Celestial Atlas
(NGC 5700 - 5749) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 5750 - 5799 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 5800 - 5849)
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5750, 5751, 5752, 5753, 5754, 5755, 5756, 5757, 5758, 5759, 5760, 5761, 5762, 5763, 5764, 5765, 5766,
5767, 5768, 5769, 5770, 5771, 5772, 5773, 5774, 5775, 5776, 5777, 5778, 5779, 5780, 5781, 5782, 5783,
5784, 5785, 5786, 5787, 5788, 5789, 5790, 5791, 5792, 5793, 5794, 5795, 5796, 5797, 5798, 5799

Page last updated Dec 24, 2017
Updated Corwin positions, Steinicke databases, historical databases
NEXT: Re-check Dreyer NGC entries)
WORKING 5756: Add basic pix, tags

NGC 5750 (= PGC 52735)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 13, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.6 lenticular galaxy (type SB(r)0/a?) in Virgo (RA 14 46 11.1, Dec -00 13 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5750 (= GC 3990 = JH 1875 = WH I 183, 1860 RA 14 39 01, NPD 89 37.9) is "pretty faint, pretty small, very little extended, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Because of its exceptionally bright nucleus, NGC 5750 is listed as a Seyfert galaxy (type Sy2). Based on a recessional velocity of 1685 km/sec, it is about 80 million light years away, but redshift-independent distance estimates range from 100 to 120 million light years, so the actual distance is very uncertain. Using a distance of 100 million light years, the galaxy's apparent size of 2.85 by 1.15 arcmin would correspond to 85 thousand light years.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5750
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5750
Below, a 3 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5750

NGC 5751 (= PGC 52607)
Discovered (Apr 24, 1789) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 4, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 43 49.2, Dec +53 24 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5751 (= GC 3991 = JH 1877 = WH II 809, 1860 RA 14 39 24, NPD 35 59.1) is "faint, small, very little extended, making a triangle with 2 stars of 10th or 11th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.8? arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5751
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5751
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5751

NGC 5752 (= PGC 52685)
(with
NGC 5753, 5754 and 5755 = Arp 297)
Discovered (Apr 1, 1878) by Lawrence Parsons, 4th Lord Rosse
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 45 14.1, Dec +38 43 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5752 (4th Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 14 39 41, NPD 50 40.5) is "faint, 1' west of h 1878", (JH) 1878 being NGC 5754.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 4540 km/sec, NGC 5752 is about 210 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.75 by 0.4 arcmin, it is about 45 thousand light years across. It is part of a gravitationally interacting pair with NGC 5754 (which see for images), with which it comprises the closer half of Arp 297.

NGC 5753 (= PGC 52695)
(with
NGC 5752, 5754 and 5755 = Arp 297)
Discovered (Apr 1, 1878) by Lawrence Parsons, 4th Lord Rosse
A magnitude 15.0 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 45 18.9, Dec +38 48 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5753 (4th Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 14 39 45, NPD 50 36.7) is "faint, brighter middle, northwest of h 1878", (JH) 1878 being NGC 5754.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 9625 km/sec, NGC 5753 is about 450 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.6 by 0.5 arcmin, it is about 80 thousand light years across. At the same distance as NGC 5755, with which it comprises the more distant half of Arp 297.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5753, also showing part of spiral galaxy NGC 5755
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 5753, also showing part of NGC 5755
Below, a 3 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on the pair
SDSS image of interacting spiral galaxies NGC 5753 and  5755, which represent the more distant half of Arp 297
(See NGC 5755 for a wider view of Arp 297)

NGC 5754 (= PGC 52686)
(with
NGC 5752, 5753 and 5755 = Arp 297)
Discovered (May 16, 1787) by William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 28, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)b) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 45 19.6, Dec +38 43 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5754 (= GC 3992 = JH 1878 = WH III 687, 1860 RA 14 39 48, NPD 50 40.3) is "considerably faint, considerably small, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 4560 km/sec, NGC 5754 is about 210 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.25 by 1.15 arcmin, it is about 75 thousand light years across.NGC 5754 is gravitationally interacting with its smaller companion NGC 5752, with which it comprises the closer half of Arp 297. As a result of the interaction, the larger galaxy has wide outer arms, and a long trail of stellar debris seems to extend well off to the west of the pair.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxies NGC 5754 and NGC 5752, which are the closer half of Arp 297, also showing NGC 5753 and 5755, which are the twice as distant half of Arp 297
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5754 and 5752, also showing NGC 5753 and 5755
Above, a 3 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 5754 and its companion, NGC 5752
SDSS image of spiral galaxies NGC 5754 and NGC 5752, which are the closer half of Arp 297

