Celestial Atlas
(NGC 6050 - 6099) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 6100 - 6149 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 6150 - 6199)
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Page last updated Jun 25, 2018
Checked updated Corwin positions, updated Steinicke databases, other historical papers
Cross-checked traditional dates vs suggested updates
WORKING: Analyzing NGC 6125 = WH II 810 & NGC 6130 (probably NOT II 810)
NEXT: Re-check Dreyer NGC entries, cross-check PGC IDs

NGC 6100 (= PGC 57706)
Discovered (Jul 3, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type (R)SAB(r)a?) in Serpens (RA 16 16 52.4, Dec +00 50 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6100 (Swift list IV (#28), 1860 RA 16 09 36, NPD 88 46.8) is "most extremely faint, very small, most extremely faint star close to west".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 1.1? arcmin
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 6100
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 6100
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 6100

NGC 6101 (= GCL 40)
Discovered (Jun 1, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (Jun 18, 1835) by John Herschel
A magnitude 9.2 globular cluster (type X) in Apus (RA 16 25 48.3, Dec -72 12 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6101 (= GC 4175 = JH 3623, Dunlop 68, 1860 RA 16 09 54, NPD 161 51.9) is a "globular cluster, pretty faint, large, irregularly round, very gradually brighter middle, partially resolved (some stars seen), stars of 14th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 6? arcmin
DSS image of region near globular cluster NGC 6101
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6101

NGC 6102 (= PGC 57639)
Discovered (Jun 24, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Corona Borealis (RA 16 15 36.9, Dec +28 09 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6102 (= GC 5813, Marth #308, 1860 RA 16 09 57, NPD 61 29) is "very faint, small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.8? arcmin
Corwin lists an apparent companion (PGC 1826595) at RA 16 15 34.2, Dec +28 06 34

NGC 6103 (= PGC 57648)
Discovered (May 27, 1791) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 29, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Corona Borealis (RA 16 15 44.6, Dec +31 57 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6103 (= GC 4176 = JH 1950 = WH III 888, 1860 RA 16 10 18, NPD 57 41.1) is "very faint, small, round, very gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.5? arcmin

NGC 6104 (= PGC 57684)
Discovered (May 16, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 9, 1826) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Corona Borealis (RA 16 16 30.7, Dec +35 42 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6104 (= GC 4177 = JH 1951 = WH III 688, 1860 RA 16 11 22, NPD 53 56.3) is "very faint, small, irregularly round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.7? arcmin

NGC 6105 (= PGC 57716)
Discovered (Jul 1, 1880) by
Édouard Stephan
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Corona Borealis (RA 16 17 09.3, Dec +34 52 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6105 (Stephan list XI (#3), 1860 RA 16 11 57, NPD 54 46.4) is "faint, small, round, gradually a very little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.4? arcmin
Corwin lists an apparent companion (PGC 2056058) at RA 16 17 12.0, Dec +34 52 58

NGC 6106 (= PGC 57799)
Discovered (Apr 13, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 9, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.2 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Hercules (RA 16 18 47.2, Dec +07 24 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6106 (= GC 4178 = JH 1952 = WH II 151, 1860 RA 16 11 59, NPD 82 15.1) is "faint, pretty large, a little extended, very gradually brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.4 by 1.3? arcmin

NGC 6107 (= PGC 57728)
Discovered (Jul 1, 1880) by
Édouard Stephan
A magnitude 13.8 elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Corona Borealis (RA 16 17 20.1, Dec +34 54 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6107 (Stephan list XI (#4), 1860 RA 16 12 08, NPD 54 45.1) is "faint, very small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 1.1? arcmin

NGC 6108 (= PGC 57734)
Discovered (Jul 10, 1880) by
Édouard Stephan
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type SBab?) in Corona Borealis (RA 16 17 25.6, Dec +35 08 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6108 (Stephan list XI (#5), 1860 RA RA 16 12 14, NPD 54 31.1) is "extremely faint, very small, round, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 1.0? arcmin
Corwin lists an apparent companion (PGC 57737) at RA 16 17 35.6, Dec +35 08 03

