Celestial Atlas
(NGC 5900 - 5949) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 5950 - 5999 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 6000 - 6049)
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5950, 5951, 5952, 5953, 5954, 5955, 5956, 5957, 5958, 5959, 5960, 5961, 5962, 5963, 5964, 5965, 5966,
5967, 5968, 5969, 5970, 5971, 5972, 5973, 5974, 5975, 5976, 5977, 5978, 5979, 5980, 5981, 5982, 5983,
5984, 5985, 5986, 5987, 5988, 5989, 5990, 5991, 5992, 5993, 5994, 5995, 5996, 5997, 5998, 5999

Page last updated Mar 14, 2017
Added Dreyer NGC entries
WORKING: Reformatting to current standards
WORKING: Add basic pix, tags

NGC 5950 (= PGC 55305)
Discovered (Jun 21, 1882) by
╔douard Stephan
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 31 30.6, Dec +40 25 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5950 (Stephan list XII (#74), 1860 RA 15 26 28, NPD 49 05.7) is "very faint, small, round, small star to northwest".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 2595 km/sec, NGC 5950 is about 115 million light years away, in reasonable agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 120 to 130 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 1.5 by 0.8 arcmin, it is about 45 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5950
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5950
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5950

NGC 5951 (= PGC 55435)
Discovered (Mar 19, 1787) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc) in Serpens (RA 15 33 43.1, Dec +15 00 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5951 (= GC 4110 = WH II 654, 1860 RA 15 27 14, NPD 74 32.0) is "faint, pretty small, extended 150░▒".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.6 by 0.8? arcmin.

NGC 5952 (= PGC 55496)
Discovered (Mar 25, 1865) by
Albert Marth
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Serpens (RA 15 34 56.3, Dec +04 57 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5952 (= GC 5780, Marth #288, 1860 RA 15 27 59, NPD 84 33) is "extremely faint, very small, almost stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.3? arcmin.

NGC 5953 (= PGC 55480, and with
NGC 5954 = Arp 91)
Discovered (Apr 17, 1784) by William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a) in Serpens (RA 15 34 32.3, Dec +15 11 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5953 (= GC 4111 = JH 1927 = WH II 178, 1860 RA 15 28 04, NPD 74 20.2) is "pretty bright, considerably small, western of double nebula", the other being NGC 5954.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.3 arcmin.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5953 and spiral galaxy NGC 5954, also known as Arp 91
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5953 and 5954
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair
SDSS view of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5953 and spiral galaxy NGC 5954, also known as Arp 91

NGC 5954 (= PGC 55482, and with
NGC 5953 = Arp 91)
Discovered (Apr 17, 1784) by William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc pec) in Serpens (RA 15 34 34.9, Dec +15 12 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5954 (= GC 4112 = JH 1927 = WH II 179, 1860 RA 15 28 07, NPD 74 19.7) is "pretty bright, considerably small, eastern of double nebula", the other being NGC 5953, which see for images.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.5? arcmin.

NGC 5955 (= PGC 55510)
Discovered (Mar 25, 1865) by
Albert Marth
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb) in Serpens (RA 15 35 12.4, Dec +05 03 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5955 (= GC 5781, Marth #289, 1860 RA 15 28 15, NPD 84 27) is "extremely faint, very small, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.6? arcmin.

NGC 5956 (= PGC 55501)
Discovered (Apr 29, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Serpens (RA 15 34 58.5, Dec +11 45 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5956 (= GC 5782, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 15 28 23, NPD 77 47.0) is "faint, small, round, 16th magnitude star close to east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.6? arcmin.

NGC 5957 (= PGC 55520)
Discovered (Apr 29, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb) in Serpens (RA 15 35 23.1, Dec +12 02 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5957 (= GC 5783, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 15 28 46, NPD 77 29.2) is "pretty bright, pretty large, cometic, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.8 by 2.6? arcmin.

