Celestial Atlas
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Page last updated Mar 14, 2017
Added Dreyer NGC entries
WORKING 6005: Add basic pix, tags

NGC 6000 (= PGC 56145)
Discovered (May 8, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc) in Scorpius (RA 15 49 49.4, Dec -29 23 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6000 (= GC 4142 = JH 3614, 1860 RA 15 41 11, NPD 118 57.3) is "very faint, small, round, suddenly brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 1.6? arcmin
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 6000
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6000
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 6000

NGC 6001 (= PGC 56056)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Corona Borealis (RA 15 47 46.0, Dec +28 38 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6001 (= GC 4143 = WH III 371, 1860 RA 15 42 04, NPD 60 54.9) is "very faint, small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 1.1 arcmin (as measured from the images below).
SDSS image of the region near spiral galaxy NGC 6001, also showing the star that is probably NGC 6002, and PGC 56051, which is sometimes misidentified as NGC 6002
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 6001, also showing NGC 6002 and PGC 56051
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 6001

NGC 6002
Discovered (Apr 20, 1873) by
Lawrence Parsons, 4th Lord Rosse
Probably a 17th magnitude star in Corona Borealis (RA 15 47 44.4, Dec +28 36 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6002 (= GC 5788, 4th Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 15 42 04, NPD 60 56.6) is a "nebula 100 arcsec south of III 371", (WH) III 371 being NGC 6001. The position precesses to RA 15 47 48.6, Dec +28 37 24, but there is nothing there. However, the NGC position contains round-off errors that put it nearly an arcmin northeast of Lord Rosse's position (which was nearly 100 arcsec south of NGC 6001, as stated in Dreyer's description, or more accurately, 97.6 arcsec from that galaxy, at a position angle of 197.3 degrees). There is nothing of note there either, but the faint star listed above lies less than 0.35 arcmin beyond Lord Rosse's position, could certainly have been seen with his 72-inch Leviathan, and is generally considered the best candidate for what Rosse observed. However, several references list the galaxy (PGC 56051) about an arcmin southwest of NGC 6001 as NGC 6002. That is certainly wrong, because both the distance and direction are completely at odds with Lord Rosse's measurements, and such a faint galaxy would almost certainly have been beyond the reach of even his telescope (keeping in mind the fact that in modern photographs extended objects such as galaxies can look as bright or brighter than equally bright stars, but for visual observers stars look much brighter than nebulae, because the extended objects' light, being spread out over a wider area, is too faint for the eye to notice). However, given its frequent misidentification as NGC 6002, PGC 56051 is discussed in the next entry.
SDSS image of region near the star that is probably NGC 6002, also showing NGC 6001, Lord Rosse's position for NGC 6002, the NGC position, and PGC 56051, which is often misidentified as NGC 6002
Above, a 6 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on the star that is probably NGC 6002. Lord Rosse's position is shown by a plus sign just northeast of the star (just above the GC in NGC 6002), the "rounded-off" NGC position by a plus sign in a box, and PGC 56051 is identified by its PGC designation.

PGC 56051 (not =
NGC 6002)
Not an NGC object, but listed here because sometimes misidentified as NGC 6002
A 16th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Corona Borealis (RA 15 47 42.0, Dec +28 37 51)
Historical Identification: See NGC 6002 for a discussion of why PGC 56051 cannot be that NGC object.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 9980 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 56051 is about 465 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 445 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 455 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.45 by 0.1 arcmin, the galaxy is about 60 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 56051, which is often misidentied as NGC 6002
Above, a 0.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 56051; for a wider view, see NGC 6001

NGC 6003 (= PGC 56130)
Discovered (Jun 19, 1879) by
Édouard Stephan
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Serpens (RA 15 49 25.6, Dec +19 01 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6003 (Stephan list X (#28), 1860 RA 15 43 10, NPD 70 32.2) is "faint, very small, small star involved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.8? arcmin
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 6003
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 6003
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 6003

NGC 6004 (= PGC 56166)
Discovered (Jun 14, 1879) by
Édouard Stephan
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc) in Serpens (RA 15 50 22.8, Dec +18 56 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6004 (Stephan list X (#29), 1860 RA 15 44 07, NPD 70 38.1) is "very faint, pretty large, a little extended, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 1.7? arcmin
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 6004
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 6004
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 6004

NGC 6005 (= OCL 945)
Discovered (May 8, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude open cluster (type I1p) in Norma (RA 15 55 47.4, Dec -57 26 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6005 (= GC 4144 = JH 3615, Dunlop 334, 1860 RA 15 44 35, NPD 147 01.0) is a "cluster, pretty small, pretty rich, much compressed, stars of 16th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 5.0? arcmin