NGC 6109 (= PGC 57748)
Discovered (Jul 7, 1880) by
Édouard Stephan
A magnitude 12.7 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Corona Borealis (RA 16 17 40.5, Dec +35 00 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6109 (Stephan list XI (#6), 1860 RA 16 12 29, NPD 54 39.0) is "faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 1.0? arcmin

NGC 6110 (= PGC 57751)
Discovered (Jul 10, 1880) by
Édouard Stephan
A magnitude 14.8 spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Corona Borealis (RA 16 17 44.0, Dec +35 05 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6110 (Stephan list XI (#7), 1860 RA 16 12 32, NPD 54 34.0) is "extremely faint, very small, round, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.3? arcmin

NGC 6111 (= PGC 57579)
Discovered (May 31, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
Also observed by Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 14.0 elliptical galaxy (type E1? pec) in Draco (RA 16 14 22.2, Dec +63 15 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6111 (Swift list VI (IX #57), 1860 RA 16 12 37, NPD 27 17.7) is "very faint, pretty small, a little extended, double star near to south". The first IC adds "In Swift's list IX the declination for 1890 is given as 63 32.6. It was 62 in the MS. communication sent me in 1887" (which of the two values might be correct not being indicated in the addition). The second IC lists a corrected position (per Bigourdan) of RA 16 13 47, NPD 26 55.
Discovery Notes: This is one of several objects that were in a pre-publication version of Swift's list VI sent to Dreyer in 1887 that were inadvertently omitted from the published list. For most of them Swift corrected the error by adding them to his list IX (as shown by the note Dreyer made about the difference between the NPD in the 1887 note and the published list IX).
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.85 by 0.7? arcmin. Paired with a fainter galaxy (7ZW638 = "PGC 3167969") at RA 16 14 23.4, Dec +63 15 38.
Corwin lists an apparent companion (PGC 57569) at RA 16 14 12.4, Dec +63 16 02

NGC 6112 (= PGC 57762)
Discovered (Jul 7, 1880) by
Édouard Stephan
A magnitude 14.0 elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Corona Borealis (RA 16 18 00.6, Dec +35 06 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6112 (Stephan list XI (#8), 1860 RA 16 12 49, NPD 54 32.7) is "very faint, very small, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.8? arcmin
Corwin lists an apparent companion (PGC 2060285) at RA 16 17 51.2, Dec +35 09 24
and another (SDSS J161750.55+350914.8 = "PGC 4542814") at RA 16 17 50.6, Dec +35 09 15

NGC 6113 (= PC 57807)
Discovered (Jun 19, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 14.1 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Hercules (RA 16 19 10.5, Dec +14 08 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6113 (Swift list VI (IX #59), 1860 RA 16 12 52, NPD 75 30.6) is "very faint, small, round".
Discovery Notes: This is one of several objects that were in a pre-publication version of Swift's list VI sent to Dreyer in 1887 that were inadvertently omitted from the published list. For most of them Swift corrected the error by adding them to his list IX, hence the reference to that list in parentheses.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.4? arcmin
Corwin lists an apparent companion (PGC 57809) at RA 16 19 12.2, Dec +14 09 05
and another (PGC 2800999) at RA 16 19 10.5, Dec +14 04 27

NGC 6114 (= PGC 57784)
Discovered (Jul 10, 1880) by
Édouard Stephan
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Corona Borealis (RA 16 18 23.6, Dec +35 10 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6114 (Stephan list XI (#9), 1860 RA 16 13 14, NPD 54 28.9) is "extremely faint, small, round, gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.6? arcmin

NGC 6115 (= OCL 960)
Discovered (Jun 26, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Jul 8, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 9.8 open cluster (type I2p) in Norma (RA 16 24 26.8, Dec -51 57 12)
Corwin lists a position of RA 16 23 46, Dec -51 55 30
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6115 (= GC 4179 = JH 3625, (Dunlop 379), 1860 RA 16 13 43, NPD 141 36.8) is a "cluster, extremely large, extremely rich".
Discovery Notes: When Dreyer published the NGC, Dunlop's #379 had not been connected with any particular object; but per Cozens, it is now believed that to be NGC 6115, whence the discovery information shown above (and inserted in Dreyer's NGC entry in parentheses).
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.4? arcmin

