Celestial Atlas
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6717, 6718, 6719, 6720, 6721, 6722, 6723, 6724, 6725, 6726, 6727, 6728, 6729, 6730, 6731, 6732, 6733,
6734, 6735, 6736, 6737, 6738, 6739, 6740, 6741, 6742, 6743, 6744, 6745, 6746, 6747, 6748, 6749

Page last updated Oct 19, 2014
WORKING 6700: Add/update Dreyer/Steinicke listings/data, check IDs

NGC 6700 (= PGC 62376)
Discovered (Aug 17, 1873) by
Édouard Stephan (5-3)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Lyra (RA 18 46 04.3, Dec +32 16 46)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.0? arcmin

NGC 6701 (= PGC 62314)
Discovered (Aug 6, 1883) by
Lewis Swift (2-71)
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Draco (RA 18 43 12.6, Dec +60 39 11)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 1.3? arcmin

NGC 6702 (= PGC 62395)
Discovered (Sep 8, 1863) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Lyra (RA 18 46 57.6, Dec +45 42 22)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 1.5? arcmin

NGC 6703 (= PGC 62409)
Discovered (Sep 4, 1863) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
An 11th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Lyra (RA 18 47 18.9, Dec +45 33 03)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.7 by 2.5? arcmin

NGC 6704 (= OCL 82)
Discovered (Jul 23, 1854) by
August Winnecke
A 9th-magnitude open cluster (type I3m) in Scutum (RA 18 50 45.8, Dec -05 12 18)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 6.0? arcmin

NGC 6705 (=
M11 = OCL 76), The Wild Duck Cluster
Discovered (1681) by Gottfried Kirch
Recorded (1764) by Charles Messier as M11
A 6th-magnitude open cluster (type I2r) in Scutum (RA 18 51 05.0, Dec -06 16 12)
Historical Identification: As is the case with many of the objects in Messier's catalog, M11 was first noticed (as a fuzzy patch in the sky) nearly a century earlier, in this case by German astronomer Gottfried Kirch, in 1681. William Derham was probably the first to see that it consisted of a cloud of faint stars, in 1733.
Physical Information: Approximately 5000 light-years distant, M11 is one of the richest and most compact open clusters, with nearly 3000 stars concentrated in a region only twenty light-years across (or from our perspective, about 11 arcmin), many of which are upper Main Sequence blue giants, or more highly evolved yellow and red giants. As a result, an observer in the center of the cluster would see several hundred first magnitude stars scattered around the sky. Given the presence of Main Sequence stars up to spectral class B8, the age of the cluster is estimated at 250 million years, or only about 5% the age of our solar system.
CFHT image of open cluster NGC 6705, also known as M11, or the Wild Duck Cluster
Above, a ? arcmin wide image of NGC 6705
(Image Credit & © Jean-Charles Cuillandre (CFHT), Hawaiian Starlight, CFHT)

NGC 6706 (= PGC 62596)
Discovered (Jun 8, 1836) by
John Herschel
Also observed by DeLisle Stewart
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Pavo (RA 18 56 51.0, Dec -63 09 59)
Historical Identification: The second IC adds (per DeLisle Stewart) "very faint, very small, considerably extended 120 degrees, stellar nucleus".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.7? arcmin.

NGC 6707 (= PGC 62563)
Discovered (Jul 8, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Telescopium (RA 18 55 21.9, Dec -53 49 09)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 1.0? arcmin

NGC 6708 (= PGC 62569)
Discovered (Jun 9, 1836) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Telescopium (RA 18 55 35.6, Dec -53 43 24)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.9? arcmin

NGC 6709 (= OCL 100)
Discovered (Jul 29, 1827) by
John Herschel
A 7th-magnitude open cluster (type III2m) in Aquila (RA 18 51 30.0, Dec +10 20 00)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 15? arcmin

NGC 6710 (= PGC 62482)
Discovered (Aug 3, 1864) by
Albert Marth (391)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Lyra (RA 18 50 34.0, Dec +26 50 19)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.0? arcmin

