Celestial Atlas
(NGC 5850 - 5899) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 5900 - 5949 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 5950 - 5999)
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5900, 5901, 5902, 5903, 5904, 5905, 5906, 5907, 5908, 5909, 5910, 5911, 5912, 5913, 5914, 5915, 5916,
5917, 5918, 5919, 5920, 5921, 5922, 5923, 5924, 5925, 5926, 5927, 5928, 5929, 5930, 5931, 5932, 5933,
5934, 5935, 5936, 5937, 5938, 5939, 5940, 5941, 5942, 5943, 5944, 5945, 5946, 5947, 5948, 5949

Page last updated Mar 13, 2017
Added Dreyer NGC entries
WORKING: Reformatting to current standards
WORKING: Add basic pix, tags

NGC 5900 (= PGC 54431)
Discovered (Apr 9, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 15 05.2, Dec +42 12 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5900 (= GC 4078 = JH 1915 = WH III 660, 1860 RA 15 10 03, NPD 47 16.8) is "very faint, small, very little extended, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 0.5 arcmin
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5900
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5900
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5900

NGC 5901
Recorded (May 23, 1854) by
R. J. Mitchell
A star in Bo÷tes (RA 15 15 02.3, Dec +42 13 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5901 (= GC 4079, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 15 10 03, NPD 47 16▒) is "close north of h 1915, extremely faint, small", (JH) 1915 being NGC 5900.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case R. J. Mitchell.

NGC 5902 (= PGC 54394)
Discovered (May 1, 1788) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 14 22.3, Dec +50 19 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5902 (= GC 4080 = WH III 737, 1860 RA 15 10 15, NPD 39 12.1) is "very faint, very small, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 1.0 arcmin

NGC 5903 (= PGC 54646)
Discovered (May 21, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2) in Libra (RA 15 18 36.5, Dec -24 04 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5903 (= GC 4081 = JH 3598 = WH III 139, 1860 RA 15 10 24, NPD 113 31.1) is "considerably faint, small, round, gradually pretty much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.7 by 2.1 arcmin

NGC 5904 (=
M5 = GCL 34)
Discovered (May 5, 1702) by Gottfried Kirch
Recorded (May 23, 1764) by Charles Messier as M5
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 6th-magnitude globular cluster in Serpens Caput (RA 15 18 33.8, Dec +02 05 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5904 (= GC 4083 = JH 1916, G. Kirch, M 5, 1860 RA 15 11 28, NPD 87 24.3) is "a very remarkable object, a globular cluster, very bright, large, extremely compressed middle, stars from 11th to 15th magnitude".
Physical Information: One of the most massive globular clusters in the Milky Way Galaxy
SDSS image of globular cluster NGC 5904, also known as M5
Above, a 24 arcmin wide view of M5
Below, a closeup of the globular cluster (Credit and ©: Jim Misti, Misti Mountain Observatory; used by permission)
Misti Mountain Observatory image of globular cluster NGC 5904, also known as M5

NGC 5905 (= PGC 54445)
Discovered (May 5, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb) in Draco (RA 15 15 23.3, Dec +55 31 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5905 (= GC 4082 = GC 4084 = WH II 758, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 15 11 40, NPD 33 57.9) is "pretty faint, pretty small, irregularly round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.0 by 2.6 arcmin

NGC 5906 (= the fainter western part of
NGC 5907)
Recorded (Apr 13, 1850) by George Stoney
Part of a spiral galaxy in Draco (RA 15 15 52.1, Dec +56 19 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5906 (= GC 4086, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 15 12 15, NPD 33 10▒) is "A ray, very much extended, parallel to h 1917 and close to the west of it", (JH) 1917 being NGC 5907.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case George Stoney.
Physical Information: This is merely part of spiral galaxy NGC 5907 (which see for images). It is probably the fainter western portion of the galaxy that is obscured by dust in the galaxy's disc, while NGC 5907 would originally have been the brighter eastern portion of the galaxy, but is now synonymous with the entire galaxy.