NGC 6116 (= PGC 57800)
Discovered (Jul 10, 1880) by
Édouard Stephan
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Corona Borealis (RA 16 18 54.6, Dec +35 09 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6116 (Stephan list XI (#10), 1860 RA 16 13 44, NPD 54 30.3) is "very faint, very small, round, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.2 by 0.9? arcmin

NGC 6117 (= PGC 57816)
Discovered (Jul 5, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Corona Borealis (RA 16 19 18.2, Dec +37 05 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6117 (= GC 5814, Marth #309, 1860 RA 16 14 15, NPD 52 35) is "very faint, small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 1.2? arcmin

PGC 57822 (= "NGC 6117B")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 6117B
A magnitude 15.1 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in
Corona Borealis (RA 16 19 21.6, Dec +37 04 09)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.3? arcmin

NGC 6118 (= PGC 57924)
Discovered (Apr 14, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 15, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.7 spiral galaxy (type SA(s)cd?) in Serpens (RA 16 21 48.6, Dec -02 17 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6118 (= GC 4180 = JH 1953 = WH II 402, 1860 RA 16 14 33, NPD 91 56.8) is "very faint, considerably large, considerably extended 45°±, mottled but not resolved". The position precesses to 16 21 49.5, Dec -02 16 54, right on the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 1575 km/sec, NGC 6118 is about 73 million light years away, in perfect agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 62 to 84 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 4.7 by 1.6 arcmin, it is about 100 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 6118 overlaid on a DSS background to fill in missing regions
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS/DSS composite centered on NGC 6118
Below, a 4.5 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit ESO)
ESO image of spiral galaxy NGC 6118
Below, a 2.5 arcmin wide HST/ESO composite of the galaxy (Image Credit as above, and Hubble Legacy Archive)
'Raw' HST image of part of spiral galaxy NGC 6118 overlaid on an ESO image to show the region involved

NGC 6119 (= PGC 57837)
Discovered (Apr 27, 1827) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 15.3 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Corona Borealis (RA 16 19 42.0, Dec +37 48 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6119 (= GC 4181 = JH 1954, 1860 RA 16 14 44, NPD 51 53.0) is "very faint, extremely small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.5? arcmin
(for now, see NGC 6120 for an image)

NGC 6120 (= PGC 57842)
Discovered (Mar 17, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 24, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type Sd? pec) in Corona Borealis (RA 16 19 48.1, Dec +37 46 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6120 (= GC 4182 = JH 1955 = WH III 623, 1860 RA 16 14 51, NPD 51 54.1) is "very faint, very small, round, double star to northeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.7? arcmin
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 6120, also showing NGC 6119 and NGC 6122
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 6120, also showing NGC 6119 and 6122
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 6120

NGC 6121 (=
M4 = GCL 41)
Discovered (1746) by Philippe de Cheseaux
Independently discovered (Apr 13, 1752) by Nicolas Lacaille
Independently discovered (May 8, 1764) by Charles Messier (and recorded as M4)
A magnitude 5.4 globular cluster (type IX) in Scorpius (RA 16 23 35.2, Dec -26 31 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6121 (= GC 4183, Lacaille I 9, M 4, 1860 RA 16 15 04, NPD 116 11.2) is a "cluster, 8 or 10 bright stars in line, with 5 stars, well resolved, clearly consisting of stars".
Discovery Notes: SEDS states that Lacaille observed this cluster on Apr 13, 1752, but Steinicke lists the date as 1751. Also observed by Johann Bode, Caroline Herschel (May 5, 1783), William Herschel (1783), and Admiral William Henry Smyth (April, 1837).
Physical Information: At less than 6000 light years distance, M4 is the closest globular cluster to the Sun. One result of this is that white dwarfs, which are among the faintest stars actually visible in any given region of space, can be imaged in the cluster. By studying the properties of M4's white dwarfs, the age of the cluster can be determined (the oldest white dwarfs presumably being about the same age as the cluster). This yields an age of 12 to 13 billion years, which is almost as old as the Universe, and taking into account the time it would take clusters to form, implies that the stars in M4 are among the oldest known to exist. Apparent size 36? arcmin.
NOAO image of globular cluster NGC 6121, also known as M4
Above, a ? arcmin wide NOAO image of NGC 6121 (Image Credit T2KA/KPNO 0.9-m Telescope, NOAO, AURA, NSF)
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of the cluster
(Image Credit & © Jim Misti, Misti Mountain Observatory; used by permission)
Misti Mountain Observatory image of globular cluster NGC 6121, also known as M4
Below, part of the NOAO image of M4 is shown, with a box indicating the location of the HST image of the cluster at lower left. The box in that image indicates the region shown in even greater detail at lower right, in which the white dwarfs used to determine the age of the cluster are circled. The extreme faintness of the white dwarfs makes most of them hard to see even in the lower right image; and none are visible at all in the other, more normally exposed images. (Image Credits: NOAO image, NOAO/AURA/NSF (as in the image at top); HST image, H. Richer (U. of British Columbia), NASA)
NOAO and HST images of globular cluster NGC 6121, also known as M4
Below, a ? arcmin wide HST image of the core of the cluster (Image Credits: ESA/Hubble/NASA)
HST image of the core of globular cluster NGC 6121, also known as M4