NGC 5755 (= PGC 52690)
(with
NGC 5752, 5753 and 5754 = Arp 297)
Discovered (May 16, 1787) by William Herschel
Discovered (Apr 1, 1878) by Lawrence Parsons, 4th Lord Rosse
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type SBd?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 45 24.5, Dec +38 46 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5755 (4th Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 14 39 51, NPD 50 38.3) is "faint, 2' northeast of h 1878", (JH) 1878 being NGC 5754.
Herschel's Discovery: Dreyer's NGC only credits the 4th Lord Rosse with the discovery of NGC 5755, but Herschel's sweep records (S179 in the list of historical references) show that he observed it on the same night that he found NGC 5754. He just didn't publish the observation, so no one was aware of it until centuries later, making Lord Rosse's observation, though not the very first, a completely independent discovery.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 9660 km/sec, NGC 5755 is about 450 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.3 by 1.0 arcmin, it is about 170 thousand light years across. Although in the same general direction as the interacting pair NGC 5754 and 5752, NGC 5755 has no connection to those galaxies, being over twice as far away. Despite that, it is considered a part of galaxy quartet Arp 297, as Arp's catalog was based only on the visual appearance of galaxies and groups of galaxies, and not whether they were actually physically related to each other. However, as indicated by its distorted shape, NGC 5755 probably is interacting with NGC 5753, which is at about the same distance. So Arp 297 does consist of a quartet of physically interacting galaxies — just two completely separate pairs, instead of four directly interacting galaxies.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxies NGC 5755 and NGC 5753, which are the more distant half of Arp 297, also showing NGC 5752 and 5754, which are the half as distant half of Arp 297
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5755, also showing NGC 5752, 5753 and 5754
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5755, part of the more distant half of Arp 297
Below, a 6.4 arcmin wide SDSS (unlabeled) image of Arp 297
SDSS image of NGC 5752, NGC 5753, NGC 5754 and NGC 5755, which comprise Arp 297

NGC 5756 (= PGC 52825)
Discovered (Jun 5, 1836) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.3 spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Libra (RA 14 47 33.7, Dec -14 51 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5756 (= GC 3993 = JH 3581, 1860 RA 14 39 54, NPD 104 15.9) is "pretty bright, pretty large, pretty much extended, gradually pretty much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.8 by 1.3? arcmin

NGC 5757 (= PGC 52839)
Discovered (May 19, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 12, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.9 spiral galaxy (type (R)SB(r)b) in Libra (RA 14 47 46.4, Dec -19 04 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5757 (= GC 3994 = JH 1876 = WH III 690, 1860 RA 14 39 54, NPD 108 29.8) is "very faint, small, irregularly round, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 2675 km/sec, NGC 5757 is about 125 million light years away, in good agreement with a redshift-independent distance estimate of 130 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 2.1 by 1.7 arcmin, it is about 75 thousand light years across. NED lists the galaxy as a member of a galaxy pair, presumably with PGC 52846, the edge-on spiral galaxy to its southeast, which is about the same distance from us.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5757
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 5757
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5757
Below, a ? arcmin wide HST image of part of the galaxy (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
'Raw' HST image of part of spiral galaxy NGC 5757
Corwin lists the position of PGC 52846 as RA 14 47 54.3, Dec -19 07 53

NGC 5758 (= PGC 52787)
Discovered (Jun 6, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.5 lenticular galaxy (E/S0?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 47 02.1, Dec +13 40 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5758 (Swift list III (#83), 1860 RA 14 40 20, NPD 75 46.3) is "extremely faint, pretty small, round, 9th magnitude star 22 seconds of time to east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.9? arcmin
Corwin lists a possible companion (SDSS J144705.77+133953.0 =PGC 2800991)
at RA 14 47 05.9, Dec +13 39 52
and another (PGC 52791) at RA 14 47 08.5, Dec +13 39 17