NGC 6711 (= PGC 62456)
Discovered (Aug 5, 1885) by
Lewis Swift (2-72)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc? pec) in Draco (RA 18 49 00.9, Dec +47 39 27)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.9? arcmin

NGC 6712 (= GCL 103)
Discovered (Jun 16, 1784) by
William Herschel
An 8th-magnitude globular cluster (type IX) in Scutum (RA 18 53 04.3, Dec -08 42 20)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 9.8? arcmin

NGC 6713 (= PGC 62487)
Discovered (Aug 3, 1864) by
Albert Marth (392)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Lyra (RA 18 50 44.2, Dec +33 57 37)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.3? arcmin

NGC 6714
Recorded (May 27, 1886) by
Lewis Swift (4-74)
A lost or nonexistent object in Draco (RA 18 45 49.0, Dec +66 43 30)
Historical Identification:

NGC 6715 (=
M54 = GCL 104)
Discovered (Sep 24, 1778) by Charles Messier (and listed as M54)
An 8th-magnitude globular cluster (type III) in Sagittarius (RA 18 55 03.3, Dec -30 28 40)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: M54 was formerly thought to be an outlying member of the Milky Way's globular clusters, at perhaps 60 thousand light years distance. Recent evidence, however, makes it probable that it is actually part of one of the Milky Way's nearest neighbors, the Sagittarius Dwarf Elliptical Galaxy. If so, it is almost 90 thousand light years away, and its 12 arcmin apparent size would correspond to 150 light years.
NOAO image of globular cluster NGC 6715, also known as M54
Above, a ? arcmin wide image of NGC 6715 (Image Credit REU Program, AURA, NSF, NOAO)
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of the cluster
(Image Credit & © Jim Misti, Misti Mountain Observatory; used by permission)
Misti Mountain Observatory image of globular cluster NGC 6715, also known as M54
Below, a 3.4 arcmin wide HST image of the cluster (Image Credit ESA, HST, NASA)
HST image of globular cluster NGC 6715, also known as M54

NGC 6716 (= OCL 46)
Discovered (Jul 14, 1830) by
John Herschel
An 8th-magnitude open cluster (type IV1p) in Sagittarius (RA 18 54 34.0, Dec -19 54 30)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 10? arcmin

NGC 6717 (= GCL 105)
Discovered (Aug 7, 1784) by
William Herschel
An 8th-magnitude globular cluster (type VIII) in Sagittarius (RA 18 55 06.2, Dec -22 42 01)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 5.4? arcmin

NGC 6718 (= PGC 62688)
Discovered (Jun 23, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Pavo (RA 19 01 28.9, Dec -66 06 37)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.8? arcmin

NGC 6719 (= PGC 62710)
Discovered (Jun 23, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Pavo (RA 19 03 07.3, Dec -68 35 16)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 0.8? arcmin

NGC 6720 (=
M57), The Ring Nebula
Discovered (January, 1779) by Antoine Darquier
Discovered (Jan 31, 1779) by Charles Messier and listed as M57
A 9th-magnitude planetary nebula in Lyra (RA 18 53 35.1, Dec +33 01 47)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: NGC 6720 is about 2000 light years away. Apparent size 3.0 by 2.4? arcmin.
HST image of planetary nebula NGC 6720, the Ring Nebula, also known as M57
Above, a ? arcmin wide image of NGC 6720 (Image credit H. Bond et al., Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA), NASA)

NGC 6721 (= PGC 62680)
Discovered (Jul 12, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Pavo (RA 19 00 50.9, Dec -57 45 34)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.4? arcmin

NGC 6722 (= PGC 62722)
Discovered (Jun 8, 1836) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Pavo (RA 19 03 40.1, Dec -64 53 42)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.9 by 0.4? arcmin

