Celestial Atlas
(NGC 6200 - 6249) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 6250 - 6299 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 6300 - 6349)
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Page last updated Mar 18, 2017
Added Dreyer NGC entries
WORKING 6250: Adding/updating Steinicke listings/data, checking IDs

NGC 6250 (= OCL 991)
Discovered (Jul 1, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 6th-magnitude open cluster (type IV3p) in Ara (RA 16 57 56.0, Dec -45 56 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6250 (= GC 4252 = JH 3656, 1860 RA 16 47 41, NPD 135 42.4) is "a cluster, large, a little rich, a little compressed, stars from 8th to 12th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size ? arcmin.
DSS image of open cluster NGC 6250
Above, a 30 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6250

NGC 6251 (= PGC 58472)
Discovered (Jan 1, 1802) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Ursa Minor (RA 16 32 31.8, Dec +82 32 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6251 (= GC 4253 = WH III 974, 1860 RA 16 47 55, NPD 07 09.0) is "considerably faint, small, brighter middle, western of 2", the other being NGC 6252. The second IC lists a corrected NPD (per Bigourdan) of 07 14.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 1.5? arcmin.
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 6251, also showing spiral galaxy NGC 6252
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6251, also showing NGC 6252
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 6251
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide 'raw' HST image of part of the galaxy (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
'Raw' HST image of part of elliptical galaxy NGC 6251

NGC 6252 (= PGC 58456)
Discovered (Jan 1, 1802) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S??) in Ursa Minor (RA 16 32 40.3, Dec +82 34 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6252 (= GC 4254 = WH III 975, 1860 RA 16 47 58, NPD 07 06.0) is "very faint, very small, eastern of 2", the other being NGC 6251. The second IC lists a corrected NPD (per Bigourdan) of 07 11.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.3? arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 6252, also showing elliptical galaxy NGC 6251
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6252, also showing NGC 6251
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 6252

NGC 6253 (= OCL 972)
Discovered (May 14, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 10th-magnitude open cluster (type I3m) in Ara (RA 16 59 06.1, Dec -52 42 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6253 (= GC 4255 = JH 3657, Dunlop 374?, 1860 RA 16 48 03, NPD 142 28.9) is "a cluster, small, triangular, stars of 13th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4? arcmin.

NGC 6254 (=
M10 = GCL 49)
Discovered (May 29, 1764) by Charles Messier (and recorded as M10)
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 7th-magnitude globular cluster (type VII) in Ophiuchus (RA 16 57 08.9, Dec -04 05 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6254 (= GC 4256 = JH 1972 = JH 3659, M 10, 1860 RA 16 49 47, NPD 93 52.7) is "a remarkable object, a globular cluster, bright, very large, round, gradually very much brighter middle, well resolved, clearly consisting of stars, stars from 10th to 15th magnitude".
Physical Information: About 16 thousand light years away and 70 light years across. Apparent size 20? arcmin.
NOAO image of globular cluster NGC 6254, also known as M10
Below, a ? arcmin wide image centered on NGC 6254
(Image Credit N.A.Sharp, Vanessa Harvey/REU program/AURA/NSF/NOAO)
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of the cluster
(Image Credit & © Jim Misti, Misti Mountain Observatory; used by permission)
Misti Mountain Observatory image of globular cluster NGC 6254, also known as M10

NGC 6255 (= PGC 59244)
Discovered (May 16, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Hercules (RA 16 54 47.4, Dec +36 30 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6255 (= GC 4257 = JH 1973 = WH III 689, 1860 RA 16 49 48, NPD 53 16.8) is "extremely faint, considerably large, extended 90°".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.6 by 1.5? arcmin.

