Celestial Atlas
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Page last updated Mar 8, 2015
WORKING 6900: Add/update Steinicke listings/data, check IDs
WORKING 6924: Find Stone observations
WORKING 6925+: Checking Steinicke discovery information

NGC 6900 (= PGC 64530)
Discovered (Oct 1, 1863) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type Sb??) in Aquila (RA 20 21 35.1, Dec -02 34 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6900 (= GC 5954, Marth 408, 1860 RA 20 14 18, NPD 92 59) is "very faint, small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.8? arcmin

NGC 6901 (=
IC 5000 = PGC 64552)
Discovered (Aug 15, 1863) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 6901)
Discovered (Sep 29, 1891) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 5000)
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type SB(r)ab?) in Aquila (RA 20 22 21.6, Dec +06 25 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6901 (= GC 5955, Marth 409, 1860 RA 20 14 22, NPD 83 59) is "extremely faint".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 4760 km/sec, NGC 6901 is about 220 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.4 by 0.6? arcmin, it is about 90 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 6901
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 6901
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 6901

NGC 6902 ( = PGC 64632 and probably =
IC 4948)
Almost certainly not observed (Aug 4, 1826) by James Dunlop
Discovered (Sep 2, 1836) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 6902)
Discovered (Sep 17, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 4948)
A magnitude 10.9 spiral galaxy (type SA(rs)bc? pec) in Sagittarius (RA 20 24 27.9, Dec -43 39 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6902 (= GC 4569 = JH 3827, 1860 RA 20 14 53, NPD 134 05.9) is "faint, considerably small, round, brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 20 24 30.8, Dec -43 39 07, within the eastern outline of the galaxy listed above, the description is a reasonable fit and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain.
Discovery Notes: Steinicke states that NGC 6902 was observed by Dunlop (as his #451) on Aug 4, 1826, presumably as a result of a tentative 2008 suggestion by Glen Cozens, hence its inclusion in the discovery list above. However, Dunlop's identifiable objects generally have declination errors of less than 10 arcmin, and the position of Dunlop 451 (1827 RA 20 12 16, Dec -45 23) precesses to RA 20 24 18.8, Dec -44 50 12, which is over a degree to the south of the galaxy listed above, in a region devoid of objects that Dunlop could have seen. In addition, Dunlop's description "An extremely small faint elliptical nebula, about 12" long and 8" broad, with a small bright point in the following extremity, which may be a star" is a questionable fit to the galaxy, as its bright core is far larger than Dunlop's description, and the only "bright point in the following extremity" that Dunlop could have seen is an 11th magnitude star several arcmin to the southeast of the galaxy, which seems too far away for an object described in arcsec. Finally, in a 2010 paper whose authors include Dr. Cozens, Dunlop 451 is not assigned a modern identification, so it appears that the original suggestion has been reconsidered and rejected. But even in the unlikely event that Dunlop did observe NGC 6902, the fact that his position was so far off means that when Herschel tried to identify Dunlop 451 he had no hope of success, and his discovery of NGC 6902 owes nothing to Dunlop's efforts. So at least as far as the NGC is concerned, Herschel was the discoverer.
Physical Information: Apparent size of the visible-light galaxy, 5 by 4 arcmin, of the UV galaxy, 7.7 by 6 arcmin
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 6902
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6902
Below, a 4.8 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of spiral galaxy NGC 6902
Below, a 12 arcmin wide UV image of the galaxy (Image Credit GALEX, Wikimedia Commons)
GALEX image of spiral galaxy NGC 6902

PGC 64575 (= "NGC 6902A1")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes given the non-standard designation NGC 6902A1
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBm?) in
Sagittarius (RA 20 23 00.4, Dec -44 16 14)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.0? arcmin. One of a pair of galaxies with a non-standard designation based on NGC 6902, but probably unrelated to that galaxy.

PGC 64576 (= "NGC 6902A2")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes given the non-standard designation NGC 6902A2
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in
Sagittarius (RA 20 22 58.8, Dec -44 16 22)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.5? arcmin. One of a pair of galaxies with a non-standard designation based on NGC 6902, but probably unrelated to that galaxy.