NGC 5759 (= PGC 52797)
Discovered (Jun 7, 1880) by
╔douard Stephan
A magnitude 14.4 irregular galaxy (type Irr) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 47 14.9, Dec +13 27 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5759 (Stephan list XI (#9), 1860 RA 14 40 36, NPD 75 57.3) is "extremely faint, small, round".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 8310 km/sec, NGC 5759 is about 390 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.1 by 0.5 arcmin, it is about 125 thousand light years across. It is in a gravitationally interacting pair with PGC 200319, which is undoubtedly responsible for its chaotic appearance.
SDSS image of region near irregular galaxy NGC 5759 and its companion, PGC 200319
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5759 and its companion, PGC 200319
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the pair
SDSS image of irregular galaxy NGC 5759 and its companion, PGC 200319

PGC 200319
Not an NGC object but listed here because of its gravitational interaction with
NGC 5759
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 47 13.3, Dec +13 28 03)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 8540 km/sec, PGC 200319 is about 400 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.25 by 0.2 arcmin, it is about 30 thousand light years across. It is in a gravitationally interacting pair with NGC 5759 (which see for images), so despite the difference in the galaxies' recessional velocities, they must be at essentially the same distance.

NGC 5760 (= PGC 52833)
Discovered (May 24, 1791) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 17, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 47 42.3, Dec +18 30 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5760 (= GC 3995 = JH 1879 = WH III 885, 1860 RA 14 41 13, NPD 70 54.6) is "very faint, very small, considerably extended 90░, very gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.7? arcmin

NGC 5761 (= PGC 52916)
Discovered (1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
A magnitude 12.4 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Libra (RA 14 49 08.5, Dec -20 22 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5761 (Leavenworth list I (#211), 1860 RA 14 41 20, NPD 109 41.4) is "very faint, small, round, gradually a little brighter middle and nucleus".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.3? arcmin
Corwin lists a possible companion (PGC 52918) at RA 14 49 09.8, Dec -20 21 47
and another (PGC 52911, apparently interacting w/5761) at RA 14 49 02.7, Dec -20 23 58
He also lists a possible alternate candidate for 5761 (PGC 52956) at RA 14 49 50.0, Dec -20 16 42

NGC 5762 (= PGC 52887)
Discovered (May 22, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
Also observed (May 21, 1892) by Guillaume Bigourdan
Also observed (Jul 1899 to Jun 1900) by Herbert Howe
A magnitude 12.8 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 48 42.6, Dec +12 27 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5762 (Swift list III (#84), 1860 RA 14 42 13, NPD 76 58.3) is "very faint, small, round, western of 2", the other being NGC 5763. The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe and Bigourdan) of RA 14 42 00.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 1.3? arcmin.

NGC 5763 (= PGC 52905)
Discovered (May 22, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
Also observed (May 21, 1892) by Guillaume Bigourdan
Also observed (Jul 1899 to Jun 1900) by Herbert Howe
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 48 58.7, Dec +12 29 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5763 (Swift list III (#85), 1860 RA 14 42 38, NPD 76 56.3) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, very difficult, eastern of 2", the other being NGC 5762. The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe and Bigourdan) of RA 14 42 16.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.4? arcmin.

NGC 5764 (= OCL 934)
Discovered (Jul 8, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.6 open cluster (type II2p) in Lupus (RA 14 53 30.6, Dec -52 40 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5764 (= GC 3996 = JH 3582, 1860 RA 14 43 45, NPD 142 05.4) is a "cluster, very faint, very small, very compressed".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0? arcmin.

