Celestial Atlas
(NGC 6700 - 6749) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 6750 - 6799 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 6800 - 6849)
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Page last updated Apr 1, 2017
Noted equality of NGC 6748 and 6751 (found original records and fixed all errors)
Added Dreyer NGC entries
WORKING 6750: Add/update Steinicke listings/data, check IDs

NGC 6750 (= PGC 62671)
Discovered (Sep 10, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Draco (RA 19 00 36.0, Dec +59 10 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6750 (Swift list II (#73), 1860 RA 18 58 27, NPD 31 01.9) is "very faint, very small, round".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 3720 km/sec, NGC 6750 is about 175 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.0 by 0.6? arcmin, it is about 50 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 6750
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6750
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 6750

NGC 6751 (=
NGC 6748)
Discovered (Jul 20, 1863) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 6751)
Discovered but misrecorded (Jul 17, 1871) by Édouard Stephan (and later listed as NGC 6748)
Rediscovered (Aug 3, 1881) by Édouard Stephan (and later listed as NGC 6751)
A 12th-magnitude planetary nebula in Aquila (RA 19 05 55.5, Dec -05 59 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6751 (= GC 5940, Marth #397, Stephan list XII (#90), 1860 RA 18 58 27, NPD 96 12.1) is "pretty bright, small".
Discovery Notes: See NGC 6748 for a discussion of the duplicate listing.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.43? arcmin.
HST image of planetary nebula NGC 6751
Above, a ? arcmin wide HST image of NGC 6751 (Image Credit NASA, The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA))

NGC 6752 (= GCL 108 (and perhaps =
NGC 6777?))
Discovered (Jun 30, 1826) by James Dunlop
Also observed (Jul 12, 1834) by John Herschel
A 5th-magnitude globular cluster (type VI) in Pavo (RA 19 10 51.8, Dec -59 58 53)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6752 (= GC 4467 = JH 3778, Dunlop 295, 1860 RA 18 58 28, NPD 150 11.8) is "a globular cluster, bright, very large, irregularly round, well resolved, clearly consisting of stars, stars from 11th to 16th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 29? arcmin.

NGC 6753 (= PGC 62870)
Discovered (Jul 5, 1836) by
John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Pavo (RA 19 11 23.7, Dec -57 02 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6753 (= GC 4468 = JH 3779, 1860 RA 18 59 38, NPD 147 15.5) is "pretty bright, pretty large, round, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.4 by 2.1? arcmin.

NGC 6754 (= PGC 62871)
Discovered (Jul 8, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Telescopium (RA 19 11 25.0, Dec -50 38 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6754 (= GC 4469 = JH 3780, 1860 RA 19 00 34, NPD 140 51.5) is "pretty faint, pretty large, much extended 63°, very gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 0.9? arcmin.

PGC 62816 (= "NGC 6754A")
Not an NGC object, but listed here since sometimes called NGC 6754A
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in
Telescopium (RA 19 08 44.0, Dec -51 02 47)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 0.3? arcmin.

NGC 6755 (= OCL 96)
Discovered (Jul 30, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Jul 7, 1827) by John Herschel
An 8th-magnitude open cluster (type IV2m) in Aquila (RA 19 07 49.0, Dec +04 16 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6755 (= GC 4470 = JH 2030 = WH VII 19, 1860 RA 19 00 51, NPD 85 59.3) is "a cluster, very large, very rich, pretty compressed, stars from 12th to 14th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 15? arcmin.

NGC 6756 (= OCL 99)
Discovered (Aug 21, 1791) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Jul 7, 1827) by John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude open cluster (type I2m) in Aquila (RA 19 08 42.5, Dec +04 42 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6756 (= GC 4471 = JH 2031 = WH VII 62, 1860 RA 19 01 47, NPD 85 32.7) is "a cluster, small, rich, a little compressed, stars from 11th to 12th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.0? arcmin.