NGC 6006 (= PGC 56295)
Discovered (Jun 2, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3) in Serpens (RA 15 53 02.5, Dec +12 00 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6006 (= GC 5789, Marth #294, 1860 RA 15 46 27, NPD 77 35) is "very faint, small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.4? arcmin
SDSS image of region elliptical galaxy near NGC 6006, also showing NGC 6007 and NGC 6009
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 6006, also showing NGC 6007 and 6009
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 6006

NGC 6007 (= PGC 56309)
Discovered (Jun 2, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBcd) in Serpens (RA 15 53 23.2, Dec +11 57 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6007 (= GC 5790, Marth #295, 1860 RA 15 46 46, NPD 77 38) is "faint, pretty large".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.2? arcmin
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 6007, also showing NGC 6006 and NGC 6009
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 6007, also showing NGC 6006 and 6009
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 6007
NGC 6008 (= PGC 56289)
Discovered (Jun 10, 1880) by
Édouard Stephan
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(r)b) in Serpens (RA 15 52 55.9, Dec +21 06 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6008 (Stephan list XI (#19), 1860 RA 15 56 48, NPD 68 28.8) is "very faint, round, pretty large, brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 15 52 56.8, Dec +21 06 03, within the outline of the galaxy, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 4870 km/sec, NGC 6008 is about 225? million light years away. Given that and its 1.4 by 1.3? arcmin apparent size, it is about 90 thousand light years across. Based on their similar distance and direction, NGC 6008 and PGC 56301 may be a physical pair (their difference in radial velocity is less than normal peculiar (non-Hubble expansion) velocities, so the difference in their estimated distances may be real, or illusory).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 6008, also showing PGC 56301
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 6008, also showing PGC 56301
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 6008

PGC 56301 (= "NGC 6008B")
Not an NGC object, but often called NGC 6008B because of its proximity to
NGC 6008
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Serpens (RA 15 53 08.2, Dec +21 04 33)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5120 km/sec, PGC 56301 is about 240 million light years away. Given that and its 0.7 by 0.5 arcmin apparent size, it is about 50 thousand light years across. Based on their similar distance and direction, PGC 56301 and NGC 6008 may be a physical pair (their difference in radial velocity is less than normal peculiar (non-Hubble expansion) velocities, so the apparent difference in distance may be real, or illusory).
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 56301, sometimes called NGC 6008B
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 56301; see NGC 6008 for a wide-field view

NGC 6009 (= PGC 56312)
Discovered (Jun 2, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S) in Serpens (RA 15 53 24.1, Dec +12 03 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6009 (= GC 5791, Marth #296, 1860 RA 15 46 48, NPD 77 31) is "faint, very small, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.2? arcmin
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 6009, also showing NGC 6006 and NGC 6007
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 6009, also showing NGC 6006 and 6007
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 6009

NGC 6010 (= PGC 56337)
Discovered (May 3, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a) in Serpens (RA 15 54 18.9, Dec +00 32 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6010 (= GC 4145 = JH 1939 = WH II 583, 1860 RA 15 47 10, NPD 89 02.3) is "pretty faint, small, extended 90°±, gradually brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0 by 0.5? arcmin
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 6010
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 6010
Below, a 3 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 6010

NGC 6011 (= PGC 56008)
Discovered (Mar 16, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Ursa Minor (RA 15 46 32.4, Dec +72 10 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6011 (= GC 4146 = WH III 313, 1860 RA 15 47 36, NPD 17 24.9) is "very faint, small, extended 90°±, very small star to east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0 by 0.7? arcmin

NGC 6012 (= PGC 56334)
Discovered (Mar 19, 1787) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBab) in Serpens (RA 15 54 13.6, Dec +14 36 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6012 (= GC 4147 = WH II 657, 1860 RA 15 47 49, NPD 75 00.0) is "faint, between 2 bright stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 1.5? arcmin

NGC 6013 (= PGC 56287)
Discovered (Jun 21, 1876) by
Édouard Stephan
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb) in Hercules (RA 15 52 52.9, Dec +40 38 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6013 (= GC 5792, Stephan list VII (#1), 1860 RA 15 47 59, NPD 48 56.3) is "extremely faint, very small, irregularly round, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.8? arcmin

NGC 6014 (=
IC 4586 = PGC 56413)
Discovered (Apr 24, 1830) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 6014)
Discovered (Aug 19, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 4586)
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0(r)?) in Serpens (RA 15 55 57.5, Dec +05 55 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6014 (= GC 4148 = JH 1940, 1860 RA 15 49 04, NPD 83 39.5) is "pretty bright, pretty large, extended".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 2490 km/sec, NGC 6014 is about 115 million light years distant. Given that and its apparent size of 1.7 by 1.6 arcmins, it is about 55 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 6014
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 6014
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 6014