NGC 6723 (= GCL 106)
Discovered (Jun 2, 1826) by
James Dunlop (573)
A 7th-magnitude globular cluster (type VII) in Sagittarius (RA 18 59 33.2, Dec -36 37 52)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 13? arcmin

NGC 6724
Discovered (Sep 5, 1828) by
John Herschel
A group of stars in Aquila (RA 18 56 46.0, Dec +10 25 42)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:

NGC 6725 (= PGC 62692)
Discovered (Jul 8, 1834) by
John Herschel
Also observed by DeLisle Stewart
An 11th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Telescopium (RA 19 01 56.4, Dec -53 51 51)
Historical Identification: The second IC adds (per DeLisle Stewart) "not pretty large, round, but considerably faint, extremely small, stellar nucleus, with straight wisp at 40 degrees".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.2 by 0.5? arcmin.

NGC 6726
Discovered (Jun 15, 1861) by
Julius Schmidt
A reflection nebula in Corona Australis (RA 19 01 39.2, Dec -36 53 29)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 9.0 by 7.0? arcmin. Paired with NGC 6727.

NGC 6727
Discovered (Jun 15, 1861) by
Julius Schmidt
A reflection nebula in Corona Australis (RA 19 01 42.2, Dec -36 52 35)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 80? arcmin. Paired with NGC 6726.

NGC 6728
Discovered (Jun 16, 1784) by
William Herschel
A group of stars in Scutum (RA 18 57 31.4, Dec -08 57 56)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 18? arcmin

NGC 6729
Discovered (Jun 15, 1861) by
Julius Schmidt
An emission and reflection nebula in Corona Australis (RA 19 01 55.3, Dec -36 57 28)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 25 by 20? arcmin. In same region as reflection nebulae NGC 6726 and 6727.

NGC 6730 (= PGC 62796)
Discovered (Jul 23, 1835) by
John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Pavo (RA 19 07 33.6, Dec -68 54 44)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 1.5? arcmin. Only 1.5 arcmin southwest of 7th magnitude SAO 254465.
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 6730
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6730
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 6730

NGC 6731
Discovered (1886) by
Gerhard Lohse
A group of stars in Lyra (RA 18 57 13.5, Dec +43 04 38)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:

NGC 6732 (= PGC 62586)
Discovered (Oct 16, 1886) by
Lewis Swift (5-87)
Also observed by Herbert Howe
Also observed by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E4?) in Draco (RA 18 56 24.1, Dec +52 22 39)
Historical Identification: The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe and Bigourdan) of 18 53 09.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.7? arcmin.
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 6732
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6732
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy, also showing PGC 2413402
DSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 6732 and compact galaxy PGC 2413402

PGC 2413402
Not an NGC object but listed here since an optical double with
NGC 6732
A 15th-magnitude compact galaxy (type C??) in Draco (RA 18 56 26.2, Dec +52 22 38)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.1 by 0.1? arcmin; nothing else available. Probably an optical double with NGC 6732 (which see for images), rather than a physical pairing. Given the poor quality of available images possibly a foreground star or stars (as suggested by NED).

NGC 6733 (= PGC 62770)
Discovered (Aug 8, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Pavo (RA 19 06 10.7, Dec -62 11 48)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 1.2? arcmin

NGC 6734 (= PGC 62786)
Discovered (Jun 8, 1836) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Pavo (RA 19 07 14.4, Dec -65 27 39)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.1? arcmin

NGC 6735
Discovered (Jul 18, 1827) by
John Herschel
A star group in Aquila (RA 19 00 45.3, Dec -00 27 21)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 8.0? arcmin. Near 7th-magnitude SAO 142915.