NGC 5907 (= PGC 54470)
Discovered (May 5, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 10th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc??) in Draco (RA 15 15 53.8, Dec +56 19 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5907 (= GC 4087 = JH 1917 = WH II 759, 1860 RA 15 12 16, NPD 33 09.3) is "considerably bright, very large, very much extended 155░, very gradually then pretty suddenly brighter middle and nucleus".
Physical Information: Apparent size 11.6 by 0.95 arcmin. GC 4087 = NGC 5907 represents the entire galaxy, but apparently what we see as the brighter eastern part of the nucleus and disc of the galaxy was interpreted by George Stoney as a separate object from the fainter western portion, which therefore became NGC 5906, but is only the part of the galaxy that is partially obscured by dust in its disk.
Mount Lemmon SkyCenter image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5907
Above, a 12 arcmin wide image centered on NGC 5907
(Image Credit & © Adam Block/Mount Lemmon SkyCenter/U. of Arizona, data courtesy Don McCrady; used by permission)
Below, a labeled version of the image; NGC 5907 is presumably the brighter eastern portion of the galaxy
NGC 5906 is presumably the fainter western region obscured by dust in the galaxy's disk
Labeled version of Mount Lemmon SkyCenter image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5907, showing that the western portion of the galaxy obscured by dust in its disk is presumably NGC 5906

NGC 5908 (= PGC 54522)
Discovered (May 5, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Draco (RA 15 16 43.1, Dec +55 24 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5908 (= GC 4085 = GC 4088 = WH II 760, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 15 13 00, NPD 34 04.1) is "pretty faint, pretty small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.3 by 1.4 arcmin

NGC 5909 (= PGC 54223)
Discovered (Dec 12, 1797) by
William Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc) in Ursa Minor (RA 15 11 27.9, Dec +75 23 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5909 (= GC 4089 = WH III 943, 1860 RA 15 13 11, NPD 14 07.1) is "very faint, very small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.5 arcmin

NGC 5910 (= PGC 54688 + 54689)
Discovered (Apr 13, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 14th-magnitude galaxy triplet in Serpens
#1 (PGC 54689): A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) at RA 15 19 24.7, Dec +20 53 46
#2 (PGC 54688): A 15th-magnitude pair of elliptical galaxies (type E+E) at RA 15 19 24.2, Dec +20 53 29
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5910 (= GC 4090 = WH II 400, 1860 RA 15 13 16, NPD 68 36.9) is "very faint, small, extremely mottled but not resolved".
Discovery Notes: The description "extremely mottled but not resolved" suggests that although Herschel could not have seen the three galaxies as separate objects, the fact that they are separate objects may have affected his perception of their appearance.
Physical Information: Apparent size of component 1: 0.7 by 0.7 arcmin. Apparent size of component 2: 0.4 by 0.4 arcmin.

NGC 5911 (= PGC 54731)
Discovered (Jun 5, 1880) by
╔douard Stephan
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a) in Serpens (RA 15 20 18.1, Dec +03 31 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5911 (Stephan list XI (#12), 1860 RA 15 13 18, NPD 85 58.3) is "very faint, very small, 2 small stars involved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.8 arcmin

NGC 5912 (= PGC 54237)
Discovered (Dec 12, 1797) by
William Herschel
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Ursa Minor (RA 15 11 40.5, Dec +75 23 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5912 (= GC 4091 = WH III 944, 1860 RA 15 13 36, NPD 14 07.1) is "very faint, very small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 1.1 arcmin

NGC 5913 (= PGC 54761)
Discovered (Apr 14, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa) in Serpens (RA 15 20 55.5, Dec -02 34 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5913 (= GC 4092 = JH 1918 = JH 3599 = WH III 374, 1860 RA 15 13 39, NPD 92 04.0) is "very faint, pretty large, very little extended, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.7 arcmin

NGC 5914 (= PGC 54654)
Discovered (May 16, 1882) by
╔douard Stephan
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 18 43.8, Dec +41 51 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5914 (Stephan list XII (#71), 1860 RA 15 13 41, NPD 47 37.4) is "faint, very small, round, faint star involved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.85 by 0.35 arcmin. Vr 5410 km/sec.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5914, also showing PGC 54653 and PGC 2188560
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5914, also showing PGC 54653 and 2188560
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5914

