Celestial Atlas
(NGC 6300 - 6349) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 6350 - 6399 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 6400 - 6449)
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Page last updated Apr 1, 2017
Checked Dreyer NGC entries
Checked all Steinicke references/updates, used or noted Corwin's comments
WORKING 6368: Adding/adjusting pix, tags, comments
WORKING 6360: Need to analyze (extremely uncertain) identification

NGC 6350 (= PGC 60046)
Discovered (Jun 29, 1880) by
Édouard Stephan
A magnitude 13.2 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Hercules (RA 17 18 42.2, Dec +41 41 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6350 (Stephan list XI (#17), 1860 RA 17 14 16, NPD 48 09.6) is "pretty faint, pretty small, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity 9765 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that NGC 6350 is about 455 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 440 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 445 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 1.0 by 0.95 arcmin, the galaxy is about 130 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 6350, also showing NGC 6348
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 6350, also showing NGC 6348
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 6350
Below, the 12 arcmin wide SDSS image also showing PGC 91591, PGC 2184190 and PGC 2184380
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 6350, also showing NGC 6348, PGC 91591, PGC 2184190 and PGC 2184380

NGC 6351 (= PGC 60063 + SDSS J171911.7+360340)
Discovered (Jul 15, 1879) by
Édouard Stephan
A pair of galaxies in Hercules
PGC 60063 = A magnitude 15.2 lenticular galaxy (type S0(s)a? pec) at RA 17 19 11.1, Dec +36 03 37
J171911.7+360340 = A magnitude 16.5(?) lenticular galaxy (type SB0? pec) at RA 17 19 11.7, Dec +36 03 40
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6351 (Stephan list X (#33), 1860 RA 17 14 16, NPD 53 47.8) is "very faint, very small, fainter than preceding (western) one", the other being NGC 6349.
Physical Information: The apparent size of PGC 60063 is about 0.25 by 0.1 arcmin, of SDSS J171911.66 +360339.7, about 0.15 by 0.1 arcmin, and of the entire complex surrounding the interacting pair, about 0.5 by 0.5 arcmin, but nothing is known about the distance or recessional velocity of the pair, so the actual sizes are unknown.
SDSS image of region near the interacting lenticular galaxies that comprise NGC 6351, also showing NGC 6349
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 6351, also showing NGC 6349
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the pair
SDSS image of the interacting lenticular galaxies that comprise NGC 6351

NGC 6352 (= GCL 64)
Discovered (May 14, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (Jul 7, 1885) by Edward Barnard
Also observed (date?) by DeLisle Stewart (while listed as NGC 6352)
A magnitude 7.8 globular cluster (type XI) in Ara (RA 17 25 29.2, Dec -48 25 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6352 (Dunlop 417, Barnard, 1860 RA 17 14 50, NPD 138 20) is "pretty faint, large". The second IC adds (per DeLisle Stewart) "A cluster, not a nebula".
Physical Information: Apparent size about 9 arcmin.
DSS image of region near globular cluster NGC 6352
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6352
Below, a 3 arcmin wide image of the core of the cluster (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
HST image of the core of globular cluster NGC 6352

NGC 6353
Recorded (1886) by
Gerhard Lohse
Five stars in Hercules (RA 17 21 12.3, Dec +15 41 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6353 (J. G. Lohse, 1860 RA 17 14 53, NPD 74 10.2) is "pretty bright, pretty small, 3 small stars involved, 10th magnitude star 1 arcmin to northeast". The position precesses to RA 17 21 11.4, Dec +15 41 17, right on the asterism listed above, and the star to the north northeast makes the identification certain. Per Corwin, this consists of five stars, four of which are clearly shown on the images below; the fifth is in between the eastern and western stars, and almost looks like an overlap of their images, but there is little doubt that it is real.
DSS image of region near the group of stars listed as NGC 6353
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6353
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the group
DSS image of the group of stars listed as NGC 6353

NGC 6354
Recorded (1884) by
Edward Barnard
Four stars in Scorpius (RA 17 24 34.0, Dec -38 32 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6354 (Barnard, 1860 RA 17 15 02, NPD 128 24) is "extremely faint, small". Per Corwin, Knox-Shaw published a 1912 description based on a plate taken with the 30-inch reflector at Helwan (in Egypt), stating "Four stars near together; not a nebula."
DSS image of region near the group of stars listed as NGC 6354
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6354
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the group
DSS image of the group of stars listed as NGC 6354

