Celestial Atlas
(NGC 6750 - 6799) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 6800 - 6849 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 6850 - 6899)
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Page last updated Mar 31, 2017
Added Dreyer NGC entries
WORKING 6800: Add/update Steinicke listings/data, check IDs

NGC 6800 (= OCL 123)
Discovered (Sep 10, 1784) by
William Herschel
Discovered (Aug 18, 1828) by John Herschel
An open cluster (type III2p) in Vulpecula (RA 19 27 00.0, Dec +25 09 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6800 (= GC 4497 = JH 2041 = WH VIII 21, 1860 RA 19 21 23, NPD 65 08.4) is "a cluster, very large, pretty rich, very little compressed, stars from 10th magnitude". The position listed above is more or less in the middle of a wide scattering of brighter stars for which different catalogs list positions differing from each other by several arcmin. Dreyer's position precesses to RA 19 27 11.9, Dec +25 08 25, southeast of some listed positions but northwest of others, so the uncertainty in modern positions is larger than the difference between any of them and Dreyer's position, and the identification can be considered certain.
Physical Information: The cluster is a group of perhaps a hundred slightly brighter stars scattered across a region more than 20 arcmin in diameter.
DSS image of open cluster NGC 6800
Above, a 30 arcmin wide DSS image centered on the position listed here for NGC 6800

NGC 6801 (= PGC 63229)
Discovered (Aug 5, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Cygnus (RA 19 27 35.9, Dec +54 22 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6801 (Swift list IV (#76), 1860 RA 19 24 26, NPD 35 54.5) is "extremely faint, pretty small, round, faint star near to south".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.7? arcmin.

NGC 6802 (= OCL 114)
Discovered (Sep 22, 1783) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Aug 24, 1827) by John Herschel
A 9th-magnitude open cluster (type III1m) in Vulpecula (RA 19 30 36.0, Dec +20 15 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6802 (= GC 4498 = JH 2042 = WH VI 14, 1860 RA 19 24 30, NPD 70 01.1) is "a cluster, large, very compressed, extended 0°, stars from 14th to 18th magnitude".
Discovery Notes: Herschel's published papers list the date of his first observation of WH VI 14 as Jul 11, 1784, but according to Steinicke, he had already observed it before (presumably during studies of double stars) on Sep 22, 1783, as shown above.
Physical Information: Apparent size 5? arcmin.

NGC 6803
Discovered (Sep 17, 1882) by
Edward Pickering
An 11th-magnitude planetary nebula in Aquila (RA 19 31 16.5, Dec +10 03 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6803 (Pickering (HN 52), 1860 RA 19 24 39, NPD 80 13) is a "planetary nebula, stellar". The position precesses to RA 19 31 18.9, Dec +10 04 31, a little over an arcmin to the northeast of the nebula (roughly equidistant from NGC 6803 and the 11th-magnitude star just to its north), but there is nothing else nearby that fits the description, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Stellar is indeed an appropriate description for NGC 6803, as it is only about 4 arcsec across, looks just like a star save at high magnification, and even then shows only the slightest hint of nebular structure. The main way in which amateurs can tell that such an object is a nebula is by using a filter (such as an OIII filter) that blocks most visible light, save for a narrow band centered on a wavelength at which interstellar gases emit their radiation. "Blinking" the field (viewing it with, then without such a filter) changes the brightness of normal stars far more than the brightness of nebulae, allowing the observer to pick out objects which don't change their brightness much. As it happens, that is not the way that Pickering discovered his planetaries. Instead, he placed an objective prism in the light-path of the telescope, which turned stellar images into short rainbows (or more accurately, since the eye cannot see color at low light levels, pale gray lines), but left nebulae as "stellar" objects, since they only emit light at a few wavelengths. The first pair of images below shows a normal closeup of NGC 6803 and a filtered view, in which the stars look much fainter. The following image shows a filtered closeup of the nebula superimposed on the "normal" image. The inset shows a 3 arcsec wide roughly circular core, surrounded by an almost as circular halo which extends another arcsec or so. Given estimates of the distance of the nebula (about 6 to 10 thousand light years from the Sun), the brighter core is a little over a tenth of a light year across, while the outer halo is a little less than twice that size.
DSS image of region near planetary nebula NGC 6803
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6803 shows no sign of its nebular nature
Below, a 50 arcsec wide DSS image of the nebula
DSS image of planetary nebula NGC 6803
Above and below, an example of how "blinking" a field (observing it with and without nebular filters such as an OIII filter) affects the appearance of stars and nebulae. Both images show a 50 arcsec wide image, and in each view NGC 6803 looks essentially stellar and relatively bright. But in the broad-spectrum visible light DSS image above, the background of nearby stars is also bright, while in the filtered view below (Image Credit Romano Corradi; used by permission) the stars are much fainter (in fact, I have enhanced the stellar images to make it easier to see that the fields of view are the same).
Romano Corradi image of planetary nebula NGC 6803, demonstrating the effect of a nebular filter
Below, a filtered image inset on a 50 arcsec wide DSS image (Inset Credit & © Bernd Gährken; used by permission)
A nebular filter image of NGC 6803 by Bernd Gährken, superimposed on a DSS background