PGC 64580 (= "NGC 6902B")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 6902B
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBcd?) in
Sagittarius (RA 20 23 06.8, Dec -43 52 08)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 1.2? arcmin

NGC 6903 (= PGC 64607)
Discovered (Jul 14, 1830) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.9 lenticular galaxy (type E/SB0?) in Capricornus (RA 20 23 44.9, Dec -19 19 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6903 (= GC 4570 = JH 2073, 1860 RA 20 15 40, NPD 109 45.2) is "considerably large, extended, brighter middle equivalent to 17th magnitude star, 10th magnitude star attached on north".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 1.5? arcmin

NGC 6904 (not =
M5)
Discovered (Aug 18, 1828) by John Herschel
Some sites misidentify M5 as NGC 6904; if you are here because of that, see NGC 5904.
An "open cluster" in Vulpecula (RA 20 21 48.3, Dec +25 44 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6904 (= GC 4571 = JH 2074, 1860 RA 20 15 46, NPD 64 41.5) is a "cluster, small, very little compressed, with stars from 10th to 11th magnitude". Herschel's original description states that the position is for the brightest member of the cluster, which he estimated as 9th magnitude. The position precesses to RA 20 21 42.8, Dec +25 45 07, less than 0.1 arcmin from the 8th-magnitude star, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: The "cluster" is a 4 arcmin wide scattering of just a few stars, but with sufficient brightness to stand out against the background of the Milky Way. Whether it is a physical group or a chance alignment of unrelated stars appears uncertain, but it is certainly the "object" seen by Herschel.
DSS image of region near stellar group NGC 6904
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6904

NGC 6905, the Blue Flash Nebula
Discovered (Sep 16, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Aug 24, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.1 planetary nebula in Delphinus (RA 20 22 23.0, Dec +20 06 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6905 (= GC 4572 = JH 2075 = WH IV 16, 1860 RA 20 16 09, NPD 70 20.4) is a "very remarkable object, planetary nebula, bright, pretty small, round, 4 small stars near".
Physical Information:
DSS image of region near planetary nebula NGC 6905
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6905
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide NOAO/DSS composite image of the planetary nebula
(NOAO Image Credit Bill Gillispie/Adam Block/NOAO/AURA/NSF)
Superposition of an NOAO image of planetary nebula NGC 6905 on a DSS image to show the nebula's outer halo
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide image of the nebula (Image Credit Bill Gillispie/Adam Block/NOAO/AURA/NSF)
NOAO image of planetary nebula NGC 6905

NGC 6906 (= PGC 64601)
Discovered (Aug 15, 1863) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 12.3 spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Aquila (RA 20 23 34.0, Dec +06 26 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6906 (= GC 5956, Marth 410, 1860 RA 20 16 39, NPD 83 59) is "pretty faint, pretty large, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.8? arcmin

NGC 6907 (= PGC 64650)
Discovered (Jul 12, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Sep 13, 1830) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.2 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)bc?) in Capricornus (RA 20 25 06.6, Dec -24 48 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6907 (= GC 4573 = JH 2076 = WH III 141, 1860 RA 20 16 44, NPD 115 14.9) is "considerably faint, considerably large, very little extended, very gradually little brighter middle, mottled but not resolved, 3 stars preceding (to the west)". The position precesses to RA 20 25 05.7, Dec -24 47 55, about 0.7 arcmin north of the center of the galaxy, but well within its outline, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 3180 km/sec, NGC 6907 is about 150 million light years away, in fair agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 110 to 135 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 3.3 by 2.7 arcmin, it is about 130 thousand light years across. NGC 6908 is superimposed on the northeastern arm of NGC 6907, and must lie in front of it. NGC 6908 is superimposed on the northeastern arm of NGC 907, and must lie in front of it. The two galaxies' recessional velocities are nearly the same, which means that they are at nearly the same distance, and recent evidence suggests that they are not only interacting, but will eventually merge. The fact that the recessional velocity of NGC 6908 is less than that of NGC 6907 and the former is in front of the latter suggests that in their most recent interaction that smaller galaxy was moving toward us relative to the larger one, passed through it from behind (from our point of view), and as a result is now in front (again, from our point of view), slowly moving away from it; but the difference in velocity is so small that eventually NGC 6908 will reverse its motion and pass through NGC 6907 again (hence the statement that they will eventually merge).
Superposition of NOAO image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 6907 and and lenticular galaxy NGC 6908 on a DSS background, to fill out the areas not covered by the NOAO image
Above, a 12 arcmin wide composite image centered on NGC 6907, also showing 6908
(Foreground image credit as for the NOAO image at bottom; superimposed on a DSS background)
Below, a 4 arcmin wide DSS image of NGC 6907 and NGC 6908
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 6907 and and lenticular galaxy NGC 6908
Below, the NOAO image of the same region (Image Credit Fred Calvert/Adam Block/NOAO/AURA/NSF)
NOAO image of spiral galaxy NGC 6907 and and lenticular galaxy NGC 6908