NGC 6355 (= GCL 63)
Discovered (May 24, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 13, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 8.6 globular cluster in Ophiuchus (RA 17 23 58.4, Dec -26 21 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6355 (= GC 4295 = JH 3681 = WH I 46, 1860 RA 17 15 16, NPD 116 12.7) is "considerably faint, large, round, gradually brighter middle, well resolved, clearly consisting of stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size about 3 arcmin
DSS image of region near globular cluster NGC 6355
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6355
Below, a 4.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the cluster
DSS image of globular cluster NGC 6355

NGC 6356 (= GCL 62)
Discovered (Jun 18, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 7, 1836)by John Herschel
A magnitude 8.2 globular cluster (type II) in Ophiuchus (RA 17 23 35.0, Dec -17 48 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6356 (= GC 4296 = JH 3683 = WH I 48, 1860 RA 17 15 26, NPD 107 40.5) is a "globular cluster, very bright, considerably large, very gradually very much brighter middle, well resolved, clearly consisting of stars, stars from 20th magnitude downwards".
Physical Information: Apparent size about 5 arcmin
DSS image of region near globular cluster NGC 6356
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6356
Below, a 4.5 arcmin wide image of the central part of the cluster
(Image Credit & © 1999 CFHT/Coelum (J.-C. Cuillandre & G. Anselmi); CFHT calendar image, used by permission)
CFHT image of central portion of globular cluster NGC 6356

NGC 6357
Discovered (Jun 8, 1837) by
John Herschel
An open cluster and emission nebula in Scorpius (RA 17 24 43.5, Dec -34 12 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6357 (= GC 4297 = JH 3682, 1860 RA 17 15 28, NPD 124 03.1) is "faint, large, extended, very gradually a little brighter middle, double star involved".
Physical Information: NGC 6357 is an emission nebula associated with several clusters of stars recently formed, and still in the process of formation. One of the clusters, Pismis 24, contains a large number of very massive stars, one of which, Pismis 24-1, was thought to be the most massive known star, with perhaps two or three hundred solar masses; but as shown in the bottom image, it is actually a double (or even multiple) star, so each star is no more than 70 to 100 or so solar masses. Still, that is near the maximum theoretical mass for stars (about 100 to 150 solar masses), so stars of such mass are very rare (less than one in ten thousand for new stars, and less than one in a million for all stars, since the massive ones don't last very long). The nebula is about a degree across, and given its probable distance of 8000 light years, must be well over 100 light years across (the brighter portion consisting of the NGC object is only about 25 arcmin across, and therefore only about 50 light years across).
DSS image of region near open clusters and emission nebula NGC 6357
Above, a one degree wide DSS image centered on the nebula
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of the central region and the young star cluster, Pismis 24
(Image Credits: IDA/Danish 1.5 m/ R. Gendler, U.G. Jørgensen, J. Skottfelt, K. Harpsøe/ESO)
ESO image of open clusters and emission nebula NGC 6357 and Pismis 24
Below, a ? arcmin wide HST image of the region above. At top, a massive young star is heating and blowing away the clouds of gas and dust still surrounding it and its (mostly unseen) companions. Pismis 24 is the group of bright stars scattered below the brightly glowing clouds. (Image Credits: ESA and J. M. Apellániz (IAA, Spain), NASA. Acknowledgement: Davide De Martin (ESA/Hubble))
HST image of clouds of gas and dust near Pismis 24
Below, extreme closeups showing the multiple nature of Pismis 24-1 (the bright star in the small box)
(Image Credits: ESA and J. M. Apellániz (IAA, Spain), NASA)
HST images showing the multiple nature of Pismis 24-1