NGC 6804
Discovered (Aug 25, 1791) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Aug 21, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.0 planetary nebula in Aquila (RA 19 31 35.4, Dec +09 13 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6804 (= GC 4499 = JH 2043 = WH VI 38, 1860 RA 19 24 53, NPD 81 04.0) is "considerably bright, small, irregularly round, well resolved, clearly consisting of stars".
Physical Information: NGC 6804 is four to six thousand light years from the Sun. Apparent size 1.1? arcmin, corresponding to perhaps 1.3 light years physical extent.
Superposition of NOAO image of planetary nebula NGC 6804 on a DSS background, to fill in missing areas at the top and bottom
Above, a 12 arcmin wide image centered on NGC 6804
(Image Credit above and below Libby Harrell/Adam Block/NOAO/AURA/NSF, overlaid on DSS background)
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide image of the planetary nebula
Superposition of NOAO image of planetary nebula NGC 6804 on a DSS background, to better show the fainter outer regions

NGC 6805 (= PGC 63413)
Discovered (Aug 24, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Sagittarius (RA 19 36 45.8, Dec -37 33 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6805 (= GC 4500 = JH 3796, 1860 RA 19 27 18, NPD 128 51.5) is "extremely faint, round, very gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.9? arcmin

NGC 6806 (= PGC 63416)
Discovered (Sep 5, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Sagittarius (RA 19 37 04.8, Dec -42 17 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6806 (= GC 4501 = JH 3795, 1860 RA 19 27 19, NPD 132 36.3) is "extremely faint, very small, 14th magnitude star attached".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.8? arcmin

NGC 6807
Discovered (Sep 4, 1882) by
Edward Pickering
A 12th-magnitude planetary nebula in Aquila (RA 19 34 33.5, Dec +05 41 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6807 (Pickering (HN 51), 1860 RA 19 27 41, NPD 84 36) is "a planetary nebula, stellar". The position precesses to RA 19 34 34.5, Dec +05 42 07, about an arcmin north of the correct position, an error similar to that of NGC 6803, which shares a similar description and appearance. That object is about 5 arcsec across, and barely distinguishable from a star at high magnification; but NGC 6807 is only 2 arcsec across, and appears perfectly stellar regardless of the magnification used to view it. So even more so than in the case of NGC 6803, distinguishing the nebula from a star relies on using filters (such as an OIII filter) which block all light save the line emission radiated by interstellar clouds of gas (see NGC 6803 for a discussion of the technique involved).
Physical Information: NGC 6807 is 15 to 20 thousand light years from the Sun. Given that, its apparent size (of 2 arcsec?) corresponds to a diameter of a sixth of a light year.
DSS image of region near planetary nebula NGC 6807
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 6807
Below, even in a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image, the planetary nebula looks like a star
DSS image of planetary nebula NGC 6807
Below, the non-stellar nature of NGC 6807 is revealed in a ? arcmin wide monochromatic (black and white) HST image (this is a "raw" image which has had minimal post-processing to remove some cosmic ray artifacts). (Image Credit ESA, NASA, Hubble Legacy Archive)
Raw HST image of planetary nebula NGC 6807