NGC 6908
Discovered (Sep 24, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 14.6 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Capricornus (RA 20 25 09.0, Dec -24 48 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6908 (= GC 5957, Marth 411, 1860 RA 20 16 46, NPD 115 15) is "extremely faint, very small, a little extended, h076 preceding (to the west)", h2076 being NGC 6907. It should be kept in mind that in an era of visual observations, NGC 6907 appeared not as a huge spiral structure overlapping NGC 6908, but as a slightly brighter slightly larger fuzzy spot (the brightest part of the galaxy) a little to the south and west of NGC 6908. The position precesses to RA 20 25 07.7, Dec -24 48 01, less than 0.3 arcmin west of the galaxy, but even without that good agreement the description of its relationship to NGC 6907 would make the identification of NGC 6908 certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 3060 km/sec, NGC 6908 is about 145 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.3 by 0.1 arcmin, it is about 12 thousand light years across. NGC 6908 is superimposed on the northeastern arm of NGC 6907, and must lie in front of it. The two galaxies' recessional velocities are nearly the same, which means that they are at nearly the same distance, and recent evidence suggests that they are not only interacting, but will eventually merge. The fact that the recessional velocity of NGC 6908 is less than that of NGC 6907 and the former is in front of the latter suggests that in their most recent interaction that smaller galaxy was moving toward us relative to the larger one, passed through it from behind (from our point of view), and as a result is now in front (again, from our point of view), slowly moving away from it; but the difference in velocity is so small that eventually NGC 6908 will reverse its motion and pass through NGC 6907 again (hence the statement that they will eventually merge).
NOAO image of spiral galaxy NGC 6907 and and lenticular galaxy NGC 6908
Above, a 4 arcmin wide image of NGC 6908 and 6907 (which see for a wide-field image)
(Image Credit Fred Calvert/Adam Block/NOAO/AURA/NSF)

NGC 6909 (= PGC 64725)
Discovered (Jul 1, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.7 elliptical galaxy (type E5?) in Telescopium (RA 20 27 38.8, Dec -47 01 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6909 (= GC 4574 = JH 3828, 1860 RA 20 17 44, NPD 137 29.0) is "pretty bright, pretty large, gradually brighter middle, 2 stars of 10th magnitude near".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.2 by 1.1? arcmin

NGC 6910 (= OCL 181)
Discovered (Oct 17, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Sep 18, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 7.4 open cluster (type I2p) in Cygnus (RA 20 23 12.0, Dec +40 46 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6910 (= GC 4575 = JH 2077 = WH VIII 56, 1860 RA 20 18 06, NPD 49 40.2) is a "cluster, pretty bright, pretty small, poor, pretty compressed, stars of 10th to 12th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 10? arcmin

NGC 6911 (= PGC 64485)
Discovered (Jun 9, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Draco (RA 20 19 38.3, Dec +66 43 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6911 (= Swift list II (#84), 1860 RA 20 18 16, NPD 23 42.6) is "extremely faint, large, a little brighter middle, pretty bright star near".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.1? arcmin