NGC 6256 (= GCL 49.1)
Discovered (Aug 2, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 11th-magnitude globular cluster in Scorpius (RA 16 59 32.6, Dec -37 07 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6256 (= GC 4258 = JH 3658, (Dunlop 554), 1860 RA 16 50 09, NPD 126 53.5) is "a globular cluster, very faint, very large, irregularly round, very gradually brighter middle, well resolved, clearly consisting of stars".
Discovery Notes: Neither Herschel nor Dreyer realized that Dunlop might have observed this object, but it is now thought that it is his #554, hence the credit in parentheses. Physical Information: Apparent size 4.1? arcmin.
DSS image of globular cluster NGC 6256
Above, 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6256

NGC 6257 (= PGC 59274)
Discovered (May 16, 1831) by
John Herschel
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S??) in Hercules (RA 16 56 03.4, Dec +39 38 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6257 (= GC 4259 = JH 1974, 1860 RA 16 50 12, NPD 50 09.6) is "very faint (very small double star?), faint double star to northeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.2? arcmin.

NGC 6258 (= PGC 59165)
Discovered (Jun 28, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Draco (RA 16 52 29.7, Dec +60 30 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6258 (Swift list IV (#44), 1860 RA 16 50 31, NPD 29 14.4) is "extremely faint, very small, round, bright star and double star to west".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7? arcmin.

NGC 6259 (= OCL 996)
Discovered (May 13, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
An 8th-magnitude open cluster (type III2m) in Scorpius (RA 17 00 45.3, Dec -44 39 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6259 (= GC 4260 = JH 3660, Dunlop 456, 1860 RA 16 50 37, NPD 134 26.9) is "a remarkable object, a cluster, bright, very large, very rich, stars from 11th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 15? arcmin.

NGC 6260 (= PGC 59142)
Discovered (Aug 5, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Draco (RA 16 51 50.3, Dec +63 42 53)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6260 (Swift list IV (#45), 1860 RA 16 50 43, NPD 26 03.0) is "extremely faint, pretty small, round, several stars near to southeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.8? arcmin.

NGC 6261 (= PGC 59286)
Discovered (Jul 13, 1880) by
Édouard Stephan
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Hercules (RA 16 56 30.4, Dec +27 58 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6261 (Stephan list XI (#13), 1860 RA 16 50 56, NPD 61 48.0) is "extremely faint, extremely small, irregular figure".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.5? arcmin.

NGC 6262 (= PGC 59363)
Discovered (Oct 23, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Draco (RA 16 58 42.9, Dec +57 05 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6262 (Swift list V (#72), 1860 RA 16 51 03, NPD 32 51.0) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, round, very difficult".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.4? arcmin.

NGC 6263 (= PGC 59292)
Discovered (Jun 28, 1864) by
Albert Marth
Also observed (date?) by Édouard Stephan
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Hercules (RA 16 56 43.1, Dec +27 49 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6263 (= GC 5834, Marth #319, Stephan list II (#??), 1860 RA 16 51 11, NPD 61 57.0) is "very faint, very small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.9? arcmin.

NGC 6264 (= PGC 59306)
Discovered (Jun 28, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Hercules (RA 16 57 16.1, Dec +27 50 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6264 (= GC 5835, Marth #320, Stephan list II (#??), 1860 RA 16 51 44, NPD 61 55.4) is "extremely faint, very small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.4? arcmin.

NGC 6265 (= PGC 59315)
Discovered (Jun 28, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Hercules (RA 16 57 29.0, Dec +27 50 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6265 (= GC 5836, Marth #321, Stephan list II (#??), 1860 RA 16 51 57, NPD 61 55.9) is "extremely faint, very small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.5? arcmin.

NGC 6266 (=
M62 = GCL 51)
Discovered (Jun 7, 1771) by Charles Messier (and recorded as M62)
Also observed (date?) by James Dunlop
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 6th-magnitude globular cluster (type IV) in Ophiuchus (RA 17 01 12.6, Dec -30 06 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6266 (= GC 4261 = JH 3661, M 62, Dunlop 627, 1860 RA 16 52 19, NPD 119 53.8) is "a remarkable object, a globular cluster, very bright, large, gradually much brighter middle, well resolved, clearly consisting of stars, stars of 14th to 16th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 15? arcmin.
DSS image of region near globular cluster NGC 6266, also known as M62
Above, a 24 arcmin wide DSS image of NGC 6266
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of the cluster
(Image Credit & © Jim Misti, Misti Mountain Observatory; used by permission)
Misti Mountain Observatory image of globular cluster NGC 6266, also known as M62
Below, a 1.65 arcmin wide HST image of the core of M62 (Image Credit NASA/STScI/HST)
HST image of the core of globular cluster NGC 6266, also known as M62

NGC 6267 (= PGC 59340)
Discovered (May 15, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Hercules (RA 16 58 08.7, Dec +22 59 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6267 (= GC 4262 = WH III 123, 1860 RA 16 52 22, NPD 66 46.9) is "very faint, pretty large, round, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.0? arcmin.