NGC 6808 (= PGC 63578)
Discovered (Jun 27, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Pavo (RA 19 43 54.4, Dec -70 37 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6808 (= GC 4502 = JH 3794, 1860 RA 19 28 30, NPD 160 57.5) is "pretty bright, extended, binuclear, 8th magnitude star to east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.9? arcmin

NGC 6809 (=
M55 = GCL 113)
Discovered (1751) by Nicolas Lacaille
Recorded (1778) by Charles Messier as M55
Also observed (Jul 10, 1826) by James Dunlop
Also observed (Aug 3, 1834) by John Herschel
A 6th-magnitude globular cluster (type XI) in Sagittarius (RA 19 39 59.4, Dec -30 57 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6809 (= GC 4503 = JH 3798, Lacaille I 14, M 55, Dunlop 620, 1860 RA 19 31 08, NPD 121 15.7) is "a globular cluster, pretty bright, large, round, very rich, very gradually brighter middle, stars from 12th to 15th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 19? arcmin.
Wikimedia Commons image of globular cluster NGC 6809, also known as M55
Above, a ? arcmin wide image of NGC 6809 (Image Credit Hunter Wilson, Wikimedia Commons)
Below, a ? arcmin wide CFHT image of the cluster
(Image Credit & © Jean-Charles Cuillandre (CFHT), Hawaiian Starlight, CFHT)
CFHT image of globular cluster NGC 6809, also known as M55
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of the cluster (Image Credit B.J. Mochejska, J. Kaluzny (CAMK), 1m Swope Telescope)
Swope Telescope image of globular cluster NGC 6809, also known as M55

NGC 6810 (= PGC 63571)
Discovered (Jul 10, 1834) by
John Herschel
Also observed (date?) by DeLisle Stewart
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Pavo (RA 19 43 34.3, Dec -58 39 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6810 (= GC 4504 = JH 3797, 1860 RA 19 31 43, NPD 148 58.7) is "pretty small, round, very gradually brighter middle". The second IC adds "Not round, but considerably faint, small, considerably extended 170 degrees, stellar nucleus (DeLisle Stewart). h. called it once round, another time much extended", "h." being John Herschel.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.9? arcmin.

NGC 6811 (= OCL 185)
Discovered (Aug 29, 1829) by
John Herschel
A 7th-magnitude open cluster (type IV3p) in Cygnus (RA 19 37 09.6, Dec +46 22 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6811 (= GC 4505 = JH 2044, 1860 RA 19 33 59, NPD 43 44.8) is "a cluster, large, pretty rich, a little compressed, stars from 11th to 14th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 15? arcmin.

NGC 6812 (= PGC 63625)
Discovered (Jul 9, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Telescopium (RA 19 45 23.9, Dec -55 20 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6812 (= GC 4506 = JH 3799, 1860 RA 19 34 07, NPD 145 40.3) is "pretty bright, pretty small, pretty much extended, gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.6? arcmin.

NGC 6813
Discovered (Aug 7, 1864) by
Albert Marth
An emission nebula in Vulpecula (RA 19 40 24.0, Dec +27 18 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6813 (= GC 5944, Marth #400, 1860 RA 19 34 41, NPD 63 01) is "a double star in a very faint, small nebula".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0 by 3.0? arcmin

NGC 6814 (= PGC 63545)
Discovered (Aug 2, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Jul 30, 1827) by John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Aquila (RA 19 42 40.5, Dec -10 19 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6814 (= GC 4507 = JH 2045 = WH III 744, 1860 RA 19 35 00, NPD 100 38.5) is "pretty faint, pretty large, round, brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0 by 2.8? arcmin