NGC 6912 (= PGC 64700)
Discovered (Aug 14, 1881) by
Edward Holden
A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Capricornus (RA 20 26 52.1, Dec -18 37 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6912 (Holden (#21), 1860 RA 20 18 50, NPD 109 04) is "very faint, 2 stars of 14th to 15th magnitude to northwest, 8th magnitude star to east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.1? arcmin

NGC 6913 (=
M29 = OCL 168)
Discovered (Jul 29, 1764) by Charles Messier (and listed as M29)
Independently discovered (Dec 5, 1774) by Johann Bode
Also observed (Aug 6, 1829) by John Herschel
A magnitude 6.6 open cluster (type III3p) in Cygnus (RA 20 24 06.0, Dec +38 29 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6913 (= GC 4576 = JH 2078, M29, 1860 RA 20 18 52, NPD 51 56.1) is a "cluster, poor, a little compressed, stars large and small (meaning bright and faint)".
Physical Information: Apparent size 10? arcmin wide
NOAO image of open cluster NGC 6913, also known as M29
Above, a ? arcmin wide image of NGC 6913 (Image Credit Hillary Mathis, AURA, NSF, NOAO)

NGC 6914
Discovered (Aug 29, 1881) by
Édouard Stephan
A reflection nebula in Cygnus (RA 20 24 43.0, Dec +42 29 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6914 (Stephan list XII (#93), 1860 RA 20 19 52, NPD 47 58.2) is "very faint, very large, irregularly round, diffuse, 2 stars attached on west".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0 by 3.0? arcmin

NGC 6915 (= PGC 64729)
Discovered (Jul 24, 1863) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 12.2 spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Aquila (RA 20 27 46.0, Dec -03 04 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6915 (= GC 5958, Marth 412, 1860 RA 20 20 27, NPD 93 30.2) is "pretty bright, small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.9? arcmin

NGC 6916 (= PGC 64600)
Discovered (Jun 26, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Cygnus (RA 20 23 33.1, Dec +58 20 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6916 (Swift list VI (actually list IX #94), 1860 RA 20 20 35, NPD 32 04.0) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, faint star close on west, very difficult". There is no object in Swift's list VI with a position anywhere near that quoted by Dreyer, but per Steinicke the object corresponds to Swift list IX #94, with the additional note "2 single and 2 double stars in line to north point to it". Swift's 1890 position of RA 20 21 20, Dec +58 01.0 precesses to 1860 RA 20 20 40, NPD 32 04.8, so there is no doubt that the object was indeed Swift's list IX #94. Swift's position precesses to J2000 RA 20 23 45.5, Dec +58 22 25, which is 2.4 arcmin northeast of the galaxy listed above, but the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 1.2? arcmin

NGC 6917 (= PGC 64715)
Discovered (Aug 15, 1863) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Delphinus (RA 20 27 28.4, Dec +08 05 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6917 (= GC 5959, Marth 413, 1860 RA 20 20 38, NPD 82 22) is "very faint, small, attached to a small star".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.0? arcmin

NGC 6918 (= PGC 64851)
Discovered (Jul 1, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.6 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a?) in Indus (RA 20 30 46.9, Dec -47 28 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6918 (= GC 4577 = JH 3830, 1860 RA 20 20 50, NPD 137 56.5) is "very faint, 12th magnitude star attached on southwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7? arcmin

NGC 6919 (= PGC 64883)
Discovered (Sep 2, 1836) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Microscopium (RA 20 31 38.0, Dec -44 13 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6919 (= GC 4578 = JH 3831, 1860 RA 20 22 00, NPD 134 40.9) is "extremely faint, pretty small, round, very gradually very little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.2? arcmin

NGC 6920 (= PGC 65273)
Discovered (Jul 21, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.2 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Octans (RA 20 43 57.1, Dec -80 00 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6920 (= GC 4579 = JH 3829, 1860 RA 20 22 36, NPD 170 28.8) is "pretty bright, considerably small, round, pretty suddenly much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 1.5? arcmin

