Celestial Atlas
(NGC 6150 - 6199) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 6200 - 6249 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 6250 - 6299)
Click here for Introductory Material
QuickLinks:
6200, 6201, 6202, 6203, 6204, 6205, 6206, 6207, 6208, 6209, 6210, 6211, 6212, 6213, 6214, 6215, 6216,
6217, 6218, 6219, 6220, 6221, 6222, 6223, 6224, 6225, 6226, 6227, 6228, 6229, 6230, 6231, 6232, 6233,
6234, 6235, 6236, 6237, 6238, 6239, 6240, 6241, 6242, 6243, 6244, 6245, 6246, 6247, 6248, 6249

Page last updated Mar 18, 2017
Added Dreyer NGC entries
WORKING: Add/update Steinicke listings, check IDs

NGC 6200 (= OCL 978)
Discovered (Jul 1, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 7th-magnitude open cluster (type III2m) in Ara (RA 16 44 08.6, Dec -47 28 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6200 (= GC 4228 = JH 3643, 1860 RA 16 33 50, NPD 137 11.8) is "a cluster (in Milky Way)".
Physical Information: Apparent size 15? arcmin

NGC 6201 (= PGC 58727)
Discovered (Jun 6, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 15th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Hercules (RA 16 40 14.4, Dec +23 45 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6201 (= GC 5826, Marth #314, 1860 RA 16 34 22, NPD 65 58) is "extremely faint, very small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.3? arcmin

NGC 6202 (=
NGC 6226 = PGC 58847)
Discovered (Sep 24, 1862) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 6226)
Discovered (Jul 9, 1886) by Lewis Swift (4-38) (and later listed as NGC 6202)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?? pec) in Draco (RA 16 43 23.2, Dec +61 59 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6202 (Swift list IV (#38), 1860 RA 16 34 32, NPD 27 45.5) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, star to east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.4? arcmin
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 6202
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6202
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 6202

NGC 6203 (= PGC 58729)
Discovered (Jun 6, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Hercules (RA 16 40 27.3, Dec +23 46 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6203 (= GC 5827, Marth #315, 1860 RA 16 34 34, NPD 65 57) is "extremely faint, very small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.6? arcmin
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 6203, also showing several other members of the Hercules Cluster
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 6203, showing numerous members of the Hercules Cluster
(Labeled version of image above to be posted later)
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 6203

NGC 6204 (= OCL 982)
Discovered (May 13, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
An 8th-magnitude open cluster (type I2p) in Ara (RA 16 46 07.9, Dec -47 00 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6204 (= GC 4229 = JH 3644, Dunlop 442, 1860 RA 16 36 07, NPD 136 45.6) is "a cluster, pretty rich, extremely irregularly compressed middle, stars from 11th to 12th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 6.0? arcmin

NGC 6205 (=
M13 = GCL 45), The Great Globular Cluster in Hercules
Discovered (1714) by Edmund Halley
Recorded (1764) by Charles Messier as M13
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 6th-magnitude globular cluster (type V) in Hercules (RA 16 41 41.5, Dec +36 27 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6205 (= GC 4230 = JH 1968, Halley 1714, M 13, 1860 RA 16 36 40, NPD 53 16.3) is "a very remarkable object, a globular cluster, extremely bright, very rich, very gradually extremely compressed middle, stars from 11th magnitude".
Physical Information: About 22 thousand light years away, M13 contains about a million stars within its 150 light year width. Apparent size 20 arcmin.
NOAO image of globular cluster NGC 6205, also known as M13, and the Globular Cluster in Hercules
Above, a ? arcmin wide image of M13 (Image Credit N.A.Sharp, REU program/AURA/NSF/NOAO)
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of the cluster
(Image Credit & © Jim Misti, Misti Mountain Observatory; used by permission)
Misti Mountain Observatory image of globular cluster NGC 6205, also known as M13, and as the Great Globular Cluster in Hercules
Below, a ? arcmin wide HST image of the core of M13 (Image Credit ESA/Hubble/NASA)
HST image of the core of globular cluster NGC 6205, also known as M13, and as the Great Globular Cluster in Hercules

NGC 6206 (=
IC 1227 = PGC 58723)
Discovered (Oct 23, 1886) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 6206)
Discovered (Aug 13, 1888) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 1227)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Draco (RA 16 40 07.9, Dec +58 37 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6206 (Swift list V (#71), 1860 RA 16 37 25, NPD 31 07.1) is "pretty faint, extremely small, round, stellar, 3 very faint stars near". The second IC adds "Sw 5 = IC 1227, Bigourdan 210"; so the identity of the two entries has been known for more than a century.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.7? arcmin.