NGC 6757 (= PGC 62752)
Discovered (Aug 15, 1884) by
Lewis Swift
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
Also observed (Sep 5, 1888) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a?) in Draco (RA 19 05 06.1, Dec +55 43 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6757 (Swift list II (#74), 1860 RA 19 01 55, NPD 34 30.0) is "pretty faint, much extended, 3 faint stars involved". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe and Bigourdan) of 19 02 19.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.0? arcmin.

NGC 6758 (= PGC 62935)
Discovered (Jun 9, 1836) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Telescopium (RA 19 13 52.5, Dec -56 18 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6758 (= GC 4472 = JH 3781, 1860 RA 19 02 16, NPD 146 32.4) is "pretty bright, small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.3 by 1.7? arcmin.

NGC 6759 (= PGC 62779)
Discovered (July? 1865) by
Auguste Voigt
Also observed (Oct 16, 1886) by Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S??) in Draco (RA 19 06 57.0, Dec +50 20 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6759 (Swift list V (#89), (Voigt 8), 1860 RA 19 03 20, NPD 39 51.9) is "very faint, small, round, very faint double star close to southwest".
Discovery Notes: Voigt's discovery was one of ten nebulae he discovered between March and August of 1865; but they were only noted in his observing records, and were not published until 1987, so Dreyer had no knowledge of his observation, hence his inclusion in parentheses.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.7? arcmin.

NGC 6760 (= GCL 109)
Discovered (Mar 30, 1845) by
John Hind
Also observed (April 1852) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 9.0 globular cluster (type IX) in Aquila (RA 19 11 12.1, Dec +01 01 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6760 (= GC 4473, Hind, (d'Arrest), 1860 RA 19 04 05, NPD 89 11.7) is "pretty bright, pretty large, very gradually a little brighter middle (Auwers 44)".
Discovery Notes: d'Arrest's observation was essentially a footnote to observations of the positions of comets and asteroids in April of 1852, and not noted in the GC or NGC (hence its being shown here in parentheses). Dreyer's reference to Arthur von Auwers does not mean that Auwers observed this object. A catalog of all known nebulae published by Auwers in 1862 was one of the sources for John Herschel's GC, which was the basis for the NGC. In this case, (Auwers 44) means that in Herschel's entry for GC 4473 he cites #44 in Auwers' table of nebulae discovered by various observers after 1845 as the source for his information about Hind's discovery.
Physical Information: Apparent size 9.6? arcmin.

NGC 6761 (= PGC 62957)
Discovered (Jul 8, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBab?) in Telescopium (RA 19 15 04.7, Dec -50 39 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6761 (= GC 4474 = JH 3782, 1860 RA 19 04 14, NPD 140 53.2) is "very faint, pretty small, irregularly round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.2? arcmin.

NGC 6762 (=
NGC 6763 = PGC 62757)
Discovered (Aug 30, 1883) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 6763)
Discovered (Apr 30, 1884) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 6762)
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
Also observed (Aug 29, 1889) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Draco (RA 19 05 37.0, Dec +63 56 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6762 (Swift list II (#75), 1860 RA 19 04 18, NPD 26 17.5) is "extremely faint, much extended". The second IC states (per Howe and Bigourdan) "6762 = 6763, RA is 19 04 32", so the equality of the two entries has been known for more than a century. For that matter, given the nearly identical positions and similar descriptions, it is surprising that Dreyer didn't suspect the equality when he compiled the NGC, for if there had been two objects so close together Swift should have noted it in his paper.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.4? arcmin.

NGC 6763 (=
NGC 6762 = PGC 62757)
Discovered (Aug 30, 1883) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 6763)
Discovered (Apr 30, 1884) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 6762)
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
Also observed (Aug 29, 1889) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Draco (RA 19 05 37.0, Dec +63 56 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6763 (Swift list II (#76), 1860 RA 19 04 18, NPD 26 17.0) is "extremely faint, very small, considerably extended, faint star near". The second IC states (per Howe and Bigourdan) "6762 = 6763, RA is 19 04 32", so the equality of the two entries has been known for more than a century. For that matter, given the nearly identical positions and similar descriptions, it is surprising that Dreyer didn't suspect the equality when he compiled the NGC, for if there had been two objects so close together Swift should have noted it in his paper.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 6762 for anything else.