NGC 6921 (= PGC 64768)
Discovered (Sep 6, 1863) by
Albert Marth
Discovered (July? 1865) by Auguste Voigt
A magnitude 13.4 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Vulpecula (RA 20 28 28.9, Dec +25 43 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6921 (= GC 5960, Marth 414, 860 RA 20 22 36, NPD 64 45) is "faint, small, extended".
Discovery Notes: Voigt's discovery was one of ten nebulae he discovered between March and August of 1865; but they were only noted in his observing records, and were not published until 1987. So Dreyer had no knowledge of his observation, and whether he might have given Voigt credit as a co-discoverer can only be mere speculation.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.2? arcmin

NGC 6922 (= PGC 64814)
Discovered (Jul 24, 1863) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Aquila (RA 20 29 52.8, Dec -02 11 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6922 (= GC 5961, Marth 415, 1860 RA 20 22 36, NPD 92 39) is "very faint, pretty large, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.1? arcmin

NGC 6923 (=
IC 5004 = PGC 64884)
Discovered (Jul 31, 1834) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 6923)
Discovered (Jul 22, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5004)
A magnitude 12.0 spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Microscopium (RA 20 31 39.0, Dec -30 49 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6923 (= GC 4580 = JH 3832, 1860 RA 20 23 02, NPD 121 17.6) is "pretty faint, considerably small, round, gradually brighter middle, between 2 stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.6 by 1.3? arcmin

NGC 6924 (= PGC 64945)
Discovered (Jul 8, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (Oct 6, 1887) by Ormond Stone
Also observed (at a later date) by Ormond Stone
A magnitude 12.8 lenticular galaxy (type E/SA0(s)?) in Capricornus (RA 20 33 19.1, Dec -25 28 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6924 (Leavenworth list I (#231), 1860 RA 20 24 10, NPD 115 57.0) is "very faint, pretty small, round, suddenly brighter middle and nucleus". The first IC lists a corrected RA (per Ormond Stone) of 20 24 57. The position precesses to RA 20 33 19.0, Dec -25 28 40, well within the outline of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain.
Discovery Notes: Leavenworth made the first observation at the Leander-McCormick observatory, obtaining a right ascension that was nearly 50 seconds of time to the west of the correct position. A couple of years later (listed as epoch 1887.763) Stone reobserved the nebula (as #799 in a catalog of southern galaxies), but only checked its declination, obtaining a result essentially the same as Leavenworth's measurement. The first IC note shows that Stone must have done another observation of the object at a later date, finally obtaining an accurate measurement of the right ascension; but I have found no reference to the later observation save for the IC note, so further clarification must await a later iteration of this entry.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 6070 km/sec, NGC 6924 is about 280 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.05 by 0.8 arcmin, it is about 85 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 6924
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6924
Below, a 1.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 6924

WORKING HERE: Checking Steinicke's discovery information

NGC 6925 (= PGC 64980)
Discovered (Jul 31, 1834) by
John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Microscopium (RA 20 34 20.5, Dec -31 58 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6925 (= GC 4581 = JH 3834, 1860 RA 20 25 36, NPD 122 26.9) is "considerably bright, large, much extended 6°, pretty suddenly a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.4 by 1.1? arcmin

NGC 6926 (= PGC 64939)
Discovered (Jul 21, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(s)bc? pec) in Aquila (RA 20 33 05.9, Dec -02 01 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6926 (= GC 4582 = JH 2079 = WH III 142, 1860 RA 20 25 52, NPD 92 29.7) is "very faint, pretty large, extended 176°, preceding (western) of 2", the other being NGC 6929.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5880 km/sec, NGC 6926 is about 275 million light years away. Given that and its 1.9 by 1.3 arcmin apparent size, it is about 150 thousand light years across. NED states that it is in a group with NGC 6929 and PGC 64910 (among others?), and a member of a pair with an unnamed member of that group; their gravitational interaction is perhaps responsible for its active core, which classifies it as a Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 2).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 6926, also showing NGC 6929
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6926, also showing NGC 6929
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 6926
Below, a 20 arcmin wide DSS image centered between NGC 6926, NGC 6929, and PGC 64910
DSS image of region centered between galaxies NGC 6926 and 6929, and PGC 64910

