Celestial Atlas
(NGC 6100 - 6149) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 6150 - 6199 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 6200 - 6249)
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6150, 6151, 6152, 6153, 6154, 6155, 6156, 6157, 6158, 6159, 6160, 6161, 6162, 6163, 6164, 6165, 6166,
6167, 6168, 6169, 6170, 6171, 6172, 6173, 6174, 6175, 6176, 6177, 6178, 6179, 6180, 6181, 6182, 6183,
6184, 6185, 6186, 6187, 6188, 6189, 6190, 6191, 6192, 6193, 6194, 6195, 6196, 6197, 6198, 6199

Page last updated Mar 17, 2017
Added Dreyer NGC entries
WORKING 6150: Add/update Steinicke listings/data and check IDs

NGC 6150 (= PGC 58105)
Discovered (Mar 18, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E5??) in Hercules (RA 16 25 49.9, Dec +40 29 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6150 (= GC 4198 = JH 1959 = WH III 639, 1860 RA 16 21 10, NPD 49 13.0) is "very faint, very small, round".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 8720 km/sec, NGC 6150 is about 405 million light years away. (Need to apply relativistic correction to Hubble distance.) Given that and its apparent size of 1.3 by 0.65? arcmin, it is about 150 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 6150
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered near NGC 6150
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy, also showing PGC 58100
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 6150 and spiral galaxy PGC 58100, which is sometimes called NGC 6150B

PGC 58100 (= "NGC 6150B")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 6150B
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in
Hercules (RA 16 25 44.4, Dec +40 28 32)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 9535 km/sec, PGC 58100 is about 445 million light years away. (Need to apply relativistic correction to Hubble distance.) Given that and its apparent size of 0.7 by 0.3 arcmin, it is about 90 thousand light years across. Although peculiar (non-Hubble expansion) velocities could be responsible for the difference in recessional velocity between PGC 58100 and NGC 6150 (which see for images of the pair), their lack of any obvious gravitational interaction suggests that the smaller galaxy truly is a background object, and not physically related to its apparent companion.

NGC 6151
Discovered (Jun 29, 1835) by
John Herschel
A group of stars in Apus (RA 16 38 24.1, Dec -73 15 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6151 (= GC 4199 = JH 3630, 1860 RA 16 21 41, NPD 162 57.0) is "very faint, very small, 9th magnitude star near".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5? arcmin

NGC 6152 (= OCL 961)
Discovered (Jul 8, 1834) by
John Herschel
An 8th-magnitude open cluster (type II2m) in Norma (RA 16 32 45.0, Dec -52 38 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6152 (= GC 4200 = JH 3631, 1860 RA 16 21 50, NPD 142 19.0) is "a cluster, large, a little compressed, stars large".
Physical Information: Apparent size 25? arcmin

NGC 6153
Discovered (May 27, 1883) by
Ralph Copeland
An 11th-magnitude planetary nebula in Scorpius (RA 16 31 30.6, Dec -40 15 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6153 (Copeland, 1860 RA 16 21 54, NPD 129 56) is "a planetary nebula, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4? arcmin.

NGC 6154 (= PGC 58095)
Discovered (May 15, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Hercules (RA 16 25 30.6, Dec +49 50 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6154 (= GC 4201 = WH III 680, 1860 RA 16 22 07, NPD 39 48.8) is "very faint, small, round, a little brighter middle, extremely mottled but not resolved". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Bigourdan) of 16 21 42.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 2.0? arcmin.

NGC 6155 (= PGC 58115)
Discovered (May 12, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Hercules (RA 16 26 08.3, Dec +48 22 03)
Historical Identification:Per Dreyer, NGC 6155 (= GC 4202 = WH II 690, 1860 RA 16 22 35, NPD 41 17.8) is "faint, pretty small, irregular figure, gradually brighter middle". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Bigourdan) of 16 22 11.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.9? arcmin.