NGC 6122 (= PGC 57858)
Discovered (May 6, 1886) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 14.6 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Corona Borealis (RA 16 20 09.6, Dec +37 47 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6122 (Bigourdan (list II #78), 1860 RA 16 15 10, NPD 51 59) is "very faint, round, no nucleus". The second IC lists a corrected NPD (per Bigourdan) of 51 52.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.3? arcmin.
(for now, see NGC 6120 for an image)

NGC 6123 (= PGC 57729)
Discovered (1885) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.7 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Draco (RA 16 17 19.7, Dec +61 56 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6123 (Swift list II (#40), 1860 RA 16 15 13, NPD 27 43.6) is "pretty faint, very small, extended, star near".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.3? arcmin

NGC 6124 (= OCL 990)
Discovered (1751) by
Nicolas Lacaille
Also observed (May 10, 1826) by James Dunlop
Also observed (Jun 5, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 5.8 open cluster (type II3m) in Scorpius (RA 16 25 16.0, Dec -40 39 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6124 (= GC 4184 = JH 3626, Lacaille I 8, Dunlop 514, 1860 RA 16 16 01, NPD 130 20.1) is "a cluster, bright, large, pretty rich, a little compressed middle, stars from 9th to 11th magnitude".
Physical Information: The central concentration covers less than half a degree, but the overall extent of the cluster is about 40 arcmin.
DSS image of open cluster NGC 6124
Above, a 45 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6124

NGC 6125 (=
NGC 6127 = NGC 6128 = PGC 57812)
Almost certainly discovered (Apr 24, 1789) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 6125)
Discovered (Jun 28, 1886) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 6128)
Discovered (Jul 6, 1886) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 6127)
A magnitude 12.0 elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Draco (RA 16 19 11.5, Dec +57 59 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6125 (= GC 4185 = WH II 810, 1860 RA 16 16 04, NPD 32 02.8) is "pretty faint, pretty small, a little extended". The position precesses to RA 16 18 46.7, Dec +57 36 58, just over 6 arcmin west of PGC 57828, which is usually identified as NGC 6130, and about 22 arcmin nearly due south of PGC 57812, which is usually identified as NGC 6125. In the 1912 publication of all of Herschel's papers Dreyer states that Herschel made a 20 arcmin error in the NPD for WH II 810, thereby placing it only a couple of arcmin south of what later became PGC 57812, and therefore assigned NGC 6125 to that nebula/galaxy; and (per Corwin) it is hard to believe that Herschel could have seen the much fainter PGC 57828, and missed the much brighter PGC 57812, so there is almost universal agreement that Herschel observed the galaxy listed above. However, there are some who prefer to identify WH II 810 as the fainter galaxy listed as NGC 6130, hence the uncertainty about the discovery credit noted at both entries.
Analysis of Herschel's WH II 810: (To Be Added ASAP)
Discovery Notes: Steinicke is among those who assign WH II 810 to NGC 6130, so he lists Swift as the discoverer of NGC 6125, with a date of Jun 28, 1886, and assigns Herschel's observation to NGC 6130.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.4? arcmin
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 6125
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 6125
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 6125
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy

NGC 6126 (= PGC 57908)
Discovered (Jun 19, 1880) by
Édouard Stephan
A magnitude 13.6 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Corona Borealis (RA 16 21 27.9, Dec +36 22 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6126 (Stephan list XII (#83), 1860 RA 16 16 23, NPD 53 17.4) is "faint, very small, round, brighter middle and small nucleus".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 1.0? arcmin

NGC 6127 (=
NGC 6125 = NGC 6128 = PGC 57812)
Almost certainly discovered (Apr 24, 1789) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 6125)
Discovered (Jun 28, 1886) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 6128)
Discovered (Jul 6, 1886) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 6127)
A magnitude 12.0 elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Draco (RA 16 19 11.5, Dec +57 59 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6127 (Swift list IV (#29), 1860 RA 16 16 32, NPD 31 40.6) is "pretty faint, very small, round".
Discovery Notes: Steinicke lists Swift as the discoverer of NGC 6125, with a date of Jun 28, 1886; and assigns Herschel's observation to NGC 6130.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 6125 for anything else.

NGC 6128 (=
NGC 6125 = NGC 6127 = PGC 57812)
Almost certainly discovered (Apr 24, 1789) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 6125)
Discovered (Jun 28, 1886) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 6128)
Discovered (Jul 6, 1886) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 6127)
A magnitude 12.0 elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Draco (RA 16 19 11.5, Dec +57 59 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6128 (Swift list IV (#30), 1860 RA 16 16 38, NPD 31 40.0) is "pretty faint, pretty small, round, brighter middle".
Discovery Notes: Steinicke lists Swift as the discoverer of NGC 6125, with a date of Jun 28, 1886; and assigns Herschel's observation to NGC 6130.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 6125 for anything else.

NGC 6129 (= PGC 57920)
Discovered (May 30, 1791) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 14.0 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Corona Borealis (RA 16 21 43.3, Dec +37 59 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6129 (= GC 4186 = WH III 891, 1860 RA 16 16 46, NPD 51 40.8) is "extremely faint, very small, round, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.8? arcmin
Corwin lists an apparent companion (PGC 57915) at RA 16 21 33.9, Dec +38 00 31

NGC 6130 (= PGC 57828)
Possibly but probably not discovered (Apr 24, 1789) by
William Herschel
Discovered (Jun 28, 1886) by Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Draco (RA 16 19 33.4, Dec +57 36 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6130 (Swift list IV (#31), 1860 RA 16 16 55, NPD 32 02.3) is "pretty faint, pretty large, round, bright star near to west".
Discovery Notes: See the discussion at NGC 6125 for why Herschel's observation of Apr 24, 1789 is sometimes (but probably incorrectly) assigned to NGC 6130.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.7? arcmin

NGC 6131 (= PGC 57927)
Discovered (Jun 15, 1882) by
Édouard Stephan
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Corona Borealis (RA 16 21 52.2, Dec +38 55 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6131 (Stephan list XII (#84), 1860 RA 16 17 00, NPD 50 44.1) is "very faint, pretty large, irregularly round, diffuse".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 1.0? arcmin
Corwin lists an apparent companion (PGC 2140191) at RA 16 21 57.2, Dec +38 56 40

PGC 57932 (= "NGC 6131B")
Not an NGC object, but listed here because sometimes called NGC 6131B
A magnitude 14.5 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in
Corona Borealis (RA 16 22 00.2, Dec +38 54 54)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.2? arcmin

NGC 6132 (=
IC 4602 = PGC 58002)
Discovered (Jul 16, 1876) by Édouard Stephan (and later listed as NGC 6132)
Discovered (Jul 22, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 4602)
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Hercules (RA 16 23 38.8, Dec +11 47 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6132 (= GC 5815, Stephan list VII (#7), 1860 RA 16 17 06, NPD 77 53.1) is "extremely faint, very small, very little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.5? arcmin
Corwin lists an apparent companion (SDSS J162346.79+114423.2 = "PGC 5060399") at RA 16 23 46.8, Dec +11 44 23

NGC 6133
Recorded (Oct 23, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
Three stars in Draco (RA 16 20 17.0, Dec +56 39 07)
Corwin also lists another candidate (PGC 57945) at RA 16 22 37.3, Dec +56 35 16
and yet another (PGC 2543122) at RA 16 17 57.7, Dec +56 38 23
Historical Identification: Pre Dreyer, NGC 6133 (Swift list V (#69), 1860 RA 16 17 20, NPD 32 59.5) is "most extremely faint, small, considerably extended, very difficult".

