Celestial Atlas
(NGC 5800 - 5849) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 5850 - 5899 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 5900 - 5949)
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Page last updated Mar 12, 2017
Corrected entry for NGC 5861 and its nonexistent "neighbor", added Dreyer, NGC entries
WORKING: Reformatting to current standards
WORKING: Search for best available images

NGC 5850 (= PGC 53979)
Discovered (Feb 24, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb) in Virgo (RA 15 07 07.5, Dec +01 32 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5850 (= GC 4047 = JH 1902 = WH II 543, 1860 RA 15 00 02, NPD 87 54.9) is "considerably faint, small, a little extended, pretty suddenly brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.5 by 3.9? arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5850
Above, a 5 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5850
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5850

NGC 5851 (= PGC 53965)
Discovered (May 26, 1791) by
William Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Boötes (RA 15 06 53.3, Dec +12 51 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5851 (= GC 4048 = WH III 886, 1860 RA 15 00 17, NPD 76 36.1) is "extremely faint, very small, northwestern of 2", the other being NGC 5852.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.3 arcmin. Apparently in a pair with NGC 5852.
SDSS image of spiral galaxies NGC 5851 and 5852
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5851 and 5852
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxies; also shown is PGC 53961
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxies NGC 5851 and 5852

NGC 5852 (= PGC 53974)
Discovered (May 26, 1791) by
William Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S) in Boötes (RA 15 06 56.3, Dec +12 50 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5852 (= GC 4049 = WH III 887, 1860 RA 15 00 17, NPD 76 36.1) is "extremely faint, very small, southeastern of 2", the other being NGC 5851.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.6 arcmin. Apparently in a pair with NGC 5851, which see for images.

NGC 5853 (= PGC 53894)
Discovered (May 19, 1881) by
Édouard Stephan
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb) in Boötes (RA 15 05 53.2, Dec +39 31 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5853 (Stephan list XII (#70), 1860 RA 15 00 35, NPD 49 56.1) is "pretty faint, pretty small, round, much brighter middle, mottled but not resolved?".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.9? arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5853
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5853
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5853

NGC 5854 (= PGC 54013)
Discovered (Feb 24, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a) in Virgo (RA 15 07 47.6, Dec +02 34 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5854 (= GC 4050 = JH 1903 = WH II 544, 1860 RA 15 00 45, NPD 86 53.5) is "pretty bright, small, very little extended, a little brighter middle, among stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.7 by 0.8? arcmin.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5854
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5854
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5854

NGC 5855 (= PGC 54014)
Discovered (Mar 30, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
A 15th-magnitude compact galaxy (type C) in Virgo (RA 15 07 48.9, Dec +03 59 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5855 (Swift list VI (#76), 1860 RA 15 00 45, NPD 85 28.4) is "extremely faint, small, round, 2 stars to northeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.4? arcmin.
SDSS image of compact galaxy NGC 5855
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5855
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near compact galaxy NGC 5855

NGC 5856 (= SAO 101379)
Recorded (May 24, 1791) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Heinrich d'Arrest
Also observed (date?) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 6th-magnitude star in Boötes (RA 15 07 20.3, Dec +18 26 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5856 (= GC 4053 = JH 1904 = WH IV 71, d'Arrest list I, 1860 RA 15 00 55, NPD 71 00.9) is a "nebulous 6th magnitude star (??)". The first IC notes "No nebulosity seen by Bigourdan".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.9? arcmin. As with all telescopic images, the diffraction spikes and glare shown below are artifacts.
DSS image of region near the star listed as NGC 5856
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on "NGC 5856".