NGC 5765 (= PGC 53011 + PGC 53012)
Discovered (Apr 24, 1830) by
John Herschel
A pair of galaxies in Virgo (RA 14 50 51.1, Dec +05 07 01)
PGC 53011 = A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type Sb? pec) at RA 14 50 50.6, Dec +05 07 11
PGC 53012 = A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type S(rs)ab? pec) at RA 14 50 51.5, Dec +05 06 52
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5765 (= GC 3997 = JH 1880, 1860 RA 14 43 52, NPD 84 18.0) is "a double nebula, both extremely faint". The position precesses to RA 14 50 50.5, Dec +05 07 09, right on the northern member of the pair of galaxies listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Warning About Non-Standard Usage: This is an example of a system where letters are often attached to the NGC number to specify which galaxy is which; however, there is no standard for adding the letters, and they are assigned to different galaxies in various references. For that reason, such non-standard usage should never be used; instead, some standardized designation (such as the PGC designations used here) is preferable.
Physical Information: PGC 53011 has a recessional velocity of 8470 km/sec, while PGC 53012 has a recessional velocity of 8335 km/sec. Since they are obviously an interacting pair, the difference in their recessional velocities must be due to their relative motion, and their average recessional velocity of 8400 km/sec should be used to determine their distance. Based on that (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that NGC 5765 is about 390 to 395 million light years away, in reasonable agreement with a single redshift-independent distance estimate of about 410 million light years. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the pair was about 375 to 380 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 385 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.8 by 0.35 arcmin (from the images below), PGC 53011 is about 85 to 90 thousand light years across, and the apparent size of about 0.65 by 0.5 arcmin for PGC 53012 (also from the images below) corresponds to about 70 to 75 thousand light years. Counting the extended tails and other material thrown out of the galaxies by their interaction, which span about 4 by 1.5 arcmin, the entire structure is about 440 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near the pair of interacting spiral galaxies listed as NGC 5765
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5765
Below, a 5 arcmin wide enhanced SDSS image showing the galaxies and their extended fragments
SDSS image of the pair of interacting spiral galaxies listed as NGC 5765, including their extended tails and other fragments
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the pair
SDSS image of the pair of interacting spiral galaxies listed as NGC 5765
Below, a 1 arcmin wide HST image of the pair (Image Credit ESA/Hubble & NASA)
HST image of the pair of interacting spiral galaxies listed as NGC 5765
Below, a 1.4 by 2.1 arcmin wide HST image of the pair and part of their tails (Image Credit as above)
(with North to the right, to allow for more detail)
HST image of the pair of interacting spiral galaxies listed as NGC 5765, also showing part of their extended tails

NGC 5766 (= PGC 53186)
Discovered (Jul 8, 1885) by
Ormond Stone
Also observed (Jul 1899 to Jun 1900) by Herbert Howe
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Libra (RA 14 53 09.6, Dec -21 23 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5766 (Ormond Stone list I (#212), 1860 RA 14 44 20, NPD 110 47.5) is "extremely faint, pretty small, round, gradually brighter middle". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of RA 14 45 10.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.7? arcmin.

NGC 5767 (= PGC 52942)
Discovered (May 14, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
Also observed (Jun 14, 1898) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type SBab?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 49 34.4, Dec +47 22 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5767 (Swift list I (#37), 1860 RA 14 44 58, NPD 42 02.1) is "extremely faint, pretty small, round, star near". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Bigourdan) of RA 14 44 41.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7? arcmin.

NGC 5768 (= PGC 53089)
Discovered (Apr 14, 1785) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 12.5 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Libra (RA 14 52 08.0, Dec -02 31 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5768 (= GC 3998 = WH III 373, 1860 RA 14 44 59, NPD 91 57.2) is "faint, round, brighter middle and faint nucleus, small star to south".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 1.4? arcmin.

NGC 5769 (= PGC 53145)
Discovered (Apr 27, 1881) by
Edward Holden
A magnitude 14.4 elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 52 41.5, Dec +07 55 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5769 (Holden (#17), 1860 RA 14 45 47, NPD 81 27) is "very faint".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.6? arcmin.
Corwin lists a possible companion (PGC 53155) at RA 14 52 48.4, Dec +07 56 45

NGC 5770 (= PGC 53201)
Discovered (Apr 29, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 9, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.3 lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Virgo (RA 14 53 15.0, Dec +03 57 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5770 (= GC 3999 = JH 1881 = WH II 576, 1860 RA 14 46 13, NPD 85 27.6) is "considerably faint, small, very little extended, brighter middle, binuclear".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.3? arcmin.
Corwin lists a possible companion (PGC 214340) at RA 14 53 15.0, Dec +03 55 35

NGC 5771 (= PGC 53088)
Discovered (May 16, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 15, 1830) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.6 elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 52 14.3, Dec +29 50 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5771 (= GC 4000 = JH 1882 = WH III 129, 1860 RA 14 46 17, NPD 59 35.1) is "very faint, small, round, pretty gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.7? arcmin.