NGC 5958 (= PGC 55494)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Corona Borealis (RA 15 34 49.1, Dec +28 39 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5958 (= GC 4113 = WH II 399, 1860 RA 15 28 58, NPD 60 51.4) is "pretty faint, pretty large, irregularly round, brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 1.0? arcmin.

NGC 5959 (= PGC 55625)
Discovered (Jun 26, 1886) by
Ormond Stone
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2) in Libra (RA 15 37 22.3, Dec -16 35 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5959 (Ormond Stone list I (#228), 1860 RA 15 29 20, NPD 106 06.9) is "very faint, pretty small, very little extended, brighter middle and nucleus".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0 by 1.7? arcmin.

NGC 5960 (= PGC 55575)
Discovered (Apr 12, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc) in Serpens (RA 15 36 18.4, Dec +05 39 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5960 (= GC 5784, Marth #290, 1860 RA 15 29 23, NPD 83 52) is "very faint, small, nebulous star".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.6? arcmin.

NGC 5961 (= PGC 55515)
Discovered (Jun 8, 1880) by
╔douard Stephan
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Corona Borealis (RA 15 35 16.2, Dec +30 51 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5961 (Stephan list XI (#16), 1860 RA 15 29 36, NPD 58 40.0) is "pretty faint, small, extended east-west".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.3? arcmin.

NGC 5962 (= PGC 55588)
Discovered (Mar 21, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Serpens (RA 15 36 31.6, Dec +16 36 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5962 (= GC 4116 = JH 1928 = WH II 96, 1860 RA 15 30 07, NPD 72 55.6) is "pretty faint, pretty large, irregularly a little extended, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0 by 2.2? arcmin.

NGC 5963 (= PGC 55419)
Discovered (May 5, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Draco (RA 15 33 27.8, Dec +56 33 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5963 (= GC 4114 = WH II 761, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 15 30 10, NPD 32 57.8) is "pretty faint, pretty small, irregular figure".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.3 by 2.6? arcmin.

NGC 5964 (=
IC 4551 = PGC 55637)
Discovered (Apr 24, 1830) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5964)
Also observed (date?) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 5964)
Discovered (Aug 19, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 4551)
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBcd) in Serpens (RA 15 37 36.2, Dec +05 58 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5964 (= GC 4118 = JH 1929, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 15 30 40, NPD 83 33.7) is "extremely faint, very large, round, very gradually brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.1 by 3.3? arcmin.

NGC 5965 (= PGC 55459)
Discovered (May 5, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Draco (RA 15 34 02.0, Dec +56 41 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5965 (= GC 4115 = JH 1931 = WH II 762, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 15 30 42, NPD 32 50.7) is "considerably faint, considerably large, a little extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 6.2 by 0.85? arcmin. Vr 3410 km/sec.

PGC 2544663
Not an NGC object, but listed here since an apparent companion of
NGC 5965
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S) in Draco (RA 15 33 53.4, Dec +56 41 28)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.3 by 0.2? arcmin. Recessional velocity 11875 km/sec, so not a companion of NGC 5965, but merely an optical double. (Listed in NED as SDSS J153353.52+564126.3)

NGC 5966 (= PGC 55552)
Discovered (Mar 18, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E4) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 35 52.2, Dec +39 46 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5966 (= GC 4119 = JH 1930 = WH III 634, 1860 RA 15 30 48, NPD 49 46.2) is "very faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle, two 8th magnitude stars to east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 1.1? arcmin.

NGC 5967 (= PGC 56078)
Discovered (Jun 7, 1836) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc) in Apus (RA 15 48 16.0, Dec -75 40 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5967 (= GC 4120 = JH 3608, 1860 RA 15 31 13, NPD 165 13.2) is "faint, pretty large, round, very gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.7 by 1.7? arcmin.