PGC 54653 (= "NGC 5914B")
Not an NGC object, but listed here since sometimes called NGC 5914B

A 16th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 18 45.3, Dec +41 53 26)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.7 arcmin. Nothing known about distance or actual size. In any event, almost certainly completely unrelated to NGC 5914, save by its inappropriate designation as NGC 5914B.
SDSS image of spiral galaxies PGC 54653 and PGC 2188560, sometimes referred to as NGC 5914B
Above, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 54653 and 2188560; for a wide-field image see NGC 5914

PGC 2188560 (= "NGC 5914B2")
Not an NGC object, but listed here since sometimes referred to as part of "NGC 5914B"
A 16th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in
Bo÷tes (RA 15 18 46.1, Dec +41 53 10)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.1 arcmin. Sometimes called, by those who foolishly designate PGC 54653 as NGC 5914B, a part of that object; but almost certainly a much more distant object, completely unrelated to any of the other "nearby" galaxies. Vr = 22645 km/sec, z = 0.075536, indicating that it is at least four times more distant than NGC 5914, and probably twice the distance PGC 54653.
SDSS image of spiral galaxies PGC 54653 and PGC 2188560, sometimes referred to as NGC 5914B
Above, a 0.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 54653 and 2188560; for a wide-field image see NGC 5914

NGC 5915 (= PGC 54816)
Discovered (Jun 5, 1836) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBab) in Libra (RA 15 21 33.0, Dec -13 05 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5915 (= GC 4093 = JH 3600, 1860 RA 15 13 51, NPD 102 35.1) is "bright, small, round, gradually a little brighter middle, western of 2", the other being NGC 5916.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.1 arcmin

NGC 5916 (= PGC 54825)
Discovered (Jun 5, 1836) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa pec) in Libra (RA 15 21 37.8, Dec -13 10 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5916 (= GC 4094 = JH 3601, 1860 RA 15 13 56, NPD 102 39.2) is "faint, small, a little extended, gradually a little brighter middle, eastern of 2", the other being NGC 5915.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.8 by 0.9 arcmin

PGC 54779 (= "NGC 5916A")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 5916A
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc pec) in
Libra (RA 15 21 13.7, Dec -13 06 03)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.3 arcmin

NGC 5917 (= PGC 54809 =
Arp 254)
Discovered (Jul 16, 1835) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Libra (RA 15 21 32.5, Dec -07 22 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5917 (= GC 4095 = JH 3602, 1860 RA 15 14 03, NPD 96 51.1) is "extremely faint, very small, pretty suddenly brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.9 arcmin

NGC 5918 (= PGC 54690)
Discovered (Apr 26, 1830) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 19 25.1, Dec +45 52 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5918 (= GC 4096 = JH 1920, 1860 RA 15 14 37, NPD 43 36.7) is "considerably faint, large, pretty much extended, gradually a little brighter middle, double star to south".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 0.8 arcmin

NGC 5919 (= PGC 54826)
Discovered (Mar 30, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
A 16th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0) in Serpens (RA 15 21 36.8, Dec +07 43 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5919 (Swift list VI (#77), 1860 RA 15 14 37, NPD 81 46.8) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, a little extended, northwestern of 2", the other being NGC 5920.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.3 by 0.3 arcmin

NGC 5920 (= PGC 54839)
Discovered (Mar 30, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Serpens (RA 15 21 51.8, Dec +07 42 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5920 (Swift list VI (#78), 1860 RA 15 14 59, NPD 81 47.3) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, a little extended, southeastern of 2", the other being NGC 5919.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.6 arcmin

NGC 5921
Discovered (May 1, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc) in Serpens (RA 15 21 56.3, Dec +05 04 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5921 (= GC 4097 = JH 1919 = WH I 148, 1860 RA 15 15 00, NPD 84 25.6) is "considerably bright, considerably large, irregularly round, very suddenly brighter middle like 12th magnitude star, among stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.8 by 4.0 arcmin