NGC 6764 (= PGC 62806)
Discovered (Jul 4, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Cygnus (RA 19 08 16.6, Dec +50 55 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6764 (Swift list II (#77), 1860 RA 19 04 43, NPD 39 17.5) is "pretty faint, pretty large, much extended, several very faint stars involved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.2 by 1.2? arcmin.

NGC 6765
Discovered (Jun 28, 1864) by
Albert Marth (398)
Discovered (Jul 12, 1866) by Truman Safford
Discovered (Jul 20, 1870) by Édouard Stephan
A 13th-magnitude planetary nebula in Lyra (RA 19 11 06.5, Dec +30 32 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6765 (= GC 5941, Marth #398, Stephan list II (#??) & MS, 1860 RA 19 05 42, NPD 59 40.9) is "faint, small, extended".
Discovery Notes: "MS" following Stephan's name indicates that Dreyer not only obtained information about Stephan's observation from his published list II, but also via a manuscript (that is, a private communication).
Physical Information:
DSS image of region near planetary nebula NGC 6765
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6765
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the nebula
DSS image of planetary nebula NGC 6765

NGC 6766 (=
NGC 6884)
Discovered (May 8, 1883) by Edward Pickering (and later listed as NGC 6766)
Discovered (Sep 20, 1884) by Ralph Copeland (and later listed as NGC 6884)
An 11th-magnitude planetary nebula in Cygnus (RA 20 10 23.7, Dec +46 27 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6766 (Pickering (HN 53), 1860 RA 19 05 57, NPD 43 57.7) is "a planetary nebula, stellar". The RA is off by an hour (it should be 20 05 57), but Dreyer never learned of the error, and as a result NGC 6766 was thought to be lost or nonexistent for more than a century. However, it turns out that Pickering published a corrected position (in HA 60) after the last NGC/IC catalog was published, and it was just bad luck (and the difficulty of searching through mountains of old and presumably obsolete papers) that no one noticed that correction (or Thomas Espin's 1911 paper, in which he quotes Pickering as having corrected the position) until (per Corwin) Dave Riddle finally found the answer to the puzzle. In any event, the huge error in the NGC position made it inevitable that Copeland's later observation would end up with a completely different listing, even though Pickering's corrected position (and description) was identical.
An Interesting Observational Note: Corwin mentions Pickering's ingenious method of discovering "stellar" planetaries, which are indistinguishable from stars by ordinary methods of observation. He would place a prism in the light path of his telescope which turned stellar images into a blur of various colors (or more accurately, given their faintness, into a linear blur of a pale grayish color) corresponding to their continuous spectra, but left planetary nebulae, which emit significant amounts of light at only one or two wavelengths, as apparently stellar objects. In other words, the stars became nebular blurs, and the planetary nebulae remained starlike; so that the appearance was exactly backwards from the reality. This provided an easy way to quickly distinguish planetary nebulae from stars, albeit one that is beyond the reach of most amateur telescopes, which (until the advent of CCD cameras) would produce spectra far too faint to see.
Physical Information: Normally physical data and images for duplicate listings are placed at the earlier numbered entry, but since the identification of NGC 6766 was delayed by more than a century, this planetary is almost universally called NGC 6884; so see that entry for anything else.