NGC 6358 (= PGC 60054)
Discovered (May 2, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 14.0 lenticular galaxy (type S0(rs)a? pec) in Draco (RA 17 18 53.0, Dec +52 36 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6358 (Swift list VI (#92), 1860 RA 17 15 41, NPD 37 13.1) is "extremely faint, small, round, double star near to northwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.4 arcmin. Possibly interacting with the 17th magnitude galaxy at RA 17 18 51.9, Dec +52 36 44 (on its southern rim), but there appears to be nothing known about that object, and the standard references disagree on its designation, so any information available is probably misfiled.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 6358
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 6358
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 6358

NGC 6359 (= PGC 60025)
Discovered (Oct 27, 1861) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
Also observed (Aug 1, 1885) by Lewis Swift
A magnitude 12.6 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Draco (RA 17 17 53.0, Dec +61 46 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6359 (= GC 4298, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 17 16 27, NPD 28 04.5) is "pretty bright, small, round, bright middle and nucleus equal to 12th magnitude star".
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.25 by 0.85 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 6359
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 6359
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 6359

WORKING HERE: Establishing (extremely uncertain) identification

NGC 6360
Recorded (Aug 3, 1834) by
John Herschel
A group of stars in Ophiuchus
(position estimates include RA 17 24 26, Dec -29 52 18 and RA 17 24 36, Dec -29 53 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6360 (= GC 4299 = JH 3685, 1860 RA 17 16 28, NPD 119 51.6) is a "nebula in patches (in the Milky Way)". There is nothing in the region save for regions of the Milky Way separated by irregular clouds of obscuring dust, and which regions Herschel was referring to is very uncertain. As a result, I will leave this "object" for a later update of this page. In the meantime see Corwin for more.

NGC 6361 (= PGC 60045)
Discovered (Aug 18, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.1 spiral galaxy (type SAb?) in Draco (RA 17 18 41.0, Dec +60 36 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6361 (Swift list IV (#48), 1860 RA 17 16 52, NPD 29 14.4) is "very faint, pretty small, much extended, nearly between 2 stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.3 by 0.6 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 6361
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 6361
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 6361

NGC 6362 (= GCL 66)
Discovered (Jun 25, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (Jul 22, 1835) by John Herschel
A magnitude 8.1 globular cluster (type X) in Ara (RA 17 31 54.8, Dec -67 02 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6362 (= GC 4300 = JH 3684, Dunlop 225, 1860 RA 17 17 23, NPD 156 55.8) is a "globular cluster, considerably bright, large, very gradually much brighter middle, well resolved, clearly consisting of stars, stars from 14th to 17th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size about 14 arcmin.
ESO image of region near globular cluster NGC 6362
Above, a 20 arcmin wide image centered on NGC 6362 (Image Credit ESO)
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide image of the core of the cluster (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
HST image of stars in the core of globular cluster NGC 6362

NGC 6363 (=
NGC 6138 = PGC 60164)
Discovered (September, 1872) by Édouard Stephan (and later listed as NGC 6138)
Discovered (Jul 24, 1879) by Édouard Stephan (and later listed as NGC 6363)
A magnitude 13.3 elliptical galaxy (type E2? pec) in Hercules (RA 17 22 40.0, Dec +41 06 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6363 (Stephan list X (#34), 1860 RA 17 18 10, NPD 48 45.9) is "very faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle".
Discovery Notes: Normally an NGC object with duplicate entries is referred to by its lowest NGC number, but in this case the equality of the two listings was not recognized for over a century, so it is most appropriate to refer to this galaxy as NGC 6363. For a history of the confusion involving its identification see NGC 6138.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.9 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 6363, which is also the correct NGC 6138
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 6363
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 6363, which is also the correct NGC 6138

NGC 6364 (= PGC 60228)
Discovered (June? 1865) by
Auguste Voigt
Discovered (Sep 5, 1866) by Truman Safford
Discovered (Jul 21, 1879) by Édouard Stephan
A magnitude 12.9 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Hercules (RA 17 24 27.3, Dec +29 23 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6364 (= Stephan list X (#??), (Voigt 6), (Safford #??), 1860 RA 17 19 01, NPD 60 28.7), is "pretty faint, very small, round, brighter middle equivalent to 13th magnitude star".
Discovery Notes: Voigt's discovery was one of ten nebulae he discovered between March and August of 1865; but they were only noted in his observing records, and were not published until 1987, so Dreyer had no knowledge of his observation. Safford's observations were not as belatedly published, but were sufficiently delayed that Dreyer only became aware of them when in the last stages of preparing the NGC for publication, so they were only partially noted in an appendix, and not at all in any of the individual entries, hence their inclusion in parentheses.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.3 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 6364
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 6364
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 6364