NGC 6736 (= PGC 62792)
Discovered (Jun 8, 1836) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Pavo (RA 19 07 29.3, Dec -65 25 43)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.9? arcmin

NGC 6737
Discovered (Jul 14, 1830) by
John Herschel
A group of stars in Sagittarius (RA 19 02 10.0, Dec -18 32 48)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:

NGC 6738 (= OCL 101)
Discovered (Jul 29, 1829) by
John Herschel
An 8th-magnitude open cluster in Aquila (RA 19 01 20.0, Dec +11 36 54)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 15? arcmin

NGC 6739 (= PGC 62799)
Discovered (Aug 7, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Pavo (RA 19 07 48.7, Dec -61 22 03)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.4 by 0.9? arcmin

NGC 6740 (= PGC 62675)
Discovered (Jun 28, 1864) by
Albert Marth (396)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Lyra (RA 19 00 50.5, Dec +28 46 16)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.8? arcmin

NGC 6741
Discovered (Aug 19, 1882) by
Edward Pickering (HN 50)
A 12th-magnitude planetary nebula in Aquila (RA 19 02 37.0, Dec -00 26 56)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.13? arcmin

WORKING HERE: remove artifact in DSS image

NGC 6742 (= Abell 50)
Discovered (Jul 8, 1788) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude planetary nebula in Draco (RA 18 59 19.8, Dec +48 27 59)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: NGC 6742 is probably about 13 thousand light years away. If so, the nebula's apparent size of 33 arcsec corresponds to about 0.9 light years. The 20th-magnitude central star has a temperature of about 100 thousand Kelvins, and because of its high temperature is about 50 times as bright as the Sun despite having collapsed to a white dwarf about the size of the Earth.
NOAO image of region near planetary nebula NGC 6742, also known as Abell 50, superimposed on a DSS image to fill in otherwise missing areas
Above, a 12 arcmin wide NOAO/DSS composite image centered on NGC 6742
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide image of the nebula (Image Credit above & below Adam Block/NOAO/AURA/NSF)
NOAO image of planetary nebula NGC 6742, also known as Abell 50

NGC 6743
Discovered (Jul 6, 1828) by
John Herschel
A group of stars in Lyra (RA 19 01 26.7, Dec +29 17 24)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 8.0? arcmin

NGC 6744 (= PGC 62836)
Discovered (Jun 30, 1826) by
James Dunlop (262)
A 9th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Pavo (RA 19 09 46.1, Dec -63 51 24)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 20.1 by 12.9? arcmin. NGC 6744 is about 30 million light years away. Its appearance is thought to be nearly identical to our own galaxy, save for the fact that it is about twice as large, and therefore probably about ten times as massive. (Note: the stated size of the galaxy includes some very faint outer arms. In the Observatorio Antilhue image immediately below the faint tracery of the northernmost arm extends nearly to the top of the image, then curves around past the faint irregular galaxy (PGC 62815) to the northwest of the spiral.)
Observatorio Antilhue image of spiral galaxy NGC 6744
Above, a nearly 20 arcmin wide image of NGC 6744
(Credit & © for image above Daniel Verschatse, Observatorio Antilhue; used by permission)
Below, a ? arcmin wide multi-spectral image of the galaxy emphasizes its emission nebulae
(Image Credit ESO; the mis-registration of component images is not uncommon in such composites)
ESO multi-spectral image of spiral galaxy NGC 6744

PGC 62815 (= "NGC 6744A")
Not an NGC object, but listed here since sometimes called NGC 6744A
A 15th-magnitude irregular galaxy (type IBm?) in
Pavo (RA 19 08 43.7, Dec -63 43 48)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 0.7? arcmin.
Observatorio Antilhue image of irregular galaxy PGC 62815, sometimes referred to as NGC 6744A
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide image centered on PGC 62815
(Credit & © for images above & below Daniel Verschatse, Observatorio Antilhue; used by permission)
Below, a 12 arcmin wide image showing the galaxy's position relative to NGC 6744
Labeled Observatorio Antilhue image of spiral galaxy NGC 6744, also showing PGC 62815