NGC 6156 (= PGC 58536)
Discovered (Apr 24, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Triangulum Australe (RA 16 34 52.6, Dec -60 37 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6156 (= GC 4203 = JH 3632, 1860 RA 16 22 36, NPD 150 18.0) is "pretty faint, pretty large, very little extended, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.4? arcmin.

NGC 6157 (= PGC 58101)
Discovered (Jun 28, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Draco (RA 16 25 48.3, Dec +55 21 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6157 (Swift list IV (#34), 1860 RA 16 22 44, NPD 34 19.3) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, round, very difficult".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.5? arcmin.

NGC 6158 (= PGC 58198)
Discovered (Mar 17, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Herman Schultz
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Hercules (RA 16 27 40.9, Dec +39 23 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6158 (= GC 4205 = WH II 647, Schultz, 1860 RA 16 22 52, NPD 50 18.2) is "faint, small, irregular figure".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.6? arcmin.

NGC 6159 (= PGC 58185)
Discovered (Jul 20, 1879) by
Édouard Stephan
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Hercules (RA 16 27 25.1, Dec +42 40 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6159 (Stephan list X (#30), 1860 RA 16 22 54, NPD 47 00.4) is "very faint, small, irregularly round, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.0? arcmin.

NGC 6160 (= PGC 58199)
Discovered (Mar 18, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Hercules (RA 16 27 41.1, Dec +40 55 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6160 (= GC 4204 = JH 1960 = WH II 652, 1860 RA 16 23 01, NPD 48 45.3) is "considerably faint, pretty large, round, gradually brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 1.5? arcmin.

NGC 6161 (= PGC 58235)
Discovered (Jun 30, 1870) by
Édouard Stephan
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Hercules (RA 16 28 20.6, Dec +32 48 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6161 (= GC 5818, Stephan list I (#4), 1860 RA 16 23 02, NPD 56 52.7) is "very faint, small, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.3? arcmin.

NGC 6162 (= PGC 58238)
Discovered (Jun 30, 1870) by
Édouard Stephan
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Hercules (RA 16 28 22.3, Dec +32 50 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6162 (= GC 5819, Stephan list I (#5), 1860 RA 16 23 03, NPD 56 50.3) is "faint, small, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7? arcmin.

NGC 6163 (= PGC 58250)
Discovered (Jun 30, 1870) by
Édouard Stephan
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Hercules (RA 16 28 27.8, Dec +32 50 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6163 (= GC 5820, Stephan list I (#6), 1860 RA 16 23 10, NPD 56 50.5) is "very faint, small, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.3? arcmin.

NGC 6164
Discovered (Jul 1, 1834) by
John Herschel
An emission nebula in Norma (RA 16 33 41.0, Dec -48 04 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6164 (= GC 4206 = JH 3633, 1860 RA 16 23 23, NPD 137 48.0) is "extremely faint (strongly suspected), double star near to east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.3? arcmin.

NGC 6165
Discovered (Jul 1, 1834) by
John Herschel
An emission nebula in Norma (RA 16 34 02.0, Dec -48 09 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6165 (= GC 4207 = JH 3634, 1860 RA 16 23 40, NPD 137 51.3) is "faint, considerably small, a little extended, very gradually a little brighter middle, double star to west".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.5 by 0.5? arcmin.

NGC 6166 (= PGC 58265)
Discovered (May 30, 1791) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Hercules (RA 16 28 38.5, Dec +39 33 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6166 (= GC 4208 = JH 1961 = WH II 875, 1860 RA 16 23 51, NPD 50 08.3) is "pretty faint, small, very little extended, very gradually much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 1.4? arcmin.

PGC 58254 (= "NGC 6166A")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 6166A
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in
Hercules (RA 16 28 31.0, Dec +39 31 16)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.3 by 0.2? arcmin.

PGC 58299 (= "NGC 6166B")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 6166B
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in
Hercules (RA 16 28 53.1, Dec +39 33 39)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.3? arcmin.

PGC 58244 (= "NGC 6166C")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 6166C
A 15th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in
Hercules (RA 16 28 23.2, Dec +39 34 14)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.4? arcmin.