NGC 6365 (=
Arp 30 = PGC 60171 + PGC 60174)
Discovered (Aug 15, 1884) by Lewis Swift
A pair of galaxies in Draco
PGC 60171 = A magnitude 14.2 spiral galaxy (type Sdm?) at RA 17 22 43.5, Dec +62 10 24
PGC 60174 = PGC 60138 = A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type SBcd?) at RA 17 22 44.0, Dec +62 09 57
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6365 (Swift list IV (#49), 180 RA 17 20 16, NPD 27 42.3) is "most extremely faint, pretty large, irregularly round, extremely faint star involved, star to southeast".
Physical Information: Used by the Arp Atlas as an example of a spiral galaxy with one heavy arm, but that is wrong. On Arp's plate the edge-on galaxy (PGC 60171) appears to be part of the face-on spiral (PGC 60174), as its position is where an extension of the face-on galaxy's northwestern spiral arm would be. However, better images show that it is actually a separate galaxy. There is considerable controversy about the relationship of the two galaxies. PGC 60174 has a recessional velocity of 8035 km/sec, while PGC 60171 has a recessional velocity of 8495 km/sec. This implies that the edge-on galaxy is further away, but the difference in their radial velocities is small enough that it could be due to peculiar (non-Hubble expansion) velocities of a few hundred km/sec, in which case the two galaxies could lie relatively close together (though since there is no obvious sign of interaction between the two they are probably not very close together), and the edge-on galaxy might even lie in front of the face-on galaxy, as its figure does not appear to be obscured by the presumably closer galaxy. However, the fainter arms of the face-on galaxy might not be dusty enough to significantly obscure the other galaxy even if it is further away, and the images below, though the best currently available, do not definitively resolve the problem. In addition, although there are numerous queries and suppositions about the relative positions of the galaxies posted online, they all appear speculative, and I can't find any convincing discussion of the situation. So although it is tempting to suppose that the edge-on galaxy is the closer of the two, I am unwilling to say anything other than that the two galaxies are relatively close to each other in comparison to their distance from us. Based on their average recessional velocity of 8265 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that NGC 6365 is about 385 million light years away, with a separation of 20 million light years between the individual galaxies if their peculiar velocities are of no consequence. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxies were about 375 million light years away at the time the light by which we see them was emitted, about 380 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 1.15 by 0.85 arcmin, PGC 60174 is about 120 thousand light years across, while PGC 60171's apparent size of 1.1 by 0.2 arcmin corresponds to about 120 to 125 thousand light years (depending upon whether it is closer or further than its apparent companion). Note: The face-on galaxy (PGC 60174) is a Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 1).
Lemmon SkyCenter image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 60171 and spiral galaxy PGC 60174, which comprise NGC 6365, also known as Arp 30
Above, a 12 arcmin wide image centered on NGC 6365, also known as Arp 30
(Image Credit & © above and below Adam Block/Mount Lemmon SkyCenter/University of Arizona; used by permission)
Below, a 2.0 arcmin wide image of the two galaxies
Lemmon SkyCenter image of spiral galaxy pair NGC 6365, also known as Arp 30

NGC 6366 (= GCL 65)
Discovered (Apr 12, 1860) by
August Winnecke
Also observed (date?) by Arthur von Auwers
A magnitude 9.5 globular cluster (type XI) in Ophiuchus (RA 17 27 44.3, Dec -05 04 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6366 (= GC 4301, Winnecke, 1860 17 20 19, NPD 94 57.0) is "faint, large, very little brighter middle (= Auwers 36)".
Physical Information: Apparent size about 13 arcmin.
DSS image of region near globular cluster NGC 6366
Above, a 15 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6366
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide image of the core of the cluster (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
HST image of core of globular cluster NGC 6366