NGC 5857 (= PGC 53995)
Discovered (Apr 27, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb) in Boötes (RA 15 07 27.3, Dec +19 35 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5857 (= GC 4051 = JH 1905 = WH II 751, 1860 RA 15 01 06, NPD 69 51.7) is "considerably faint, considerably small, extended, western of double nebula", the other being NGC 5859.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.6? arcmin. Paired with the nearly twice as large and bright NGC 5859.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5857
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5857, showing the western edge of NGC 5859
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxies NGC 5857 and 5859

NGC 5858 (= PGC 54075)
Discovered (May 14, 1882) by
Edward Holden
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E6) in Libra (RA 15 08 49.1, Dec -11 12 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5858 (Holden (#25), 1860 RA 15 01 12, NPD 100 40.0) is "faint, small, stellar nucleus, II 192 to southeast", (WH) II 192 being NGC 5861.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.7 arcmin
DSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 5858
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5858
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 5858

NGC 5859 (= PGC 54001)
Discovered (Apr 27, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc) in Boötes (RA 15 07 34.9, Dec +19 34 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5859 (= GC 4052 = JH 1905 = WH II 752, 1860 RA 15 01 13, NPD 69 52.7) is "pretty faint, pretty small, extended, eastern of double nebula", the other being NGC 5857.
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0 by 0.8 arcmin. Paired with the approximately half as large and bright NGC 5857.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5859
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5859, showing the eastern edge of NGC 5857
Below, a 4 arcmin wide region centered on the pair
SDSS image of spiral galaxies NGC 5857 and 5859
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 5857
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxies NGC 5857 and 5859

NGC 5860 (= PGC 53939)
Discovered (Apr 17, 1830) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude pair of lenticular galaxies (type S0+S0) in Boötes (RA 15 06 33.7, Dec +42 38 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5860 (= GC 4054 = JH 1906, 1860 RA 15 01 29, NPD 46 49.8) is "faint, small, round, pretty suddenly brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7? arcmin
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy pair NGC 5860
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5860
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy pair NGC 5860

NGC 5861 (= PGC 54097)
Discovered (May 9, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc) in Libra (RA 15 09 16.2, Dec -11 19 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5861 (= GC 4055 = WH II 192, 1860 RA 15 01 37, NPD 100 46.8) is "faint, large, extended, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0 by 1.7? arcmin
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5861, also showing the plate defect sometimes misidentified as the nonexistent spiral galaxy PGC 3098144
Above, a 12 arcmin wide "standard" DSS image centered on NGC 5861
"PGC 3098144" is a plate defect sometimes misidentified as a superthin galaxy
Below, a corrected version of the image above
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5861, after removing the plate defect sometimes misidentified as the nonexistent spiral galaxy PGC 3098144
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of NGC 5861
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5861
Below, a 3 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5861

"PGC 3098144"
Not a real object but listed here because of its appearance in DSS images of
NGC 5861
A nonexistent object in Libra (RA 15 09 07.1, Dec -11 18 42)
Historical Misidentification: The blue DSS plate of the region near NGC 5861 shows what appears to be a superthin spiral galaxy to the west of the NGC object. It is actually a plate defect, as shown by PanSTARR images of the region near the NGC object; but it is listed as a galaxy in HyperLEDA, so this entry serves as a warning about the misidentification.
PanSTARRS image of the region west of NGC 5861, showing that the supposed PGC 3098144 does not exist
Above, a 5 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image showing that PGC 3098144 does not exist
Also shown is part of NGC 5861, which see

NGC 5862 (= PGC 53900)
Discovered (Jun 11, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
A 15th-magnitude compact galaxy (type C) in Draco (RA 15 06 03.2, Dec +55 34 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5862 (Swift list I (#40), 1860 RA 15 02 19, NPD 33 51.8) is "extremely faint, pretty small, round, very difficult".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.5? arcmin.
SDSS image of compact galaxy NGC 5862
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5862
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy; also shown is NGC 5870
SDSS image of region near compact galaxy NGC 5862, also showing lenticular galaxy NGC 5870

NGC 5863 (= PGC 54160)
Discovered (1886) by
Ormond Stone
Also observed (date?) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa) in Libra (RA 15 10 48.3, Dec -18 25 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5863 (Ormond Stone list I (#223), 1860 RA 15 02 20, NPD 107 53.0) is a "12th magnitude star in an extremely faint nebula, small, round". The first IC lists a corrected position (per Bigourdan) of RA 12 02 53, NPD 107 58.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.2? arcmin.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5863
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5863
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5863