PGC 58262 (= "NGC 6166D")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 6166D
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in
Hercules (RA 16 28 39.1, Dec +39 31 08)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.3? arcmin.

NGC 6167 (= OCL 971)
Discovered (Jun 26, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 7th-magnitude open cluster (type II3m) in Norma (RA 16 34 34.9, Dec -49 46 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6167 (= GC 4209 = JH 3635, Dunlop 400 (& 401), 1860 RA 16 23 51, NPD 139 27.8) is "a cluster, large, a little compressed, irregular figure".
Physical Information: Apparent size 7? arcmin.

NGC 6168 (= PGC 58423)
Discovered (May 21, 1884) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sd?) in Hercules (RA 16 31 21.3, Dec +20 11 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6168 (Swift list I (#46), 1860 RA 16 23 55, NPD 69 31.2) is "most extremely faint, much extended, faint star at western end, very difficult".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.3? arcmin.

NGC 6169 (= OCL 984)
Discovered (Jun 1, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 7th-magnitude open cluster in Norma (RA 16 34 05.0, Dec -44 02 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6169 (= GC 4210 = JH 3636, 1860 RA 16 24 07, NPD 133 44.3) is "a cluster, μ Normae involved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 12? arcmin.

NGC 6170 (=
NGC 6176 = PGC 58188)
Discovered (Jul 9, 1886) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 6170)
Discovered (Oct 1, 1886) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 6176)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Draco (RA 16 27 36.4, Dec +59 33 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6170 (Swift list IV (#35), 1860 RA 16 24 41, NPD 30 07.4) is "most extremely faint, very small, round, very difficult".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.5? arcmin.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 6170, superimposed on a DSS background to fill in missing areas
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS/DSS image centered on NGC 6170
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 6170

NGC 6171 (=
M107 = GCL 44)
Discovered (April, 1782) by Pierre Méchain
Also observed (date?) by William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
Added to Charles Messier's catalog as M107 by Helen Sawyer Hogg in 1947
An 8th-magnitude globular cluster (type X) in Ophiuchus (RA 16 32 31.9, Dec -13 03 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6171 (= GC 4211 = JH 3637 = WH VI 40, Méchain, 1860 RA 16 24 42, NPD 102 44.8) is "a globular cluster, large, very rich, very much compressed, round, well resolved, clearly consisting of stars".
Physical Information: About 50 light years across, and 10 thousand light years away from the Sun. Apparent size 13 arcmin.
ESO image of region near globular cluster NGC 6171, also known as M107
Above, a 24 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 6171 (Image Credit ESO)
Below, a 12 arcmin wide image centered on the globular cluster
(Image Credit & © Jim Misti, Misti Mountain Observatory; used by permission)
Misti Mountain Observatory image of globular cluster NGC 6171, also known as M107
Below, a ? arcmin wide HST image of the core of the cluster (Image Credit HST/NASA/ScSTI)
HST image of core of globular cluster NGC 6171, also known as M107

NGC 6172 (=
IC 1213 = PGC 57937)
Discovered (Jun 21, 1884) by Édouard Stephan (13b-86) (and later listed as NGC 6172)
Discovered (Apr 19, 1890) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 1213)
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Serpens (RA 16 22 10.2, Dec -01 30 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6172 (Stephan list XIII (#86), 1860 RA 16 24 57, NPD 91 11.3) is "very faint, extremely small, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.8? arcmin.

NGC 6173 (= PGC 58348)
Discovered (Mar 18, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Hercules (RA 16 29 45.0, Dec +40 48 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6173 (= GC 4212 = JH 1962 = WH III 640, 1860 RA 16 25 05, NPD 48 52.6) is "considerably faint, very small, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 1.4? arcmin.

NGC 6174 (= PGC 58334)
Discovered (Mar 26, 1849) by
George Stoney
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Hercules (RA 16 29 23.8, Dec +40 52 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6174 (= GC 4213, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 16 25 19, NPD 48 53) is "very faint".
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case George Stoney.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.6? arcmin.