NGC 6134 (= OCL 968)
Discovered (May 10, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (Jul 5, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 7.2 open cluster (type II3m) in Norma (RA 16 27 47.0, Dec -49 10 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6134 (= GC 4187 = JH 3627, Dunlop 412, 1860 RA 16 17 21, NPD 138 49.5) is "a cluster, considerably large, pretty rich, a little compressed middle, stars from 13th to 15th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 6.0? arcmin

NGC 6135 (= PGC 57580)
Discovered (Jul 9, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 14.2 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Draco (RA 16 14 24.9, Dec +64 58 58)
Corwin lists another candidate (a pair of stars) at RA 16 18 49.6, Dec +64 54 00
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6135 (Swift list IV (#32), 1860 RA 16 17 54, NPD 24 45.6) is "very faint, very small, much extended, 2 stars near".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.3? arcmin

NGC 6136 (= PGC 57892)
Discovered (Jul 6, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 14.8 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Draco (RA 16 20 59.4, Dec +55 58 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6136 (Swift list IV (#33), 1860 RA 16 18 00, NPD 33 41.4) is "most extremely faint, small, round, very difficult".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.3? arcmin

NGC 6137 (= PGC 57966)
Discovered (Mar 17, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 9, 1826) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.4 elliptical galaxy (type E4?) in Corona Borealis (RA 16 23 03.1, Dec +37 55 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6137 (= GC 4188 = JH 1956 = WH III 624, 1860 RA 16 18 04, NPD 51 44.8) is "faint, small, irregularly round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 1.2? arcmin

PGC 57964 (= "NGC 6137B")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 6137B
A magnitude 14.7 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in
Corona Borealis (RA 16 22 59.7, Dec +37 56 57)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.5? arcmin

NGC 6138 (=
NGC 6363 = PGC 60164, not PGC 58070)
Discovered (September, 1872) by Édouard Stephan (and later listed as NGC 6138)
Discovered (Jul 24, 1879) by Édouard Stephan (and later listed as NGC 6363)
A magnitude 13.3 elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Hercules (RA 17 22 40.0, Dec +41 06 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6138 (= GC 5816, Stephan list II (#2), 1860 RA 16 18 09, NPD 48 44.3) is "very faint, very small, round, brighter middle". Stephan made a huge error (a whole hour of right ascension) in converting the telescopic observation of his "list 2 #2" to a fixed place in the sky, presumably (per Corwin) due to a misidentification of the comparison star used to establish the position of the nebula. As noted in the discussion of NGC 218, sometime before 1914 a student assistant at the Marseille Observatory, Emmanuel Esmiol, was given the task of collecting all of Stephan's observations and converting them to the 1900 Equinox. While doing that Esmiol discovered and corrected several errors in Stephan's reductions (that is, the conversion of his raw observations to accurately calculated positions). In the present case Esmiol noted that NGC 6138 was the same object as NGC 6263. Unfortunately that statement was also incorrect, probably due to a typographical error; as noted by Corwin, a recent investigation by Gottlieb and Highe shows that the field around NGC 6263 does not resemble Stephan's description of the region around NGC 6138, but instead matches that around NGC 6363. And of course a decade before Esmiol published his results and a century before the truth of the matter was discovered, neither Stephan nor Dreyer had any way of realizing that NGC 6138 and 6363 were the same, so the double listing was inevitable.
Discovery Note: Since the correct identity of NGC 6138 was unknown for so long, the designation has been incorrectly applied to a completely different galaxy (PGC 58070) for quite some time, and as a result almost any search for NGC 6138 will refer to that galaxy. So although the lower NGC designation would normally be applied to a double listing, to avoid confusion NGC 6363 must be given preference.
Physical Information: For the reasons given above, see NGC 6363 for anything else.