NGC 6015 (= PGC 56219)
Discovered (Jun 2, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Heinrich d'Arrest
Also observed (date?) by William Denning
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Draco (RA 15 51 25.4, Dec +62 18 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6015 (= GC 4149 = WH III 739, 1860 RA 15 49 23, NPD 27 16.0) is "very faint, pretty large, round, very gradually brighter middle (d'Arrest: bright, much extended)". The first IC adds "d'Arrest's description is correct (Denning)".
Physical Information: Apparent size 5.4 by 2.1? arcmin
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 6015
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 6015
Below, a 6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 6015

NGC 6016 (= PGC 56410)
Discovered (Jun 28, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc) in Corona Borealis (RA 15 55 54.9, Dec +26 58 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6016 (= GC 5793, Marth #297, 1860 RA 15 50 04, NPD 62 38) is "very faint, small, extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.5? arcmin
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 6016
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 6016
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 6016

NGC 6017 (= PGC 56475)
Discovered (Apr 24, 1830) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S) in Serpens (RA 15 57 15.4, Dec +05 59 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6017 (= GC 4150 = JH 1941, 1860 RA 15 50 22, NPD 83 35.7) is "a remarkable object, very faint, very small, round, disc gradually then suddenly much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.7? arcmin
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 6017
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 6017
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 6017

NGC 6018 (= PGC 56481)
Discovered (Mar 19, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a) in Serpens (RA 15 57 29.8, Dec +15 52 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6018 (= GC 4151 = JH 1942 = WH III 646, 1860 RA 15 51 05, NPD 73 42.7) is "very faint, small, a little extended, western of 2", the other being NGC 6021.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.7? arcmin
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 6018, also showing NGC 6021
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 6018, also showing NGC 6021
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 6018

NGC 6019 (= PGC 56265)
Discovered (Jun 28, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A 15th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0) in Draco (RA 15 52 09.1, Dec +64 50 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6019 (Swift list IV (#18), 1860 RA 15 51 05, NPD 24 43.7) is "most extremely faint, small, round, very difficult".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.4? arcmin

NGC 6020 (=
IC 1148 = PGC 56467)
Discovered (May 9, 1866) by Truman Safford (and later listed as NGC 6020)
Discovered (date?) by Édouard Stephan (and later listed as NGC 6020)
Discovered (May 9, 1866) by Truman Safford (and later listed as IC 1148)
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3) in Serpens (RA 15 57 08.1, Dec +22 24 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6020 (= GC 5794, Stephan list VII (#??), (Safford #10), 1860 RA 15 51 05, NPD 67 11.2) is "extremely faint, extremely small, irregularly round, a little brighter middle".
Discovery Notes: An odd duplication caused by Dreyer not noticing Safford's observations until after finishing the NGC. As a result, the original entry for NGC 6020 lists another observer and different data; but there is no doubt that Safford's observation was of the same object at an earlier date, hence his being credited with a double discovery on the basis of a single observation.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.0? arcmin.

NGC 6021 (= PGC 56482)
Discovered (Mar 21, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E4) in Serpens (RA 15 57 30.7, Dec +15 57 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6021 (= GC 4152 = JH 1943 = WH III 73, 1860 RA 15 51 07, NPD 73 37.7) is "extremely faint, very small, a little extended, eastern of 2", the other being NGC 6018.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.8? arcmin
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 6021, also showing lenticular galaxy NGC 6018
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 6021, also showing NGC 6018
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 6021

NGC 6022 (= PGC 56495)
Discovered (May 19, 1881) by
Édouard Stephan
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc) in Serpens (RA 15 57 47.9, Dec +16 16 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6022 (Stephan list XII (#76), 1860 RA 15 51 25, NPD 73 18.7) is "extremely faint, extremely small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.5? arcmin

NGC 6023 (= PGC 56492)
Discovered (May 19, 1881) by
Édouard Stephan
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3) in Serpens (RA 15 57 49.5, Dec +16 18 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6023 (Stephan list XII (#77), 1860 RA 15 51 28, NPD 73 17.0) is "faint, small, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.0? arcmin

NGC 6024 (= PGC 56294)
Discovered (Jun 28, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S) in Draco (RA 15 53 07.8, Dec +64 55 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6024 (Swift list IV (#19), 1860 RA 15 51 50, NPD 24 40.0) is "pretty faint, pretty small, round, brighter middle, star close".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.6? arcmin

NGC 6025 (= OCL 939)
Discovered (1751) by
Nicolas Lacaille
Also observed (date?) by James Dunlop
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 5th-magnitude open cluster (type II2p) in Triangulum Australe (RA 16 03 17.7, Dec -60 25 53)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6025 (= GC 4153 = JH 3616, Lacaille III 10, Dunlop 304, 1860 RA 15 51 51, NPD 150 06.0) is a "cluster, bright, very large, pretty rich, a little compressed, stars from 7th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 15? arcmin