PGC 56024 (= "NGC 5967A")
Not an NGC object, but listed here since sometimes called NGC 5967A
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc) in
Apus (RA 15 46 58.8, Dec -75 47 13)
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0 by 1.5? arcmin.

NGC 5968 (= PGC 55738)
Discovered (Jun 3, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBab) in Lupus (RA 15 39 57.0, Dec -30 33 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5968 (= GC 4121 = JH 3609, 1860 RA 15 31 20, NPD 120 05.8) is "very faint, large, round, gradually brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 1.9? arcmin.

NGC 5969 (= PGC 55491)
Discovered (Aug 5, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Draco (RA 15 34 50.9, Dec +56 27 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5969 (Swift list II (#37), 1860 RA 15 31 29, NPD 33 04.8) is "extremely small, round, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.3? arcmin.

NGC 5970 (= PGC 55665)
Discovered (Mar 15, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc) in Serpens (RA 15 38 30.0, Dec +12 11 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5970 (= GC 4122= WH II 76, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 15 31 53, NPD 77 21.5) is "pretty faint, pretty large, round, partially resolved (some stars seen)".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0 by 2.0? arcmin.

NGC 5971 (= PGC 55529)
Discovered (Aug 5, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa) in Draco (RA 15 35 36.9, Dec +56 27 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5971 (Swift list II (#38), 1860 RA 15 32 09, NPD 33 04.8) is "most extremely faint, very small, round, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.6? arcmin.

NGC 5972 (= PGC 55684)
Discovered (Jun 29, 1880) by
╔douard Stephan
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a) in Serpens (RA 15 38 54.1, Dec +17 01 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5972 (Stephan list XI (#17), 1860 RA 15 32 31, NPD 72 30.9) is "faint, pretty small, irregularly round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.7? arcmin.

NGC 5973 (= PGC 55757)
Discovered (May 26, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a) in Libra (RA 15 40 15.6, Dec -08 36 03>
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5973 (= GC 5785, Marth #291, 1860 RA 15 32 44, NPD 98 09) is "faint, small, irregularly round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.3? arcmin.

NGC 5974 (= PGC 55694)
Discovered (Apr 29, 1827) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Corona Borealis (RA 15 39 02.3, Dec +31 45 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5974 (= GC 4123 = JH 1932, 1860 RA 15 33 26, NPD 57 46.7) is "very faint, very small, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.3? arcmin.

NGC 5975 (= PGC 55739)
Discovered (Jun 19, 1882) by
╔douard Stephan
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc) in Serpens (RA 15 39 58.0, Dec +21 28 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5975 (Stephan list XII (#75), 1860 RA 15 33 48, NPD 68 04.4) is "very faint, very small, irregularly round, several very faint stars involved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.3? arcmin.

NGC 5976 (= PGC 55609)
Discovered (May 6, 1850) by
George Stoney
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Draco (RA 15 36 47.8, Dec +59 23 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5976 (= GC 4124, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 15 34 00, NPD 30 06.4) is "most extremely faint, small, round".
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case George Stoney.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.4? arcmin.

PGC 55561 (= "NGC 5976A")
Not an NGC object, but listed here since sometimes called NGC 5976A
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBab) in
Draco (RA 15 36 07.2, Dec +59 34 00)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 1.0? arcmin.

NGC 5977 (= PGC 55769)
Discovered (Jun 29, 1880) by
╔douard Stephan
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0) in Serpens (RA 15 40 33.4, Dec +17 07 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5977 (Stephan list XI (#18), 1860 RA 15 34 11, NPD 72 25.1) is "extremely faint, small, round, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 1.0? arcmin.

NGC 5978 (= PGC 55838)
Discovered (Jun 10, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa) in Libra (RA 15 42 27.1, Dec -13 14 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5978 (Leavenworth list I (#229), 1860 RA 15 34 20, NPD 102 46.1) is "extremely faint, very small, suddenly brighter middle and nucleus, among stars". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 15 34 41.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.7? arcmin.