NGC 6367 (= PGC 60251)
Discovered (Jul 5, 1880) by
Édouard Stephan
A magnitude 14.2 spiral galaxy (type (R)Sa?) in Hercules (RA 17 25 09.0, Dec +37 45 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6367 (Stephan list XI (#18), 1860 RA 17 20 22, NPD 52 07.0) is a "very faint star in very faint, very small, round nebula".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.75 by 0.6 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 6367
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 6367
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 6367

WORKING HERE: adding pix, physical info, etc

NGC 6368 (= PGC 60315)
Discovered (Jul 9, 1863) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 12.3 spiral galaxy (type Sb??) in Ophiuchus (RA 17 27 11.4, Dec +11 32 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6368 (= GC 5860, Marth #335, 1860 RA 17 20 39, NPD 78 20) is "faint, small, extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.5 by 0.6? arcmin.

NGC 6369, The Little Ghost Nebula
Discovered (May 21, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Jul 1, 1826) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.4 planetary nebula in Ophiuchus (RA 17 29 20.4, Dec -23 45 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6369 (= GC 4302 = JH 1981 = JH 3686 = WH IV 11, 1860 RA 17 20 49, NPD 113 38.5) is "very remarkable, an annular nebula, pretty bright, small, round".
Physical Information: The Little Ghost Nebula is a planetary nebula between two and five thousand light years away, of about 1.1 by 0.7 arcmin apparent size. Planetary nebulae are clouds of gas blown off red giant stars in the last stages of their life. If enough gas is ejected, what is left of the star is unable to compress the core of the star enough to produce any further nuclear reactions, and the star collapses to form a white dwarf (the star near the center of the nebula). Prior to the collapse, the star might have been several hundred million miles across. Afterwards, it is less than ten thousand miles across, and as a result, has a density close to a million times the density of water. The central more or less circular core of the nebula is a light year or two across, while the fainter outer regions cover about twice that distance. Both regions are expanding at about 15 miles per second, and will dissipate into interstellar space and fade from view over the next ten thousand or so years, partly because of their gradually decreasing density, and partly because the white dwarf is currently very hot, and emitting large amounts of ultraviolet radiation, which is energizing the nebula. As the white dwarf cools, its ultraviolet radiation will diminish, which would cause the nebula to fade from view even if it didn't dissipate.
DSS image of region near planetary nebula NGC 6369, the Little Ghost Nebula
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6369, the Little Ghost Nebula
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide image of the nebula (Image Credit: HST, NASA/ESA)
Note concerning the HST image below: To bring out details not visible in a true-color image, the HST image below uses "false-color" blue, green and red colors to represent radiation from double ionized oxygen, and singly ionized hydrogen and nitrogen atoms, respectively. If the nebula were observed with a large enough telescope to see some hint of color, it would actually appear to be a pale greenish-gray; gray, because almost all planetary nebulae are too faint to be seen in color, and greenish, because our eyes are most sensitive to that type of light.
HST closeup of planetary nebula NGC 6369, the Little Ghost Nebula

NGC 6370 (= PGC 60192)
Discovered (Apr 19, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 12.9 elliptical galaxy (type E0??) in Draco (RA 17 23 25.1, Dec +56 58 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6370 (Swift list I (#57), 1860 RA 17 20 54, NPD 32 53.7) is "very faint, very small, round, bright star near to north".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.4? arcmin.

NGC 6371 (= PGC 60322)
Discovered (Jun 24, 1864) by
Albert Marth
Discovered (Aug 1, 1866) by Truman Safford
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Hercules (RA 17 27 20.6, Dec +26 30 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6371 (= GC 5861, Marth #336, (Safford #??), 1860 RA 17 21 43, NPD 63 22) is "very faint, small, round, northwestern of 2", the other being NGC 6372.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.3? arcmin.

NGC 6372 (= PGC 60330)
Discovered (May 19, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Albert Marth
A magnitude 12.9 spiral galaxy (type Sc??) in Hercules (RA 17 27 31.9, Dec +26 28 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6372 (= GC 4303 = WH III 137, Marth (#??), 1860 RA 17 21 55, NPD 63 24.8) is "very faint, pretty small, irregular figure, southeastern of 2", the other being NGC 6371.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.1? arcmin.

