Celestial Atlas
(NGC 6350 - 6399) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 6400 - 6449 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 6450 - 6499)
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6400, 6401, 6402, 6403, 6404, 6405, 6406, 6407, 6408, 6409, 6410, 6411, 6412, 6413, 6414, 6415, 6416,
6417, 6418, 6419, 6420, 6421, 6422, 6423, 6424, 6425, 6426, 6427, 6428, 6429, 6430, 6431, 6432, 6433,
6434, 6435, 6436, 6437, 6438, 6439, 6440, 6441, 6442, 6443, 6444, 6445, 6446, 6447, 6448, 6449

Page last updated Mar 20, 2017
Added Dreyer NGC entries
WORKING: Add/update Steinicke listings/data, check IDs

NGC 6400 (= OCL 1014)
Discovered (May 13, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 9th-magnitude open cluster (type II2m) in Scorpius (RA 17 40 12.0, Dec -36 57 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6400 (= GC 4313 = JH 3696, Dunlop 568, 1860 RA 17 30 02, NPD 126 51.5) is "a cluster, pretty large, pretty rich, irregularly round, stars from 9th to 10th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 12? arcmin

NGC 6401 (= GCL 73)
Discovered (May 21, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 7th-magnitude globular cluster (type VIII) in Ophiuchus (RA 17 38 36.9, Dec -23 54 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6401 (= GC 4314 = JH 1982 = JH 3697 = WH I 44, 1860 RA 17 30 06, NPD 113 49.6) is "pretty bright, pretty large, round, 12th magnitude star involved on east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.8? arcmin

NGC 6402 (=
M14 = GCL 72)
Discovered (Jun 1, 1764) by Charles Messier (and recorded as M 14)
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
An 8th-magnitude globular cluster (type VIII) in Ophiuchus (RA 17 37 36.1, Dec -03 14 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6402 (= GC 4315 = JH 1983 = JH 3698, M 14, 1860 RA 17 30 15, NPD 93 09.5) is "a remarkable object, a globular cluster, bright, very large, round, extremely rich, very gradually much brighter middle, well resolved, clearly consisting of stars, stars from 15th magnitude".
Physical Information: About 29000 light years away, and 70 light years across. Apparent size 11? arcmin.
NOAO image of globular cluster NGC 6402, also known as M14
Above, a ? arcmin wide image centered on NGC 6402 (Image Credit AURA, NSF, NOAO)
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of the globular cluster
(Image Credit and © Jim Misti, Misti Mountain Observatory; used by permission)
Misti Mountain Observatory image of globular cluster NGC 6402, also known as M14

NGC 6403 (= PGC 60750)
Discovered (Jun 28, 1834) by
John Herschel
Also observed (date?) by DeLisle Stewart
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Pavo (RA 17 43 23.6, Dec -61 40 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6403 (= GC 4316 = JH 3695, 1860 RA 17 30 19, NPD 151 36.1) is "most extremely faint, eastern of 2", the other being NGC 6398. The second IC adds the description (per DeLisle Stewart) "extremely faint, hazy star only".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.5? arcmin.

NGC 6404 (= OCL 1024)
Discovered (Jun 27, 1837) by
John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude open cluster (type III3m) in Scorpius (RA 17 39 37.3, Dec -33 14 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6404 (= GC 4317 = JH 4020, hon, 1860 RA 17 30 26, NPD 123 09.3) is "a cluster, faint, large, pretty rich, a little compressed, stars from 13th to 15th magnitude".
Discovery Notes: "hon" refers to the fact that JH 4020 was inadvertently omitted from its proper position in Herschel's Cape Catalog, but was listed in the errata at the end of the volume, thereby allowing Dreyer to include the observation in his NGC entry.
Physical Information: Apparent size 6.0? arcmin

NGC 6405 (=
M6 = OCL 1030) -- The Butterfly Cluster
Discovered (before 1654) by Giovanni Hodierna
Recorded (1764) by Charles Messier as M6
Also observed (date?) by Nicolas Lacaille
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 4th-magnitude open cluster (type III2p) in Scorpius (RA 17 40 20.0, Dec -32 15 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6405 (= GC 4318 = JH 3699, Lacaille III 12, M 6, 1860 RA 17 30 56, NPD 122 07.1) is "a cluster, large, irregularly round, a little compressed, stars of 7th magnitude and from 10th magnitude". (Note: See the discussion of Hodierna for an explanation of why he was not credited with the discovery of this or any other NGC object.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 33? arcmin.
NOAO image of open cluster NGC 6405, the Butterfly Cluster, also known as M6
Above, a ? arcmin wide image of NGC 6405
(Image Credit N.A.Sharp, Mark Hanna, REU program/NOAO/AURA/NSF)
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of the open cluster
(Image Credit and © Jim Misti, Misti Mountain Observatory; used by permission)
Misti Mountain Observatory image of open cluster NGC 6405, the Butterfly Cluster, also known as M6

NGC 6406
Recorded (Jun 10, 1885) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A pair of stars in Hercules (RA 17 38 19.2, Dec +18 49 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6406 (Bigourdan (list II #81), 1860 RA 17 32 14, NPD 71 05) is "very faint, extremely small, stellar".