NGC 6207 (= PGC 58827)
Discovered (May 16, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Hercules (RA 16 43 03.7, Dec +36 49 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6207 (= GC 4231 = JH 1969 = WH II 701, 1860 RA 16 38 06, NPD 52 54.1) is "pretty bright, pretty large, extended 45░▒, very gradually much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0 by 1.2? arcmin

NGC 6208 (= OCL 964)
Discovered (Jul 28, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 7th-magnitude open cluster (type II1m) in Ara (RA 16 49 25.8, Dec -53 42 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6208 (= GC 4232 = JH 3646, Dunlop 364, 1860 RA 16 38 18, NPD 143 33.5) is "a cluster, large, rich, a little compressed middle, stars from 9th to 12th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 18? arcmin

NGC 6209 (= PGC 59252)
Discovered (Jun 28, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Apus (RA 16 54 57.7, Dec -72 35 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6209 (= GC 4233 = JH 3645, 1860 RA 16 38 24, NPD 162 20.5) is "very faint, pretty large, very gradually a very little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0 by 1.6? arcmin

NGC 6210
Recorded (Mar 22, 1799) by
Joseph Lalande
Discovered (1825) by Wilhelm Struve
Also observed (May 25, 1830) by John Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Sherburne Burnham
A magnitude 9.6 planetary nebula in Hercules (RA 16 44 29.5, Dec +23 48 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6210 (= GC 4234 = JH 1970, Struve 5, Lalande 30510, 1860 RA 16 38 38, NPD 65 56.2) is "a planetary nebula, very bright, very small, round, disc and border". The second IC states "Nucleus suspected of variability, Burnham, A.N. 4261".
Discovery Notes: Although Lalande made the earliest known observation of this object, his measurement was made for a star catalog and he didn't realize that it wasn't a star; so Struve is considered the "discoverer" of the NGC object. However, Lalande's position was exceptionally accurate and undoubtedly used by Dreyer in determining the position of the object.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.35? arcmin.

NGC 6211 (= PGC 58775)
Discovered (Jun 25, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
Also observed (date?) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Draco (RA 16 41 27.6, Dec +57 47 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6211 (Swift list VI (IX #63), 1860 RA 16 38 38, NPD 31 55.5) is "very faint, pretty small, round, southwestern of 2", the other being NGC 6213. The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Bigourdan) of 16 39 00.
Discovery Notes: This is one of several objects that were in a pre-publication version of Swift's list VI sent to Dreyer in 1887 that were inadvertently omitted from the published list. For most of them (including this one) Swift corrected the error by adding them to his list IX.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.2? arcmin.

NGC 6212 (= PGC 58840)
Discovered (Jul 26, 1870) by
╔douard Stephan
A 14th-magnitude compact galaxy (type C??) in Hercules (RA 16 43 23.2, Dec +39 48 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6212 (= GC 5828, Stephan list II (#3), 1860 RA 16 38 41, NPD 49 55.8) is "extremely faint".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.4? arcmin

NGC 6213 (= PGC 58778)
Discovered (Jun 25, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
Also observed (date?) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Draco (RA 16 41 37.3, Dec +57 48 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6213 (Swift list VI (IX #64), 1860 RA 16 38 53, NPD 31 54.3) is "extremely faint, very small, round, northeastern of 2", the other being NGC 6211. The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Bigourdan) of 16 39 10.
Discovery Notes: This is one of several objects that were in a pre-publication version of Swift's list VI sent to Dreyer in 1887 that were inadvertently omitted from the published list. For most of them (including this one) Swift corrected the error by adding them to his list IX.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.3? arcmin.