WORKING HERE: Need to use relativistic correction for the Hubble expansion distance below

PGC 58070 (not =
NGC 6138)
Not an NGC object but listed here since (still) misidentified as NGC 6138 in most references
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb? edge-on) in Hercules (RA 16 24 54.1, Dec +41 03 03)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 9955 km/sec, PGC 58070 (incorrectly listed as NGC 6138 in almost every current reference for the reasons discussed in the entry above) is about 460 million light years away, in good agreement with a redshift-independent distance estimate of 445 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 1.2 by 0.25 arcmin, it is about 160 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 58070, usually incorrectly referred to as NGC 6138
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on PGC 58070
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 58070, usually incorrectly referred to as NGC 6138

NGC 6139 (= GCL 43 = "PGC 3517723")
Discovered (May 13, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (Jun 24, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 9.1 globular cluster (type II) in Scorpius (RA 16 27 40.4, Dec -38 50 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6139 (= GC 4189 = JH 3628, Dunlop 536, 1860 RA 16 18 15, NPD 128 31.0) is "bright, pretty large, round, pretty suddenly brighter middle, partially resolved (some stars seen)". The position precesses to RA 16 27 41.9, Dec -38 50 13, on the northeastern rim of the cluster listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain. LEDA lists the object as PGC 3517723 (in an effort to include all NGC objects), but a search of the database for that designation returns no result, hence its being listed in quotes.
Physical Information: NGC 6139 is thought to be about 35000 light years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 8.2 arcmin, it is about 80 to 85 light years across (some references list the size and brightness as considerably less, but that applies only to the core, which is considerably brighter than the outer regions). Like most globular clusters, it is thought to be about 10 billion years old, but a study of its horizontal branch stars indicates that only about a third of them are "first-generation" stars, and two-thirds are "second" or "third-generation" stars; that is, stars formed after the death of older stars scattered heavy elements throughout the interstellar medium inside the cluster.
DSS image of region near globular cluster NGC 6139
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6139
Below, a 9 arcmin wide DSS image of the cluster
DSS image of globular cluster NGC 6139
Below, a 1 by 2 arcmin wide HST image of the core of the cluster (Image Credit ESA/Hubble & NASA)
HST image of most of globular cluster NGC 6139

NGC 6140 (= PGC 57886)
Discovered (Jun 3, 1788) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 11.3 spiral galaxy (type SBc? pec) in Draco (RA 16 20 57.6, Dec +65 23 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6140 (= GC 4190 = WH III 740, 16 18 23, NPD 24 17.6) is "considerably faint, pretty large, irregularly round".
Discovery Notes: The page in Herschel's Catalog II that shows his III 740 has the heading "1787", but a comparison with the previous page shows that is an error, and should read 1788.
Physical Information: Apparent size 6.3 by 4.6? arcmin

NGC 6141 (= SDSSJ162306.41+405129.9 = "PGC 3498497")
Discovered (May 27, 1886) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 14.9 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Hercules (RA 16 23 06.4, Dec +40 51 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6141 (Bigourdan (list II #79), 1860 RA 16 18 24, NPD 48 52) is "very faint, pretty small, no nucleus".
Physical Information: Apparent size of main galaxy 0.3 by 0.15 arcmin, with a more or less round faint halo about 0.75 arcmin across.
Note About the PGC Designation: HyperLEDA used to state that NGC 6141 = PGC 58077, but that galaxy is NGC 6147. The correct NGC 6141 is now listed as PGC 3498497, as shown above; but a search of the database for that designation returns no result, so the PGC designation is shown in quotes.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 6141
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 6141
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 6141

NGC 6142 (= PGC 57984)
Discovered (May 30, 1791) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Corona Borealis (RA 16 23 21.1, Dec +37 15 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6142 (= GC 4191 = WH III 892, 1860 RA 16 18 24, NPD 52 26.8) is "extremely faint, small, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0 by 0.5? arcmin
Corwin lists an apparent companion (PGC 57979) at RA 16 23 17.8, Dec +37 12 56