NGC 5922 (probably =
NGC 5923 = PGC 54780)
Recorded (Apr 9, 1787) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5922)
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5922)
Possibly also observed (May 1, 1828) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5923)
Previously identified as a pair of stars in Bo÷tes (RA 15 21 09.1, Dec +41 40 23)
but probably a 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 21 14.1, Dec +41 43 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5922 (= GC 4098 = JH 1922 = WH III 661, 1860 RA 15 16 12, NPD 47 50.5) is "extremely faint, small". Per Corwin's Nov 2015 update, this is probably not a pair of stars, but a duplication of NGC 5923; but further discussion will have to wait for the next iteration of this page.

NGC 5923 (= PGC 54780 (and probably =
NGC 5922))
Possibly also observed (Apr 9, 1787) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5922)
Discovered (May 1, 1828) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5923)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 21 14.1, Dec +41 43 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5923 (= GC 4099 = JH 1921, 1860 RA 15 16 13, NPD 47 46.5) is "very faint, pretty large, very little extended, very gradually brighter middle". See NGC 5922 for a brief mention of the probable duplicate entry; but further discussion will have to wait for the next iteration of this page.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 1.8 arcmin

NGC 5924 (= PGC 54850)
Discovered (Jun 10, 1882) by
╔douard Stephan
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa) in Corona Borealis (RA 15 22 02.0, Dec +31 13 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5924 (Stephan list XII (#72), 1860 RA 15 16 20, NPD 58 15.7) is a "nebulous star, very faint, small, faint star close to south"
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.3 arcmin

NGC 5925 (= OCL 938)
Discovered (Jul 28, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
An 8th-magnitude open cluster (type III1m) in Norma (RA 15 27 26.0, Dec -54 31 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5925 (= GC 4100 = JH 3603, Dunlop 357, 1860 RA 15 17 15, NPD 144 01.7) is a "cluster, very large, very rich, a little compressed, stars from 11th to 14th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 20 arcmin

NGC 5926 (= PGC 54950)
Discovered (Jun 15, 1884) by
Lewis Swift
Not observed (date?) by Guillaume Bigourdan
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in Serpens (RA 15 23 25.0, Dec -12 42 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5926 (Swift list I (#44), 1860 RA 15 17 19, NPD 76 46.3) is "faint, very small, 2 stars near". The first IC adds "Not found by Bigourdan". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 15 16 47 (which explains Bigourdan's failure to find the object).
Physical Information: Apparent size 12.6 by 0.8 arcmin

NGC 5927 (= GCL 35)
Discovered (May 8, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
An 8th-magnitude globular cluster (type VIII) in Lupus (RA 15 28 0.5, Dec -50 40 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5927 (= GC 4101 = JH 3604, Dunlop 389, 1860 RA 15 17 56, NPD 140 10.8) is a "globular cluster, considerably bright, large, round, very gradually brighter middle, well resolved, clearly consisting of stars, stars of 15th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 6 arcmin

NGC 5928 (= PGC 55072)
Discovered (May 24, 1791) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Serpens (RA 15 26 02.8, Dec +18 04 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5928 (= GC 4102 = JH 1923 = WH II 874, 1860 RA 15 19 41, NPD 71 25.5) is "pretty bright, considerably small, round, pretty suddenly brighter middle, 7th magnitude star to north".
Discovery Notes: The first IC adds "This possibly Messier 102, found by MÚchain: 'NÚbuleuse entre les Útoiles ο du Bouvier (= Bo÷tes) et ι du Dragon: elle est trŔs foible; prŔs d'elle est une Útoile de la sixiŔme grandeur.' I assume that ι Draconis is an error for ι Serpentis". (Dreyer's supposition was wrong; M102 is actually NGC 5866.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.2 by 1.6 arcmin