NGC 6815
Discovered (Aug 18, 1828) by
John Herschel
A group of stars in Vulpecula (RA 19 40 44.0, Dec +26 45 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6815 (= GC 4508 = JH 2046, 1860 RA 19 35 07, NPD 63 30.9) is "a cluster, very large, pretty rich, a little compressed, stars from 10th to 15th magnitude".
Physical Information:

NGC 6816 (= PGC 63587)
Discovered (Jul 30, 1834) by
John Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Sagittarius (RA 19 44 02.4, Dec -28 24 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6816 (= GC 4509 = JH 3800, 1860 RA 19 35 16, NPD 118 52.7) is "extremely faint, pretty small, round, a very little brighter middle, star to northwest". The second IC says "Delete 'star to northwest' (not in Cape Obs.). There is a 14th magnitude star in position angle 20 degrees, distance 30 arcsec (per Howe)".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.8? arcmin.

NGC 6817 (= PGC 63431)
Discovered (Sep 10, 1885) by
Lewis Swift (2-81)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Draco (RA 19 37 23.5, Dec +62 23 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6817 (Swift list II (#81), 1860 RA 19 35 26, NPD 27 55.6) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, a little extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.6? arcmin. Listed in NED as NGC 6817 NED02.

PGC 3086688 (= "NGC 6817 NED01")
Not an NGC object but listed here since perhaps connected with
NGC 6817
A 15th-magnitude compact galaxy (type C??) in Draco (RA 19 37 21.1, Dec +62 23 00)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.2 by 0.2? arcmin

NGC 6818, the Little Gem Nebula
Discovered (Aug 8, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Jul 31, 1826) by John Herschel
A 9th-magnitude planetary nebula in Sagittarius (RA 19 43 57.8, Dec -14 09 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4510 = JH 2047 = WH IV 51, 1860 RA 19 36 04, NPD 104 29.0) is "a planetary nebula, bright, very small, round".
Physical Information: Between five and eight thousand light years away. Apparent size 0.45 by 0.4 arcmin.
DSS image of region near planetary nebula NGC 6818
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6818
Below, an NOAO image superimposed on a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of NGC 6818
(Image Credit Mitch and Michael Dye/Adam Block/NOAO/AURA/NSF)
NOAO/DSS image of planetary nebula NGC 6818
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide NOAO image of the nebula (NOAO Image Credit as above)
NOAO image of planetary nebula NGC 6818
Below, a 0.5 arcmin wide HST image of the nebula (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive, processing Judy Schmidt)
HST image of planetary nebula NGC 6818

NGC 6819 (= OCL 155)
Discovered (Mar 12, 1784) by
Caroline Herschel
Also observed (1824) by Karl Ludwig Harding
Also observed (Jul 31, 1831) by John Herschel
A 7th-magnitude open cluster (type I1r) in Cygnus (RA 19 41 18.0, Dec +40 11 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6819 (= GC 4511 = JH 2048, Harding 1827, 1860 RA 19 36 30, NPD 50 08.5) is "a cluster, very large, very rich, stars from 11th to 15th magnitude".
Discovery Notes: Caroline Herschel's observations were not noted in her brother's published papers, so Dreyer was often unaware of them; and since William Herschel didn't publish this object at all, her absence in the NGC entry is unsurprising. Also, though Dreyer (and John Herschel) listed "Harding 1827" that was the date of his published paper, not the date of this observation.
Physical Information: Apparent size 5.0? arcmin

NGC 6820
Discovered (Aug 7, 1864) by
Albert Marth
An emission nebula in Vulpecula (RA 19 42 28.0, Dec +23 05 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6820 (= GC 5945, Marth #401, 1860 RA 19 36 32, NPD 67 15) is "faint, small, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.5? arcmin (a knot in Sharpless 2-86)

NGC 6821 (= PGC 63594)
Discovered (Aug 8, 1863) by
Albert Marth
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBcd?) in Aquila (RA 19 44 24.2, Dec -06 50 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6821 (= GC 5946, Marth #402, 1860 RA 19 36 54, NPD 97 09) is "faint, pretty large, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.1? arcmin