NGC 6407 (= PGC 60796)
Discovered (Aug 7, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Pavo (RA 17 44 57.8, Dec -60 44 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6407 (= GC 4319 = JH 3700, 1860 RA 17 32 15, NPD 150 39.7) is "extremely faint, small, round, 3 stars near".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 1.6? arcmin

NGC 6408 (= PGC 60637)
Discovered (Jun 2, 1864) by
Albert Marth
Also observed (date?) by Édouard Stephan
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Hercules (RA 17 38 47.3, Dec +18 52 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6408 (= GC 5866, Marth #340, Stephan list II (#??), 1860 RA 17 32 41, NPD 71 02.4) is "faint, small, irregularly round, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.4? arcmin

NGC 6409 (= PGC 60565)
Discovered (Jun 18, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
Also observed by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Draco (RA 17 36 35.3, Dec +50 45 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6409 (Swift list I (#67), 1860 RA 17 32 46, NPD 39 08.9) is "very faint, small, round". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Bigourdan) of 17 33 12.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.6? arcmin.

NGC 6410
Recorded (May 2, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
A pair of stars in Draco (RA 17 35 20.5, Dec +60 47 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6410 (Swift list VI (#93), 1860 RA 17 33 33, NPD 29 05.6) is "most extremely faint, small, round, nearly between 2 stars, southwestern of 2", the other being NGC 6411.

NGC 6411 (= PGC 60536)
Discovered (Oct 27, 1861) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E4?) in Draco (RA 17 35 32.6, Dec +60 48 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6411 (= GC 4320, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 17 33 56, NPD 29 06.7) is "very small, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0 by 1.3? arcmin

NGC 6412 (=
Arp 38 = PGC 60393)
Discovered (Dec 12, 1797) by William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SA(s)c?) in Draco (RA 17 29 36.9, Dec +75 42 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6412 (= GC 4321 = WH VI 41, 1860 RA 17 34 08, NPD 14 11.2) is "a globular cluster, considerably large, round, very gradually brighter middle, partially resolved (some stars seen)".0
Physical Information: The galaxy's Arp classification is a spiral galaxy with faint companions, but it appears that the "companions" are simply bright star clouds scattered along its somewhat chaotic arms. Based on a recessional velocity of 1315 km/sec, NGC 6412 is about 60 million light years away, in fair agreement with a redshift-independent distance estimate of 75 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 2.6 by 2.2? arcmin, it is about 45 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 6412, also known as Arp 38
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6412
Below, a 3 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 6412, also known as Arp 38
Below, a ? arcmin wide HST image of the galaxy (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
Relatively raw HST image of spiral galaxy NGC 6412, also known as Arp 38

NGC 6413
Recorded (Jul 20, 1870) by
Édouard Stephan
Four stars in Ophiuchus (RA 17 40 40.7, Dec +12 37 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6413 (= GC 5867, Stephan list II (#16), 1860 RA 17 34 13, NPD 77 18.0) is "very faint, very small, suddenly much brighter middle".

NGC 6414 (= PGC 60416)
Discovered (May 30, 1886) by
Lewis Swift (3-94)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S??) in Draco (RA 17 30 36.7, Dec +74 22 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6414 (Swift list III (#94), 1860 RA 17 34 27, NPD 15 33.0) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, round, very difficult, between 2 stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.5? arcmin

NGC 6415
Discovered (Aug 26, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A group of stars in Scorpius (RA 17 44 18.0, Dec -35 04 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6415 (= GC 4322 = JH 3701, (Dunlop 595, 596), 1860 RA 17 35, NPD 124 56.5) is a "nebulous portion of the Milky Way".
Discovery Notes: Neither Herschel nor Dreyer thought Dunlop had observed this, but current thinking is that it represents his #595 and 596, hence the reference shown in parentheses.
Physical Information: Apparent size 23? arcmin

