Celestial Atlas
(NGC 5750 - 5799) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 5800 - 5849 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 5850 - 5899)
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5800, 5801, 5802, 5803, 5804, 5805, 5806, 5807, 5808, 5809, 5810, 5811, 5812, 5813, 5814, 5815, 5816,
5817, 5818, 5819, 5820, 5821, 5822, 5823, 5824, 5825, 5826, 5827, 5828, 5829, 5830, 5831, 5832, 5833,
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Page last updated Mar 12, 2017
Added Dreyer NGC entries
Reformatting to current standards
WORKING 5804: Add basic pix, tags

NGC 5800
Discovered (Jul 8, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 7th-magnitude group of stars in Lupus (RA 15 01 47.8, Dec -51 55 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5800 (= GC 4018 = JH 3585, 1860 RA 14 52 06, NPD 141 21.5) is a "cluster, pretty large, pretty rich, a little compressed".
Physical Information: A small grouping of a few (four or five?) moderately bright stars.
DSS image of region near stellar group NGC 5800
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 5800

NGC 5801 (= PGC 53596)
Discovered (Jun 10, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Libra (RA 15 00 25.9, Dec -13 54 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5801 (Leavenworth list I (#215), 1860 RA 14 52 20, NPD 103 17.7) is "very faint, very small, suddenly brighter middle, 1st of 3", the others being NGC 5802 and 5803. The second IC lists a corrected position (per Howe) of RA 14 52 44, NPD 103 20.8.
Physical Information: NGC 5801 is the westernmost of a trio of galaxies including NGC 5802 and 5803. Its apparent size is 0.9 by 0.6 arcmins; nothing else seems directly available, but if it is physically associated with NGC 5802, as its distorted shape suggests, it is about 350 million light years away and 90 thousand light years across.
alt="DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5801 and its possible companion, lenticular galaxy NGC 5802">
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5801 and to its southeast, NGC 5802
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 5801, 5802, and 5803
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5801 and lenticular galaxies NGC 5802 and 5803

NGC 5802 (= PGC 53601)
Discovered (Jun 10, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Libra (RA 15 00 29.9, Dec -13 55 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5802 (Leavenworth list I (#216), 1860 RA 14 52 20, NPD 103 18.7) is "very faint, very small, suddenly brighter middle, 2nd and brightest (of 3, the others being NGC 5801 and 5803)". The second IC lists a corrected position (per Howe) of RA 14 52 48, NPD 103 21.7.
Physical Information: NGC 5802 is the southernmost of a trio of galaxies, including NGC 5801 and 5803. Based on a recessional velocity of 7535 km/sec, the galaxy is about 350 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.3 by 0.9 arcmins, it is about 130 thousand light years across.
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5802 and its possible companion, spiral galaxy NGC 5801
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5802 and NGC 5801, which see for a wide-field view

NGC 5803 (= PGC 53609)
Discovered (Jun 10, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Libra (RA 15 00 34.4, Dec -13 53 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5803 (Leavenworth list I (#217), 1860 RA 14 52 20, NPD 103 16.7) is "very faint, very small, suddenly brighter middle, 3rd of 3", the others being NGC 5801 and 5802. The second IC lists a corrected position (per Howe) of RA 14 53 16, NPD 103 20.2.
Physical Information: NGC 5803 is the easternmost of a trio of galaxies, including NGC 5801 and 5802. NGC 5803's apparent size is 0.9 by 0.4 arcmin; nothing else seems to be directly available, but if it is physically associated with NGC 5802 it is about 350 million light years away, and 90 thousand light years across.
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5803
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5803; see NGC 5801 for a wide=field view

NGC 5804 (= PGC 53437)
Discovered (May 15, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 57 06.6, Dec +49 40 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5804 (= GC 4019 = JH 1895 = WH III 679, 1860 RA 14 52 31, NPD 39 45.3) is "very faint, very small, very suddenly much brighter middle, 6th magnitude star near". Though not noted in its NGC entry, it is the "3rd of 4", the others being NGC 5794, 5795 and 5805.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 1.1 arcmin