NGC 6175 (= PGC 58362)
Discovered (Mar 18, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A pair of galaxies in Hercules
#1: A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) at RA 16 29 57.4, Dec +40 37 49
#2: A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0?) at RA 16 29 58.0, Dec +40 37 41
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6175 (= GC 4214 = JH 1963 = WH III 641, 1860 RA 16 25 19, NPD 49 03.9) is "very faint, very small, round".
Physical Information: #1: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.8? arcmin. #2: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.6? arcmin.
SDSS image of region near galaxy pair NGC 6175
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 6175
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy pair
SDSS image of galaxy pair NGC 6175

NGC 6176 (=
NGC 6170 = PGC 58188)
Discovered (Jul 9, 1886) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 6170)
Discovered (Oct 1, 1886) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 6176)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Draco (RA 16 27 36.4, Dec +59 33 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6176 (Swift list V (#70), 1860 RA 16 25 28, NPD 30 07.2) is "extremely faint, extremely small, very difficult".
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 6170 for anything else.

NGC 6177 (= PGC 58390)
Discovered (May 28, 1791) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Hercules (RA 16 30 38.8, Dec +35 03 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6177 (= GC 4215 = JH 1964 = WH III 890, 1860 RA 16 25 34, NPD 54 38.0) is "very faint, pretty large, irregularly extended, partially resolved (some stars seen), star near".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.2? arcmin.

NGC 6178 (= OCL 980)
Discovered (Jul 27, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 7th-magnitude open cluster (type I3p) in Scorpius (RA 16 35 50.8, Dec -45 38 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6178 (= GC 4216 = JH 3638, 1860 RA 16 25 36, NPD 135 19.3) is "a cluster, bright, small, stars pretty large".
Physical Information: Apparent size 5.0? arcmin.

NGC 6179 (= PGC 58401)
Discovered (Apr 19, 1855) by
R. J. Mitchell
A 15th-magnitude compact galaxy (type C??) in Hercules (RA 16 30 46.9, Dec +35 06 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6179 (= GC 4217, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 16 25 48, NPD 54 35.2) is "very faint, small, brighter middle and nucleus, 4 arcmin northeast of h 1964", (JH) 1964 being NGC 6177.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case R. J. Mitchell.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.4? arcmin.

NGC 6180 (= PGC 58386)
Discovered (Jun 23, 1876) by
Édouard Stephan
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E?) in Hercules (RA 16 30 33.9, Dec +40 32 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6180 (= GC 5821, Stephan list VII (#8), 1860 RA 16 25 52, NPD 49 09.4) is "extremely faint, very small, round, much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.6? arcmin.

NGC 6181 (= PGC 58470)
Discovered (Apr 28, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Herman Schultz
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Hercules (RA 16 32 20.7, Dec +19 49 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6181 (= GC 4218 = WH II 753, Schultz, 1860 RA 16 26 14, NPD 69 52.4) is "pretty bright, pretty large, very little extended, pretty gradually much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.5 by 1.1? arcmin.

NGC 6182 (= PGC 58338)
Discovered (Apr 24, 1789) by
William Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Draco (RA 16 29 33.9, Dec +55 31 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6182 (= GC 4219 = WH III 813, 1860 RA 16 26 50, NPD 34 09.9) is "very faint, very small, irregularly round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.4? arcmin.

NGC 6183 (= PGC 58785)
Discovered (Apr 25, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Triangulum Australe (RA 16 41 41.8, Dec -69 22 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6183 (= GC 4220 = JH 3639, 1860 RA 16 26 50, NPD 159 04.9) is "very faint, extremely small, round, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 0.6? arcmin.

NGC 6184 (= PGC 58432)
Discovered (Jun 23, 1876) by
Édouard Stephan
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Hercules (RA 16 31 34.4, Dec +40 33 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6184 (= GC 5822, Stephan list VII (#9), 1860 RA 16 26 53, NPD 49 08.0) is "extremely faint, very small, round, very little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.5? arcmin.