NGC 6268 (= OCL 1002)
Discovered (Jun 5, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 10th-magnitude open cluster (type II2p) in Scorpius (RA 17 02 04.1, Dec -39 43 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6268 (= GC 4263 = JH 3662, Dunlop 521, 1860 RA 16 52 26, NPD 129 30.8) is "a cluster, bright, pretty large, considerably rich, stars from 10th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 6? arcmin.

NGC 6269 (= PGC 59332)
Discovered (Jun 28, 1864) by
Albert Marth
Also observed (date?) by Édouard Stephan
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Hercules (RA 16 57 58.0, Dec +27 51 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6269 (= GC 5837, Marth #322, Stephan list II (#??), 1860 RA 16 52 26, NPD 61 55.3) is "faint, small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0 by 1.6? arcmin.

NGC 6270 (= PGC 95562)
Discovered (Jun 28, 1864) by
Albert Marth
Also observed (date?) by Édouard Stephan
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Hercules (RA 16 58 44.1, Dec +27 51 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6270 (= GC 5838, Marth #323, Stephan list II (#??), 1860 RA 16 53 12, NPD 61 55.2) is "extremely faint, small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.4? arcmin.

NGC 6271 (= PGC 59365)
Discovered (Jun 28, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Hercules (RA 16 58 50.7, Dec +27 57 53)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6271 (= GC 5839, Marth #324, 1860 RA 16 53 18, NPD 61 49) is "very faint, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.6? arcmin.

NGC 6272 (= PGC 59367)
Discovered (Jun 28, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Hercules (RA 16 58 58.2, Dec +27 55 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6272 (= GC 5840, Marth #325, 1860 RA 16 53 26, NPD 61 52) is "very faint".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.3? arcmin.

NGC 6273 (=
M19 = GCL 52)
Discovered (Jun 5, 1764) by Charles Messier (and recorded as M19)
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 7th-magnitude globular cluster (type VIII) in Ophiuchus (RA 17 02 37.7, Dec -26 16 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6273 (= GC 4264 = JH 1975 = JH 3663, M 19, 1860 RA 16 53 59, NPD 116 03.2) is "a globular cluster, very bright, large, round, very compressed middle, well resolved, clearly consisting of stars, stars of 16th magnitude".
Physical Information: About 28 thousand light years from the Earth, but only 5 thousand light years from the center of our Galaxy, as it lies almost directly in line with the center from our point of view. Like most globular clusters, M19's stars are all about 13 billion years old. Apparent size 17 arcmin.
NOAO image of region near globular cluster NGC 6273, also known as M19
Above, a ? arcmin wide image centered on NGC 6273
(Image Credit Doug Williams, REU Program/AURA/NSF/NOAO)
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of the cluster
(Image Credit & © Jim Misti, Misti Mountain Observatory; used by permission)
Misti Mountain Observatory image of globular cluster NGC 6273, also known as M19
Below, a 2.5 arcmin wide HST image of part of the core of the cluster (Image Credit NASA/STScI/HST)
HST image of core of globular cluster NGC 6273, also known as M19

NGC 6274 (= PGC 59383)
Discovered (Jun 28, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Hercules (RA 16 59 20.4, Dec +29 56 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6274 (= GC 5841, Marth #326, 1860 RA 16 54 08, NPD 60 02) is "extremely faint, very small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.4? arcmin. (Steinicke inadvertently reversed the PGC designations for the pair.)
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxies NGC 6274 and PGC 59381
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS/DSS composite image centered on NGC 6274, also showing PGC 59381
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the pair
SDSS image of spiral galaxies NGC 6274 and PGC 59381

PGC 59381
Not an NGC object but listed here because probably paired with
NGC 6274
A magnitude 14.7 spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Hercules (RA 16 59 21.6, Dec +29 56 27)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.2? arcmin. Recessional velocity essentially the same as for NGC 6274 (which see for images), so the two are probably physical companions; however, one must be a little in front of the other, as they do not show signs of distortion corresponding to a very close interaction or collision. (Note: Steinicke inadvertently reversed the PGC designations for the pair.)