NGC 6416 (= OCL 1031)
Discovered (May 13, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 6th-magnitude open cluster (type IV1p) in Scorpius (RA 17 44 19.9, Dec -32 21 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6416 (= GC 4323 = JH 3702, Dunlop 612, 1860 RA 17 35 09, NPD 122 17.0) is "a cluster, very large, rich, a little compressed".
Physical Information: Apparent size 15? arcmin

NGC 6417 (= PGC 60709)
Discovered (Jul 2, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Hercules (RA 17 41 47.8, Dec +23 40 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6417 (= GC 5868, Marth #341, 1860 RA 17 36 00, NPD 66 15) is "pretty faint, small, very little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.3? arcmin

NGC 6418 (= PGC 60610)
Discovered (May 4, 1885) by
Edward Swift
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S??) in Draco (RA 17 38 09.4, Dec +58 42 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6418 (Swift list I (#68), 1860 RA 17 36 16, NPD 31 11.4) is "extremely faint, pretty small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.4? arcmin

NGC 6419 (= PGC 60543)
Discovered (Aug 17, 1883) by
Lewis Swift
Also observed (date?) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Draco (RA 17 36 05.6, Dec +68 09 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6419 (Swift list II (#55), 1860 RA 17 36 26, NPD 21 45.6) is "most extremely faint, extremely small, round, very difficult". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Bigourdan) of 17 36 42.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.3? arcmin.

NGC 6420 (= PGC 60553)
Discovered (Aug 17, 1883) by
Lewis Swift
Also observed (date?) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Draco (RA 17 36 16.2, Dec +68 03 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6420 (Swift list II (#56), 1860 RA 17 36 26, NPD 21 52.3) is "most extremely faint, extremely small, round, very difficult". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Bigourdan) of 17 36 50.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.3? arcmin.

NGC 6421
Discovered (Aug 3, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude star group in Scorpius (RA 17 45 44.0, Dec -33 41 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6421 (= GC 4324 = JH 3702, 1860 RA 17 36 30, NPD 123 37.6) is "a cluster, very large, pretty rich, stars from 8th to 12th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 45? arcmin

NGC 6422 (= PGC 60558)
Discovered (Aug 1, 1883) by
Lewis Swift
Also observed (date?) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Draco (RA 17 36 29.8, Dec +68 03 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6422 (Swift list II (#57), 1860 RA 17 36 46, NPD 21 51.8) is "extremely faint, pretty small, round, nearly between 2 stars". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Bigourdan) of 17 37 03 and adds "NGC 6423 is 26 seconds east, 7 arcmin north".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.6? arcmin.

NGC 6423 (= PGC 60576)
Discovered (Aug 1, 1883) by
Lewis Swift
A 15th-magnitude compact galaxy (type C??) in Draco (RA 17 36 53.2, Dec +68 10 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6423 (Swift list II (#58), 1860 RA 17 37 16, NPD 21 45.8) is "most extremely faint, very small, round, star close to east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.5? arcmin

NGC 6424 (= PGC 60552)
Discovered (Aug 5, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Draco (RA 17 36 12.0, Dec +69 59 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6424 (Swift list II (#59), 1860 RA 17 37 25, NPD 19 56.2) is "very faint, pretty small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.6? arcmin

NGC 6425 (= OCL 1033)
Discovered (Aug 3, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 7th-magnitude open cluster (type I1p) in Scorpius (RA 17 47 00.0, Dec -31 31 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6425 (= GC 4326 = JH 3703, 1860 RA 17 37 56, NPD 121 28.0) is "a cluster, pretty small, a little rich, a little compressed, stars from 10th to 12th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 10? arcmin

NGC 6426 (= GCL 76)
Discovered (Jul 15, 1781) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Édouard Stephan
An 11th-magnitude globular cluster (type IX) in Ophiuchus (RA 17 44 54.7, Dec +03 10 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6426 (= GC 4325 = GC 5870 = WH II 587, Stephan list VII (#??), 1860 RA 17 37 56, NPD 86 45.9) is "very faint, considerably large, extended, very little brighter middle".
Discovery Notes: Herschel's published papers list the date of his first observation of WH II 587 as Jun 3, 1786, but according to Steinicke, he had already observed it before (presumably during studies of double stars) on Jul 15, 1781, as shown above.
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.2? arcmin

NGC 6427 (=
NGC 6431 = PGC 60758)
Discovered (Jul 2, 1864) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 6427)
Recorded (Jun 23, 1870) by Édouard Stephan (and later listed as NGC 6431)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Hercules (RA 17 43 38.5, Dec +25 29 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6427 (= GC 5869, Marth #342, 1860 RA 17 37 57, NPD 64 25) is "very faint, very small, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.6? arcmin

NGC 6428
Recorded (Jul 7, 1885) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A pair of stars in Hercules (RA 17 43 52.4, Dec +25 33 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6428 (Bigourdan (list II #82), 1860 RA 17 38 13, NPD 64 24) is "very faint, small, stellar".