NGC 5929 (= PGC 55076, and with
NGC 5930 = Arp 90)
Discovered (May 13, 1828) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab pec) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 26 06.1, Dec +41 40 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5929 (= GC 4103 = JH 1924, 1860 RA 15 21 06, NPD 47 50.5) is "very faint, very small, southwestern member of double nebula", the other being NGC 5930.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.8 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxies NGC 5929 and 5930, also known as Arp 90
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5929 and 5930
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxies NGC 5929 and 5930, also known as Arp 90

NGC 5930 (= PGC 55080, and with
NGC 5929 = Arp 90)
Discovered (Mar 18, 1787) by William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb pec) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 26 08.0, Dec +41 40 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5930 (= GC 4104 = JH 1925 = WH II 651, 1860 RA 15 21 09, NPD 47 50.3) is "pretty faint, pretty small, round, northeastern member of double nebula", the other being NGC 5929 (which see for images of the pair).
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.8 arcmin.

NGC 5931 (= PGC 55233)
Discovered (Apr 19, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Serpens (RA 15 29 29.6, Dec +07 34 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5931 (Swift list VI (#81), 1860 RA 15 22 32, NPD 81 57.0) is "extremely faint, pretty large, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.5 arcmin

NGC 5932 (= PGC 55109)
Discovered (Apr 21, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 26 48.2, Dec +48 36 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5932 (Swift list VI (#79), 1860 RA 15 22 34, NPD 40 50.0) is "very faint, pretty small, round, northwestern of 2", the other being NGC 5933.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.8 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5932
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5932
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 5932 and 5933
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5932 and lenticular galaxy 5933

NGC 5933 (= PGC 55117)
Discovered (Apr 21, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 27 01.5, Dec +48 36 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5933 (Swift list VI (#80), 1860 RA 15 22 44, NPD 40 51.0) is "most extremely faint, very small, round, southeastern of 2", the other being NGC 5932.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5933
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5933; for a wide-field view, see NGC 5932

NGC 5934 (= PGC 55178)
Discovered (Jun 12, 1880) by
╔douard Stephan
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 28 12.6, Dec +42 55 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5934 (Stephan list XI (#13), 1860 RA 15 23 20, NPD 46 35.0) is "faint, small, irregular, a little extended north-south, 2 small stars involved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.6 arcmin
SDSS image of spiral galaxies NGC 5934 and 5935
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5934 and 5935
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxies NGC 5934 and 5935

NGC 5935 (= PGC 55183)
Discovered (Jun 12, 1880) by
╔douard Stephan
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 28 16.6, Dec +42 56 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5935 (Stephan list XI (#14), 1860 RA 15 23 24, NPD 46 34.1) is a "13th or 14th magnitude star which seems slightly nebulous".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.3 arcmin. See NGC 5934 for images of the pair.

NGC 5936 (= PGC 55255)
Discovered (Apr 12, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb) in Serpens (RA 15 30 00.8, Dec +12 59 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5936 (= GC 4105 = WH II 130, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 15 23 25, NPD 76 31.6) is "faint, pretty large, irregularly round, very gradually brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.3 arcmin

NGC 5937 (= PGC 55281)
Discovered (Apr 14, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Serpens (RA 15 30 46.2, Dec -02 49 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4106 (= JH 1926 = JH 3606 = WH II 401, 1860 RA 15 23 29, NPD 92 20.8) is "pretty bright, pretty small, round, very gradually brighter middle, 3 stars to east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 1.1 arcmin

NGC 5938 (= PGC 55582)
Discovered (Jun 9, 1836) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc) in Triangulum Australe (RA 15 36 26.1, Dec -66 51 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5938 (= GC 4107 = JH 3605, 1860 RA 15 23 30, NPD 156 22.6) is "faint, small, among stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.8 by 2.5 arcmin

NGC 5939 (= PGC 55022)
Discovered (Jul 11, 1883) by
Lewis Swift
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc) in Ursa Minor (RA 15 24 45.8, Dec +68 43 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5939 (Swift list I (#45), 1860 RA 15 23 51, NPD 20 46.5) is "pretty bright, pretty small, a little extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.5 arcmin