PGC 64910
Not an NGC object but listed here because of a possible interaction with
NGC 6926
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type (R')SAB(rs)bc? pec) in Aquila (RA 20 32 16.0, Dec -02 14 57)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5950 km/sec, PGC 64910 is about 275 million light years away. Given that and its 1.7 by 1.5 arcmin apparent size, it is about 135 thousand light years across. It is listed by NED as a member of a group with NGC 6926 and 6929 (among others?).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 64910
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 64910 (see NGC 6926 for a still wider view)
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 64910

NGC 6927 (= PGC 64925)
Discovered (Aug 15, 1863) by
Albert Marth
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Delphinus (RA 20 32 38.1, Dec +09 55 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6927 (= GC 5962, Marth 416, 1860 RA 20 25 52, NPD 80 35) is "extremely faint, a little extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.2? arcmin

PGC 64924 (= "NGC 6927A")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 6927A
A 16th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E??) in
Delphinus (RA 20 32 36.7, Dec +09 53 00)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.3 by 0.1? arcmin

NGC 6928 (=
IC 1325 = PGC 64932)
Discovered (Aug 15, 1863) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 6928)
Discovered (Sep 23, 1888) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 1325)
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBab?) in Delphinus (RA 20 32 50.1, Dec +09 55 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6928 (= GC 5963, Marth 417, 1860 RA 20 26 06, NPD 80 32.8) is "pretty bright, pretty large, much extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 0.6? arcmin

NGC 6929 (= PGC 64949)
Discovered (Jul 21, 1827) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SA0/a? pec) in Aquila (RA 20 33 21.6, Dec -02 02 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6929 (= GC 2583 = JH 2080, 1860 RA 20 26 08, NPD 92 30.5) is "very faint, very small, south following (southeastern) of 2", the other being NGC 6926.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 6175 km/sec, NGC 6929 is about 290 million light years away. Given that and its 0.8 by 0.7 arcmin apparent size, it is about 65 thousand light years across. It is listed by NED as a member of a group with NGC 6926 and PGC 64910 (and others?), and as a pair member with one of the group members (but which is left unstated).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 6929, also showing NGC 6926
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6929, also showing NGC 6926
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 6929

NGC 6930 (=
IC 1326 = PGC 64935)
Discovered (Aug 15, 1863) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 6930)
Discovered (Sep 23, 1888) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 1326)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBab?) in Delphinus (RA 20 32 58.8, Dec +09 52 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6930 (= GC 5964, Marth 418, 1860 RA 20 26 13, NPD 80 37) is "faint, much extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.5? arcmin

NGC 6931 (= PGC 64963)
Discovered (Jun 4, 1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
Also observed by Herbert Howe
Also observed by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Capricornus (RA 20 33 41.4, Dec -11 22 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6931 (Leavenworth list I (#232), 1860 RA 20 26 20, NPD 101 52.0) is "extremely faint, pretty small, extended 120°, gradually brighter middle". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Bigourdan and Howe) of 20 26 01.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.4? arcmin

NGC 6932 (= PGC 65219)
Discovered (Jun 29, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Pavo (RA 20 42 08.6, Dec -73 37 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6932 (= GC 4584 = JH 3833, 1860 20 26 29, NPD 164 06.8) is "faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle, 5 stars preceding (to the west)".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.2 by 1.6? arcmin

NGC 6933
Recorded (Sep 14, 1865) by
Herman Schultz
A pair of stars in Delphinus (RA 20 33 38.2, Dec +07 23 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6933 (= GC 5965, Schultz (#8, Nova VII), 1860 RA 20 26 47, NPD 83 05.3) is "pretty bright, very small, h2081 following (to the east)", h2081 being NGC 6934. (There is an erratum for this entry: "delete star", meaning, do not see the notes at the end of the NGC.)