NGC 5979
Discovered (Apr 24, 1835) by
John Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A 12th-magnitude planetary nebula in Triangulum Australe (RA 15 47 41.1, Dec -61 13 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5979 (= GC 4125 = JH 3610, 1860 RA 15 34 54, NPD 150 46.4) is "a remarkable object, a planetary nebula, pretty faint, very small, round, mottled but not resolved?, among 150 stars". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 15 35 54, with the note "error of reduction in the GC". The corrected position precesses to RA 15 47 42.3, Dec -61 12 56, within 0.2 arcmin of the center of the nebula, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Distance estimates for NGC 5979 range from about 9 to 12 thousand light years. Given that and its apparent size of about 0.25 arcmin, it is a little over 2/3 of a light year (or about 4 to 5 trillion miles) across.
DSS image of region near planetary nebula NGC 5979
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region near NGC 5979 (the overexposed blob at the center). Below, a HST closeup of the planetary nebula (Image Credits: ESA, ESO and NASA.) The color-coded numbers at lower left represent the wavelengths used for this false-color multispectral image. A wide-band near-infrared image (centered at 814 nanometers) is shown in red, a "forbidden" line of ionized nitrogen (at 658 nanometers) is shown in yellow, a wide-band green image (centered at 555 nanometers) is shown in green, and a "forbidden" line of doubly ionized oxygen (at 502 nanometers) is shown in purple.
HST image of planetary nebula NGC 5979

NGC 5980 (= PGC 55800)
Discovered (Mar 19, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Serpens (RA 15 41 30.5, Dec +15 47 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5980 (= GC 4126 = JH 1933 = WH II 655, 1860 RA 15 35 00, NPD 73 45.6) is "faint, pretty small, extended 0░".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 0.7? arcmin.

NGC 5981 (= PGC 55647)
Discovered (May 6, 1850) by
George Stoney
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Draco (RA 15 37 53.4, Dec +59 23 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5981 (= GC 4127, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 15 35 03, NPD 30 09.0) is "faint, much extended".
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case George Stoney.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.7 by 0.3? arcmin.

NGC 5982 (= PGC 55674)
Discovered (May 25, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Heinrich d'Arrest
Also observed (date?) by George RŘmker
An 11th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3) in Draco (RA 15 38 40.0, Dec +59 21 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5982 (= GC 4128 = JH 1934 = WH II 764, d'Arrest, RŘmker, 1860 RA 15 35 49, NPD 30 11.4) is "considerably bright, small, round, pretty suddenly brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.6 by 1.9? arcmin.

NGC 5983 (= PGC 55845)
Discovered (Mar 25, 1865) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0) in Serpens (RA 15 42 45.5, Dec +08 14 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5983 (= GC 5786, Marth #292, 1860 RA 15 35 59, NPD 81 18.0) is "extremely faint, extremely small, round, very little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 1.0? arcmin.

NGC 5984 (= PGC 55853)
Discovered (Mar 19, 1787) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBcd) in Serpens (RA 15 42 53.1, Dec +14 13 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5984 (= GC 4129 = WH II 656, 1860 RA 15 36 21, NPD 75 20.8) is "pretty bright, small, extended 135░▒, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.9 by 0.7? arcmin.

NGC 5985 (= PGC 55725)
Discovered (May 25, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 6, 1850) by George Stoney
Also observed (Aug 18, 1863) by Eduard Sch÷nfeld
Also observed (Apr 15, 1866) by George RŘmker
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb) in Draco (RA 15 39 37.1, Dec +59 19 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5985 (= GC 4131 = GC 4133 = WH II 766, Sch÷nfeld II, RŘmker, 1860 RA 15 36 46, NPD 30 13.0) is "pretty bright, considerably large, irregularly extended, mottled but not resolved".
Discovery Notes: Sch÷nfeld II is Astronomische Beobachtungen auf der Grossherzoglichen Sternwarte zu Mannheim vol. II (1875), available here. Steinicke notes observations by Herschel and Stoney (whence Stoney's entry above, despite his not being mentioned by Dreyer).
Physical Information: Apparent size 5.5 by 3.0? arcmin.