NGC 6429 (= PGC 60770)
Discovered (Jul 2, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Hercules (RA 17 44 05.3, Dec +25 21 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6429 (= GC 5871, Marth #343, 1860 RA 17 38 22, NPD 64 34) is "faint, small, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 0.7? arcmin

NGC 6430 (= PGC 60805)
Discovered (Jun 2, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Hercules (RA 17 45 14.2, Dec +18 08 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6430 (= GC 5872, Marth #344, 1860 RA 17 38 27, NPD 71 47) is "very faint, small, much extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 0.6? arcmin

NGC 6431 (=
NGC 6427 = PGC 60758)
Discovered (Jul 2, 1864) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 6427)
Recorded (Jun 23, 1870) by Édouard Stephan (and later listed as NGC 6431)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Hercules (RA 17 43 38.5, Dec +25 29 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6431 (= GC 5873, Stephan list I (#7), 1860 RA 17 38 35, NPD 64 25.5) is "very faint, very small, round".
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 6427 for anything else.

NGC 6432
Recorded (Jul 1, 1826) by
John Herschel
Also observed by Herbert Howe
A group of 4 stars in Sagittarius (RA 17 47 22.4, Dec -24 53 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6432 (= GC 4327 = JH 1984, 1860 RA 17 38 46, NPD 114 49.9) is "a cluster, stars very small". The second IC adds (per Howe) "Only 4 stars, 12th to 13th magnitude".

NGC 6433 (= PGC 60766)
Discovered (Jul 9, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Hercules (RA 17 43 56.2, Dec +36 48 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6433 (= GC 5874, Marth #345, 1860 RA 17 39 08, NPD 53 09) is "very faint, small, pretty much extended, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0 by 0.5? arcmin

NGC 6434 (= PGC 60573)
Discovered (Jun 6, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Draco (RA 17 36 48.8, Dec +72 05 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6434 (= GC 4328 = JH 1987 = WH III 741, 1860 RA 17 39 12, NPD 17 49.4) is "very faint, very small, round, stellar, 8th magnitude star to south".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.3 by 1.0? arcmin

NGC 6435 (= PGC 60667)
Discovered (Jun 15, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude compact galaxy (type C??) in Draco (RA 17 40 11.1, Dec +62 38 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6435 (Swift list VI (IX #86), 1860 RA 17 39 15, NPD 27 16.3) is "most extremely faint, very small, round, very faint double star near to east".
Discovery Notes: This is one of several objects included in a pre-publication version of Swift's list VI that he sent to Dreyer in 1887 that were inadvertently left out of the published paper; for most, including this one, the omission was corrected by including them in Swift's list IX, whence the reference in parentheses.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.6? arcmin

NGC 6436 (= PGC 60695)
Discovered (Sep 25, 1884) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Draco (RA 17 41 13.2, Dec +60 26 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6436 (Swift list V (#74), 1860 RA 17 39 34, NPD 29 28.2) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, a little extended, triple star near".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.8? arcmin

NGC 6437
Discovered (Jun 7, 1837) by
John Herschel
A group of stars in Scorpius (RA 17 48 24.0, Dec -35 21 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6437 (= GC 4329 = JH 3704, 1860 RA 17 39 40, NPD 125 22.8) is "a cluster, faint, extremely large, very small stars and nebula".
Physical Information: Apparent size 40? arcmin

NGC 6438 (= PGC 61787)
Discovered (Jun 2, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Octans (RA 18 22 15.9, Dec -85 24 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6438 (= GC 4330 = JH 3701, 1860 RA 17 39 43, NPD 175 24.4) is "pretty bright, round, very gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.4? arcmin. Certainly a double (and perhaps a triple) system with PGC 61793.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 6438 and ring galaxy PGC 61793, also known as NGC 6438A
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6438 and it companion, PGC 61793
Below, a 3 arcmin wide DSS image of the pair
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 6438 and ring galaxy PGC 61793, also known as NGC 6438A

PGC 61793 (= "NGC 6438A")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 6438A
A 12th-magnitude ring galaxy (type Ring B??) in
Octans (RA 18 22 33.0, Dec -85 24 22)
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.7 by 1.0 arcmin. Suggested as a pair of disk galaxies undergoing a merger. See NGC 6438 for images.