NGC 6934 (= GCL 117)
Discovered (Sep 24, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 9th-magnitude globular cluster (type VIII) in Delphinus (RA 20 34 11.6, Dec +07 24 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6934 (= GC 4585 = GC 4586 = JH 2081 = WH I 103, 1860 RA 20 27 20, NPD 83 04.2) is a "cluster, bright, large, round, well resolved and clearly consisting of stars, stars from the 16th magnitude and fainter, 9th magnitude star preceding (to the west)".
Physical Information: About 55 thousand light years from the Sun, and 120 light years in diameter (= 7 arcmin?)
DSS image of region near globular cluster NGC 6934
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6934
Below, a 3.3 arcmin wide HST image of the core of the cluster (Image Credit NASA, ESA/Hubble)
HST image of globular cluster NGC 6934

NGC 6935 (= PGC 65112)
Discovered (Jul 8, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Indus (RA 20 38 20.0, Dec -52 06 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6935 (= GC 4587 = JH 3835, 1860 RA 20 27 59, NPD 142 35.2) is "pretty bright, considerably large, round, gradually a little brighter middle, mottled but not resolved, preceding (western) of 2", the other being NGC 6937.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 1.8? arcmin

NGC 6936 (= PGC 65033)
Discovered (Sep 1, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth
Also observed by Herbert Howe
Also observed by Ormond Stone
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Capricornus (RA 20 35 56.3, Dec -25 16 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6936 (Leavenworth list I (#233), 1860 RA 20 28 10, NPD 115 46.1) is "very faint, very small, round, suddenly a little brighter middle". The first IC lists a corrected RA (per Ormond Stone) of 20 26 26. The second IC has an extended note: "Ormond Stone's place is RA 20 26 26, NPD 115 53.4, while Howe gives RA 20 27 36, NPD 115 45.6. There are two comparison stars with exactly these differences, C.D. 14864 and 14877. Ormond Stone says he used the former, but Howe's NPD agrees with that of Leavenworth, whose P.D.'s are always right within about a minute". This implies that Stone used the wrong comparison star, and Howe's position is more accurate, so I (will) use Howe's position to find the correct modern position of the object.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 1.0? arcmin

NGC 6937 (= PGC 65125)
Discovered (Jul 8, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Indus (RA 20 38 45.8, Dec -52 08 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6937 (= GC 4588 = JH 3836, 1860 RA 20 28 25, NPD 142 38.2) is "very faint, considerably small, round, suddenly a little brighter middle, following (eastern) of 2", the other being NGC 6935.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.5 by 2.1? arcmin

NGC 6938
Discovered (Jul 18, 1784) by
William Herschel
A group of stars in Vulpecula (RA 20 34 42.0, Dec +22 13 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6938 (= GC 4589 = JH 2082 = WH VIII 17, 1860 RA 20 28 35, NPD 68 13.9 is a "cluster, very large, poor, very little compressed".
Physical Information: Apparent size 8? arcmin wide

NGC 6939 (= OCL 217)
Discovered (Sep 9, 1798) by
William Herschel
An 8th-magnitude open cluster (type I1m) in Cepheus (RA 20 31 30.0, Dec +60 39 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dryer, NGC 6939 (= GC 4590 = JH 2083 = WH VI 42, 1860 RA 20 28 36, NPD 29 49.9) is a "cluster, pretty large, extremely rich, pretty compressed middle, stars from 11th to 16th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 10? arcmin wide

NGC 6940 (= OCL 141)
Discovered (Jul 17, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 6th-magnitude open cluster (type III2m) in Vulpecula (RA 20 34 32.3, Dec +28 16 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6940 (= GC 4591 = WH VII 8, 1860 RA 20 28 43, NPD 62 09.9) is a "cluster, very bright, very large, very rich, considerably compressed, stars pretty large (bright)".
Physical Information: Apparent size 25? arcmin wide

NGC 6941 (= PGC 65054)
Discovered (Aug 29, 1867) by
Truman Safford (83)
Discovered (?) by Édouard Stephan
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Aquila (RA 20 36 23.5, Dec -04 37 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6941 (= GC 5966 = Stephan list IV (#??), 1860 20 29 01, NPD 95 06.2) is "extremely faint, a little extended, a little brighter middle".
Discovery Notes: Dreyer was not aware of Safford's discoveries until he was almost ready to publish the NGC, so although he added a selection of Safford's discoveries to the NGC as an appendix, none of them were mentioned in the individual listings that made up the bulk of the work. Since Stephan also had no knowledge of Safford's work, his observation was an independent discovery, and was credited as such in John Herschel's General Catalog, which was the basis for the NGC.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0 by 1.4? arcmin