NGC 5805 (= PGC 53435)
Discovered (Apr 3, 1854) by
R. J. Mitchell
A 15th-magnitude compact galaxy (type C) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 57 11.7, Dec +49 37 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5805 (= GC 4020, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 14 52 31, NPD 39 47.5) is "small". Though not noted in its NGC entry, it is the "4th of 4", the others being NGC 5794, 5795 and 5804. Corwin states that Mitchell sketched the object to the south-southeast of NGC 5804. The position precesses to RA 14 57 07.6, Dec +49 38 41, about an arcmin to the northwest of the object; but that position and the galaxy itself are in the appropriate part of his sketch, so the identification is certain. Corwin adds that several of the objects observed in this area were mislabeled in the 1973 Revised NGC, and the result is a number of errors in the subsequent literature as to which galaxies correspond to which listings. For instance, LEDA also incorrectly lists PGC 53381 as NGC 5805, and a Wikisky search for NGC 5805 shows that same incorrect galaxy.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case R. J. Mitchell.
Physical Information:The actual NGC 5805 appears to be a double galaxy, with an apparent size of 0.4 by 0.3 arcmin for the larger, brighter galaxy, and a much fainter smaller companion immediately to its southeast.
SDSS image of compact galaxy (pair) NGC 5805
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5805
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 5804
SDSS image of region near compact galaxy (pair) NGC 5805, also showing spiral galaxy NGC 5804

PGC 53381 (= PGC 84390)
Not an NGC object; listed here because often misidentified as
NGC 5805
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 55 51.6, Dec +49 38 51)
Historical Identification: See NGC 5805 for a discussion of the erroneous identification of PGC 53381 as NGC 5805.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 7840 km/sec, PGC 53381 is about 365 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.6 by 0.4 arcmin, it is about 65 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 53381, often misidentified as NGC 5805
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 53381, often misidentified as NGC 5805
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 5794 and 5797
The "bright" star is 6th-magnitude object HD 132254, an F7 Main Sequence star
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 53381, often misidentified as NGC 5805, also showing spiral galaxy NGC 5794 and lenticular galaxy NGC 5797

NGC 5806 (= PGC 53578)
Discovered (Feb 24, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb) in Virgo (RA 15 00 00.2, Dec +01 53 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5806 (= GC 4021 = JH 1894 = WH II 539, 1860 RA 14 52 55, NPD 87 33.0) is "considerably bright, considerably large, extended 165░▒, suddenly brighter middle and nucleus".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.2 by 1.6 arcmin

NGC 5807 (= PGC 53373)
Discovered (Sep 14, 1866) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 14th-magnitude compact galaxy (type C) in Draco (RA 14 55 48.4, Dec +63 54 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5807 (= GC 5775, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 14 53 00, NPD 25 31.8) is "very faint, very small, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.5 arcmin

NGC 5808 (=
NGC 5819 = PGC 53251)
Discovered (Mar 16, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5808)
Also observed (date?) by Guillaume Bigourdan (while listed as NGC 5808)
Discovered (Oct 6, 1861) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 5819)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc) in Ursa Minor (RA 14 54 02.7, Dec +73 07 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5808 (= GC 4022 = WH III 311, 1860 RA 14 53 01, NPD 16 24.6) is "very faint, small, irregularly round, between 2 stars". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Bigourdan) of RA 14 53 48.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.9 arcmin.