NGC 5864 (= PGC 54111)
Discovered (May 27, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0) in Virgo (RA 15 09 33.5, Dec +03 03 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5864 (= GC 4056 = JH 1907 = WH II 585, 1860 RA 15 02 31, NPD 86 24.7) is "pretty faint, considerably small, irregularly a little extended, gradually brighter middle, 14th magnitude star to east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.8 by 0.9? arcmin.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5864
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5864
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5864

NGC 5865 (=
NGC 5868 = PGC 54118)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1787) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5865)
Discovered (Apr 27, 1862) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 5868)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Virgo (RA 15 09 49.1, Dec +00 31 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5865 (= GC 4057 = WH II 684, 1860 RA 15 02 39, NPD 88 58.0) is "pretty bright, small, irregularly extended". (Note: Wikisky shows this as NGC 5868, and incorrectly shows NGC 5869 as NGC 5865.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 1.0 arcmin
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5865
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5865 (with some unfortunate artifacts below center)
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy; also shown is NGC 5869
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxies NGC 5865 and 5869

NGC 5866 (= PGC 53933 and probably =
M102), The Spindle Galaxy
Probably discovered (Mar 27, 1781) by Pierre Méchain
Recorded (without observational verification) by Charles Messier as M102
Observed (perhaps as early as April 1781) by Charles Messier
Independently discovered (May 5, 1788) by William Herschel
Also observed (May 4, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 9.9 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Draco (RA 15 06 29.4, Dec +55 45 49)
Historical Identification (as NGC 5866): Per Dreyer, NGC 5866 (= GC 4058 = JH 1909 = WH I 215, 1860 RA 15 02 39, NPD 33 41.7) is "very bright, considerably large, pretty much extended 146°, gradually brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 15 06 29.0, Dec +55 45 54, essentially dead center on the galaxy listed above and the description fits, so the identification as NGC 5866 is certain. However, the identification as M102, though reasonably certain, is controversial (hence the Discovery Notes below).
Discovery Notes (as M102): Usually Messier verified discoveries reported to him by Méchain, and listed both his friend's prior discovery and his own observation. However, at the time of Méchain's observation of what became M102, the deadline for additions to the 1784 publication of Messier's last Catalog was fast approaching, so he did not verify the observation until later. Messier's description of the object was only recorded in a handwritten note in his personal copy of the printed version. (A similar situation applies to M101 and M103, the last objects recorded by Messier.) Complicating the situation is the fact that the position Messier recorded for M102 does not correspond to any object that either Messier or Méchain could have seen, and in a letter of May 6, 1783 Méchain disavowed the discovery, stating that he believed it was merely a reobservation of M101. Because of this, for most of the following 200+ years it has been generally assumed that M101 and M102 are the same object (namely, the Pinwheel Galaxy, NGC 5457). However, throughout that time there have been occasional suggestions that M102 cannot be the same as M101, as their descriptions are very different. But if so, what object is M102?
     The key to any identification of M102 probably lies in Messier's description (based on Méchain's original communication), "102: Nebula between the stars Omicron (ο) Boötis and Iota (ί) Draconis: it is very faint, near it is a star of 6th magnitude." But the two stars named in the description are 40 degrees apart, and could not possibly be used to specify the position of any object, so in Dreyer's 1912 corrections for the NGC, he suggested that ί Draconis was actually ί Serpentis, which is much closer to ο Boötis, and that M102 was probably NGC 5928. But that galaxy is four magnitudes fainter than the otherwise faintest objects in Messier's catalog, and almost certainly could not have been observed by either him or Méchain, so it is extremely unlikely that it is M102. As a result, subsequent attempts to identify M102 have centered on the possibility that what Mechain recorded as ο Boötis was probably a misprint of θ Boötis, which is also relatively close to ί Draconis (this suggestion was first proposed by Admiral William Smyth in the 1844 Bedford Catalogue). Unfortunately, there is still no galaxy at Messier's recorded position, but taking into account the fact that the star charts Messier used had tick marks at intervals of 20 minutes of time (in RA), it seems possible that a galaxy one tick mark to the east or west of Messier's position could be what he and Méchain observed as M102. This leads to the possibility that M102 is one of a group of four galaxies about 3 degrees southwest of ί Draconis. Given the magnitude limit of the Messier Catalog, the most likely candidate for M102 is the brightest member of the group, namely the galaxy listed here, NGC 5866 (this solution was first proposed in 1917 by Camille Flammarion).
     Obviously, no one now living was present when Messier and Méchain observed M102, so there can be no absolute certainty that M102 is NGC 5866, hence my writing only "probably" in the title of this entry and the corresponding one for M102. But supporting the identification is the presence of a magnitude 5+ star only a degree nearly due south of NGC 5866, which would correspond to the "star of 6th magnitude" in Méchain's description, and historical evidence that Messier did observe NGC 5866 while searching the region near his obviously misrecorded position for M102. So historians might reasonably argue that "probably" should be changed to "almost certainly", and as a result most recent versions of the Messier Catalog list M102 as NGC 5866, instead of as a duplicate of M101.
Physical Information: Apparent size 6.5 by 3.1 arcmin. NGC 5866 is the brightest member of the 45 million light-years distant NGC 5866 group of galaxies, and the dynamics of the group suggest that although NGC 5866 is only about 70 thousand light-years across, it has a trillion solar masses. This mass includes, as in the case of all galaxies of well-determined mass, large amounts of "dark matter"; but its large nucleus, presumably crammed with a multitude of faint stars, undoubtedly contributes to its unusually large ratio of mass to size.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5866, the Spindle Galaxy (also thought to be M102). and NGC 5867
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5866, also showing NGC 5867
Below, a 6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxies
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5866, the Spindle Galaxy (also thought to be M102), and NGC 5867><br>Below, a NOAO image of the galaxy <small>(Image Credit <a href=http://www.noao.edu/image_gallery/html/im0593.html target=external>NOAO</a>/AURA/NSF)</small><br><img src=m102noao.jpg border=1 width=750 height=750 alt=
Below, a HST image of NGC 5866 (Image Credit ESA, The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA), W. Keel (U. Ala.), NASA). The image is rotated 90 degrees relative to the ones above, so North is on the left. Also, to show fine details in the dusty plane of the disk, the image is slightly underexposed in comparison with the images above; as a result the nucleus looks much smaller than usual.
HST image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5866, the Spindle Galaxy (also thought to be M102)