NGC 6373 (= PGC 60220)
Discovered (Jun 13, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type SBc??) in Draco (RA 17 24 08.0, Dec +58 59 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6373 (Swift list I (#58), 1860 RA 17 22 08, NPD 30 52.5) is "most extremely faint, pretty large, very difficult".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.0? arcmin

NGC 6374 (=
NGC 6383 = OCL 1026)
Discovered (Aug 3, 1834) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 6383)
Discovered (Jun 28, 1837) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 6374)
A magnitude 5.5 open cluster (type IV3p) in Scorpius (RA 17 34 42.2, Dec -32 34 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6374 (= GC 4304 = JH 3687, 1860 RA 17 22 58, NPD 122 28.8) is a "cluster, small, poor, bright star involved". Cf Corwin for a discussion of the double listing.
Physical Information: Apparent size 20? arcmin.

NGC 6375 (= PGC 60384)
Discovered (May 15, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 13.9 elliptical galaxy (type E0??) in Hercules (RA 17 29 21.8, Dec +16 12 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6375 (= GC 5862 = Marth #337, 1860 RA 17 23 06, NPD 73 40) is "faint, very small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.6? arcmin.

NGC 6376 (= PGC 60258)
Discovered (Sep 1, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 14.8 spiral galaxy (type Sc? pec) in Draco (RA 17 25 19.2, Dec +58 49 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6376 (Swift list IV (#50), 1860 RA 17 23 18, NPD 31 03.4) is "most extremely faint, extremely small, round, very difficult".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.3? arcmin. Interacting with NGC 6377.
SDSS image of region near interacting spiral galaxies NGC 6376 and 6377
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on interacting galaxies NGC 6376 and 6377
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the pair
SDSS image of interacting spiral galaxies NGC 6376 and 6377

NGC 6377 (= PGC 60264)
Discovered (Sep 1, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 14.9 spiral galaxy (type Sbc? pec) in Draco (RA 17 25 23.0, Dec +58 49 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6377 (Swift list IV (#51), 1860 RA 17 23 23, NPD 31 03.1) is "extremely faint, extremely small, round, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.3? arcmin. Interacting with NGC 6376, which see for images.

NGC 6378 (= PGC 60418)
Discovered (Jul 13, 1876) by
Édouard Stephan
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type Sbc??) in Ophiuchus (RA 17 30 41.8, Dec +06 16 53)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6378 (= GC 5863, Stephan list VII (#17), 1860 RA 17 23 53, NPD 83 36.4) is "very difficult".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.9? arcmin.

NGC 6379 (= PGC 60421)
Discovered (May 15, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 12.9 spiral galaxy (type Sc??) in Hercules (RA 17 30 35.0, Dec +16 17 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6379 (= GC 5864, Marth #338, 1860 RA 17 24 20, NPD 73 35) is "very faint, pretty large".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 1.0? arcmin.

NGC 6380 (= GCL 68)
Discovered (Jun 29, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.5 globular cluster in Scorpius (RA 17 34 28.0, Dec -39 04 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6380 (= GC 4305 = JH 3688, 1860 RA 17 24 47, NPD 128 58.0) is "extremely faint, pretty small, a little extended, 9th magnitude star attached".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.6? arcmin.

NGC 6381 (= PGC 60321)
Discovered (Jul 7, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type Sc??) in Draco (RA 17 27 16.9, Dec +60 00 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6381 (Swift list I (#59), 1860 RA 17 25 25, NPD 29 52.7) is "very faint, pretty large, extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.0? arcmin.

NGC 6382 (= PGC 60342)
Discovered (Jun 2, 1883) by
Edward Swift
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Draco (RA 17 27 55.2, Dec +56 52 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6382 (Swift list I (#60), 1860 RA 17 25 33, NPD 33 01.3) is "pretty faint, pretty small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7? arcmin.

NGC 6383 (=
NGC 6374 = OCL 1026)
Discovered (Aug 3, 1834) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 6383)
Discovered (Jun 27, 1837) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 6374)
A magnitude 5.5 open cluster (type IV3p) in Scorpius (RA 17 34 42.2, Dec -32 34 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6383 (= GC 4306 = JH 3689, 1860 RA 17 25 34, NPD 122 28.6) is a "cluster, stars from 13th magnitude, magnitude 6 or 7 star in middle". Cf Corwin for a discussion of the double listing.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 6374 for anything else.