NGC 6026
Discovered (Jun 8, 1837) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude planetary nebula in Lupus (RA 16 01 21.0, Dec -34 32 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6026 (= GC 4154 = JH 3617, 1860 RA 15 52 19, NPD 124 08.6) is "faint, small, round, gradually pretty much brighter middle, triangle of stars to northwest".
Physical Information: As is usual for such nebulae, the central star is a white dwarf; but in this case it is also a close binary, with a red giant companion. As a result of the orbital motion of the pair, the system varies in brightness over a period of 0.528 days, which would normally correspond to an identical orbital period; but spectroscopic studies show that the actual orbital period is twice as long. The difference is interpreted as being due to the larger star having expanded until it fills its Roche lobe (the point at which any further expansion would result in material being torn away by the other star), and as a result, having an ellipsoidal shape which alters the brightness of the system according to how the ellipsoid is turned relative to our line of sight. The apparent size of the nebula is 0.9 by 0.6 arcmin; apparently nothing else is available.
DSS image of region near planetary nebula NGC 6026
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6026
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the planetary nebula
DSS image of planetary nebula NGC 6026

NGC 6027, Seyfert's Sextet
Discovered (Mar 20, 1882) by
Édouard Stephan
A compact group of galaxies in Serpens
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6027 (Stephan list XII (#78), 1860 RA 15 53 03, NPD 68 49.8) is "extremely faint, very faint star involved, 2 very faint stars near".
Physical Information: NGC 6027, or "Seyfert's Sextet", is a compact group of four galaxies, a part torn from one of them as a result of their gravitational interaction, and a background galaxy. When noted by Carl Seyfert in 1951, it was the most compact group of galaxies discovered to date. The individual galaxies range from 25 to 50 thousand light years across, and the whole group occupies a region only about the size of our Milky Way galaxy. The four interacting galaxies and their distorted extensions have recessional velocities ranging from 4015 to 4480 km/sec, which corresponds to a distance of about 200 million light years. The background galaxy (NGC 6027d in the listing below) has a recessional velocity of 19815 km/sec, which corresponds to a distance of 850 million light years (see its separate listing for more about that). In the labeled image below and the discussion of individual galaxies which follow this listing, the labels correspond to those used by Seyfert; but various references use different listings, so "A" in one list may not correspond to "A" in another, and in fact normally does not. As a result, alternative listings such as their PGC designations are the only way to be sure which galaxy is being discussed, and it is quite possible that the confusion in identification with even those listings (as noted in the individual entries below) may mean that data thought to belong to one member of the Sextet may actually be for another member. It is believed that over a period of several billion years, the interacting members of NGC 6027 will collide with each other over and over, until they finally merge into a single galaxy.
SDSS image of region near NGC 6027, also known as Seyfert's Sextet
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 6027, also known as Seyfert's Sextet
Below, a 2 arcmin wide image of the group (Image Credit ESA, HST, NASA)
HST image of NGC 6027, also known as Seyfert's Sextet
Below, a labeled version of the image above (using Seyfert's original labels)
Labeled HST image of NGC 6027, also known as Seyfert's Sextet, using Seyfert's original labels
Below, a version of the image above using PGC designations as labels
Labeled HST image of NGC 6027, also known as Seyfert's Sextet, using PGC designations

NGC 6027 (= PGC 56579), part of Seyfert's Sextet
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0 pec) in Serpens (RA 15 59 12.5, Dec +20 45 48)
Physical Information: Listed in NED as NED01 (but mis-listed as PGC 56575). NGC 6027 has a recessional velocity of 4445 km/sec, which corresponds to 205 million light years. However, based on its obvious interaction with its companions, it must share their common distance of about 200 million light years. Given that and its 0.4 by 0.2 arcmin apparent size, it is about 25 thousand light years across.
HST closeup of lenticular galaxy PGC 56579 (= NGC 6027), a member of Seyfert's Sextet
Above, a closeup of NGC 6027 (= PGC 56579); see NGC 6027 for wider-field images and credits

PGC 56576 (= "NGC 6027a"), part of Seyfert's Sextet
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa pec) in Serpens (RA 15 59 11.1, Dec +20 45 17)
Physical Information: Listed in NED as NED02. NGC 6027a has a recessional velocity of 4560 km/sec, which corresponds to 210 million light years. However, based on its obvious interaction with its companions, it must share their common distance of about 200 million light years. Given that and its 0.5 by 0.4 arcmin apparent size, it is about 30 thousand light years across.
HST closeup of spiral galaxy PGC 56576 (= NGC 6027a), a member of Seyfert's Sextet
Above, a closeup of NGC 6027a (= PGC 56576); see NGC 6027 for wider-field images and credits