NGC 5809 (= PGC 53624)
Discovered (Jun 5, 1836) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a) in Libra (RA 15 00 52.2, Dec -14 09 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5809 (= GC 4023 = JH 3586, 1860 RA 14 53 11, NPD 103 36.8) is "very faint, small, extended, gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.7 arcmin

NGC 5810 (= PGC 53711)
Discovered (1886) by
Ormond Stone
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb) in Libra (RA 15 02 42.5, Dec -17 52 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5810 (Ormond Stone list I (#218), 1860 RA 14 53 20, NPD 107 17.7) is "extremely faint, very small, a little extended 230░, between 2 very faint stars". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of RA 14 54 50.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.8 arcmin.

NGC 5811 (= PGC 53597)
Discovered (Apr 12, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBm) in Virgo (RA 15 00 27.2, Dec +01 37 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5811 (= GC 5776, Marth #285, 1860 RA 14 53 22, NPD 87 48) is "very faint, small, irregularly round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.7 arcmin

NGC 5812 (= PGC 53630)
Discovered (Mar 5, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1) in Libra (RA 15 00 55.7, Dec -07 27 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5812 (= GC 4024 = JH 3587 = WH I 71, 1860 RA 14 53 29, NPD 96 54.0) is "considerably bright, small, round, suddenly very much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.3 by 2.0 arcmin

NGC 5813 (= PGC 53643)
Discovered (Feb 24, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1) in Virgo (RA 15 01 11.1, Dec +01 42 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5813 (= GC 4026 = JH 1896 = WH I 127, 1860 RA 14 54 06, NPD 87 44.5) is "bright, pretty small, round, pretty suddenly much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.2 by 3.0 arcmin. Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type E1-2.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 5813
Above, a 5 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5813
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 5813

NGC 5814 (= PGC 53653)
Discovered (Apr 13, 1828) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab) in Virgo (RA 15 01 21.1, Dec +01 38 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5814 (= GC 4027 = JH 1897, 1860 RA 14 54 15, NPD 87 48.7) is "very faint, very small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.5 arcmin

NGC 5815 (= PGC 53600)
Discovered (Feb 15, 1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Libra (RA 15 00 29.1, Dec -16 50 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5815 (Leavenworth list I (#219), 1860 RA 14 54 20, NPD 106 15.7) is "extremely faint, pretty small, extended 10░, double star involved". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of RA 14 52 40 and adds "Double star not seen, but night not very good".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.4 arcmin.

NGC 5816 (= PGC 902544)
Discovered (1886) by
Ormond Stone
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Libra (RA 15 00 04.8, Dec -16 05 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5816 (Ormond Stone list I (#220), 1860 RA 14 54 20, NPD 105 34.7) is "faint, pretty small, gradually brighter middle and nucleus, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.3 arcmin

NGC 5817 (= PGC 53567)
Discovered (1886) by
Ormond Stone
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Libra (RA 14 59 40.8, Dec -16 10 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5817 (Ormond Stone list I (#221), 1860 RA 14 54 20, NPD 105 38.7) is "very faint, pretty small". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of RA 14 51 54.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin.

NGC 5818 (= PGC 53530)
Discovered (Apr 23, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 58 58.3, Dec +49 49 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5818 (Swift list VI (#73), 1860 RA 14 54 21, NPD 39 35.5) is "very faint, pretty small, round, extremely faint star involved, between 2 stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.9 arcmin

NGC 5819 (=
NGC 5808 = PGC 53251)
Discovered (Mar 16, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5808)
Discovered (Oct 6, 1861) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 5819)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc) in Ursa Minor (RA 14 54 02.7, Dec +73 07 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5819 (= WH III 311?, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 14 54 28, NPD 16 18.8) is "faint, pretty large, in a triangle with 2 stars", 'WH III 311?' showing that Dreyer thought this might be the same as NGC 5808 (which it indeed turned out to be).
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 5808 for anything else.