NGC 6745 (= PGC 62691 (= PGC 2170240) + PGC 200362)
Discovered (Jul 24, 1879) by
Édouard Stephan
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S??) in Lyra ( RA 19 01 41.7, Dec +40 44 37)
Companion PGC 200361 = a 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sm?) at RA 19 01 41.9, Dec +40 45 35
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6745 (= Stephan's list X(#38), 1860 RA 18 57 07, NPD 49 27.3) is "very faint, slightly extended north and south". The position precesses to RA 19 01 42.0, Dec +40 44 41, dead center on the galaxy, and the description fits, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: NGC 6745 collided with its northern "companion" (PGC 200361) about ten million years ago (this is determined by the ages of the stars created by the collision; some of the brighter ones are already dying, and their properties correspond to stars with lifetimes of about ten million years). Dynamical studies indicate that the smaller galaxy approached the larger one from the lower right, swung around it and collided with its tidally distorted outline. In the process, clouds of gas and dust in each galaxy slammed into similar clouds in the other, resulting in shock-wave formation of large numbers of stars, most notably large numbers of hot, bright stars which make up the knots of bright stars on the left and upper side of NGC 6745 (the collisional region being so bright that it has its own listing, as PGC 200362). Despite their collision the two galaxies are unlikely to merge, as the smaller one appears to be moving away from the larger one at close to a thousand km/sec (data are scant, but there is an NED reference to the difference in velocity). Based on its recessional velocity of 4545 km/sec, NGC 6745 is about 200 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.4 by 0.5 arcmin (counting the extension referred to as PGC 200362), it is about 85 thousand light years across. Its companion (PGC 200361) is about 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin, which corresponds to about 20 thousand light years.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 6745
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 6745 and PGC objects 200361 and 200362
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the interacting galaxy pair
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 6745 and its collisional neighbor, spiral galaxy PGC 200361
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of NGC 6745 and part of PGC 200361
(Image Credit NASA and The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA), Roger Lynds (KPNO/NOAO), Hubblesite)
HST image of spiral galaxy NGC 6745 and part of its collisional neighbor, spiral galaxy PGC 200361

NGC 6746 (= PGC 62852)
Discovered (Aug 11, 1836) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Pavo (RA 19 10 22.3, Dec -61 58 06)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.9? arcmin

NGC 6747 (= PGC 62564)
Discovered (Oct 31, 1886) by
Lewis Swift (5-88)
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Draco (RA 18 55 21.5, Dec +72 46 20)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.4? arcmin

NGC 6748
Recorded (July, 1870) by
Édouard Stephan (2-26)
A lost or nonexistent object in Vulpecula (RA 19 03 50.0, Dec +21 36 30)
Historical Identification:

NGC 6749 (= GCL 107 = OCL 91)
Discovered (Jul 15, 1827) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude globular cluster in Aquila (RA 19 05 15.3, Dec +01 54 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6749 (= John Herschel's GC 4466, 1860 RA 18 57 57, NPD 88 25.2) is a "cluster, large, a little compressed, stars large and small". The position precesses to RA 19 05 02.0, Dec +01 47 12, about 7 arcmin southwest of the cluster, but there is nothing similar nearby, so the description makes the identification certain.
Physical Information: The cluster is about 26 thousand light years from the Sun. Given that and its apparent size of about 6 arcmin, it is about 45 light years across. Compared to many other globulars, NGC 6749 is sparsely populated; as a result, it is also cataloged as a rich open cluster. Which appellation is more accurate depends upon the nature of its stellar content. If it consists of metal-poor stars the best part of 12 billion years old, it might be more appropriate to call it a globular cluster. If it contains metal-rich stars of considerably younger origin, it would be an open (or "galactic") cluster. Which is correct is probably known, but other than Steinicke's statement ("not OCL") a quick survey of the literature does not reveal the answer; so I will leave that question for a later iteration of this page.
DSS image of region near globular cluster NGC 6749
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6749
Below, an 8 arcmin wide DSS image of the cluster
DSS image of globular cluster NGC 6749
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 6650 - 6699) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 6700 - 6749     → (NGC 6750 - 6799)