NGC 6214 (= PGC 58709)
Discovered (Aug 2, 1884) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Draco (RA 16 39 31.8, Dec +66 02 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6214 (Swift list I (#47) & IV (#??), 1860 RA 16 38 54, NPD 23 41.5) is "extremely faint, very small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.8? arcmin

NGC 6215 (= PGC 59112)
Discovered (Jul 9, 1836) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Ara (RA 16 51 07.0, Dec -58 59 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6215 (= GC 4235 = JH 3647, 1860 RA 16 39 04, NPD 148 44.8) is "pretty faint, round, very gradually a little brighter middle, 4th magnitude star 79 seconds of time to west".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.2 by 2.0? arcmin

PGC 59180 (= NGC 6215A)
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 6215A
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in
Ara (RA 16 52 48.7, Dec -58 56 49)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.5? arcmin

NGC 6216 (=
NGC 6222 = OCL 989)
Discovered (May 13, 1826) by James Dunlop (and later listed as NGC 6216)
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 6216)
Discovered (May 13, 1826) by James Dunlop (and later listed as NGC 6222)
A 10th-magnitude open cluster (type II2p) in Scorpius (RA 16 49 23.5, Dec -44 43 53)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6216 (= GC 4237 = JH 3648, Dunlop 454, 1860 RA 16 39 20, NPD 134 28.3) is "a cluster, pretty small, pretty rich, pretty compressed, stars from 12th to 15th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.0? arcmin

NGC 6217 (= PGC 58477)
Discovered (Dec 12, 1797) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by George RŘmker
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type (R)SB(rs)bc?) in Ursa Minor (RA 16 32 38.7, Dec +78 11 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6217 (= GC 4236 = WH I 280, G. RŘmker, 1860 RA 16 39 25, NPD 11 31.3) is "bright, considerably large, a little extended, suddenly a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.6 by 3.1? arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 6217
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 6217
Below, a 4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 6217
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit: Hubble Legacy Archive, Acknowledgment Stephen Byrne)
HST image of spiral galaxy NGC 6217
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of the central part of the galaxy (Image Credit as above)
HST image of central portion of spiral galaxy NGC 6217

NGC 6218 (=
M12 = GCL 46)
Discovered (May 30, 1764) by Charles Messier (and recorded as M 12)
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 6th-magnitude globular cluster (type IX) in Ophiuchus (RA 16 47 14.5, Dec -01 56 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6218 (= GC 4238 = JH 1971, M 12, 1860 RA 16 39 58, NPD 91 41.7) is "a very remarkable object, a globular cluster, very bright, very large, irregularly round, gradually much brighter middle, well resolved, clearly consisting of stars, stars from 10th magnitude".
Physical Information: About 15 thousand light years away, and 70 light years across. Apparent size 16 arcmin.
NOAO image of globular cluster NGC 6218, also known as M12
Above, a ? arcmin wide image of NGC 6218 (Image Credit REU Program, AURA, NSF, NOAO)
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of the cluster
(Image Credit & © Jim Misti, Misti Mountain Observatory; used by permission)
Misti Mountain Observatory image of globular cluster NGC 6218, also known as M12
Below, a roughly 3.2 arcmin wide image of the cluster's core (Image Credit ESA/Hubble, NASA)
HST image of core of of globular cluster NGC 6218, also known as M12

NGC 6219 (= PGC 58944)
Discovered (Jun 10, 1863) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Hercules (RA 16 46 22.6, Dec +09 02 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6219 (= GC 5829, Marth #316, 1860 RA 16 40 08, NPD 80 41) is "faint, small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.7? arcmin

NGC 6220 (= PGC 58979)
Discovered (Jun 19, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Ophiuchus (RA 16 47 13.2, Dec -00 16 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6220 (Swift list VI (IX #65), 1860 RA 16 40 08, NPD 90 00.2) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, irregularly round, 3 faint stars to south".
Discovery Notes: This is one of several objects that were in a pre-publication version of Swift's list VI sent to Dreyer in 1887 that were inadvertently omitted from the published list. For most of them (including this one) Swift corrected the omission by adding them to his list IX. Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 0.9? arcmin

NGC 6221 (= PGC 59175)
Discovered (May 3, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 10th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Ara (RA 16 52 46.1, Dec -59 13 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6221 (= GC 4239 = JH 3649, 1860 RA 16 40 40, NPD 148 58.0) is "a globular cluster, pretty bright, considerably large, round, gradually a little brighter middle, partially resolved (some stars seen)".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.5 by 2.5? arcmin

NGC 6222 (=
NGC 6216 = OCL 989)
Discovered (May 13, 1826) by James Dunlop (and later listed as NGC 6216)
Discovered (May 13, 1826) by James Dunlop (and later listed as NGC 6222)
Also observed (Jun 6, 1834) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 6222)
A 10th-magnitude open cluster (type II2p) in Scorpius (RA 16 49 23.5, Dec -44 43 53)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6222 (= GC 4240 = JH 3650, Dunlop 456? (454), 1860 RA 16 40 41, NPD 134 28.6) is "a cluster, very large, very rich, a little brighter middle, stars from 12th to 13th magnitude".
Discovery Notes: Though Dreyer (and presumably Herschel) identified this as probably Dunlop 456, Steinicke lists it as Dunlop 454, with Dunlop 456 as a secondary reference.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 6216 for anything else.