NGC 5820 (= PGC 53511)
Discovered (May 5, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 58 39.9, Dec +53 53 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5820 (= GC 4029 = GC 4025 = JH 1898 = WH II 756, 1860 RA 14 54 31, NPD 35 33.3) is "bright, extended 90░▒, suddenly brighter middle, bright double star 8 arcmin to east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.1 arcmin

NGC 5821 (= PGC 53532)
Discovered (Apr 24, 1789) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 6, 1851) by Bindon Stoney
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 58 59.8, Dec +53 55 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5821 (= GC 4030 = GC 4028 = WH III 811, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 14 54 51, NPD 35 30) is "very faint, small".
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case Bindon Stoney.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.8 arcmin

NGC 5822 (= OCL 937)
Discovered (Jul 3, 1836) by
John Herschel
A 7th-magnitude open cluster (type II1r) in Lupus (RA 15 04 02.3, Dec -54 20 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5822 (= GC 4031 = JH 3588, 1860 RA 14 55 02, NPD 143 47.4) is a "cluster, very large, rich, a little compressed, stars from 9th to 12th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 35 arcmin

NGC 5823 (= OCL 936)
Discovered (May 8, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
An 8th-magnitude open cluster (type III2m) in Circinus (RA 15 05 30.5, Dec -55 36 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5823 (= GC 4032 = JH 3589, (Dunlop 351), 1860 RA 14 55 20, NPD 145 02.3) is a "cluster, considerably large, rich, a little compressed middle, stars from 13th to 14th magnitude".
Discovery Notes: Dunlop's prior observation of the cluster was not recognized at the time Dreyer published the NGC, hence its inclusion here in parentheses.
Physical Information: Apparent size 12 arcmin

NGC 5824 (=
NGC 5834 = GCL 31)
Discovered (May 14, 1826) by James Dunlop (and later listed as NGC 5834)
Discovered (May 9, 1831) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5834)
Discovered (1882) by Edward Barnard (and later listed as NGC 5824)
A 9th-magnitude globular cluster (type I) in Lupus (RA 15 03 58.5, Dec -33 04 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5824 (Barnard, 1860 RA 14 55 23, NPD 122 30.9) is "pretty bright, small, stellar, nuclear". Dreyer listed this object as being discovered by Barnard, and NGC 5834 as being discovered by John Herschel (many of Dunlop's observations being so poorly reduced that Herschel often received credit for their discovery even when Dunlop's observations were reasonably accurate). The first IC states for NGC 5824, "5824 is = h. 1900 (per Barnard, A.N. 2995). It also occurs in the Cordoba D.M.". Since h.1900 is NGC 5834, the identity of the two entries has been known for more than a century. Normally Dunlop and Herschel's prior discovery would lead to this object being known as NGC 5834; but in the first IC notes for that object (which see), Dreyer recommends striking out NGC 5834, presumably due to the fact that Barnard, who had been given credit for discovering NGC 5824, was also the one who noted its identity with NGC 5834.
Physical Information: Apparent size 7.4 arcmin.

WORKING HERE

NGC 5825
Recorded (Jun 20, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A lost or nonexistent object in Bo÷tes (RA 15 02 00.0, Dec +18 42 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5825 (Swift list IV (#16), 1860 RA 14 55 36, NPD 70 45.2) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, a little extended, pretty bright star close to east".

NGC 5826 (=
NGC 5870 = PGC 53949)
Discovered (Jun 9, 1885) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 5826)
Discovered (Jun 11, 1885) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 5870)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Draco (RA 15 06 33.7, Dec +55 28 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5826 (Swift list I (#39), 1860 RA 14 55 48, NPD 33 56.7) is "very faint, pretty large, extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.9 arcmin
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5826
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5826
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy; the nearby star is 12th magnitude
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5826

NGC 5827 (= PGC 53676)
Discovered (Jun 8, 1880) by
╔douard Stephan
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 01 53.5, Dec +25 57 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5827 (Stephan list XI (#10), 1860 RA 14 55 49, NPD 63 28.9) is "pretty bright, pretty large, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.8 arcmin

NGC 5828 (= PGC 53618)
Discovered (Jun 24, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 00 45.9, Dec +49 59 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5828 (Swift list VI (list IX #43), 1860 RA 14 56 12, NPD 39 26.2) is "extremely faint, pretty small, round, between 2 distant stars".
Discovery Notes: Swift apparently sent Dreyer his list VI prior to publication, but in this case (and a few others) inadvertently left the object out of the actual publication; but he corrected the omission in his list IX, hence the note in parentheses.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.5 arcmin. Recessional velocity = 4070 km/sec.