PGC 166188 (= "NGC 5866A")
Not an NGC object, but often referred to as NGC 5866A because of its apparent proximity to
NGC 5866
A 16th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0) in Draco (RA 15 05 16.1, Dec +55 49 39)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.5? arcmin
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy PGC 166188
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 166188
Below, a 15 arcmin wide region showing its position relative to NGC 5866
SDSS image of region between elliptical galaxy PGC 166188 and lenticular galaxy NGC 5866

PGC 54267 (= "NGC 5866B")
Not an NGC object, but often referred to as NGC 5866B despite not being particularly close to
NGC 5866
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBd) in Draco (RA 15 12 07.2, Dec +55 47 07)
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.7 by 1.9? arcmin
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 54267
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 54267
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 54267
Below, a 1 degree wide region showing its position relative to NGC 5866
SDSS image of region between spiral galaxy PGC 54267 and lenticular galaxy NGC 5866

NGC 5867 (= PGC 2512461)
Discovered (Apr 25, 1851) by
Bindon Stoney
A 16th-magnitude compact galaxy (type C) in Draco (RA 15 06 24.3, Dec +55 43 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5867 (= GC 4059, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 15 02 40, NPD 33 43) is "extremely faint, very small, stellar".
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case Bindon Stoney.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.2 by 0.2? arcmin.
SDSS image of compact galaxy NGC 5867
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5867, showing part of NGC 5866, which see for wider views

NGC 5868 (=
NGC 5865 = PGC 54118)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1787) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5865)
Discovered (Apr 27, 1862) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 5868)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Virgo (RA 15 09 49.1, Dec +00 31 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5868 (= GC 4060, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 15 02 41, NPD 88 55.8) is "extremely faint, II 545 is 3 arcmin to south", (WH) II 545 being NGC 5869.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 5865 for anything else.