NGC 6384 (= PGC 60459)
Discovered (Jun 10, 1863) by
Albert Marth
Also observed (Apr 8, 1866) by Heinrich d'Arrest
Also observed (Jul 19, 1870) by Édouard Stephan
A magnitude 10.4 spiral galaxy (type SBbc??) in Ophiuchus (RA 17 32 24.2, Dec +07 03 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6384 (= GC 5865, d'Arrest, Marth #339, Stephan list II (#??), 1860 RA 17 25 38, NPD 82 50.0) is "pretty bright, small, very little extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 6.2 by 4.1? arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 6384
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 6384
Below, a 6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 6384
Below, a 3.2 by 3.5 arcmin wide image of part of the galaxy (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
NOAO image of spiral galaxy NGC 6384
Below, a 3 by 1.5 arcmin image of the nucleus, rotated to show more detail (Image Credit ESA/Hubble/NASA)
HST image of nucleus of spiral galaxy NGC 6384

NGC 6385 (= PGC 60343)
Discovered (Jul 22, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.1 spiral galaxy (type SBa??) in Draco (RA 17 28 01.5, Dec +57 31 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6385 (Swift list IV (#52), 1860 RA 17 25 39, NPD 32 21.6) is "extremely faint, small, round, bright star to south".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.3? arcmin.

NGC 6386 (= PGC 60367)
Discovered (Jun 8, 1883) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 14.2 spiral galaxy (type Sbc??) in Draco (RA 17 28 51.7, Dec +52 43 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6386 (Swift list IV (I #61), 1860 RA 17 25 56, NPD 37 10.4) is "very faint, pretty small, round, between 2 stars".
Discovery Notes: Dreyer says list IV, but Steinicke says list I #61; need to check before finalizing.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 1.0? arcmin.

NGC 6387 (= PGC 60355)
Discovered (Jul 22, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 15.7 compact galaxy (type C??) in Draco (RA 17 28 23.9, Dec +57 32 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6387 (Swift list IV (#53), 1860 RA 17 25 59, NPD 32 20.6) is "extremely faint, small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.3 by 0.2? arcmin.

NGC 6388 (= GCL 70)
Discovered (May 13, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also discovered (Jun 3, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 6.8 globular cluster (type III) in Scorpius (RA 17 36 17.0, Dec -44 44 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6388 (= GC 4307 = JH 3690, Dunlop 457, 1860 RA 17 26 03, NPD 134 38.5) is a "globular cluster, very bright, large, round, pretty gradually, then pretty suddenly very much brighter middle, well resolved, clearly consisting of stars, stars from 17th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 10.4? arcmin.

NGC 6389 (= PGC 60466)
Discovered (Jun 29, 1799) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Jul 7, 1878) by Christian Peters
A magnitude 12.1 spiral galaxy (type Sbc??) in Hercules (RA 17 32 39.7, Dec +16 24 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6389 (= GC 4308 = WH II 901, Peters, 1860 RA 17 26 24, NPD 73 30.5) is "faint, small, irregular figure, extremely mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.8 by 1.9? arcmin.

NGC 6390 (= PGC 60356)
Discovered (Jul 7, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type Sbc??) in Draco (RA 17 28 28.1, Dec +60 05 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6390 (Swift list I (#62), 1860 RA 17 26 31, NPD 29 41.7) is "most extremely faint, much extended, very difficult".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.4? arcmin.

NGC 6391 (= PGC 60358)
Discovered (Sep 1, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 14.5 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0??) in Draco (RA 17 28 49.0, Dec +58 51 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6391 (Swift list IV (#54), 1860 RA 17 26 33, NPD 31 02.2) is "extremely faint, very small, round, nearly between 2 stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7? arcmin.

NGC 6392 (= PGC 60753)
Discovered (Jun 17, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.6 spiral galaxy (type Sab??) in Apus (RA 17 43 30.6, Dec -69 47 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6392 (= GC 4309 = JH 3691, 1860 RA 17 27 58, NPD 159 41.3) is "considerably faint, small, round, gradually a little brighter middle, 13th magnitude star to southwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.3? arcmin.