PGC 53619 (= "NGC 5828A")
Not an NGC object but sometimes referred to as NGC 5828A because of its proximity to
NGC 5828
A 16th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 00 45.3, Dec +49 58 59)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin. Recessional velocity unknown, but probably merely an optical companion to NGC 5828, as there is no obvious interaction between them.

NGC 5829 (= PGC 53709 =
HCG 73A, and with IC 4526 = Arp 42)
Discovered (May 11, 1882) by ╔douard Stephan
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SA(s)c) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 02 42.0, Dec +23 20 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5829 (Stephan list XII (#68), 1860 RA 14 56 31, NPD 66 06.8) is "very faint, very large, irregularly round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5635 km/sec, NGC 5829 is about 260 million light years away, in unusually poor agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 145 to 175 million light years. Using an intermediate distance of 200 million light years, the galaxy's apparent size of 1.45 by 1.0 arcmin would correspond to 110 thousand light years. NGC 5829 and IC 4526 make up Arp 42, an example of a spiral galaxy with a faint companion; but the two are not physical companions, as IC 4526 is over 300 million light years further away. The galaxy is also listed as a member of Hickson Compact Group 73, but is not actually a physical member of the group, being much closer than all the other members.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5829 and irregular galaxy IC 4526, collectively known as Arp 42
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of Arp 42
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 5829, also showing other members of HCG 73
Several hundred distant galaxies are scattered across the wide-field image
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5829 and irregular galaxy IC 4526, collectively known as Arp 42

NGC 5830 (= PGC 53674)
Discovered (Apr 23, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 01 51.0, Dec +47 52 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5830 (Swift list VI (#74), 1860 RA 14 57 00, NPD 41 32.0) is "very faint, small, round, bright star near to east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.7 arcmin

NGC 5831 (= PGC 53770)
Discovered (Feb 24, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3) in Virgo (RA 15 04 06.8, Dec +01 13 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5831 (= GC 4033 = JH 1899 = WH II 540, 1860 RA 14 57 02, NPD 88 14.7) is "pretty bright, small, much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 1.9 arcmin

NGC 5832 (= PGC 53469)
Discovered (Mar 16, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb) in Ursa Minor (RA 14 57 45.7, Dec +71 40 53)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5832 (= GC 4034 = WH II 332, 1860 RA 14 57 32, NPD 17 45.3) is "pretty bright, considerably large, irregularly round, brighter on west side, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.6 by 2.2 arcmin

NGC 5833 (= PGC 54250)
Discovered (Apr 4, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc) in Apus (RA 15 11 54.1, Dec -72 51 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5833 (= GC 4035 = JH 3590, 1860 RA 14 57 33, NPD 162 19.1) is "faint, considerably small, a little extended, gradually a little brighter middle, among stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 1.0 arcmin