NGC 5986 (= GCL 37)
Discovered (May 10, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
An 8th-magnitude globular cluster (type VII) in Lupus (RA 15 46 03.5, Dec -37 47 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5986 (= GC 4132 = JH 3611, Dunlop 552, 1860 RA 15 36 53, NPD 127 19.4) is "a remarkable object, a globular cluster, very bright, large, round, very gradually brighter middle, stars of 13th to 15th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 9.6? arcmin.

NGC 5987 (= PGC 55740)
Discovered (May 25, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Draco (RA 15 39 56.9, Dec +58 04 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5987 (= GC 4130 = WH II 765, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 15 36 56, NPD 31 27.5) is "pretty faint, considerably small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.2 by 1.3? arcmin.

NGC 5988 (= PGC 55921)
Discovered (Apr 17, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Scd) in Serpens (RA 15 44 33.8, Dec +10 17 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5988 (Swift list VI (#86), 1860 RA 15 37 39, NPD 79 15.4) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, round, faint star near to north".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 1.0? arcmin.

NGC 5989 (= PGC 55802)
Discovered (May 25, 1788) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Draco (RA 15 41 32.4, Dec +59 45 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5989 (= GC 4134 = WH III 738, 1860 RA 15 38 47, NPD 29 47.6) is "very faint, very small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.9? arcmin.

NGC 5990 (= PGC 55993)
Discovered (May 5, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa) in Serpens (RA 15 46 16.4, Dec +02 24 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5990 (= GC 4135 = JH 1935 = WH II 425, 1860 RA 15 39 16, NPD 87 08.9) is "very faint, very small, round, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.9? arcmin.

NGC 5991 (= PGC 55953)
Discovered (Jun 13, 1879) by
╔douard Stephan
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S) in Serpens (RA 15 45 16.7, Dec +24 37 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5991 (Stephan list X (#27), 1860 RA 15 39 19, NPD 64 55.7) is "pretty faint, small, round, much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.9? arcmin.

NGC 5992 (= PGC 55913)
Discovered (Mar 18, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 44 21.5, Dec +41 05 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5992 (= GC 4136 = JH 1936 = WH III 635, 1860 RA 15 39 30, NPD 48 26.7) is "very faint, very small, round, brighter middle, southwestern of 2", the other being NGC 5993.
Physical Information: The galaxy's middle is relatively bright, leading to its classification as a starburst galaxy. Based on a recessional velocity of 9520 km/sec, NGC 5992 is about 440 million light years away. Given that and its 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin apparent size, it is about 115 thousand light years across. Aside from being in nearly the same direction as NGC 5993, NGC 5992 has nearly the same recessional velocity (and therefore, nearly the same estimated distance), and there is the faintest hint of a stellar stream extending between the two galaxies; so they are almost certainly a gravitationally interacting pair.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5992
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5992
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered between NGC 5992 and NGC 5993
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxies NGC 5992 and 5993

NGC 5993 (= PGC 55918)
Discovered (Mar 18, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(r)b) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 44 27.6, Dec +41 07 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5993 (= GC 4137 = JH 1937 = WH III 636, 1860 RA 15 39 33, NPD 48 26.1) is "considerably faint, very small, round, brighter middle, northeastern of 2", the other being NGC 5992.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 9565 km/sec, NGC 5993 is about 440 million light years away. Given that and its 1.2 by 0.9 arcmin apparent size, it is about 150 thousand light years across. Aside from being in nearly the same direction as NGC 5992, NGC 5993 has nearly the same recessional velocity (and therefore, nearly the same estimated distance), and there is the faintest hint of a stellar stream extending between the two galaxies; so they are almost certainly a gravitationally interacting pair.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5993
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5993; see NGC 5992 for a wide-field image