PGC 56575 (= "NGC 6027b"), part of Seyfert's Sextet
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a pec) in Serpens (RA 15 59 10.8, Dec +20 45 44)
Physical Information: Listed in NED as NED03 (but mis-listed as PGC 56584). NGC 6027b has a recessional velocity of 4055 km/sec, which corresponds to 190 million light years. However, based on its obvious interaction with its companions, it must share their common distance of about 200 million light years. Given that and its 0.4 by 0.2 arcmin apparent size, it is about 25 thousand light years across.
HST closeup of lenticular galaxy PGC 56575 (= NGC 6027b), a member of Seyfert's Sextet
Above, a closeup of NGC 6027b (= PGC 56575); see NGC 6027 for wider-field images and credits

PGC 56578 (= "NGC 6027c"), part of Seyfert's Sextet
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(s)c? edge-on) in Serpens (RA 15 59 11.8, Dec +20 44 49)
Physical Information: Listed in NED as NED04. NGC 6027c has a recessional velocity of 4620 km/sec, which corresponds to 215 million light years. However, based on its obvious interaction with its companions, it must share their common distance of about 200 million light years. Given that and its 0.9 by 0.2 arcmin apparent size, it is about 50 thousand light years across.
HST closeup of spiral galaxy PGC 56578 (=NGC 6027c), a member of Seyfert's Sextet
Above, a closeup of NGC 6027c (= PGC 56578); see NGC 6027 for wider-field images and credits

PGC 56580 (= "NGC 6027d"), part of Seyfert's Sextet
A 16th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(s)bc pec) in Serpens (RA 15 59 12.9, Dec +20 45 36)
Physical Information: Listed in NED as NED05. Based on a recessional velocity of 19810 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates a distance for NGC 6027d of about 925 million light years. However, for objects at that distance, we must take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took the galaxy's light to reach us. Doing that shows that NGC 6027d was about 850 million light years away when the light by which we see it was emitted, about 880 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during that interval). Given that and its 0.2 by 0.2 arcmin apparent size, NGC 6027d is about 50 thousand light years across. Unlike the other members of Seyfert's Sextet, NGC 6027d is not a member of the compact group of interacting galaxies; instead, as indicated by its estimated distance, it is a background galaxy over four times more distant than its apparent companions.
HST closeup of spiral galaxy PGC 56580 (= NGC 6027d), an apparent member of Seyfert's Sextet
Above, a closeup of NGC 6027d (= PGC 56580); see NGC 6027 for wider-field images and credits

PGC 56584 (= "NGC 6027e"), part of Seyfert's Sextet
A 16th-magnitude galaxy (type S0?) or galaxy extension in Serpens (RA 15 59 14.5, Dec +20 45 57)
Physical Information: Listed in NED as NED06 (but mis-listed as PGC 56579). Based on a recessional velocity of 4095 km/sec, which corresponds to about 190 million light years. However, based on its obvious interaction with its companions, it must share their common distance of about 200 million light years (in fact, it may not be a separate galaxy but simply a part of NGC 6027 that was torn away by a recent collision). Given that and its 0.8 by 0.4 arcmin apparent size, it is about 45 thousand light years across.
HST closeup of galaxy (or galaxy extension) PGC 56584 (= NGC 6027e), part of Seyfert's Sextet
Above, a closeup of PGC 56584 (= NGC 6027e); see NGC 6027 for wider-field images and credits

NGC 6028 (=
NGC 6046 = PGC 56716)
Discovered (Mar 14, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 6046)
Discovered (May 4, 1886) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as NGC 6028)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a) in Hercules (RA 16 01 29.1, Dec +19 21 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6028 (Bigourdan (list II #76), 1860 RA 15 55 20, NPD 70 14) is "very faint, pretty small, no nucleus".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.1? arcmin

NGC 6029 (= PGC 56756)
Discovered (Jun 2, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 15th-magnitude compact galaxy (type C) in Serpens (RA 16 01 58.8, Dec +12 34 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6029 (= GC 5795, Marth #298, 1860 RA 15 55 24, NPD 77 01) is "very faint, very small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.7? arcmin

NGC 6030 (= PGC 56750)
Discovered (Jun 17, 1884) by
Édouard Stephan
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Hercules (RA 16 01 51.3, Dec +17 57 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6030 (Stephan list XIII (#84), 1860 RA 15 55 35, NPD 71 39.0) is "pretty faint, very small, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.8? arcmin

NGC 6031 (= OCL 951)
Discovered (Jul 28, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 9th-magnitude open cluster (type I2p) in Norma (RA 16 07 34.4, Dec -54 01 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6031 (= GC 4155 = JH 3618, Dunlop 359, 1860 RA 15 56 43, NPD 143 38.5) is a "cluster, small, much compressed, stars from 11th to 14th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0? arcmin

NGC 6032 (= PGC 56842)
Discovered (Jun 9, 1880) by
Édouard Stephan
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb) in Hercules (RA 16 03 01.1, Dec +20 57 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6032 (Stephan list XI (11c#1), 1860 RA 15 56 54, NPD 68 39.1) is "very faint, pretty large, a little extended, very little brighter middle, northwestern of 2", the other being NGC 6035.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.7? arcmin.