NGC 5869 (= PGC 54119)
Discovered (Feb 24, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Virgo (RA 15 09 49.4, Dec +00 28 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5869 (= GC 4061 = JH 1908 = WH II 545, 1860 RA 15 02 41, NPD 88 59.4) is "pretty faint, small, extended, pretty suddenly brighter middle". (Note: Wikisky incorrectly shows this as NGC 5865.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.3 by 1.6? arcmin.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5869
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5869
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy; also shown is NGC 5865
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxies NGC 5865 and 5869

NGC 5870 (=
NGC 5826 = PGC 53949)
Discovered (Jun 9, 1885) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 5826)
Discovered (Jun 11, 1885) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 5870)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Draco (RA 15 06 33.7, Dec +55 28 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5870 (Swift list I (#41), 1860 RA 15 02 49, NPD 33 58.8) is "extremely faint, pretty small, a little extended, very difficult, star to east".
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 5826 for anything else.

NGC 5871
Recorded (1882) by
Wilhelm Tempel
A 15th-magnitude star in Virgo (RA 15 10 04.8, Dec +00 29 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5871 (Tempel list V, 1860 RA 15 02 53, NPD 88 57) is "extremely faint, forms trapezium with 3 nebulae to the west".
SDSS image of star listed as NGC 5871
Above, a 6 arcmin wide region centered on the star listed as NGC 5871
NGC 5865 and 5869 are just to the west, so also see their wide-field images

NGC 5872 (= PGC 54169)
Discovered (Jul 30, 1867) by
Joseph Winlock
Also observed (date?) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy in Libra (RA 15 10 55.6, Dec -11 28 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5872 (Winlock (329, HN 30), 1860 RA 15 03 19, NPD 100 56.2) has "No description". The first IC adds (per Bigourdan) "Description is very faint, small, round, very much brighter middle, 13th magnitude star half an arcmin to the northeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.9? arcmin.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5872
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5872
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5872 superimposed on a DSS image of the same region to fill in otherwise missing coverage

NGC 5873
Discovered (May 2, 1883) by
Ralph Copeland
An 11th-magnitude planetary nebula in Lupus (RA 15 12 50.7, Dec -38 07 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5873 (Copeland, 1860 RA 15 03 46, NPD 127 34) is a "planetary nebula, stellar = 9.5 magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.2? arcmin.
DSS image of region near planetary nebula NGC 5873
Above, a 6 arcmin wide view of the region near NGC 5873 (no more detailed image is available)
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the nebula
DSS image of region near planetary nebula NGC 5873

NGC 5874 (= PGC 54018)
Discovered (Jun 11, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc) in Boötes (RA 15 07 51.9, Dec +54 45 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5874 (Swift list I (#42), 1860 RA 15 03 53, NPD 34 42.5) is "very faint, pretty large, round, in triangle of 3 bright stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.3 by 1.6? arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5874
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5874
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5874

NGC 5875 (= PGC 54095)
Discovered (May 1, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Basilius Engelhardt
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Boötes (RA 15 09 13.1, Dec +52 31 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5875 (= GC 4062 = WH II 755, Engelhardt, 1860 RA 15 05 02, NPD 36 56.2) is "pretty bright, pretty large, a little extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.3 by 1.2? arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5875
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5875
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5875

PGC 54061 (= "NGC 5875A")
Not an NGC object, but listed here since often referred to as NGC 5875A
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in
Boötes (RA 15 08 33.5, Dec +52 17 46)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.5? arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 54061
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 54061
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 54061
Below, an 18 arcmin wide region showing its position relative to NGC 5875
SDSS image of region between spiral galaxies NGC 5875 and PGC 54061

NGC 5876 (=
IC 1111 = PGC 54110)
Discovered (Jun 11, 1885) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 5876)
Discovered (Aug 27, 1888) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 1111)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBab) in Boötes (RA 15 09 31.4, Dec +54 30 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5876 (Swift list I (#43), 1860 RA 15 05 28, NPD 34 57.3) is "faint, small, round, much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.4 by 1.2? arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5876
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5876
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5876