NGC 6439
Discovered (Aug 18, 1882) by
Edward Pickering
A 13th-magnitude planetary nebula in Sagittarius (RA 17 48 19.8, Dec -16 28 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6439 (Pickering (HN 48), 1860 RA 17 40 13, NPD 106 26) is "a planetary nebula, stellar object equivalent to 13th magnitude star".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.23? arcmin

NGC 6440 (= GCL 77)
Discovered (May 28, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 9th-magnitude globular cluster (type V) in Sagittarius (RA 17 48 52.6, Dec -20 21 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6440 (= GC 4331 = JH 1985 = WH I 150, 1860 RA 17 40 34, NPD 110 18.5) is "pretty bright, pretty large, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.4? arcmin

NGC 6441 (= GCL 78)
Discovered (May 13, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 7th-magnitude globular cluster (type III) in Scorpius (RA 17 50 12.9, Dec -37 03 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6441 (= GC 4332 = JH 3705, Dunlop 557, 1860 RA 17 40 42, NPD 127 00.1) is "a globular cluster, very bright, pretty large, round, very gradually much brighter middle, well resolved, clearly consisting of stars, stars from 18th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 9.6? arcmin

NGC 6442 (= PGC 60844)
Discovered (Jun 2, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Hercules (RA 17 46 51.3, Dec +20 45 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6442 (= GC 5875, Marth #346, 1860 RA 17 40 50, NPD 69 10) is "pretty faint, small, irregularly round, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 1.6? arcmin

NGC 6443 (= PGC 60783)
Discovered (Oct 22, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Hercules (RA 17 44 33.7, Dec +48 06 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6443 (Swift list V (#75), 1860 RA 17 40 55, NPD 41 48.8) is "extremely faint, pretty small, a little extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.5? arcmin

NGC 6444 (= OCL 1023)
Discovered (Jun 28, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (Jun 7, 1837) by John Herschel
An open cluster (type III2m) in Scorpius (RA 17 49 35.1, Dec -34 49 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6444 (= GC 4334 = JH 3706, Dunlop 597?, 1860 RA 17 40 55, NPD 124 48.8) is "a cluster, very large, very rich, stars from 12th to 13th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 12? arcmin

NGC 6445, the Little Gem Nebula
Discovered (May 28, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude planetary nebula in Sagittarius (RA 17 49 15.1, Dec -20 00 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6445 (= GC 4333 = JH 1986 = WH II 586, 1860 RA 17 40 57, NPD 109 57.5) is "pretty bright, pretty small, round, gradually brighter middle, mottled but not resolved, 15th magnitude star to northwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.73? arcmin

NGC 6446 (= PGC 60825)
Discovered (Jul 9, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Hercules (RA 17 46 07.5, Dec +35 34 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6446 (= GC 5876, Marth #347, 1860 RA 17 41 10, NPD 54 22) is "extremely faint, very small, irregularly round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.6? arcmin. A relatively close companion of NGC 6447, and possibly a gravitationally bound pair with that galaxy. Also, given its appearance, possibly a conglomeration of several smaller galaxies itself.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxies NGC 6446 and 6447
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered between NGC 6446 and NGC 6447
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy (or group of galaxies) listed as NGC 6446
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 6446 (or possibly a conglomeration of several smaller galaxies)

NGC 6447 (= PGC 60829)
Discovered (Jul 9, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Hercules (RA 17 46 17.1, Dec +35 34 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6447 (= GC 5877, Marth #348, 1860 RA 17 41 20, NPD 54 22) is "very faint, small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.9? arcmin. A relatively close companion of NGC 6446, and possibly a gravitationally bound pair with that galaxy.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 6447
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of NGC 6447; see NGC 6446 for a wide-field image

NGC 6448
Recorded (Jul 16, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
A lost or nonexistent object in Draco (RA 17 44 20.5, Dec +53 32 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6448 (Swift list II (#60), 1860 RA 17 41 23, NPD 36 24.1) is "very faint, pretty small, round, a little brighter middle".

NGC 6449 (= PGC 60762)
Discovered (Apr 19, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Draco (RA 17 43 46.6, Dec +56 48 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6449 (Swift list I (#69), 1860 RA 17 41 24, NPD 33 08.0) is "very faint, pretty small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.8? arcmin
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 6449
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 6449
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 6449
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 6350 - 6399) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 6400 - 6449     → (NGC 6450 - 6499)