NGC 6185 (= PGC 58493)
Discovered (Apr 27, 1827) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Hercules (RA 16 33 17.8, Dec +35 20 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6185 (= GC 4221 = JH 1965, 1860 RA 16 28 15, NPD 54 21.7) is "faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle, 11th magnitude star to northwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.9? arcmin.

NGC 6186 (= PGC 58523)
Discovered (Apr 28, 1788) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Hercules (RA 16 34 25.4, Dec +21 32 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6186 (= GC 4222 = WH III 730, 1860 RA 16 28 19, NPD 68 09.9) is "extremely faint, very small, extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 1.2? arcmin.

NGC 6187 (= PGC 58429)
Discovered (Oct 5, 1883) by
Charles Young
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S??) in Draco (RA 16 31 36.6, Dec +57 42 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6187 (Young, 1860 RA 16 28 58, NPD 31 59.3) is "very faint, very small, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.3? arcmin.

NGC 6188
Discovered (Apr 15, 1836) by
John Herschel
An emission and reflection nebula in Ara (RA 16 40 05.0, Dec -48 39 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6188 (= GC 4223 = JH 3640, 1860 RA 16 29 15, NPD 138 44) is "a remarkable object, faint, very large, very irregularly extended, bright star involved".
Physical Information: NGC 6188 is a 20 by 12 arcmin wide emission and reflection nebula to the west (to the right in the images below) of a very young association of stars (NGC 6193) that is heating and lighting up the eastern (left) side of the nebula. The nebula and cluster are about 4000 light years away, so the half-degree wide images below cover a region about 35 light years across. As can be seen in these wide-field views of NGC 6188 and 6193, most of the clouds of gas and dust in the region are relatively cool and dark. The region being fiercely heated and sculpted by the radiation from the nearby cluster of stars is also referred to as RCW 108.
Composite of ESO and DSS images of nebula NGC 6188 and open cluster NGC 6193
Above, a 30 arcmin wide image centered on NGC 6188, also showing NGC 6193
(Color overlay image credit ESO; monochrome background image credit DSS)
Below, a 29.5 arcmin wide image centered near NGC 6193, also showing NGC 6188 (Image Credit as above)
ESO image of nebula NGC 6188 and open cluster 6193

NGC 6189 (=
NGC 6191 = PGC 58440)
Discovered (Aug 3, 1885) by Lewis Swift (2-41) (and later listed as NGC 6189)
Discovered (Jul 6, 1886) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 6191)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Draco (RA 16 31 40.7, Dec +59 37 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6189 (Swift list II (#41), 1860 RA 16 29 21, NPD 30 05.3) is "very faint, pretty small, a little extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 0.9? arcmin.

NGC 6190 (= PGC 58458)
Discovered (Oct 30, 1883) by
Lewis Swift
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Draco (RA 16 32 06.4, Dec +58 26 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6190 (Swift list II (#42), 1860 RA 16 29 34, NPD 31 15.9) is "very faint, pretty small, round, faint star near".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.3? arcmin.

NGC 6191 (=
NGC 6189 = PGC 58440)
Discovered (Aug 3, 1885) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 6189)
Discovered (Jul 6, 1886) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 6191)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Draco (RA 16 31 40.7, Dec +59 37 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6191 (Swift list IV (#36), 1860 RA 16 29 35, NPD 30 54.3) is "pretty faint, pretty large, extended, 2 stars to west".
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 6189 for anything else.

NGC 6192 (= OCL 988)
Discovered (May 13, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 9th-magnitude open cluster (type I2p) in Scorpius (RA 16 40 20.8, Dec -43 21 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6192 (= GC 4224 = JH 3641, Dunlop 483, 1860 RA 16 30 29, NPD 133 05.3) is "a cluster, pretty large, pretty rich, irregularly round, stars from 11th to 14th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 9? arcmin.