NGC 6822 (=
IC 4895 = PGC 63616), Barnard's Galaxy
Discovered (Aug 17, 1884) by Edward Barnard (and later listed as NGC 6822)
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe (while listed as NGC 6822)
Discovered (Jul 16, 1906) by Max Wolf (and later listed as IC 4895)
A 9th-magnitude irregular galaxy (type IB(s)m?) in Sagittarius (RA 19 44 56.6, Dec -14 48 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6822 (Barnard, 1860 RA 19 37 03, NPD 105 06) is "very faint, large, extended, diffuse". The second IC says (per Howe) "Not large but very small". Dreyer and his successors made a number of mistakes in listing this galaxy and various parts of it which acquired NGC/IC listings of their own. A later iteration of this page will include a labeled version of the image below, to show which numbers correspond to which regions; but for now, refer to Steinicke's article for a discussion of the confusion involving the discovery (and mis-discovery) of this galaxy.
Physical Information: The recessional velocity of NGC 6822 is -55 km/sec, meaning it is so close that its Hubble expansion velocity is less than its peculiar (non-Hubble expansion) velocity, and its distance cannot be determined from the velocity (although it can be inferred that it is very close, intergalactically speaking). Redshift-independent distance estimates range from 1.4 to 2.3 million light years, with a "best" estimate of 1.65 million light years, making it one of the closest galaxies known, and a member of the Local Group of galaxies (which includes our Milky Way Galaxy and the Andromeda Galaxy). Because of its proximity NGC 6822 appears large (about 15.5 by 14 arcmin), but it is actually a dwarf galaxy, only about 8 thousand light years across.
ESO image of irregular galaxy NGC 6822, also known as Barnard's Galaxy
Above, an 18 arcmin wide image of NGC 6822 (Image Credit ESO)

NGC 6823 (= OCL 124)
Discovered (Jul 17, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Jul 12, 1830) by John Herschel
A 7th-magnitude open cluster (type I3pn) in Vulpecula (RA 19 43 10.0, Dec +23 18 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6823 (= GC 4512 = JH 2049 = WH VII 18, 1860 RA 19 37 14, NPD 67 01.8) is "a cluster, considerably rich, extended, stars from 11th to 12th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 7.0? arcmin

NGC 6824 (= PGC 63575)
Discovered (Sep 16, 1792) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Cygnus (RA 19 43 40.5, Dec +56 06 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6824 (= GC 4513 = WH II 878, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 19 40 39, NPD 34 13.6) is "pretty bright, irregularly faint, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 1.4? arcmin

NGC 6825 (= PGC 63535)
Discovered (Sep 18, 1884) by
Edward Swift
A 14th-magnitude compact galaxy (type C??) in Draco (RA 19 41 54.5, Dec +64 04 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6825 (Swift list II (#82), 1860 RA 19 40 45, NPD 26 16.0) is "extremely faint, very small, very difficult, faint star near".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.3? arcmin

NGC 6826, the Blinking Planetary Nebula
Discovered (Sep 6, 1793) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Sep 8, 1829) by John Herschel
A 9th-magnitude planetary nebula in Cygnus (RA 19 44 48.2, Dec +50 31 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6826 (= GC 4514 = JH 2050 = WH IV 73, 1860 RA 19 41 02, NPD 39 48.8) is "a planetary nebula, bright, pretty large, round, 11th magnitude star in middle".
Physical Information: NGC 6826 is three to five thousand light years from the Sun. Apparent size 0.6? arcmin.
Cold Spring Observatory image of region near planetary nebula NGC 6826, superimposed on a DSS image to fill in areas otherwise uncovered
Above, a 12 arcmin wide composite image centered on NGC 6826
(Foreground image credit Fred Calvert, Cold Spring Observatory; superimposed on DSS background)
Below, a 3 arcmin wide image of NGC 6826 (Image Credit Fred Calvert, Cold Spring Observatory)
Cold Spring Observatory image of planetary nebula NGC 6826
Below, a ? arcmin wide HST image of the central portion of the nebula (Image Credit Bruce Balick (University of Washington), Jason Alexander (University of Washington), Arsen Hajian (U.S. Naval Observatory), Yervant Terzian (Cornell University), Mario Perinotto (University of Florence, Italy), Patrizio Patriarchi (Arcetri Observatory, Italy) & NASA)
HST image of central portion of planetary nebula NGC 6826