NGC 5834 (=
NGC 5824 = GCL 31)
Discovered (May 14, 1826) by James Dunlop (and later listed as NGC 5834)
Discovered (May 9, 1831) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5834)
Also observed (date?) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 5834)
Discovered (1882) by Edward Barnard (and later listed as NGC 5824)
A 9th-magnitude globular cluster (type I) in Lupus (RA 15 03 58.5, Dec -33 04 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5834 (= GC 4036 = JH 1900, (Dunlop 611), 1860 RA 14 57 47, NPD 122 34.6) is "most extremely faint? (Marth: bright, stellar)". Dreyer listed this object as being discovered by Herschel, and NGC 5824 as being discovered by Barnard. The identity of the two objects was noted in the first IC, which states for NGC 5824, "5824 is = h. 1900 (per Barnard, A.N. 2995). It also occurs in the Cordoba D.M.". Since h.1900 is NGC 5834, the identity of the two entries has been known for more than a century. Normally Dunlop and Herschel's prior discovery would lead to this object being known as NGC 5834; but in the first IC notes for NGC 5834 Dreyer says "5834 to be struck out, is = 5824", presumably due to the fact that Barnard, who had been given credit for discovering NGC 5824, was also the one who noted its identity with NGC 5834.
Discovery Notes: Dunlop's prior observation was not recognized at the time that Dreyer published the NGC, hence its inclusion in parentheses.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 5824 for anything else.

NGC 5835 (= PGC 53699)
Discovered (Apr 23, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 02 25.3, Dec +48 52 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5835 (Swift list VI (#75), 1860 RA 14 57 50, NPD 40 32.4) is "very faint, pretty small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.9 arcmin

NGC 5836 (= PGC 53554)
Discovered (Mar 16, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb) in Ursa Minor (RA 14 59 31.1, Dec +73 53 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5836 (= GC 4037 = WH III 312, 1860 RA 14 57 55, NPD 15 36.3) is "extremely faint, very small, a little extended, 2 stars involved". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Bigourdan) of RA 15 00 05.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 1.0 arcmin.

NGC 5837 (= PGC 53817)
Discovered (Jun 19, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 04 40.6, Dec +12 38 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5837 (Swift list VI (list IX #44), 1860 RA 14 57 55, NPD 76 49.1) is "very faint, small, round, double star to northwest".
Discovery Notes: Swift apparently sent Dreyer his list VI prior to publication, but in this case (and a few others) inadvertently left the object out of the actual publication; but he corrected the omission in his list IX, hence the note in parentheses.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.6 arcmin

NGC 5838 (= PGC 53862)
Discovered (Feb 24, 1786) by
William Herschel
An 11th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Virgo (RA 15 05 26.0, Dec +02 05 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5838 (= GC 4038 = WH II 542, 1860 RA 14 58 22, NPD 87 21.2) is "pretty bright, pretty small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.2 by 1.5 arcmin

NGC 5839 (= PGC 53865)
Discovered (Feb 24, 1786) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Virgo (RA 15 05 27.4, Dec +01 38 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5839 (= GC 4039 = WH II 541, 1860 RA 14 58 22, NPD 87 49.2) is "pretty faint, pretty small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.2 arcmin

NGC 5840
Recorded (Jul 22, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A lost or nonexistent object in Bo÷tes (RA 15 04 20.5, Dec +29 30 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5840 (Swift list IV (#17), 1860 RA 14 58 27, NPD 59 56.7) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, a little extended, very difficult".

NGC 5841 (=
NGC 5848 = PGC 53941)
Discovered (May 6, 1862) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 5848)
Discovered (Apr 12, 1864) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 5841)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a) in Virgo (RA 15 06 34.8, Dec +02 00 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5841 (= GC 5777, Marth #286, 1860 RA 14 58 31, NPD 87 28) is "faint, small, extended".
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 5848 for anything else.

NGC 5842 (= PGC 53831)
Discovered (May 11, 1882) by
╔douard Stephan
A 14th-magnitude compact galaxy (type C) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 04 52.1, Dec +21 04 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5842 (Stephan list XII (#69), 1860 RA 14 58 34, NPD 68 22.9) is "extremely faint, very small, round, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.4 arcmin

NGC 5843 (= PGC 53996)
Discovered (May 3, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb) in Lupus (RA 15 07 27.8, Dec -36 19 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5843 (= GC 4040 = JH 3592, 1860 RA 14 58 42, NPD 125 47.1) is "very faint, small, a little extended, a very little brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 1.1 arcmin