NGC 6767
Recorded (1886) by
Gerhard Lohse
A pair of stars in Lyra (RA 19 11 34.0, Dec +37 43 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6767 (J. G. Lohse, 1860 RA 19 06 40, NPD 52 30.8) is "very faint, small, round, stellar, small star near to north".
Physical Information:

NGC 6768 (= PGC 62997)
Discovered (Aug 4, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E??) in Crater (RA 19 16 32.7, Dec -40 12 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6768 (= GC 4475 = JH 3786, 1860 RA 19 06 50, NPD 130 25.7) is "very faint, small, round, pretty suddenly a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 1.1? arcmin.

PGC 62995 (= part of
NGC 6768?)
Whether or not this is part of an NGC object seems uncertain, so this entry is a place-holder
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Crater (RA 19 16 29.7, Dec -40 13 22)
Historical Identification: Close to NGC 6768 and listed by Steinicke as component 2 of that object. Whether that is reasonable depends upon the visual appearance of the pair in a telescope similar to that used by Herschel. For now I am listing it as a separate object, but a later iteration of this entry will discuss whether it should be listed as a separate object, or as part of NGC 6768.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.4? arcmin.

NGC 6769 (= PGC 63042, and with
NGC 6770 and 6771 = the Devil's Mask)
Discovered (Aug 11, 1836) by John Herschel
Also observed (Aug 13, 1901) by DeLisle Stewart
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(r)b? pec) in Pavo (RA 19 18 22.8, Dec -60 30 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6769 (= GC 4476 = JH 3783, 1860 RA 19 06 54, NPD 150 44.3) is "very faint, small, round, a little brighter middle, 1st of 3", the others being NGC 6770 and 6771. The second IC notes "RA to be decreased by one minute (DeLisle Stewart). h. observed only once".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.2 by 1.5? arcmin. Part of a triple system with NGC 6770 and 6771.
ESO image of the triple system known as the Devil's Mask (spiral galaxies NGC 6769 and 6770 and lenticular galaxy NGC 6771), superimposed on a DSS image of the region near the triplet
Above, a 12 arcmin wide image centered on NGC 6769, 6770 and 677a (Image Credit ESO/DSS)
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide ESO image of NGC 6769 (Image Credit ESO)
ESO image of spiral galaxy NGC 6769
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of the triple system made by NGC 6769, 6770 and 6771 (Image Credit ESO)
ESO image of the triple system known as the Devil's Mask: spiral galaxies NGC 6769 and 6770, and lenticular galaxy NGC 6771

NGC 6770 (= PGC 63048, and with
NGC 6769 and 6771 = the Devil's Mask)
Discovered (Aug 11, 1836) by John Herschel
Also observed (Aug 13, 1901) by DeLisle Stewart
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)b? pec) in Pavo (RA 19 18 37.0, Dec -60 29 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6770 (= GC 4477 = JH 3784, 1860 RA 19 07 06, NPD 150 44.8) is "extremely faint, very small, 2nd of 3", the others being NGC 6769 and 6771. The second IC notes "RA to be decreased by one minute (DeLisle Stewart). h. observed only once".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.2 by 1.6? arcmin. Part of a triple system with NGC 6769 and 6771.
ESO image of spiral galaxy NGC 6770
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide image of NGC 6770 (Image Credit ESO); for a wider view see NGC 6769

NGC 6771 (= PGC 63049, and with
NGC 6769 and 6770 = the Devil's Mask)
Discovered (Aug 11, 1836) by John Herschel
Also observed (Aug 13, 1901) by DeLisle Stewart
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0(r)? pec) in Pavo (RA 19 18 39.4, Dec -60 32 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6771 (= GC 4478 = JH 3785, 1860 RA 19 07 07, NPD 150 46.4) is "extremely faint, small, 3rd of 3", the others being NGC 6769 and 6770. The second IC notes "RA to be decreased by one minute (DeLisle Stewart). h. observed only once".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.3 by 0.5? arcmin. Part of a triple system with NGC 6769 and 6770.
ESO image of lenticular galaxy NGC 6771, superimposed on a DSS image to fill in a missing area at the bottom
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide image of NGC 6771 (Image Credit ESO/DSS); for a wider view see NGC 6769