NGC 6827 (= OCL 120)
Discovered (Oct 16, 1878) by
Édouard Stephan
An open cluster (type I3m) in Vulpecula (RA 19 48 53.2, Dec +21 12 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6827 (Stephan list IX (#25), 1860 RA 19 42 47, NPD 69 08.0) is "very faint, extended, diffuse, several stars involved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0? arcmin

NGC 6828
Discovered (Jul 30, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Aug 21, 1827) by John Herschel
A group of stars in Aquila (RA 19 50 17.0, Dec +07 54 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6828 (= GC 4515 = JH 2051 = WH VIII 73, 1860 RA 19 43 30, NPD 82 26.4) is "a cluster, poor, a little compressed".
Physical Information:

NGC 6829 (= PGC 63667)
Discovered (Sep 3, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Draco (RA 19 47 07.5, Dec +59 54 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6829 (Swift list IV (#77), 1860 RA 19 44 59, NPD 30 26.7) is "extremely faint, pretty small, round, pretty bright star close to south, western of 2", the other being NGC 6831.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.4? arcmin

NGC 6830 (= OCL 125)
Discovered (Jul 19, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Jul 12, 1830) by John Herschel
An 8th-magnitude open cluster (type II2p) in Vulpecula (RA 19 51 00.0, Dec +23 06 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6830 (= GC 4516 = JH 2052 = WH VII 9, 1860 RA 19 45 04, NPD 67 15.8) is "a cluster, large, pretty rich, pretty compressed, stars from 11th to 12th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 6.0? arcmin

NGC 6831 (= PGC 63674)
Discovered (Sep 3, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Draco (RA 19 47 57.2, Dec +59 53 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6831 (Swift list IV (#78), 1860 RA 19 45 44, NPD 30 26.7) is "extremely faint, small, round, eastern of 2", the other being NGC 6829.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.4? arcmin

NGC 6832
Discovered (Aug 11, 1831) by
John Herschel
A group of stars in Cygnus (RA 19 48 15.5, Dec +59 25 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6832 (= GC 4517 = JH 2053, 1860 RA 19 45 44, NPD 30 55.9) is "a cluster, very large, a little compressed, stars from the 7th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 12? arcmin

NGC 6833
Discovered (May 8, 1883) by
Edward Pickering (HN 54)
A 12th-magnitude planetary nebula in Cygnus (RA 19 49 46.6, Dec +48 57 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6833 (Pickering (HN 54), 1860 RA 19 45 47, NPD 41 23.5) is "a planetary nebula, stellar". As for NGC 6803 and 6807, which share the same discoverer and description, the 5 arcsec disc of NGC 6833 is indistinguishable from a star in visual or broad-spectrum photographic surveys. Only the use of filters (such as an OIII filter) which block most wavelengths but pass the radiation emitted by interstellar gases allows an observer to tell the difference between ordinary stars, which look fainter when viewed through such filters, and planetary nebulae, which remain about the same brightness.
Physical Information: NGC 6833 probably lies in the next spiral arm out from the center of our galaxy, or even in the inner halo beyond that arm, which would put it at least seven thousand light years from the Sun, and most likely considerably further.
DSS image of region near planetary nebula NGC 6833
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6833
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of NGC 6833 shows no hint of its nebular structure
DSS image of planetary nebula NGC 6833
Below left, a HST closeup of the star shows a faint outer disk about 5 arcsec in width (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive). Below right, a composite HST image shows a low-ionization region about one arcsec in size centered on the star (Image Credit WFPC2/PC Casertano GO6943, NASA/ESA/STScI, Hubble Archives)
HST images of planetary nebula NGC 6833