NGC 6033 (= PGC 56941)
Discovered (Jul 23, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc) in Serpens (RA 16 04 27.9, Dec -02 07 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6033 (= GC 5796, Marth #299, 1860 RA 15 57 09, NPD 91 44) is a "very faint nebulous star".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 1.0? arcmin

NGC 6034 (= PGC 56877)
Discovered (Jun 19, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2) in Hercules (RA 16 03 32.0, Dec +17 11 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6034 (Swift list IV (#20), 1860 RA 15 57 10, NPD 72 23.3) is "most extremely faint, very small, round, very difficult".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.8? arcmin

NGC 6035 (= PGC 56864)
Discovered (Jun 9, 1880) by
Édouard Stephan
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc) in Hercules (RA 16 03 24.1, Dec +20 53 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6035 (Stephan list XI (11c#2), 1860 RA 15 57 17, NPD 68 43.1) is "very faint, pretty large, a little extended, southeastern of 2", the other being NGC 6032.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.9? arcmin.

NGC 6036 (= PGC 56950)
Discovered (Jul 23, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a) in Serpens (RA 16 04 30.7, Dec +03 52 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6036 (= GC 5797, Marth #300, 1860 RA 15 57 31, NPD 85 45) is "very faint, very small, round, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.4? arcmin

NGC 6037 (= PGC 56947)
Discovered (Jul 23, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab) in Serpens (RA 16 04 29.8, Dec +03 48 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6037 (= GC 5798, Marth #301, 1860 RA 15 57 32, NPD 85 49) is "very faint, small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.6? arcmin

NGC 6038 (= PGC 56812)
Discovered (Mar 17, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Corona Borealis (RA 16 02 40.4, Dec +37 21 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6038 (= GC 4156 = JH 1944 = WH III 622, 1860 RA 15 57 35, NPD 52 15.6) is "very faint, small, round, 10th magnitude star to southeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 1.1? arcmin

NGC 6039 (=
NGC 6042 = PGC 56972)
Discovered (Jun 27, 1870) by Édouard Stephan (and later listed as NGC 6042)
Discovered (Jun 27, 1886) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 6039)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Hercules (RA 16 04 39.5, Dec +17 42 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6039 (Swift list IV (#21), 1860 RA 15 58 08, NPD 71 55.2) is "most extremely faint, very small, round, southwestern of 3 in line", the others being NGC 6040 and 6041 (though the direction is wrong, as discussed in the Discovery Note below).
Discovery Notes: Swift's original paper says "southwestern of 3 in a line; the other 2 being 2 of Stephan's; 3rd of 10". This could only be true if Swift's IV-21 was the galaxy to the southeast of NGC 6040 and 6041 (namely NGC 6042), and Swift's statement that it was the 3rd of 10 means he knew it was to the east of Stephan's objects, so he must have meant to say that it was the southeastern of 3, and thanks to a poor right ascension Dreyer couldn't catch the error.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.7? arcmin. Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type E+1 (gE).
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 6039, also showing NGC 6041
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 6039, also showing NGC 6041 (which see for wider images)

NGC 6040 (= PGC 56932)
Discovered (Jun 27, 1870) by
Édouard Stephan
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)c) in Hercules (RA 16 04 26.7, Dec +17 45 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6040 (= GC 5799, Stephan list I (#1), 1860 RA 15 58 09, NPD 71 51.9) is "very faint, extremely small, faint star close". The position precesses to RA 16 04 26.7, Dec +17 44 57, practically dead center on the galaxy listed above and the description fits (with the 'faint star close' perhaps being the galaxy to the south), so the identification is certain. The galaxy to the south, PGC 56942, is often misdesignated "NGC 6040B", and some references list NGC 6040 as a double galaxy; but since Stephan's position falls exactly on the more northerly galaxy it is unlikely that he thought whatever might lie to the south had anything to do with his I-1, and PGC 56942 is almost certainly not an NGC object.
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.5 by 0.4 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 6040 and PGC 56942 (also known as NGC 6040B), also showing IC 1170, NGC 6041 and NGC 6039
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 6040, also showing IC 1170, NGC 6041 and 6039
(PGC 56942 is also labeled, since it is often called "NGC 6040B")
Below, a 2 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 6040 and PGC 56942
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 6040A and lenticular galaxy PGC 56942 (also known as NGC 6040B)