NGC 5844
Discovered (May 2, 1835) by
John Herschel
Also observed (date?) by DeLisle Stewart
A 12th-magnitude planetary nebula in Triangulum Australe (RA 15 10 40.7, Dec -64 40 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5844 (= GC 4041 = JH 3591, 1860 RA 14 58 51, NPD 154 08.2) is "pretty bright, pretty large, round, very gradually a very little brighter middle". The second IC adds "Three very faint nebulae only (DeLisle Stewart). h. has 2 observations, pretty bright, pretty large, round, very gradually a little brighter middle" ('h' meaning John Herschel).
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.22 arcmin.

NGC 5845 (= PGC 53901)
Discovered (Feb 24, 1786) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3) in Virgo (RA 15 06 00.6, Dec +01 38 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5845 (= GC 4042 = WH III 511, 1860 RA 14 58 55, NPD 87 49.3) is "very faint, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.5 arcmin

NGC 5846 (= PGC 53932)
Discovered (Feb 24, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 10th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1) in Virgo (RA 15 06 29.0, Dec +01 36 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5846 (= GC 4045 = JH 1901 = WH I 128, 1860 RA 14 59 24, NPD 87 51.1) is "very bright, pretty large, round, pretty suddenly brighter middle and nucleus, faint star involved to south, partially resolved (some stars seen)".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.0 by 3.7 arcmin. Recessional velocity 1715 km/sec.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 5846 and its smaller 'companion', lenticular galaxy PGC 53930 (sometimes called NGC 5846A)
Above, a 4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5846 and its apparent companion, PGC 53930
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 5846 and its smaller 'companion', lenticular galaxy PGC 53930 (sometimes called NGC 5846A)

PGC 53930 (= "NGC 5846A")
Not an NGC object but sometimes called NGC 5846A because of it overlaps
NGC 5846
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Virgo (RA 15 06 29.1, Dec +01 35 40)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.3 arcmin. The small galaxy just below the nucleus of NGC 5846, which see for images. Recessional velocity 2200 km/sec, close enough to that of NGC 5846 that they are probably members of the same group of galaxies, though whether they are as close as they appear or physically interacting is not obvious. In fact, the lack of any obvious distortion suggests that the smaller galaxy probably lies in front of or behind the larger one, rather than within its direct sphere of influence (as opposed to NGC 5850, which despite being further away (in the sky) is obviously distorted by the gravitational influence of NGC 5846).

NGC 5847 (= PGC 53928)
Discovered (Mar 25, 1865) by
Albert Marth
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc) in Virgo (RA 15 06 22.2, Dec +06 22 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5847 (= GC 5778, Marth #287, 1860 RA 14 59 28, NPD 83 05) is "extremely faint, small, irregularly round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.4 arcmin

NGC 5848 (=
NGC 5841 = PGC 53941)
Discovered (May 6, 1862) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 5848)
Discovered (Apr 12, 1864) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 5841)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a) in Virgo (RA 15 06 34.8, Dec +02 00 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5848 (= GC 4046, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 14 59 29, NPD 87 26.7) is "extremely faint, small, close double star 7 arcmin to southeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.4 arcmin
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5848
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5848
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5848

NGC 5849 (= PGC 53962)
Discovered (Jun 6, 1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Libra (RA 15 06 50.6, Dec -14 34 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5849 (Leavenworth list I (#222), 1860 RA 14 59 30, NPD 103 53.1) is a "13th magnitude star in a very faint nebula, 3 stars 1 second of time to west, 8th magnitude star 10 seconds of time to east and 15 arcmin to south".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 7185 km/sec, NGC 5849 is about 335 million light years away. Given that and its 0.9 by 0.8 arcmin apparent size, it is about 85 thousand light years across.
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5849
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5849
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5849
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 5750 - 5799) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 5800 - 5849     → (NGC 5850 - 5899)