NGC 6772
Discovered (Jul 21, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Jul 23, 1827) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude planetary nebula in Aquila (RA 19 14 36.4, Dec -02 42 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6772 (= GC 4479 = JH 2032 = WH IV 14, 1860 RA 19 07 15, NPD 92 57.1) is "very faint, large, round, very very little brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.45 by 1.05 arcmin (from the images below).
Superposition of an NOAO image of planetary nebula NGC 6772 on a DSS background
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS/NOAO composite image centered on NGC 6772
(NOAO Image Credit (above and below) Gunnar Hurtig /Adam Block/NOAO/AURA/NSF)
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide NOAO image of the planetary nebula
NOAO image of planetary nebula NGC 6772
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the planetary nebula
PanSTARRS image of planetary nebula NGC 6772

NGC 6773
Discovered (Aug 13, 1830) by
John Herschel
A group of stars in Aquila (RA 19 15 08.0, Dec +04 51 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6773 (= GC 4480 = JH 2033, 1860 RA 19 08 04, NPD 85 22.2) is "a cluster, poor, a little compressed".
Physical Information:

NGC 6774 (= OCL 65)
Discovered (Jul 19, 1828) by
John Herschel
An open cluster (type III2m) in Sagittarius (RA 19 16 18.0, Dec -16 19 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6774 (= GC 4481 = JH 2034, 1860 RA 19 08 39, NPD 106 30.6) is "a cluster, very large, a little compressed".
Physical Information: Apparent size 20? arcmin.

NGC 6775
Discovered (Jul 21, 1827) by
John Herschel
A group of stars in Aquila (RA 19 16 42.0, Dec -00 55 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6775 (= GC 4482 = JH 2035, 1860 RA 19 09 38, NPD 91 09.8) is "a cluster, poor, a little compressed, stars from 10th to 11th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 13? arcmin.

NGC 6776 (= PGC 63185)
Discovered (Jun 20, 1835) by
John Herschel
Also observed (Aug 13, 1901) by DeLisle Stewart
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Pavo (RA 19 25 19.1, Dec -63 51 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6776 (= GC 4483 = JH 3787, 1860 RA 19 10 23, NPD 154 08.4) is "pretty bright, small, round, pretty gradually brighter middle". The second IC adds "RA is 19 08 47 (DeLisle Stewart). h. observed only once".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.4? arcmin.

PGC 63181 (= "NGC 6776A")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 6776A

A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Pavo (RA 19 25 05.8, Dec -63 40 58)
Physical Information: 1.4 by 0.3? arcmin.

NGC 6777 (perhaps =
NGC 6752??)
Recorded (1751) by Nicolas Lacaille
Looked for but not found (plate 4724?) by DeLisle Stewart
A pair of stars (SAO 257685 and 257686) in Pavo (RA 19 26 32.0, Dec -71 27 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6777 (= GC 4484, Lacaille I 13, 1860 RA 19 10 46, NPD 161 45.6) is "a nebula without stars". The second IC notes "Not een [presumably 'not seen'], 2 stars 8 or 9 magnitude near, but no nebula (DeLisle Stewart); only observed by Lacaille". The current identification appears uncertain, and Steinicke suggests the actual object may have been NGC 6752.

NGC 6778 (=
NGC 6785)
Discovered (May 21, 1825) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 6785)
Discovered (Jun 25, 1863) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 6778)
Also observed (Sept, 1882) by Edward Pickering (and later listed as NGC 6778)
A 12th-magnitude planetary nebula in Aquila (RA 19 18 24.9, Dec -01 35 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6778 (= GC 5942, Marth #399, 1860 RA 19 11 04, NPD 91 52) is "small, extended, ill-defined disc".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.45 by 0.35 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near planetary nebula NGC 6778
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6778
(Image Credit for colored detail (above) unknown; several possible sources, but can't find my notes)
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the nebula
PanSTARRS image of planetary nebula NGC 6778