NGC 5877
Recorded (May 24, 1867) by
Julius Schmidt
Three stars in Libra (RA 15 12 53.1, Dec -04 55 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5877 (= GC 5779, J Schmidt, 1860 RA 15 05 31, NPD 94 23.7) is "very faint, small, 12th magnitude star attached on north".
Physical Information: Approximately 13th magnitude in toto
DSS image of region near the triplet of stars referred to as NGC 5877
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the triplet of stars referred to as NGC 5877

NGC 5878 (= PGC 54364)
Discovered (Apr 30, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Libra (RA 15 13 45.7, Dec -14 16 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5878 (= GC 4063 = JH 3593 = WH III 736, 1860 RA 15 06 02, NPD 103 44.6) is "pretty bright, pretty large, pretty much extended 0°, pretty suddenly much brighter middle, star involved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.5 by 1.4? arcmin.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5878
Above, a 4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5878
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5878

NGC 5879 (= PGC 54117)
Discovered (May 5, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc) in Draco (RA 15 09 46.8, Dec +57 00 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5879 (= GC 4064 = JH 1910 = WH II 757, 1860 RA 15 06 09, NPD 32 28.0) is "considerably bright, small, extended, much brighter middle and round nucleus, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.2 by 1.3? arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5879
Above, a 5 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5879
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5879

NGC 5880 (= PGC 54427)
Discovered (Jun 6, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Libra (RA 15 15 01.0, Dec -14 34 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5880 (Leavenworth list I (#224), 1860 RA 15 06 20, NPD 104 01.1) is "extremely faint, very small, round, brighter middle, in field with (NGC) 5883".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.6? arcmin.
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5880
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5880
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered between NGC 5880 and nearby NGC 5883
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxies NGC 5880 and 5883

NGC 5881 (=
IC 1100 = PGC 53920)
Discovered (Apr 26, 1789) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5881)
Not found (date?) by Guillaume Bigourdan
Discovered (Jun 22, 1889) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 1100)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in Draco (RA 15 06 20.6, Dec +62 58 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5881 (= GC 4065 = WH II 818, 1860 RA 15 06 27, NPD 26 30.8) is "pretty faint, considerably small, round, very gradually brighter middle". The first IC states "Not found by Bigourdan". (Note: A Wikisky search for IC 1100 shows the correct object, but a search for NGC 5881 shows PGC 54150, which the NED lists as "often misidentified as NGC 5881".)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 6585 km/sec, NGC 5881 is about 300 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.8 by 0.7 arcmins, it is about 70 thousand light years across.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5881
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5881
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5881

PGC 54150
Not an NGC object, but listed here since often misidentified as
NGC 5881 (as noted above)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(s)dm) in Draco (RA 15 10 38.2, Dec +64 53 54)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.5 by 1.2 arcmin. Recessional velocity 2245 km/sec. Redshift-independent distance estimates 35.7 to 97.2 Mpc.
DSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 54150, often misidentified as NGC 5881
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 54150, often misidentified as NGC 5881
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 54150, often misidentified as NGC 5881

NGC 5882 (=
IC 1108)
Discovered (Sep 27, 1834) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5882)
Discovered (1894) by Williamina Fleming (and later listed as IC 1108)
A 9th-magnitude planetary nebula in Lupus (RA 15 16 50.0, Dec -45 38 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5882 (= GC 4066 = JH 3594, 1860 RA 15 07 19, NPD 135 07.5) is a "planetary nebula, very small, round, quite sharp".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.35? arcmin.
HST image of planetary nebula NGC 5882
Above, a 29 arcsec wide closeup of NGC 5882 (Image Credits: ESA/HST, NASA)
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near planetary nebula NGC 5882

NGC 5883 (= PGC 54439)
Discovered (Jul 30, 1867) by
Joseph Winlock
Also observed (date?) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Libra (RA 15 15 10.1, Dec -14 36 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5883 (Winlock (331, HN 31), 1860 RA 15 07 24, NPD 104 05.2) has "No description". The first IC adds (per Bigourdan) "Description is very faint, pretty small, stellar nucleus".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.5? arcmin.
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5883
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5883
For a wide-field image see nearby NGC 5880

