle and bright nucleus". (Note: The GC uses the shorthand bMBN for the last entry, misrecorded in the NGC as bmBN.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 7.4 by 1.3 arcmin

NGC 5747 (=
IC 4493 = PGC 52638)
Discovered (Mar 15, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5747)
Discovered (Apr 12, 1898) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 4493)
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 44 20.9, Dec +12 07 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5747 (= GC 3988 = WH III 48, 1860 RA 14 38 26, NPD 77 18.5) is "extremely faint, small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.8 arcmin
There is a companion (SDSS J144420.72+120742.1 = PGC 93126) at (per Corwin) RA 14 44 20.7 , Dec +12 07 42

NGC 5748 (= PGC 52672)
Discovered (Jun 14, 1882) by
╔douard Stephan
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 45 05.1, Dec +21 54 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5748 (Stephan list XII (#67), 1860 RA 14 38 44, NPD 67 29.5) is "extremely faint, very small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.5 arcmin

NGC 5749 (= OCL 930)
Discovered (May 7, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 8.8 open cluster (type IV1p) in Lupus (RA 14 48 48.8, Dec -54 29 37)
Corwin also lists a couple of positions nearer RA 14 48 54, Dec -54 29 22
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5749 (= GC 3989 = JH 3580, Dunlop 356, 1860 RA 14 38 57, NPD 143 56.2) is a "cluster, pretty large, pretty rich, a little compressed, stars from 10th to 11th magnitude".
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 5749
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 5749
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 5650 - 5699) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 5700 - 5749     → (NGC 5750 - 5799)