NGC 6779 (=
M56 = GCL 110)
Discovered (Jan 23, 1779) by Charles Messier (and listed as M56)
Also observed (Sep 4, 1825) by John Herschel
An 8th-magnitude globular cluster (type X) in Lyra (RA 19 16 35.5, Dec +30 11 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6779 (= GC 4485 = JH 2036, M 56, 1860 RA 19 11 08, NPD 60 03.7) is "a globular cluster, bright, large, irregularly round, gradually much compressed middle, well resolved, clearly consisting of stars, stars from 11th to 14th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 8.8? arcmin.
NOAO image of globular cluster NGC 6779, also known as M56
Above, a ? arcmin wide image of NGC 6779 (Image Credit AURA, NSF, NOAO)
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of the cluster
(Image Credit & © Jim Misti, Misti Mountain Observatory; used by permission)
Misti Mountain Observatory image of globular cluster NGC 6779, also known as M56

NGC 6780 (= PGC 63151)
Discovered (Jun 9, 1836) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Telescopium (RA 19 22 50.8, Dec -55 46 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6780 (= GC 4486 = JH 3788, 1860 RA 19 11 18, NPD 146 01.8) is "very faint, large, round, very gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 1.6? arcmin.

NGC 6781
Discovered (Jul 30, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Aug 15, 1830) by John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude planetary nebula in Aquila (RA 19 18 28.3, Dec +06 32 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6781 (= GC 4487 = JH 2037 = WH III 743, 1860 RA 19 11 38, NPD 83 42.9) is "a planetary nebula, faint, large, round, very suddenly brighter middle and disc, small star to northeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9? arcmin.
Misti Mountain Observatory image of region near planetary nebula NGC 6781, using a DSS image to fill in areas outside the field of view at the very top and bottom
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS/Misti Mountain composite image centered on NGC 6781
(Image Credit & © above and below: Jim Misti, Misti Mountain Observatory; used by permission)
Below, a 3 arcmin wide image of the planetary nebula
Misti Mountain Observatory image of planetary nebula NGC 6781
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of the nebula (Image Credit ESO)
ESO image of planetary nebula NGC 6781

NGC 6782 (= PGC 63168)
Discovered (Jul 12, 1834) by
John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Pavo (RA 19 23 57.9, Dec -59 55 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6782 (= GC 4488 = JH 3789, 1860 RA 19 11 39, NPD 150 10.7) is "considerably faint, considerably small, round, a little brighter middle, 9th magnitude star to south".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.4 by 2.0? arcmin.

NGC 6783 (= PGC 63003)
Discovered (Aug 4, 1872) by
Édouard Stephan
A 14th-magnitude compact galaxy (type C??) in Cygnus (RA 19 16 47.5, Dec +46 01 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6783 (= GC 5943, Stephan list IV (#2), 1860 RA 19 12 40, NPD 44 14.8) is "extremely faint, difficult".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.6? arcmin.

NGC 6784 (= PGC 63209)
Discovered (Jun 23, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Pavo (RA 19 26 31.2, Dec -65 37 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6784 (= GC 4489 = JH 3790, 1860 RA 19 12 48, NPD 155 53.0) is "most extremely excessively faint, pretty small, among small stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.5? arcmin.

PGC 63210 (= "NGC 6784A")
Status as an NGC object doubtful, but listed here anyway since sometimes called NGC 6784A
Either part of
John Herschel's NGC 6784, or merely an apparently nearby galaxy
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Pavo (RA 19 26 35.7, Dec -65 37 03)
Historical Identification: Since this object has the same brightness and appearance as NGC 6784 and is close enough to it that the pair might have looked like a single extended object to Herschel, this may actually be a component of NGC 6784; but the research required to verify or disprove that must await a later iteration of this page.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.5? arcmin.