NGC 6834 (= OCL 134)
Discovered (Jul 17, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Sep 4, 1825) by John Herschel
An 8th-magnitude open cluster (type II2m) in Cygnus (RA 19 52 12.5, Dec +29 24 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6834 (= GC 4518 = JH 2054 = WH VIII 16, 1860 RA 19 46 34, NPD 60 57.1) is "a cluster, poor, a little compressed, stars from 11th to 12th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 6.0? arcmin

NGC 6835 (= PGC 63800)
Discovered (Aug 2, 1881) by
Édouard Stephan
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Sagittarius (RA 19 54 32.8, Dec -12 34 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6835 (Stephan list XII (#91), 1860 RA 19 46 45, NPD 102 55.8) is "faint, pretty large, much extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.4 by 0.7? arcmin

NGC 6836 (= PGC 63803)
Discovered (Aug 2, 1881) by
Édouard Stephan
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBm?) in Sagittarius (RA 19 54 40.3, Dec -12 41 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6836 (Stephan list XII (#92), 1860 RA 19 46 53, NPD 103 02.9) is "very faint, pretty large, round, diffuse". The second IC adds (per Howe) "13.5 magnitude star attending to east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.5? arcmin.

NGC 6837 (= OCL 108)
Discovered (Sep 4, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Jul 29, 1829) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude open cluster in Aquila (RA 19 53 08.0, Dec +11 41 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6837 (= GC 4519 = JH 2055 = WH VIII 18, 1860 RA 19 46 53, NPD 78 40.5) is "a cluster, small, poor".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0? arcmin.

NGC 6838 (=
M71 = GCL 115)
Discovered (1745) by Philippe de Cheseaux
Discovered (between 1772 and 1778?) and recorded (1779) by Johann Koehler
Discovered (Jun 28, 1780) by Pierre Méchain
Also observed (Oct 4, 1780) by Charles Messier as M71
Also observed (Aug 24, 1827) by John Herschel
An 8th-magnitude globular cluster in Sagitta (RA 19 53 46.1, Dec +18 46 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6838 (= GC 4520 = JH 2056, Méchain, M 71, 1860 RA 19 47 30, NPD 71 35.1) is "a cluster, very large, very rich, pretty much compressed, stars from 11th to 16th magnitude".
Physical Information: About 30 light years across and 12 thousand light years away (8 arcmin wide?). Perhaps a massive "open" cluster, rather than a globular (its age would determine the difference).
Composite of Misti Mountain Observatory image (for detail and color control) and DSS image (for depth of exposure) of region near globular cluster NGC 6838, also known as M71
Above, a 12 arcmin wide image centered on NGC 6838
(Image Credit & © Jim Misti, Misti Mountain Observatory; used by permission/DSS composite)
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of the entire cluster (Image Credit REU program/AURA/NSF/NOAO)
NOAO image of globular cluster NGC 6838, also known as M71
Below, a 3.35 arcmin wide HST image of the core of the cluster (Image Credit ESA/HST/Wikimedia Commons)
HST image of core of globular cluster NGC 6838, also known as M71

NGC 6839
Discovered (Aug 18, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Aug 26, 1827) by John Herschel
A group of stars in Sagitta (RA 19 54 33.0, Dec +17 56 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6839 (= GC 4521 = JH 2057 = WH VI 16?, 1860 RA 19 48 14, NPD 72 28.4) is "a cluster, very small, very compressed".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.0? arcmin

NGC 6840
Discovered (Sep 4, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Feb 18, 1828) by John Herschel
A group of stars in Aquila (RA 19 55 17.0, Dec +12 07 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6840 (= GC 4522 = JH 2058 = WH VIII 19, 1860 RA 19 48 42, NPD 78 15.6) is "a cluster, poor, a little compressed".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.0? arcmin

NGC 6841 (= PGC 63881)
Discovered (Sep 28, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Sagittarius (RA 19 57 49.1, Dec -31 48 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6841 (= GC 4523 = JH 3802, 1860 RA 19 48 58, NPD 122 11.5) is "very faint, small, round, pretty suddenly brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 1.4? arcmin