NGC 6193 (= OCL 975)
Discovered (May 14, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 5th-magnitude open cluster (type II3p) in Ara (RA 16 41 20.3, Dec -48 45 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6193 (= GC 4225 = JH 3642, Dunlop 413, 1860 RA 16 30 52, NPD 138 29.1) is "a cluster, very large, a little rich, a little compressed, well resolved, clearly consisting of stars, faint nebula involved".
Physical Information: NGC 6193 is an OB1 association (a group of extremely young stars, at most a few million years old, which therefore includes some extremely hot, bright stars) that is heating and lighting up the gas and dust surrounding it, especially the emission and reflection nebula to the west (to the right in the images below) which is listed as NGC 6188. Most of the radiation heating, sculpting, and compressing the nearby clouds of gas and dust comes from the bright object near the center of the cluster, which is actually a binary star consisting of two extremely massive, extremely bright O-type stars. The cluster and nebula lie about 4000 light years away, so the 12 arcmin image below covers a region about 14 light years across, and the 30 arcmin image covers a region about 35 light years across. As can be seen in the wide-field views of NGC 6193 and 6188, most of the clouds of gas and dust in the region are relatively cool and dark. The region being fiercely heated and sculpted by the radiation from the nearby cluster of stars is also referred to as RCW 108.
Overlay of an ESO image of region near open cluster NGC 6193 and nebula NGC 6188 on a DSS image, to show better detail in otherwise overexposed regions
Above, a 30 arcmin wide image centered on NGC 6193, also showing NGC 6188 (which see)
(Color overlay image credit ESO; monochrome background image credit DSS)
Below, a 12 arcmin wide composite image centered on the cluster
(Combination of the color and monochrome images adjusted to show more detail in otherwise overexposed regions)
Overlay of an ESO image of open cluster NGC 6193 on a DSS image, to show better detail in otherwise overexposed regions

NGC 6194 (= PGC 58598)
Discovered (Apr 27, 1827) by
John Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Herman Schultz
Also observed (date?) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Hercules (RA 16 36 37.0, Dec +36 12 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6194 (= GC 4227 = JH 1967, Schultz, 1860 RA 16 31 35, NPD 53 30.9) is "very faint, very small, suddenly brighter middle equivalent to 12th magnitude star". The first IC adds "Bigourdan 209 assumed identical with this, as the places and descriptions agree perfectly".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.8? arcmin.

NGC 6195 (= PGC 58596)
Discovered (May 30, 1791) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Hercules (RA 16 36 32.6, Dec +39 01 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6195 (= GC 4226 = JH 1966 = WH III 893, 1860 RA 16 31 44, NPD 50 41.5) is "very faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle, between 2 stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 1.1? arcmin.

NGC 6196 (=
IC 4615 = PGC 58644)
Discovered (Jul 9, 1864) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 6196)
Discovered (Aug 28, 1886) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 4615)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Hercules (RA 16 37 53.8, Dc +36 04 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6196 (= GC 5823, Marth #311, 1860 RA 16 32 13, NPD 53 37) is "very faint, very small, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0 by 1.2? arcmin.

NGC 6197 (=
IC 4616 = PGC 58655)
Discovered (Jul 9, 1864) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 6197)
Discovered (Aug 28, 1886) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 4616)
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a?) in Hercules (RA 16 37 59.8, Dec +35 59 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6197 (= GC 5824, Marth #312, 1860 RA 16 32 18, NPD 53 42) is "extremely faint, extended, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.5? arcmin.

NGC 6198 (= PGC 58554)
Discovered (Jun 28, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Draco (RA 16 35 30.6, Dec +57 29 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6198 (Swift list IV (#37), 1860 RA 16 33 08, NPD 32 12.8) is "very faint, very small, round, 2 stars to east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.7? arcmin.
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 6198
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6198
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 6198

NGC 6199
Recorded (Jul 9, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 15th-magnitude star in Hercules (RA 16 39 28.9, Dec +36 03 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6199 (= GC 5825, Marth #313, 1860 RA 16 33 50, NPD 53 38) is "extremely faint".
SDSS image of region centered on the star listed as NGC 6199
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on the star listed as NGC 6199
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 6100 - 6149) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 6150 - 6199     → (NGC 6200 - 6249)