NGC 5884
Recorded (1886) by
Gerhard Lohse
Also observed (date?) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A pair of stars in Boötes (RA 15 13 09.2, Dec +31 51 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5884 (J. G. Lohse, 1860 RA 15 07 26, NPD 57 36.9) is "faint, binuclear, (at) position angle 170°, distance 7"±". The first IC adds "No nebulosity; only two faint stars seen by Bigourdan".
DSS image of region near the pair of stars listed as NGC 5884
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair of stars listed as NGC 5884

NGC 5885 (= PGC 54429)
Discovered (May 9, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc) in Libra (RA 15 15 04.2, Dec -10 05 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5885 (= GC 4067 = JH 3595 = WH III 116, 1860 RA 15 07 30, NPD 99 33.1) is "faint, considerably large, round, very gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.5 by 3.1? arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5885
Above, a 4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5885
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5885 superimposed on a DSS image of the same region to fill in otherwise missing coverage

NGC 5886 (= PGC 54298)
Discovered (May 13, 1828) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Boötes (RA 15 12 45.4, Dec +41 14 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5886 (= GC 4068 = JH 1911, 1860 RA 15 07 38, NPD 48 15.0) is "faint, very small, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.4? arcmin.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5886
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5886
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 5888 and 5889
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5886, also showing spiral galaxies NGC 5888 and 5889

NGC 5887 (= PGC 54416)
Discovered (Jun 9, 1880) by
Édouard Stephan
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a) in Serpens (RA 15 14 43.9, Dec +01 09 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5887 (Stephan list XI (#11), 1860 RA 15 07 38, NPD 88 19.3) is "pretty faint, pretty small, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 1.0? arcmin.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5887
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5887
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5887

NGC 5888 (= PGC 54316)
Discovered (Apr 9, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc) in Boötes (RA 15 13 07.4, Dec +41 15 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5888 (= GC 4069 = JH 1912 = WH III 659, 1860 RA 15 07 59, NPD 48 13.0) is "considerably faint, very small, round, brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.8? arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5888
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5888
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 5886 and 5889
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5888, also showing lenticular galaxy NGC 5886 and spiral galaxy NGC 5889

NGC 5889 (= PGC 54317)
Discovered (Apr 25, 1851) by
Bindon Stoney
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb) in Boötes (RA 15 13 15.7, Dec +41 19 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5889 (= GC 4070, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 15 08 20±, NPD 48 08.5) is "most extremely faint, gradually a little brighter middle".
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case Bindon Stoney.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.3? arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5889
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5889
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 5886 and 5888
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5889, also showing lenticular galaxy NGC 5886 and spiral galaxy NGC 5888

NGC 5890 (= PGC 54602)
Discovered (1886) by
Ormond Stone
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a) in Libra (RA 15 17 51.1, Dec -17 35 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5890 (Ormond Stone list I (#225), 1860 RA 15 08 20, NPD 107 02.2) is "very faint, very small, extended 235°".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.0? arcmin.
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5890
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5890
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5890

NGC 5891 (= PGC 54491)
Discovered (Jun 12, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (date?) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc) in Libra (RA 15 16 13.2, Dec -11 29 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5891 (Leavenworth list I (#226), 1860 RA 15 08 20, NPD 101 00.2) is "very faint, pretty small, a little extended, gradually brighter middle, 11th magnitude star to east". The first IC lists a corrected position (per Bigourdan) of RA 15 08 35, NPD 100 58.5.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.5? arcmin.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5891
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5891
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5891

NGC 5892 (= PGC 54365)
Discovered (1886) by
Ormond Stone
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBcd) in Libra (RA 15 13 48.1, Dec -15 27 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5892 (Ormond Stone list I (#227), 1860 RA 15 08 20, NPD 104 28.2) is "extremely faint, large, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.6 by 2.9? arcmin.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5892
Above, a 4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5892
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5892