NGC 6223 (= PGC 58828)
Discovered (Sep 24, 1862) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Draco (RA 16 43 04.2, Dec +61 34 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6223 (= GC 4241, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 16 41 24, NPD 28 09.3) is "faint, small, round, much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.5 by 2.6? arcmin

NGC 6224 (= PGC 59017)
Discovered (Jun 15, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Hercules (RA 16 48 18.5, Dec +06 18 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6224 (Swift list VI (IX #66), 1860 RA 16 41 37, NPD 83 25.7) is "most extremely faint, very small, a little extended, pretty bright star near to north, northern of 2", the other being NGC 6225.
Discovery Notes: This is one of several objects that were in a pre-publication version of Swift's list VI sent to Dreyer in 1887 that were inadvertently omitted from the published list. For most of them (including this one) Swift corrected the omission by adding them to his list IX (whence the reference in parentheses). Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 1.0? arcmin

NGC 6225 (= PGC 59024)
Discovered (Jun 15, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Hercules (RA 16 48 21.6, Dec +06 13 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6225 (Swift list VI (IX #67), 1860 RA 16 41 39, NPD 83 31.2) is "extremely faint, very small, a little extended, faint star involved, southern of 2", the other being NGC 6224.
Discovery Notes: This is one of several objects that were in a pre-publication version of Swift's list VI sent to Dreyer in 1887 that were inadvertently omitted from the published list. For most of them (including this one) Swift corrected the omission by adding them to his list IX (whence the reference in parentheses). Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.6? arcmin

NGC 6226 (=
NGC 6202 = PGC 58847)
Discovered (Sep 24, 1862) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 6226)
Discovered (Jul 9, 1886) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 6202)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S? pec) in Draco (RA 16 43 23.2, Dec +61 59 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6226 (= GC 4242, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 16 41 47, NPD 27 46.0) is "faint, small, in a triangle with two stars of 12th and 14th magnitude".
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 6202 for anything else.

NGC 6227
Discovered (Jun 5, 1834) by
John Herschel
A star cloud in Scorpius (RA 16 51 30.0, Dec -40 54 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6227 (= GC 4243 = JH 3651, 1860 RA 16 41 52, NPD 130 58.7) is "a cluster, extremely large, extremely rich (in Milky Way)".

NGC 6228 (= PGC 59007)
Discovered (Jun 28, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Hercules (RA 16 48 02.8, Dec +26 12 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6228 (= GC 5830, Marth #317, 1860 RA 16 42 18, NPD 63 33) is "very faint, small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.6? arcmin

NGC 6229 (= GCL 47)
Discovered (May 12, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Herman Schultz
A 9th-magnitude globular cluster (type IV) in Hercules (RA 16 46 58.9, Dec+47 31 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6229 (= GC 4244 - WH IV 50, Schultz, 1860 RA 16 43 03, NPD 42 13.3) is "a globular cluster, very bright, large, round, disc and faint border, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.5? arcmin

NGC 6230 (= PGC 59106)
Discovered (Jul 3, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Hercules (RA 16 50 46.8, Dec +04 36 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6230 (Swift list IV (#40), 1860 RA 16 43 47, NPD 85 07.8) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, round, very difficult".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.7? arcmin