NGC 5994 (= PGC 56020, and with
NGC 5996 = Arp 72)
Discovered (Mar 9, 1851) by Bindon Stoney
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Serpens (RA 15 46 53.2, Dec +17 52 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5994 (3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 15 40, NPD 71 41) is "small, southwest of II 97", (WH) II 97 being NGC 5996.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case Bindon Stoney.
Physical Information: NGC 5994's recessional velocity of 3290 km/sec per second is nearly identical to that of its larger companion, NGC 5996 (which see for images), and in any event their obvious interaction proves that they share the same distance (of about 155 million light years). Given that, the smaller galaxy's apparent size of 0.4 by 0.2 arcmin corresponds to about 20 thousand light years.

NGC 5995 (= PGC 56081)
Discovered (Jun 5, 1836) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa) in Libra (RA 15 48 24.9, Dec -13 45 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5995 (= GC 4138 = JH 3613, 1860 RA 15 40 39, NPD 103 19.2) is "extremely faint, small, round, very small star to west".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7? arcmin.

NGC 5996 (= PGC 56023, and with
NGC 5994 = Arp 72)
Discovered (Mar 21, 1784) by William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc pec) in Serpens (RA 15 46 58.9, Dec +17 53 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5996 (= GC 4139 = JH 1938 = WH II 97, 1860 RA 15 40 40, NPD 71 40.4) is "pretty faint, considerably small, round, mottled but not resolved, between 2 double stars".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 3295 km/sec, NGC 5996 is about 155 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.7 by 0.9 arcmin, the main portion of the galaxy is about 75 thousand light years across; but as can be seen in the digitally stretched image, fainter extensions cover a region nearly twice that size. A starburst galaxy.
SDSS image of spiral galaxies NGC 5994 and 5996, which comprise Arp 72
Above, a 3.6 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5994 and 5996
Below, the same image, digitally stretched to show the fainter regions of the larger galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxies NGC 5994 and 5996, which comprise Arp 72, digitally altered to enhance the fainter portions of the larger galaxy
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxies
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxies NGC 5994 and 5996, which comprise Arp 72; slightly post-processed to hint at the fainter regions

NGC 5997 (= PGC 56044)
Discovered (Mar 25, 1865) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude compact galaxy (type C) in Serpens (RA 15 47 27.6, Dec +08 19 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5997 (= GC 5787, Marth #293, 1860 RA 15 40 41, NPD 81 15) is "extremely faint, most extremely small, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.4? arcmin.

NGC 5998
Discovered (Apr 30, 1786) by
William Herschel
A group of stars in Scorpius (RA 15 49 38.1, Dec -28 34 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5998 (= GC 4140 = WH VII 29, 1860 RA 15 40 56, NPD 118 10.5) is a "cluster, pretty large, pretty rich, stars very small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0 by 1.0? arcmin.

NGC 5999 (= OCL 946)
Discovered (May 8, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 9th-magnitude open cluster (type I3m) in Norma (RA 15 52 08.5, Dec -56 28 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5999 (= GC 4141 = JH 3612, Dunlop 343, 1860 RA 15 41 07, NPD 146 02.7) is a "cluster, large, pretty rich, stars of 12th to 14th magnitude".
Physical Information: A 3 arcmin wide group of stars with no really bright stars, this open cluster is reportedly easy to see visually, but in photographs it is hard to discern against the background of the Milky Way.
Observatorio Antilhue image of region near open cluster NGC 5999
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region near NGC 5999. The catalog position is for the brighter stars at the top of the roughly circular grouping of stars at the center of the image. (Image Credit and Copyright: Daniel Verschatse, Observatorio Antilhue, Chile; used by permission)
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 5900 - 5949) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 5950 - 5999     → (NGC 6000 - 6049)