NGC 5893 (= PGC 54351)
Discovered (Apr 9, 1787) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb) in Boötes (RA 15 13 34.3, Dec +41 57 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5893 (= GC 4071 = JH 1913 = WH II 678, 1860 RA 15 08 30, NPD 47 31.3) is "faint, small, round, mottled but not resolved, 3 stars near".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 1.1? arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5893
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5893
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 5895 and 5896
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5893, also showing spiral galaxy NGC 5895 and lenticular galaxy NGC 5896

NGC 5894 (= PGC 54234)
Discovered (May 25, 1788) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBm) in Draco (RA 15 11 40.9, Dec +59 48 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5894 (= GC 4074 = WH II 763, 1860 RA 15 08 38, NPD 29 40.2) is "pretty faint, pretty small, extended 0°±".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0 by 0.4? arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5894
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5894
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5894

NGC 5895 (= PGC 54366)
Discovered (May 23, 1854) by
R. J. Mitchell
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Boötes (RA 15 13 50.1, Dec +42 00 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5895 (= GC 4072, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 15 08 40, NPD 47 29) is "very faint, small, extended north-south, apparently connected (to (NGC) 5896)". As it happens, there is no connection between the two galaxies, as their distances differ by nearly 700 million light years; they are merely an "optical double".
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case R. J. Mitchell.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5355 km/sec, NGC 5895 is about 250 million light years away. Given that and its 1.1 by 0.3 arcmin apparent size, it is about 80 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5895 and lenticular galaxy NGC 5896
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5895 and 5896
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the apparent pair; also shown is NGC 5893
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5895 and lenticular galaxy NGC 5896, overlaid on DSS image where SDSS coverage is incomplete; also shown is spiral galaxy NGC 5893

NGC 5896 (= PGC 54367)
Discovered (May 23, 1854) by
R. J. Mitchell
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Boötes (RA 15 13 50.6, Dec +42 01 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5896 (= GC 4073, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 15 08 41, NPD 47 28) is "very faint, very small, round, apparently connected (to (NGC) 5895)", which see for images. As it happens, there is no connection between the two galaxies, as their distances differ by nearly 700 million light years; they are merely an "optical double".
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case R. J. Mitchell.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 19670 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that NGC 5896 is about 915 million light years away. However, for such distant objects, the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us must be taken into account. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 850 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, 875 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its 0.3 by 0.3 arcmin apparent size, NGC 5896 is about 75 thousand light years across.

NGC 5897 (= GCL 33)
Discovered (Mar 10, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
An 8th-magnitude globular cluster (type XI) in Libra (RA 15 17 24.5, Dec -21 00 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5897 (= GC 4075 = JH 3596 = WH VI 19 = WH VI 8?, 1860 RA 15 09 22, NPD 110 29.7) is a "globular cluster, pretty faint, large, very irregularly round, very gradually bighter middle, well resolved, clearly consisting of stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 11? arcmin
DSS image of globular cluster NGC 5897
Above, a 15 arcmin wide image of NGC 5897
Below, an 18 arcmin wide image (Credit and © Daniel Verschatse, Observatorio Antilhue, Chile; used by permission)
Observatorio Antilhue image of globular cluster NGC 5897

NGC 5898 (= PGC 54625)
Discovered (May 21, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Vincenzo Cerulli
An 11th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0) in Libra (RA 15 18 13.6, Dec -24 05 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5898 (= GC 4076 = JH 3597 = WH III 138, 1860 RA 15 09 53, NPD 113 31.7) is "faintg, small, round, gradually brighter middle". The second IC adds "RA is 15 10 01, NPD 113 34.9, Cerulli, A.N. 3315".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.7 by 2.6? arcmin
DSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 5898
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5898
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 5903
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxies 5898 and 5903

NGC 5899 (= PGC 54428)
Discovered (Mar 18, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)c) in Boötes (RA 15 15 03.3, Dec +42 02 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5899 (= GC 4077 = JH 1914 = WH II 650, 1860 RA 15 10 01, NPD 47 25.7) is "considerably bright, pretty large, pretty much extended, suddenly much brighter middle and nucleus".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.2 by 1.4 arcmin
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5899
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5899
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5899
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 5800 - 5849) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 5850 - 5899     → (NGC 5900 - 5949)