NGC 6275 (= PGC 59262)
Discovered (Aug 5, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBdm? pec) in Draco (RA 16 55 33.4, Dec +63 14 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6275 (Swift list IV (#46), 1860 RA 16 54 12, NPD 26 32.4) is "most extremely faint, small, a little extended, very difficult".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.45 by 0.4 arcmin
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 6275
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 6275
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 6275

NGC 6276 (=
IC 1239 = PGC 59419)
Discovered (Jun 10, 1864) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 6276)
Also observed (date?) by Édouard Stephan (and later listed as NGC 6276)
Discovered (Jun 19, 1887) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 1239)
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Hercules (RA 17 00 45.0, Dec +23 02 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6276 (= GC 5842, Marth #327, Stephan list II (#??), 1860 RA 16 54 52, NPD 66 44.9) is "extremely faint".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.3? arcmin

NGC 6277
Recorded (Jun 6, 1864) by
Albert Marth
Also observed (date?) by Édouard Stephan
A double star in Hercules (RA 17 00 48.8, Dec +23 02 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6277 (= GC 5843, Marth #328, Stephan list II (#??), 1860 RA 16 54 56, NPD 66 45.2) is "extremely faint".

NGC 6278 (= PGC 59426)
Discovered (May 15, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Édouard Stephan
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Hercules (RA 17 00 50.2, Dec +23 00 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6278 (= GC 4266 = WH III 124, Stephan list II (#??), 1860 RA 16 54 58, NPD 66 46.8) is "very faint, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 1.2? arcmin

NGC 6279 (= PGC 59370)
Discovered (Oct 23, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Hercules (RA 16 59 01.3, Dec +47 14 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6279 (Swift list V (#73), 1860 RA 16 55 03, NPD 42 32.7) is "very faint, pretty small, a little extended, coarse double star to northwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.9? arcmin

NGC 6280 (= PGC 59464 + 1305241)
Discovered (May 8, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A pair of galaxies in Ophiuchus
PGC 59464: A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) at RA 17 01 57.5, Dec +06 39 59
PGC 1305241: A 15th-magnitude compact galaxy (type C?) at RA 17 01 58.1, Dec +06 40 03
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6280 (= GC 5844, Marth #329, 1860 RA 16 55 10, NPD 83 07) is "pretty bright, small, a little extended".
Physical Information: PGC 59464 apparent size 0.5 by 0.3 arcmin. PGC 1305241 apparent size 0.2 by 0.2 arcmin.
DSS image of region near galaxy pair NGC 6280
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6280
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy pair
DSS image of galaxy pair NGC 6280

NGC 6281 (= OCL 1003)
Discovered (Jun 5, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 5th-magnitude open cluster (type II2p) in Scorpius (RA 17 04 47.2, Dec -37 53 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6281 (= GC 4265 = JH 3664, Dunlop 556, 1860 RA 16 55 16, NPD 127 40.9) is "a cluster, large, pretty rich, a little compressed, stars from 9th to 11th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 8? arcmin

NGC 6282 (= PGC 59418)
Discovered (Jun 28, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Hercules (RA 17 00 47.0, Dec +29 49 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6282 (= GC 5845, Marth #330, 1860 RA 16 55 21, NPD 59 58) is "very faint, small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.5? arcmin
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel

NGC 6283 (= PGC 59386)
Discovered (Apr 13, 1788) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in Hercules (RA 16 59 26.5, Dec +49 55 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6283 (= GC 4267 = WH III 728, 1860 RA 16 55 53, NPD 39 51.6) is "very faint, considerably small, irregularly round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 1.1? arcmin