NGC 5772 (= PGC 53067)
Discovered (May 12, 1828) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.8 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 51 38.9, Dec +40 35 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5772 (= GC 4001 = JH 1883, 1860 RA 14 46 18, NPD 48 49.4) is "pretty bright, pretty large, a little extended, pretty suddenly a little brighter middle, 8th magnitude star to northwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 1.3? arcmin.

NGC 5773 (= PGC 53124)
Discovered (May 16, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 15, 1830) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 52 30.4, Dec +29 48 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5773 (= GC 4002 = JH 1884 = WH III 130, 1860 RA 14 46 34, NPD 59 37.9) is "very faint, small, round, pretty gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.9? arcmin.

NGC 5774 (= PGC 53231)
Discovered (Apr 26, 1851) by
Bindon Stoney
A magnitude 12.1 spiral galaxy (type SBcd?) in Virgo (RA 14 53 42.5, Dec +03 34 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5774 (= GC 4003, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 14 46 43, NPD 85 50.4) is "pretty faint, pretty large, round, northwestern of 2", the other being NGC 5775.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case Bindon Stoney.
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0 by 2.3? arcmin.

NGC 5775 (= PGC 53247)
Discovered (May 27, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 10, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.4 spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Virgo (RA 14 53 57.6, Dec +03 32 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5775 (= GC 4004 = JH 1885 = WH III 554, 1860 RA 14 46 58, NPD 85 52.8) is "faint, pretty small, very much extended 148░, gradually a very little brighter middle". The position precesses to 14 53 59.8, Dec +03 32 47, just off the eastern rim of the galaxy listed above and the description fits, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 1680 km/sec, NGC 5775 is about 78 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 58 to 88 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of about 4.05 by 1.05 arcmin, the galaxy is about 90 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5775, also showing NGC 5774
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5775, also showing NGC 5774 and IC 1070
Below, a 4.0 arcmin SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5775
Below, a 2.4 by 3.0 arcmin wide HST image of the galaxy (Image Credit ESA/HST/NASA)
HST image of spiral galaxy NGC 5775

NGC 5776 (= PGC 53289)
Discovered (Apr 27, 1862) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Virgo (RA 14 54 32.7, Dec +02 57 59)
(Steinicke lists this as an elliptical galaxy)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5776 (= GC 4005, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 14 47 32, NPD 86 27.7) is "very faint, pretty large, very little brighter middle, 8th or 9th magnitude star to southwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7? arcmin.

NGC 5777 (= PGC 53043)
Discovered (Apr 17, 1789) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Draco (RA 14 51 17.9, Dec +58 58 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5777 (= GC 4006 = WH III 806, 1860 RA 14 47 33, NPD 30 26.9) is "very faint, very small, a little extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.1 by 0.4? arcmin.
Corwin lists a possible companion (PGC 53057) at RA 14 51 35.9, Dec +58 57 14

NGC 5778 (= PGC 53279 (and perhaps =
NGC 5825)
Discovered (Jun 20, 1886) by Lewis Swift
Also observed (May 19, 1890) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 13.8 elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 54 31.5, Dec +18 38 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5778 (Swift list IV (#15), 1860 RA 14 47 56, NPD 70 46.7) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, round, pretty bright star close to east, difficult". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Bigourdan) of RA 14 48 06.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.9? arcmin.

NGC 5779 (= PGC 53090)
Discovered (Jun 9, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 14.8 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Draco (RA 14 52 09.6, Dec +55 53 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5779 (Swift list I (#38), 1860 RA 14 48 17, NPD 33 30.5) is "very faint, pretty small, a little extended, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.4? arcmin.

NGC 5780 (= PGC 53275)
Discovered (Mar 30, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 54 22.7, Dec +28 56 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5780 (Swift list VI (#69), 1860 RA 14 48 26, NPD 60 28.5) is "very faint, small, round, star near to southwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.4? arcmin.