NGC 6231 (= OCL 997)
Discovered (before 1654) by
Giovanni Hodierna
Discovered (1678) by Edmond Halley
Also observed (date?) by Nicolas Lacaille
Also observed (date?) by James Dunlop
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 3rd-magnitude open cluster (type I3p) in Scorpius (RA 16 54 09.8, Dec -41 49 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6231 (= GC 4245 = JH 3652, Halley, Lacaille II 13, Dunlop 499, (Hodierna (I #7), 1860 RA 16 44 15, NPD 131 33.6) is "a cluster, bright, considerably large, pretty rich, stars from 10th to 13th magnitude". (Note: See Hodierna for a discussion of why he was not credited with the discovery of any NGC object. His list I was for visible groups of stars, so he must have seen that this object consisted of individual stars.) The position precesses to RA 16 54 04.0, Dec -41 47 50, a little over 2 arcmin northwest of the currently accepted position of the cluster, but still well within its central condensation, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: NGC 6231 is part of the Scorpius OB association, which consists of multiple clusters of very young stars. NGC 6231's hottest star, ζ Scorpii, is spectral type O8. Having a Main Sequence star of this high brightness and temperature implies a cluster age of just over 3 million years. The cluster is about 6000 light years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 15 arcmin, it is about 25 light years in diameter. The region surrounding the cluster is filled with clouds of gas and dust, many of which are heated, lit and sculpted by the radiation of the stars in the cluster.
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 6231
Above, a 3.5 degree wide DSS image centered on NGC 6231
Below, a 20 arcmin wide DSS image of the cluster
DSS image of open cluster NGC 6231

NGC 6232 (= PGC 58841)
Discovered (Jun 28, 1884) by
Lewis Swift
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Draco (RA 16 43 19.9, Dec +70 37 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6232 (Swift list I (#48), 1860 RA 16 44 22, NPD 19 06.8) is "pretty faint, pretty large, a little extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 1.5? arcmin

NGC 6233 (= PGC 59086)
Discovered (Jul 12, 1880) by
╔douard Stephan
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Hercules (RA 16 50 15.6, Dec +23 34 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6233 (Stephan list XI (#11), 1860 RA 16 44 24, NPD 66 10.6) is "pretty faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.0? arcmin

NGC 6234 (= PGC 59144)
Discovered (Jun 17, 1863) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Ophiuchus (RA 16 51 57.2, Dec +04 23 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6234 (= GC 5831, Marth #318, 1860 RA 16 45 01, NPD 85 24) is "faint, small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.4? arcmin

NGC 6235 (= GCL 48)
Discovered (May 26, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 9th-magnitude globular cluster (type X) in Ophiuchus (RA 16 53 25.4, Dec -22 10 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6235 (= GC 4246 = JH 3653 = WH II 584, 1860 RA 16 45 03, NPD 111 56.3) is "pretty bright, considerably large, irregularly round, well resolved, clearly consisting of stars, stars from 14th to 16th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 5.0? arcmin

NGC 6236 (= PGC 58891)
Discovered (Jun 28, 1884) by
Lewis Swift
Also observed (date?) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Draco (RA 16 44 34.3, Dec +70 46 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6236 (Swift list I (#50), 1860 RA 16 45 24, NPD 18 58.4) is "faint, pretty large". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Bigourdan) of 16 45 55.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.9 by 1.6? arcmin.

NGC 6237
Recorded (Jun 28, 1884) by
Lewis Swift
A lost or nonexistent object in Draco (RA 16 44 07.4, Dec +70 38 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6237 (Swift list I (#49), 1860 RA 16 45 24, NPD 19 06.9) is "extremely faint, small, extended".

NGC 6238 (= PGC 58980)
Discovered (Jun 28, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc? pec) in Draco (RA 16 47 15.9, Dec +62 08 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6238 (Swift list IV (#41), 1860 RA 16 45 38, NPD 27 36.2) is "most extremely faint, extremely small, extremely faint star close, very difficult".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.4? arcmin

NGC 6239 (= PGC 59083)
Discovered (Apr 12, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by ╔douard Stephan
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Hercules (RA 16 50 05.2, Dec +42 44 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6239 (= GC 4247 = GC 5832 = WH III 727, Stephan list VII (#??), 1860 RA 16 45 39, NPD 47 00.8) is "very faint, extended, binuclear northwest-southeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.4 by 1.1? arcmin