NGC 6284 (= GCL 53)
Discovered (May 22, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 9th-magnitude globular cluster (type IX) in Ophiuchus (RA 17 04 28.8, Dec -24 45 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6284 (= GC 4268 = JH 1976 = JH 3665 = WH VI 11, 1860 RA 16 55 56, NPD 114 33.8) is "a globular cluster, bright, large, round, compressed middle, well resolved, clearly consisting of stars, stars from 16th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 6.2? arcmin

NGC 6285 (= PGC 59344, and with
NGC 6286 = Arp 293)
Discovered (1886) by Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb? pec) in Draco (RA 16 58 23.9, Dec +58 57 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6285 (Swift list VI (#??), 1860 RA 16 56 07, NPD 30 48.8) is "most extremely faint, small, round, very difficult, northwestern of 2", the other being NGC 6286.
Discovery Notes: This is presumably one of a number of objects included in a pre-publication list sent to Dreyer in 1887 that were inadvertently left out of Swift's list VI. For most of them, the error of omission was corrected by including them in Swift's list IX, but the lack of a number (indicated by #??) suggests that this object was not included in either published list. (However, it is possible that the information exists elsewhere, and until I have a chance to confirm or alter the preceding statement this caveat will remain here.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.45 arcmin.
Mount Lemmon SkyCenter image of spiral galaxy NGC 6285
Above, a 1.2 arcmin wide image of NGC 6285; see NGC 6286 for more images
(Image Credit & © Adam Block, Mount Lemmon SkyCenter/University of Arizona; used by permission)

NGC 6286 (= PGC 59352, and with
NGC 6285 = Arp 293)
Discovered (Aug 13, 1885) by Lewis Swift
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb? pec) in Draco (RA 16 58 31.6, Dec +58 56 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6286 (Swift list II (#45), 1860 RA 16 56 17, NPD 30 51.0) is "extremely faint, pretty small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.25 by 1.1 arcmin
Mount Lemmon SkyCenter image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 6285 and spiral galaxy NGC 6286, which comprise Arp 293
Above, a 12 arcmin wide image centered on NGC 6286, also showing NGC 6285
(Image Credit & © above and below Adam Block, Mount Lemmon SkyCenter/University of Arizona; used by permission)
Below, a 3.0 arcmin wide image of Arp 293
Mount Lemmon SkyCenter image of spiral galaxy NGC 6285 and spiral galaxy NGC 6286, which comprise Arp 293
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide image of NGC 6286 (Image Credit as above)
Mount Lemmon SkyCenter image of spiral galaxy NGC 6286

NGC 6287 (= GCL 54)
Discovered (May 21, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 9th-magnitude globular cluster (type VII) in Ophiuchus (RA 17 05 09.4, Dec -22 42 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6287 (= GC 4269 = JH 3666 = WH II 195, 1860 RA 16 56 44, NPD 112 30.6) is "a globular cluster, considerably bright, large, round, gradually pretty much compressed middle, well resolved, clearly consisting of stars, stars from 16th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.8? arcmin

NGC 6288 (= PGC 59312)
Discovered (Aug 19, 1884) by
Edward Swift
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Draco (RA 16 57 24.3, Dec +68 27 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6288 (Swift list I (#52), 1860 RA 16 58 05, NPD 21 19.8) is "extremely faint, very small, round, southwestern of 2", the other being NGC 6289.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.4? arcmin

NGC 6289 (= PGC 59322)
Discovered (Aug 19, 1884) by
Edward Swift
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Draco (RA 16 57 44.9, Dec +68 30 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6289 (Swift list I (#53), 1860 RA 16 58 36, NPD 21 17.8) is "extremely faint, pretty large, much extended, northeastern of 2", the other being NGC 6288.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.6? arcmin

NGC 6290 (= PGC 59428)
Discovered (Aug 13, 1885) by
Lewis Swift (2-46)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Draco (RA 17 00 56.4, Dec +58 58 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6290 (Swift list II (#46), 1860 RA 16 58 37, NPD 30 49.6) is "extremely faint, pretty small, round, star close to east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 1.0? arcmin. For now, see NGC 6291 for images.