NGC 5781 (= PGC 53417)
Discovered (May 11, 1831) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Libra (RA 14 56 41.3, Dec -17 14 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5781 (= GC 4007 = JH 1886, 1860 RA 14 48 52, NPD 106 40.1) is "faint, small, round, brighter middle, 16th magnitude star to southwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.8? arcmin.

NGC 5782 (= PGC 53379)
Discovered (Apr 19, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
Also observed (May 31, 1894) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 14.0 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 55 55.3, Dec +11 51 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5782 (Swift list VI (#70), 1860 RA 14 48 54, NPD 77 43.4) is "extremely faint, very small, extended, star near to southeast". The second IC lists a corrected position (per Bigourdan) of RA 14 49 14, NPD 77 33.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.7? arcmin.
Corwin lists a possible companion (PGC 53382) at RA 14 55 56.5, Dec +11 52 30

NGC 5783 (=
NGC 5785 = PGC 53217)
Discovered (1887) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 5783)
Discovered (Apr 21, 1887) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 5785)
A magnitude 12.8 spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 53 28.3, Dec +52 04 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5783 (Swift list VI, 1860 RA 14 48 58, NPD 37 19.4) is "pretty bright, pretty small, irregularly round, faint star involved".
Discovery Notes: Swift sent Dreyer a copy of his list VI prior to publication, but inadvertently omitted some of the objects in the published paper. Some of them were added to his list IX (with an asterisk to indicate the reason), but this observation is not in either paper, hence the lack of a reference number.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.9 by 1.8? arcmin.
Corwin lists a possible companion (PGC 2405724) at RA 14 53 25.0, Dec +52 03 18

NGC 5784 (= PGC 53265)
Discovered (Apr 9, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 1, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.4 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 54 16.5, Dec +42 33 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5784 (= GC 4008 = JH 1887 = WH II 676, 1860 RA 14 49 05, NPD 46 52 03) is "pretty bright, small, round, suddenly much brighter middle, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 1.8? arcmin.

NGC 5785 (=
NGC 5783 = PGC 53217)
Discovered (1887) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 5783)
Discovered (Apr 21, 1887) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 5785)
A magnitude 12.8 spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 53 28.3, Dec +52 04 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5785 (Swift list VI (#71), 1860 RA 14 49 33, NPD 37 17.3) is "very faint, pretty small, faint star close to east, northwestern of 2", the other being NGC 5788.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 5783 for anything else.

NGC 5786 (= PGC 53527)
Discovered (Jun 5, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.5 spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Centaurus (RA 14 58 56.3, Dec -42 00 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5786 (= GC 4009 = JH 3583, 1860 RA 14 49 58, NPD 131 27.4) is "faint, much extended, bright star to southeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.3 by 1.2? arcmin.

NGC 5787 (= PGC 53339)
Discovered (Apr 9, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 1, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 55 15.6, Dec +42 30 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5787 (= GC 4010 = JH 1888 = WH II 677, 1860 RA 14 50 02, NPD 46 56.1) is "faint, considerably small, round, pretty suddenly a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.9? arcmin.

NGC 5788 (= PGC 53189)
Discovered (Apr 21, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 14.7 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 53 17.0, Dec +52 02 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5788 (Swift list VI (#72), 1860 RA 14 50 03, NPD 37 19.3) is "most extremely faint, small, round, very difficult, southeastern of 2", the other being NGC 5785.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.4? arcmin.

NGC 5789 (= PGC 53414)
Discovered (May 21, 1802) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 30, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type SBd?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 56 35.7, Dec +30 14 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5789 (= GC 4011 = JH 1890 = WH III 976, 1860 RA 14 50 41, NPD 59 12.9) is "extremely faint, pretty small, irregular figure".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.8? arcmin.

NGC 5790 (= PGC 53459)
Discovered (May 16, 1884) by
╔douard Stephan
A magnitude 13.6 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 57 35.8, Dec +08 17 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5790 (Stephan list XIII (#81), 1860 RA 14 50 46, NPD 81 08.9) is "extremely faint, very small, irregular figure, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.8? arcmin.