NGC 6785 (=
NGC 6778)
Discovered (May 21, 1825) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 6785)
Also observed (Jun 22, 1884) by Guillaume Bigourdan (while listed as NGC 6785)
Discovered (Jun 25, 1863) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 6778)
Also observed (Sept, 1882) by Edward Pickering (and later listed as NGC 6778)
A 12th-magnitude planetary nebula in Aquila (RA 19 18 24.9, Dec -01 35 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6785 (= GC 4490 = JH 2038, 1860 RA 19 13 23, NPD 91 21.4) is "extremely small, stellar". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Bigourdan) of 19 13 37.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 6778 for anything else.

NGC 6786 (= PGC 62864)
Discovered (Oct 3, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Draco (RA 19 10 53.8, Dec +73 24 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6786 (Swift list V (#90), 1860 RA 19 13 38, NPD 16 49.4) is "most extremely faint, small, round, 2 stars to northeast". The second IC notes (per Howe) "is only faint, not most extremely faint".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.9? arcmin.

NGC 6787 (= PGC 62987)
Discovered (Sep 10, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Draco (RA 19 16 10.5, Dec +60 25 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6787 (Swift list II (#78), 1860 RA 19 13 59, NPD 29 49.7) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, 4 stars to southeast, extremely difficult".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 1.0? arcmin.

NGC 6788 (= PGC 63214)
Discovered (Jul 9, 1834) by
John Herschel
Also observed (Sep 17, 1901) by DeLisle Stewart
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Telescopium (RA 19 26 49.7, Dec -54 57 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6788 (= GC 4491 = JH 3791, 1860 RA 19 14 31, NPD 145 13.6) is "pretty bright, small, much extended, pretty suddenly a little brighter middle". The second IC notes "Minutes of RA are 15 not 14 (DeLisle Stewart; h. was doubtful about it)".
Discovery Notes: Stewart's note describes the object as "a nebula, faint, small, extremely extended 70, bright stellar nucleus", close enough to Herschel's description to be confident that it is the same object. (Stewart's tabular position has 1900 RA 19 17.8, but his description says it is at 18.7 minutes, which must be an inadvertent transposition of the last two digits.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.9 by 0.9? arcmin.

NGC 6789 (= PGC 63000)
Discovered (Aug 30, 1883) by
Lewis Swift
A 13th-magnitude irregular galaxy (type Im?) in Draco (RA 19 16 41.7, Dec +63 58 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6789 (Swift list IV (#75), 1860 RA 19 15 28, NPD 26 18.1) is "most extremely faint, pretty large, round, very difficult".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.0? arcmin.

NGC 6790
Discovered (Jul 16, 1882) by
Edward Pickering
An 11th-magnitude planetary nebula in Aquila (RA 19 22 57.0, Dec +01 30 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6790 (Pickering (HN 46), 1860 RA 19 15 50, NPD 88 45.0) is "a planetary nebula, bright, extremely small, stellar image equivalent to 9.5 magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.17? arcmin.
HST image of planetary nebula NGC 6790
Above, a ? arcmin wide HST image of NGC 6790 (Image Credit Howard Bond (STScI) and NASA/ESA)

NGC 6791 (= OCL 142)
Discovered (December, 1853) by
August Winnecke
Discovered (Jul 17, 1859) by Horace Tuttle
A 10th-magnitude open cluster (type II3r) in Lyra (RA 19 20 52.7, Dec +37 46 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6791 (= GC 4492, Winnecke, (Tuttle), 1860 RA 19 15 56, NPD 52 28.5) is "very faint (Auwers 45)".
Discovery Notes: Dreyer did not mention Tuttle's observation, so though noted by Steinicke it is shown in parentheses; and the reference to Auwers means that John Herschel took the discovery information from Auwer's catalog (in which it was #45 in a list of newly discovered nebulae), and does not necessarily mean that Auwers actually observed the object.
Physical Information: Apparent size 10? arcmin.