NGC 6291 (= PGC 59435)
Discovered (Aug 13, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Draco (RA 17 00 56.0, Dec +58 56 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6291 (Swift list II (#47), 1860 RA 16 58 37, NPD 30 51.6) is "most extremely faint, extremely small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.4? arcmin
DSS image of region near spiral galaxies NGC 6290 and 6291
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6290 and 6291
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the pair
DSS image of spiral galaxies NGC 6290 and 6291

NGC 6292 (= PGC 59498)
Discovered (Jul 8, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
Also observed (date?) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Draco (RA 17 03 03.5, Dec +61 02 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6292 (Swift list II (#48), 1860 RA 17 00 52, NPD 28 45.8) is "extremely faint, extended, very difficult, faint star near". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Bigourdan) of 17 01 19.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.8? arcmin

NGC 6293 (= GCL 55)
Discovered (May 24, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
An 8th-magnitude globular cluster (type IV) in Ophiuchus (RA 17 10 10.4, Dec -26 34 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6293 (= GC 4270 = JH 1977 = JH 3667 = WH VI 12, 1860 RA 17 01 28, NPD 116 23.2) is "a globular cluster, very bright, large, round, pretty suddenly brighter middle, well resolved, clearly consisting of stars, stars from 16th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 8.2? arcmin

NGC 6294
Recorded (Apr 16, 1828) by
John Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A pair of stars in Ophiuchus (RA 17 10 16.1, Dec -26 34 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6394 (= GC 4271 = JH 1978, 1860 RA 17 01 34, NPD 116 22.6) is "faint, small, very gradually brighter middle, globular cluster to west", the globular cluster being NGC 6293. The second IC adds "Only a double star 13th and 13.5 magnitude, distance 8 arcsec (Howe). h. has only one observation at Slough".

NGC 6295 (= PGC 59510)
Discovered (Jun 9, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in Draco (RA 17 03 15.3, Dec +60 20 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6295 (Swift list IV (#47), 1860 RA 17 01 36, NPD 29 25.6) is "extremely faint, small, much extended, faint star near".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.4? arcmin

NGC 6296 (= PGC 59690)
Discovered (Jun 17, 1863) by
Albert Marth
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Ophiuchus (RA 17 08 44.6, Dec +03 53 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6296 (= GC 5846, Marth #331, 1860 RA 17 01 46, NPD 85 53) is "pretty bright".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7? arcmin

NGC 6297 (=
NGC 6298 = PGC 59525)
Discovered (Jul 8, 1885) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 6297)
Also observed by Guillaume Bigourdan (while listed as NGC 6297)
Discovered (Aug 1, 1885) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 6298)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Draco (RA 17 03 36.4, Dec +62 01 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6297 (Swift list II (#49), 1860 RA 17 01 50, NPD 27 46.8) is "pretty bright, pretty small, round, between 2 stars, western of 2", the other being NGC 6298. The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Bigourdan) of 17 02 09.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.5? arcmin

NGC 6298 (=
NGC 6297 = PGC 59525)
Discovered (Jul 8, 1885) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 6297)
Discovered (Aug 1, 1885) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 6298)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Draco (RA 17 03 36.4, Dec +62 01 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6298 (Swift list II (#50), 1860 RA 17 01 55, NPD 27 46.8) is "very faint, extremely small, round, between 2 stars, eastern of 2", the other being NGC 6297 (which is actually the same object, this being a duplicate entry, so Dreyer's presumption that there was a western or eastern of 2 was incorrect).
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 6297 for anything else.

NGC 6299 (= PGC 59561)
Discovered (Oct 27, 1861) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Draco (RA 17 05 04.3, Dec +62 27 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6299 (= GC 4272, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 17 03 39, NPD 27 21.9) is "very faint, very small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.6? arcmin
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 6299
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 6299
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 6299
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 6200 - 6249) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 6250 - 6299     → (NGC 6300 - 6349)