NGC 5791 (= PGC 53516)
Discovered (May 19, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 12, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.7 elliptical galaxy (type E6?) in Libra (RA 14 58 46.2, Dec -19 16 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5791 (= GC 4012 = JH 1889 = WH III 691, 1860 RA 14 50 52, NPD 108 42.5) is "pretty faint, small, round, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.5 by 1.3? arcmin.

NGC 5792 (= PGC 53499)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1787) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 11.3 spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Libra (RA 14 58 22.7, Dec -01 05 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5792 (= GC 4013 = WH II 683, 1860 RA 14 51 12, NPD 90 31.5) is "pretty bright, pretty large, round, much brighter middle, 8th or 9th magnitude star 1' to northwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size 6.8 by 1.7? arcmin.
NOAO image of region near spiral galaxy 5792 overlaid on an SDSS image of regions not otherwise covered
Above, a 12 arcmin wide composite NOAO/SDSS image centered on NGC 5792
(Image Credit above and below: Brad Ehrhorn/Adam Block/NOAO/AURA/NSF)
Below, an 8 arcmin wide composite NOAO/SDSS image of the galaxy
NOAO image of spiral galaxy 5792 overlaid on an SDSS image of regions not otherwise covered

NGC 5793 (= PGC 53550)
Discovered (1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (Jul 1899 to Jun 1900) by Herbert Howe
A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Libra (RA 14 59 24.8, Dec -16 41 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5793 (Leavenworth list I (#213), 1860 RA 14 51 20▒, NPD 106 06.7) is "extremely faint, pretty small, extended, brighter middle and nucleus". The second IC lists a corrected position (per Howe) of RA 14 51 36, NPD 106 07.9.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 0.6? arcmin.

NGC 5794 (= PGC 53378)
Discovered (May 13, 1830) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 55 53.6, Dec +49 43 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5794 (= GC 4014 = JH 1891, 1860 RA 14 51 22, NPD 39 44.7) is "pretty faint, small, very suddenly brighter middle like 13th magnitude star, 1st of 4", the others being NGC 5797, 5804 and 5805.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 1.0? arcmin.

NGC 5795 (= PGC 53402)
Discovered (Jun 24, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 56 19.3, Dec +49 23 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5795 (Swift list VI (list IX #42), 1860 RA 14 51 29, NPD 40 50.9) is "very faint, pretty small, a little extended, pretty bright star close to western end".
Discovery Notes: Swift sent Dreyer a copy of his list VI prior to publication, but inadvertently omitted some of the objects in the published paper. Some of them were added to his list IX (with an asterisk to indicate the reason), hence the reference in parentheses.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.3? arcmin.

NGC 5796 (= PGC 53549)
Discovered (May 23, 1884) by
Wilhelm Tempel
Also observed (May 31, 1886) by Francis Leavenworth
A magnitude 11.6 elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Libra (RA 14 59 24.1, Dec -16 37 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5796 (Tempel list X, Ormond Stone list I (#??), 1860 RA 14 51 36, NPD 106 03.7) is "faint, pretty small star in center".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.5 by 1.8? arcmin.

NGC 5797 (= PGC 53408)
Discovered (May 15, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 13, 1830) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.8 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 56 24.0, Dec +49 41 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5797 (= GC 4015 = JH 1893 = WH III 678, 1860 RA 14 51 46, NPD 39 44.9) is "faint, small, very suddenly brighter middle like 13th magnitude star, 2nd of 4", the others being NGC 5794, 5804 and 5805.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.0? arcmin.

NGC 5798 (= PGC 53463)
Discovered (May 16, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 30, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.0 irregular galaxy (type Im?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 57 38.0, Dec +29 58 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5798 (= GC 4016 = JH 1892 = WH III 131, 1860 RA 14 51 48, NPD 59 28.3) is "faint, small, round, very gradually brighter middle, star to northeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.9? arcmin.
SDSS image of region near irregular galaxy NGC 5798
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5798
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of irregular galaxy NGC 5798

NGC 5799 (= PGC 53875)
Discovered (Apr 4, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.9 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Apus (RA 15 05 35.2, Dec -72 25 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5799 (= GC 4017 = JH 3584, 1860 RA 14 51 49, NPD 161 52.5) is "extremely faint, small, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5799
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 5799
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5799
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 5700 - 5749) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 5750 - 5799     → (NGC 5800 - 5849)