NGC 6393 (= PGC 60405)
Discovered (Jul 7, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 15.7 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Draco (RA 17 30 08.5, Dec +59 31 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6393 (Swift list I (#64), 1860 RA 17 28 25, NPD 30 15.4) is "extremely faint, pretty small, round, southern of 2", the other being NGC 6394. The first IC adds "Swift list IX #81 assumed identical with this". Cf Corwin for a discussion of the considerable uncertainty about the identification of this and NGC 6394.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.3 by 0.3? arcmin.

NGC 6394 (= PGC 60410)
Discovered (Jul 7, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type SBb??) in Draco (RA 17 30 21.3, Dec +59 38 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6394 (Swift list I (#65), 1860 RA 17 28 25, NPD 30 11.8) is "extremely faint, pretty small, round, northern of 2", the other being NGC 6393. Cf Corwin for a discussion of the considerable uncertainty about the identification of this and NGC 6393.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.4? arcmin.

NGC 6395 (= PC 60291)
Discovered (Sep 18, 1884) by
Edward Swift
Also observed (date?) by Guillaume Bigourdan (while listed as NGC 6395)
A magnitude 12.3 spiral galaxy (type Sc?? pec) in Draco (RA 17 26 31.0, Dec +71 05 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6395 (Swift list I (#63), 1860 RA 17 28 50, NPD 18 48.2) is "very faint, pretty large, a little extended, double star to north". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Bigourdan) of 17 28 22.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.4 by 0.7? arcmin.

NGC 6396 (= OCL 1018)
Discovered (Jun 7, 1837) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 8.5 open cluster (type II3p) in Scorpius (RA 17 37 36.2, Dec -35 01 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6396 (= GC 4310 = JH 3693, 1860 RA 17 28 51, NPD 124 54.8) is a "cluster, pretty large, a little rich, a little compressed".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0? arcmin.

NGC 6397 (= GCL 74)
Discovered (1751) by
Nicolas Lacaille
Also observed (Jun 28, 1826) by James Dunlop
Also observed (Jul 8, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 5.3 globular cluster (type IX) in Ara (RA 17 40 41.3, Dec -53 40 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6397 (= GC 4311 = JH 3692, Lacaille III 11, Dunlop 366, 1860 RA 17 29 17, NPD 143 35.1) is a "globular cluster, bright, very large, rich, stars from 13th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 31? arcmin.
DSS image of region near globular cluster NGC 6397
Above, a 42 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6397
Below, a ? arcmin wide image (Image Credit & © Daniel Verschatse, Observatorio Antilhue; used by permission)
Observatorio Antilhue image of region near globular cluster NGC 6397
Below, a ? arcmin wide 2001 image of part of the core of the cluster
(Image Credit European Space Agency & Francesco Ferraro (Bologna Astronomical Observatory))
HST image of core of globular cluster NGC 6397
Below, a ? arcmin wide 2006 closeup of the central portion of the cluster
(Image Credit NASA, ESA and H. Richer (University of British Columbia))
2006 HST image of core of globular cluster NGC 6397

NGC 6398 (= PGC 60735)
Discovered (Jul 7, 1836) by
John Herschel
Also observed (date?) by DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 12.7 spiral galaxy (type (R)SB(r)a?) in Pavo (RA 17 42 43.9, Dec -61 41 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6398 (= GC 4312 = JH 3694, 1860 RA 17 29 49, NPD 151 36.1) is "extremely faint, small, round, preceding of 2", the other being NGC 6403. The second IC adds (per DeLisle Stewart) "extremely faint, hazy star only".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5365 km/sec, NGC 6398 is about 250 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 2.0 by 1.7? arcmin, it is about 145 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 6398, also showing NGC 6403
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6398, also showing NGC 6403
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 6398

NGC 6399 (= PGC 60442)
Discovered (Jul 7, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.7 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a??) in Draco (RA 17 31 50.4, Dec +59 36 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6399 (Swift list I (#66), 1860 RA 17 29 50, NPD 30 17.8) is "extremely faint, very small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.6? arcmin.
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 6300 - 6349) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 6350 - 6399     → (NGC 6400 - 6449)