NGC 6792 (= PGC 63096)
Discovered (1886) by
Gerhard Lohse
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Lyra (RA 19 20 57.3, Dec +43 07 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6792 (J. G. Lohse, 1860 RA 19 16 24, NPD 47 09.5) is "faint, extended 26°, gradually a little brighter middle, 9.5 magnitude star to southeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.2 by 1.3? arcmin.

NGC 6793 (= OCL 115)
Discovered (Jul 18, 1789) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Aug 24, 1827) by John Herschel
An open cluster (type IV2p) in Vulpecula (RA 19 23 12.6, Dec +22 09 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6793 (= GC 4493 = JH 2039 = WH VIII 81, 1860 RA 19 17 14, NPD 68 06.1) is "a cluster, poor, a little compressed".
Physical Information: Apparent size 7? arcmin.

NGC 6794 (= PGC 63241)
Discovered (Aug 24, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Sagittarius (RA 19 28 03.8, Dec -38 55 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6794 (= GC 4494 = JH 3792, 1860 RA 19 18 24, NPD 129 09.7) is "extremely faint, pretty small, round, very gradually a very little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.4? arcmin.

NGC 6795
Discovered (Aug 13, 1830) by
John Herschel
An open cluster in Aquila (RA 19 26 22.0, Dec +03 30 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6795 (= GC 4495 = JH 2040, 1860 RA 19 19 07, NPD 86 44.8) is "a cluster, rich, between two 9th magnitude stars". (Corwin notes that Herschel's more detailed description states that there are three 9th magnitude stars "nearly in the parallel", meaning aligned east-west along nearly the same line of declination, "joined by a rich clustering portion of the Milky Way", which Corwin states seems closer to the middle star than to Herschel's position, which is closer to the first star.) The position precesses to RA 19 26 06.9, Dec +03 31 42, close to the westernmost of a line of three 8 to 9th magnitude stars, so there is no doubt that this is the correct region. Unfortunately, modern photographs show a region so filled with stars it is difficult to see any specific clustering, but an analysis of the properties of the stars in the region confirms the existence of an actual cluster centered near the position listed above, which is essentially the same as Corwin's suggested position.
Physical Information: The cluster's Hertzsprung-Russell Diagram suggests an age just under a billion years and a distance of about 4300 light years. Given that and its apparent size of 8 arcmin, NGC 6795 is about 10 light years across.
DSS image of region centered near open cluster NGC 6795
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6795

NGC 6796 (= PGC 63121)
Discovered (Jul 5, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Draco (RA 19 21 31.0, Dec +61 08 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6796 (Swift list II (#79), 1860 RA 19 19 25, NPD 29 07.5) is "very faint, pretty small, much extended north-south".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 0.4? arcmin.

NGC 6797
Recorded (1860) by
Christian Peters
Looked for but not found (date?) by Herbert Howe
A pair of stars in Sagittarius (RA 19 29 00.6, Dec -25 39 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6797 (Peters, 1860 RA 19 20 25, NPD 115 56.6) is "a nebula with a 9th magnitude star attached on the east". The second IC states "Not found by Howe".
Physical Information:

NGC 6798 (=
IC 1300 = PGC 63171)
Discovered (Aug 5, 1885) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 6798)
Discovered (Oct 2, 1891) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 1300)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Cygnus (RA 19 24 03.1, Dec +53 37 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6798 (Swift list II (#80), 1860 RA 19 20 41, NPD 36 39.4) is "faint, very small, round, star very near".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.9? arcmin.

NGC 6799 (= PGC 63339)
Discovered (Jul 9, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Telescopium (RA 19 32 16.7, Dec -55 54 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6799 (= GC 4496 = JH 3793, 1860 RA 19 20 47, NPD 146 11.7) is "extremely faint, very small, round, a little brighter middle, 3 very small stars near".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.2? arcmin.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 6799
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6799
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 6799
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 6700 - 6749) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 6750 - 6799     → (NGC 6800 - 6849)