PGC 56942 (= "NGC 6040B")
Not an NGC object but listed here since often called NGC 6040B
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SA0+ pec) in
Hercules (RA 16 04 26.5, Dec +17 44 31)
Historical Identification: As discussed in the entry for NGC 6040, some references treat PGC 56942 as part of the NGC object; but it is very unlikely that it had anything to do with Stephan's observation, and is treated as merely another 'apparent companion' in this catalog.
Physical Information: Apparent size about 0.95 by 0.95 arcmin (from the images at NGC 6040)

NGC 6041 (= PGC 56962)
Discovered (Jun 27, 1870) by
Édouard Stephan
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Hercules (RA 16 04 35.8, Dec +17 43 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6042 (= GC 5801, Stephan list I (#2), 1860 RA 15 58 22, NPD 71 54.8) is "very faint, very small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.1 arcmin. Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type E+2 (gE).
Unlabeled SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 6041, also showing NGC 6039, IC 1170 and PGC 56960 (sometimes called NGC 6041B), NGC 6040 and PGC 56942 (sometimes called NGC 6040B)
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 6041, without labels to reduce clutter
Below, the same view as above but with labels
Galaxies shown are NGC 6040 and PGC 56942, NGC 6041 and PGC 56960, NGC 6039 and IC 1170
Labeled SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 6041, also showing NGC 6039, IC 1170 and PGC 56960 (sometimes called NGC 6041B), NGC 6040 and PGC 56942 (sometimes called NGC 6040B)
Below, a 6 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 6041, showing the same galaxies as above
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 6041, also showing NGC 6039, IC 1170 and PGC 56960 (sometimes called NGC 6041B), NGC 6040 and PGC 56942 (sometimes called NGC 6040B)
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 6041, also showing NGC 6039, IC 1170 and PGC 56960
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 6041, also showing lenticular galaxies NGC 6039, IC 1170 and PGC 56960 (sometimes called NGC 6041B)

PGC 56960 (= "NGC 6041B")
Not an NGC object, but often called NGC 6041B because a close companion of
NGC 6041
A 16th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Hercules (RA 16 04 35.0, Dec +17 43 02)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.3? arcmin

NGC 6042 (=
NGC 6039 = PGC 56972)
Discovered (Jun 27, 1870) by Édouard Stephan (and later listed as NGC 6042)
Discovered (Jun 27, 1886) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 6039)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Hercules (RA 16 04 39.5, Dec +17 42 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6042 (= GC 5801, Stephan list I (#3), 1860 RA 15 58 22, NPD 71 54.8) is "very faint, very small".
Physical Information: Given the duplicate listing, see NGC 6039 for anything else.

NGC 6043 (= PGC 57019)
Discovered (Jun 27, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
Also observed by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0??) in Hercules (RA 16 05 01.5, Dec +17 46 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6043 (Swift list IV (#22), 1860 RA 15 58 31, NPD 71 49.7) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, a little extended, '4th of 10'", being the next after NGC 6040, 6041 and 6039. The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Bigourdan) of 15 58 43.
Physical Information: A member of the Hercules Cluster of galaxies. Apparent size 0.8 by 0.4 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 6043, showing many other Hercules Cluster galaxies
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 6043, showing numerous Hercules Cluster galaxies
Below, a partially labeled version of the image above showing numerous NGC objects
Labeled SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 6043, showing several other members of the Hercules Cluster of galaxies, including NGC 6041, NGC 6039, NGC 6044, NGC 6045, NGC 6047 and NGC 6050
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 6043 and its companion, PGC 1541265
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 6043 and PGC 1541265, which is also known as NGC 6043B

PGC 1541265 (= "NGC 6043B")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 6043B
A magnitude 15.2 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in
Hercules (RA 16 05 00.7, Dec +17 46 24)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.2 by 0.05 arcmin. Recessional velocity (Vr 9290 km/sec, z 0.030981) similar to that of NGC 6043 (which see for images), so certainly in the same region (namely, the Hercules Cluster of galaxies), but not necessarily a close physical companion, the number of galaxies in the cluster being so large that some accidental "pairings" are inevitable.

NGC 6044 (=
IC 1172 = PGC 57015)
Discovered (Jun 27, 1886) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 6044)
Discovered (Jun 8, 1888) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 1172)
A magnitude 14.3 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Hercules (RA 16 04 59.6, Dec +17 52 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6044 (Swift list IV (#23), 1860 RA 15 58 33, NPD 71 43.7) is "most extremely faint, very small, round, very faint star close to west". Noted in Swift's paper as "5th of 10" after NGC 6040, 6041, 6039 and 6043.<
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.6? arcmin. Part of the Hercules Cluster of galaxies (for now, see NGC 6043 for an image)