NGC 6240 (=
IC 4625 = PGC 59186)
Discovered (Jul 12, 1871) by ╔douard Stephan (and later listed as NGC 6240)
Also observed (Jul 2, 1886) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as NGC 6240)
Discovered (late 1890's?) by Edward Barnard (and later listed as IC 4625)
A magnitude 12.9 irregular galaxy (type I0? pec) in Ophiuchus (RA 16 52 58.8, Dec +02 24 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6240 (= GC 5833, Stephan list II (#4), Bigourdan (#??), 1860 RA 16 45 55, NPD 87 22.0) is "very faint, pretty large, a little extended, diffuse".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 1.0 arcmin? NGC 6240 represents one of the later stages in the collision and merging of two galaxies.
SDSS image of region near irregular galaxy NGC 6420, overlaid on a DSS background to fill in missing areas
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS/DSS composite image centered on NGC 6240
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of irregular galaxy NGC 6420
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit HST (more, plus link TBA))
HST image of irregular galaxy NGC 6240
Below, a ? arcmin wide HST/Spitzer multi-spectral image of the galaxy
(Image Credit NASA/JPL-Caltech/STScI-ESA/ S. Bush et al. Harvard-Smithsonian CfA)
Composite of HST and Spitzer images of irregular galaxy NGC 6420

NGC 6241 (= PGC 59085)
Discovered (Apr 29, 1788) by
William Herschel
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Hercules (RA 16 50 11.0, Dec +45 25 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6241 (= GC 4248 = WH III 735, 1860 RA 16 46 00, NPD 44 20.4) is "extremely faint, pretty small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.8? arcmin

NGC 6242 (= OCL 1001)
Discovered (1751) by
Nicolas Lacaille
Also observed (date?) by James Dunlop
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 6th-magnitude open cluster (type I3m) in Scorpius (RA 16 55 30.6, Dec -39 28 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6242 (= GC 4249 = JH 3654, Lacaille I 10, Dunlop 520, 1860 RA 16 46 04, NPD 129 16.2) is "a cluster, bright, large, rich, stars from 8th to 11th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 9.0? arcmin

NGC 6243 (= PGC 59161)
Discovered (Jun 10, 1880) by
╔douard Stephan
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Hercules (RA 16 52 26.3, Dec +23 19 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6243 (Stephan list XI (#12), 1860 RA 16 46 34, NPD 66 26.0) is "very faint, very small, irregular figure, diffuse".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.4? arcmin

NGC 6244 (= PGC 59009)
Discovered (Jun 28, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Draco (RA 16 48 03.9, Dec +62 12 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6244 (Swift list IV (#42), 1860 RA 16 46 38, NPD 27 32.7) is "very faint, very small, round, between 2 stars, northeastern of 2", the other being NGC 6238.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.3? arcmin

NGC 6245
Recorded (Jun 28, 1884) by
Lewis Swift
A lost or nonexistent object in Draco (RA 16 45 22.4, Dec +70 48 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6245 (Swift list I (#51), 1860 RA 16 46 45, NPD 18 56.9) is "very faint, pretty large, round".

NGC 6246 (= PGC 59077)
Discovered (Jun 28, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Draco (RA 16 49 53.0, Dec +55 32 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6246 (Swift list IV (#43), 1860 RA 16 46 55, NPD 34 12.8) is "extremely faint, small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.6? arcmin

PGC 59090 (= "NGC 6246A")
Not an NGC object, but listed here since sometimes called NGC 6246A
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc pec) in
Draco (RA 16 50 14.0, Dec +55 23 05)
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0 by 2.0? arcmin

NGC 6247 (= PGC 59023)
Discovered (Sep 24, 1862) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 13th-magnitude peculiar galaxy (type pec??) in Draco (RA 16 48 19.4, Dec +62 58 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6247 (= GC 4250, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 16 47 00, NPD 26 47.5) is "faint, pretty small, irregular figure".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.3? arcmin

NGC 6248 (= PGC 58946)
Discovered (Aug 11, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBcd?) in Draco (RA 16 46 22.3, Dec +70 21 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6248 (Swift list II (#44), 1860 RA 16 47 13, NPD 19 24.4) is "most extremely faint, pretty large, round, very difficult".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.1 by 1.2? arcmin
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 6248
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6248
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 6248

NGC 6249 (= OCL 994)
Discovered (Jul 31, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
An 8th-magnitude open cluster (type II1p) in Scorpius (RA 16 57 41.7, Dec -44 48 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6249 (= GC 4251 = JH 3655, (Dunlop 455), 1860 RA 16 47 34, NPD 134 33.3) is "a cluster, pretty rich, very little compressed, irregular figure, stars large and small".
Discovery Notes: Neither Herschel nor Dreyer realized that Dunlop might have observed this object, but it is now thought that it is his #455, hence the credit in parentheses.
Physical Information: Apparent size 6.0? arcmin
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 6150 - 6199) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 6200 - 6249     → (NGC 6250 - 6299)