NGC 6143 (= PGC 57919)
Discovered (Apr 24, 1789) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 13.1 spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Draco (RA 16 21 42.3, Dec +55 05 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6143 (= GC 4192 = WH II 811, 1860 RA 16 18 37, NPD 34 35.1) is "pretty bright, irregularly round, very gradually very little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.9? arcmin

NGC 6144 (= GCL 42, and possibly =
IC 4606)
Discovered (May 22, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 6144)
Also observed (May 13, 1834) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 6144)
Possibly observed (Sep 8, 1887) by William Finlay (and later listed as IC 4606)
A magnitude 9.0 globular cluster (type XI) in Scorpius (RA 16 27 14.5, Dec -26 01 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6144 (= GC 4193 = JH 3629 = WH VI 10, 1860 RA 16 18 43, NPD 115 43.1) is a "cluster, considerably large, much compressed gradually brighter middle, well resolved, clearly consisting of stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 9.0? arcmin
CFHT image of region near globular cluster NGC 6144
Above, a ? arcmin wide CFHT image of the region near NGC 6144
(Image Credits & © Jean-Charles Cuillandre (CFHT), Hawaiian Starlight, CFHT; used by permission)
Below, a 12 arcmin wide CFHT image centered on the cluster; the red glare is from nearby Antares
CFHT image of region near globular cluster NGC 6144
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide HST image of the cluster (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
HST image of globular cluster NGC 6144

NGC 6145 (= PGC 58074)
Discovered (May 12, 1828) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 14.2 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Hercules (RA 16 25 02.4, Dec +40 56 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6145 (= GC 4194 = JH 1957, 1860 RA 16 20 21, NPD 48 44.7) is "faint, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.4? arcmin
(for now, see NGC 6147 for images)

NGC 6146 (= PGC 58080)
Discovered (Mar 18, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 12, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.5 elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Hercules (RA 16 25 10.3, Dec +40 53 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6146 (= GC 4195 = JH 1958 = WH III 638, 1860 RA 16 20 27, NPD 48 46.9) is "considerably faint, very small, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.0? arcmin
(for now, see NGC 6147 for images)

NGC 6147 (= PGC 58077)
Discovered (May 26, 1849) by
George Stoney
A magnitude 15.1 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Hercules (RA 16 25 05.8, Dec +40 55 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6147 (= GC 4196, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 16 20, NPD 48 47±) is "extremely faint, one of 3", the others being NGC 6145 and 6146. Misidentified in LEDA and Wikisky as NGC 6141.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case George Stoney.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.3? arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 6147, often misidentified as NGC 6141, also showing NGC 6145, NGC 6146 and PGC 58078, which is often misidentified as NGC 6147
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered near NGC 6147, also showing NGC 6145 and 6146
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy, also showing NGC 6145 and PGC 58078
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 6147, often misidentified as NGC 6141, also showing spiral galaxies NGC 6145 and PGC 58078, which is often misidentified as NGC 6147

PGC 58078 (not =
NGC 6147)
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes misidentified as NGC 6147
A 16th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Hercules (RA 16 25 01.8, Dec +40 55 16)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.35 by 0.3? arcmin
See NGC 6147 for images.

NGC 6148 (= PGC 58162)
Discovered (Jun 10, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 16.1 spiral galaxy (type SAB?) in Hercules (RA 16 27 04.0, Dec +24 05 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6148 (= GC 5187, Marth #310, 1860 RA 16 20 38, NPD 65 31) is "very faint, small, with stars".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 15375 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that NGC 6148 is about 715 million light years away. However, for objects at this distance we must take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 685 million light years away at the time that the light by which we see it was emitted, about 705 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.45 by 0.25 arcmin, NGC 6148 is about 90 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 6148
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 6148
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 6148

NGC 6149 (= PGC 58183)
Discovered (Apr 3, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.5 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Hercules (RA 16 27 24.2, Dec +19 35 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6149 (Swift list VI (#90), 1860 RA 16 21 09, NPD 70 05.9) is "very faint, pretty small, round, pretty bright star near to south".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.8? arcmin
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 6149
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 6149
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 6149
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 6050 - 6099) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 6100 - 6149     → (NGC 6150 - 6199)