WORKING HERE: Need relativistic correction for Hubble distance

NGC 6045 (= PGC 57031, and with
PGC 84720 = Arp 71)
Discovered (Jun 27, 1886) by Lewis Swift
Also observed by Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)c?) in Hercules (RA 16 05 08.0, Dec +17 45 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6045 (Swift list IV (#24), 1860 RA 15 58 38, NPD 71 50.7) is "most extremely faint, very small, round, very difficult". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Bigourdan) of 15 58 49. Noted in Swift's paper as "6th of 10" after NGC 6040, 6041, 6039, 6043 and 6044.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 9985 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that NGC 6045 is about 465 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 465 to 485 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 1.3 by 0.3 arcmin, it is about 175 thousand light years across. As noted below, the apparent companion (PGC 84720) which led to its listing as Arp 71 is almost certainly a co-member of the Hercules Cluster, but may not actually be close enough to the larger galaxy to be physically interacting with it, and simply a slightly foreground object.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 6045 and its apparent companion, lenticular galaxy PGC 84720, which comprise Arp 71; also shown are several other members of the Hercules Cluster of galaxies
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 6045, showing numerous Hercules Cluster galaxies
(More fully labeled version of image above be to posted later; for now, see NGC 6043)
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy, PGC 84720 and SDSS J160508.8+174545
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 6045 and its apparent companion, lenticular galaxy PGC 84720, which comprise Arp 71; also shown is SDSS J160508.8+174545, which is sometimes called NGC 6045C

WORKING HERE: Need relativistic correction for Hubble distance

PGC 84720 (= "NGC 6045B", and with
NGC 6045 = Arp 71)
Not an NGC object, but sometimes called NGC 6045B because of its apparent proximity to NGC 6045
A 16th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Hercules (RA 16 05 10.4, Dec +17 45 30)
Physical Information: The 9350 km/sec recessional velocity of PGC 84720 is nearly 700 km/sec less than for NGC 6045, which corresponds to a separation of 30 million light years. This means they are probably both members of the Hercules Cluster, but the smaller galaxy may be a foreground object, rather than a companion. In either case, PGC 84720's nearly 450 million light year distance and apparent size of 0.4 by 0.05 arcmin corresponds to ? thousand light years.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 84720, also known as NGC 6045B, and part of NGC 6045, with which it comprises Arp 71
Above, a 0.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 84720
Also shown is part of NGC 6045, which see for wider images

SDSS J160508.8+174545 (= "NGC 6045C")
Not an NGC object, but listed here since sometimes called NGC 6045C due to its proximity to
NGC 6045
A magnitude 18(?) galaxy (type Irr?) in Hercules (RA 16 05 08.8, Dec +17 45 45)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.12 by 0.12 arcmin; apparently nothing else available. As a result, whether it has any relationship to NGC 6045 or is merely in nearly the same direction is unknown.
SDSS image of galaxy J160508.8+174545, also known as NGC 6045C
Above, a 0.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of SDSS J160508.8+174545
Also shown is part of NGC 6045, which see for a wider-field image

NGC 6046 (=
NGC 6028 = PGC 56716)
Discovered (Mar 14, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 6046)
Discovered (May 4, 1886) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as NGC 6028)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a) in Hercules (RA 16 01 29.1, Dec +19 21 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6046 (= GC 4157 = WH III 33, 1860 RA 15 58 43, NPD 70 16.2) is "extremely faint, pretty large, partly verified".
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 6028 for anything else.

NGC 6047 (= PGC 57033)
Discovered (Jun 27, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3) in Hercules (RA 16 05 09.0, Dec +17 43 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6047 (Swift list IV (#25), 1860 RA 15 58 43, NPD 71 53.2) is "extremely faint, round, pretty small, faint star close to north". Noted in Swift's paper as "7th of 10" after NGC 6040, 6041, 6039, 6043, 6044 and 6045.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.8? arcmin. A member of the Hercules Cluster.
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 6047, also showing numerous Hercules Cluster galaxies
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 6047, showing many Hercules Cluster galaxies
(A labeled version of the image above to be posted later; for now, see NGC 6043)
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 6047

NGC 6048 (= PGC 56484)
Discovered (May 6, 1791) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2) in Ursa Minor (RA 15 57 30.2, Dec +70 41 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6048 (= GC 4158 = WH II 873, 1860 RA 15 58 44, NPD 18 55.1) is "faint, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.2 by 1.7? arcmin

NGC 6049 (= HD 144426)
Recorded (Apr 24, 1830) by
John Herschel
A 6th-magnitude star in Serpens (RA 16 05 37.8, Dec +08 05 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6049 (= GC 4159 = JH 1945, 1860 RA 15 58 51, NPD 81 31.3) is a "7th magnitude star in photosphere". Presumably glare from the star was mistakenly interpreted as a nebulous envelope.
SDSS image of HD 144426, also cataloged as NGC 6049
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 6049
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 5950 - 5999) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 6000 - 6049     → (NGC 6050 - 6099)