NGC 5940 (= PGC 55295)
Discovered (Apr 19, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBab) in Serpens (RA 15 31 18.2, Dec +07 27 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5940 (Swift list VI (#82), 1860 RA 15 24 27, NPD 82 03.0) is "extremely faint, pretty small, round, faint star to west, 1st of 4", the others being NGC 5941, 5942 and 5944.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.8 arcmin

NGC 5941 (= PGC 55314)
Discovered (Apr 19, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
Also observed (date?) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Serpens (RA 15 31 40.3, Dec +07 20 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5941 (Swift list VI (#83), 1860 RA 15 24 37, NPD 82 10.0) is "most extremely faint, small, round, 2nd of 4", the others being NGC 5940, 5942 and 5944. The first IC adds (per Bigourdan) that 5941 and 5942 are southwest and northeast of each other, respectively.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.3 arcmin.

NGC 5942 (= PGC 55309)
Discovered (Apr 19, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
Also observed (date?) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Serpens (RA 15 31 36.8, Dec +07 18 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5942 (Swift list VI (#84), 1860 RA 15 24 42, NPD 82 13.0) is "most extremely faint, small, round, 3rd of 4", the others being NGC 5940, 5941 and 5944. The first IC adds (per Bigourdan) that 5941 and 5942 are southwest and northeast of each other, respectively.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.4 arcmin.

NGC 5943 (= PGC 55242)
Discovered (Jun 18, 1884) by
╔douard Stephan
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 29 44.0, Dec +42 46 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5943 (Stephan list XIII (#82), 1860 RA 15 24 51, NPD 46 44.5) is "very faint, pretty small, diffuse".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.3 arcmin

NGC 5944 (= PGC 55321)
Discovered (Apr 19, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc) in Serpens (RA 15 31 47.6, Dec +07 18 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5944 (Swift list VI (#85), 1860 RA 15 24 52, NPD 82 12.2) is "most extremely faint, small, round, 4th of 4", the others being NGC 5940, 5941 and 5942.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.2 arcmin

NGC 5945 (= PGC 55243)
Discovered (Jun 12, 1880) by
╔douard Stephan
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBab) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 29 44.9, Dec +42 55 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5945 (Stephan list XI (#15), 1860 RA 15 24 53, NPD 46 35.7) is "pretty faint, pretty large, gradually much brighter middle, small star attached on northwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.9 by 1.8 arcmin

NGC 5946 (=
IC 4550 = GCL 36)
Discovered (May 8, 1826) by James Dunlop (and later listed as NGC 5946)
Discovered (May 24, 1898) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 4550)
An 8th-magnitude globular cluster (type IX) in Norma (RA 15 35 28.5, Dec -50 39 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5946 (= GC 4108 = JH 3607, 1860 RA 15 25 20, NPD 140 11.2) is a "globular cluster, considerably bright, pretty large, round, very gradually a little brighter middle, well resolved, clearly consisting of stars, stars of 16th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0 arcmin

NGC 5947 (= PGC 55274)
Discovered (Jun 18, 1884) by
╔douard Stephan
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 30 36.6, Dec +42 43 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5947 (Stephan list XIII (#83), 1860 RA 15 25 44, NPD 46 48.3) is "very faint, small, diffuse".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 1.2 arcmin

NGC 5948
Recorded (Jun 14, 1881) by
╔douard Stephan
A pair of stars in Serpens (RA 15 32 58.6, Dec +03 59 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5948 (Stephan list XII (#73), 1860 RA 15 25 59, NPD 85 32.4) is a "faint star in very faint nebulosity, very faint star close".

NGC 5949 (= PGC 55165)
Discovered (Nov 28, 1801) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc) in Draco (RA 15 28 00.7, Dec +64 45 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5949 (= GC 4109 = WH II 906, 1860 RA 15 26 03, NPD 24 45.5) is "faint, small, a little extended 45░▒, very gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.2 by 1.0 arcmin
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5949
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5949
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5949
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 5850 - 5899) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 5900 - 5949     → (NGC 5950 - 5999)