NGC 6842
Discovered (Jun 28, 1863) by
Albert Marth
Discovered (Aug 26, 1864) by Heinrich d'Arrest
Discovered (Jul 12, 1866) by Truman Safford
A 13th-magnitude planetary nebula in Vulpecula (RA 19 55 02.3, Dec +29 17 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6842 (= GC 5947, Marth #403, d'Arrest, (Safford #??), 1860 RA 19 49 19, NPD 61 05.4) is "faint pretty large, very little extended".
Discovery Notes: Safford's observations were not published until many years after the fact, so Dreyer was not aware of them until in the final stages of preparing the NGC for publication. As a result Safford's observations are only noted in an appendix, and none of the NGC entries mention his name (hence its being shown here in parentheses).
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.95? arcmin
DSS image of region near planetary nebula NGC 6842
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6842
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the planetary nebula
DSS image of planetary nebula NGC 6842

NGC 6843
Discovered (Jul 29, 1829) by
John Herschel
A group of stars in Aquila (RA 19 56 06.0, Dec +12 09 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6843 (= GC 4524 = JH 2059, 1860 RA 19 49 32, NPD 78 12.6) is "a cluster, small, poor".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.0? arcmin

NGC 6844 (= PGC 64025)
Discovered (Jun 22, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Pavo (RA 20 02 50.0, Dec -65 13 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6844 (= GC 4525 = JH 3801, 1860 RA 19 49 43, NPD 155 36.8) is "extremely faint, very small, round, pretty suddenly brighter middle, 11th magnitude star to northwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.1? arcmin

NGC 6845 (= PGC 63985)
Discovered (Jul 7, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Telescopium (RA 20 00 58.0, Dec -47 04 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6845 (= GC 4526 = JH 3803, 1860 RA 19 50 50, NPD 137 27.5) is "very faint, small, very little extended, gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.3 by 1.0? arcmin

PGC 63986 (= "NGC 6845B")
Not an NGC object, but listed here since sometimes called NGC 6845B
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in
Telescopium (RA 20 01 05.1, Dec -47 03 34)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.6? arcmin

PGC 63979 (= "NGC 6845C")
Not an NGC object, but listed here since sometimes called NGC 6845C
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in
Telescopium (RA 20 00 56.8, Dec -47 05 03)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.2? arcmin

PGC 63978 (= "NGC 6845D")
Not an NGC object, but listed here since sometimes called NGC 6845D
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in
Telescopium (RA 20 00 53.7, Dec -47 05 41)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.2? arcmin

NGC 6846 (= OCL 139)
Discovered (Aug 17, 1873) by
Édouard Stephan
A 14th-magnitude open cluster (type IV1p) in Cygnus (RA 19 56 28.1, Dec +32 20 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6846 (= GC 5948, Stephan list V (#4), 1860 RA 19 51 02, NPD 58 01.0) is "extremely faint, very small, 3 stars involved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8? arcmin

NGC 6847
Discovered (Jul 17, 1784) by
William Herschel
A star cloud in Cygnus (RA 19 56 37.7, Dec +30 12 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6847 (= GC 4527 = WH II 202, 1860 RA 19 51 23, NPD 61 01.7) is "a nebula, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information:

NGC 6848 (= PGC 64023)
Discovered (Jul 9, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Telescopium (RA 20 02 46.9, Dec -56 05 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6848 (= GC 4528 = JH 3804, 1860 RA 19 51 33, NPD 146 28.3) is "considerably faint, considerably large, round, very gradually a little brighter middle, 2 stars to east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.4 by 1.0? arcmin

NGC 6849 (= PGC 64097)
Discovered (Sep 4, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/SB0?) in Sagittarius (RA 20 06 15.6, Dec -40 11 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6849 (= GC 4529 = JH 3805, 1860 RA 19 51 48, NPD 130 35.4) is "pretty bright, small, round, very small star to northwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 1.1? arcmin
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 6849
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6849
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 6849
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 6750 - 6799) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 6800 - 6849     → (NGC 6850 - 6899)