NGC 6942 (= PGC 65172)
Discovered (Jun 9, 1836) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a?) in Indus (RA 20 40 37.9, Dec -54 18 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6942 (= GC 4592 = JH 3837, 1860 RA 20 30 04, NPD 144 47.7) is "pretty bright, pretty large, round, pretty suddenly a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 1.6? arcmin

NGC 6943 (= PGC 65295)
Discovered (Jun 27, 1835) by
John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Pavo (RA 20 44 33.7, Dec -68 44 53)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6943 (= GC 4593 = JH 3838, 1860 RA 20 31 04, NPD 159 14.3) is "pretty faint, large, much extended, very gradually a little brighter middle, very small star".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.0 by 2.2? arcmin

NGC 6944 (= PGC 65117)
Discovered (Aug 15, 1863) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Delphinus (RA 20 38 23.8, Dec +06 59 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6944 (= GC 5967, Marth 419, 1860 RA 20 31 30, NPD 83 30) is "pretty faint, small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.6? arcmin

PGC 65108 (= "NGC 6944A")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 6944A
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBd? pec) in
Delphinus (RA 20 38 11.2, Dec +06 54 09)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7? arcmin

NGC 6945 (= PGC 65132)
Discovered (Jul 12, 1864) by
Albert Marth
Discovered (?) by Édouard Stephan
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Aquarius (RA 20 39 00.5, Dec -04 58 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6945 (= GC 5968, Marth 420, Stephan list I (#??), 1860 RA 20 31 37, NPD 95 27.6) is "pretty faint, very small, round, much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.8? arcmin

NGC 6946 (=
Arp 29 = PGC 65001), The Fireworks Galaxy
Discovered (Sep 9, 1798) by William Herschel
A 9th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)cd?) in Cygnus (RA 20 34 52.1, Dec +60 09 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6946 (= GC 4594 = JH 2084 = WH IV 76, 1860 RA 20 31 57, NPD 30 20.3) is "very faint, very large, very gradually then very suddenly brighter middle, partially resolved (some stars seen)".
Physical Information: NGC 6946 is a spectacular galaxy, but relatively faint for its large size, because it lies nearly in the plane of the Milky Way, and is considerably obscured and reddened by the dust in the plane of our galaxy. However, as a Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 2), it does have a bright core. One of the Milky Way's nearest neighbors, the galaxy has an insignificant Hubble expansion velocity, so its "recessional" velocity of 40 km/sec gives no indication of its distance. Redshift-independent distance estimates range from 18 to 40 million light years, with a general consensus more in the range of 20 to 25 million light years. Given that, its 11.5 by 9.8 arcmin apparent size implies that the galaxy is about 75 thousand light years across.
NOAO image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 6946, also known as Arp 29 and The Fireworks Galaxy, superimposed on a DSS background to fill in areas otherwise not covered
Above, a 24 arcmin wide NOAO/DSS composite image centered on NGC 6946
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of NGC 6946 (Image Credit above & below Fred Calvert/Adam Block/AURA/NSF/NOAO)
NOAO image of spiral galaxy NGC 6946, also known as as Arp 29 and The Fireworks Galaxy
Below, a ? arcmin wide infrared image of the galaxy (Image Credit NASA/JPL-Caltech,
R. Kennicutt (U. of Ariz./Inst. of Astr., U. of Cambridge) and the SINGS Team, Spitzer)

Spitzer infrared image of spiral galaxy NGC 6946, also known as as Arp 29 and The Fireworks Galaxy

NGC 6947 (= PGC 65193)
Discovered (Sep 28, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Microscopium (RA 20 41 15.0, Dec -32 29 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6947 (= GC 4595 = JH 3839, 1860 RA 20 32 31, NPD 122 58.9) is "very faint, large, round, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.0? arcmin

NGC 6948 (= PGC 65256)
Discovered (Jul 24, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Indus (RA 20 43 28.9, Dec -53 21 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6948 (= GC 4596 = JH 3840, 1860 RA 20 33 05, NPD 143 51.4) is "very faint, pretty small, considerably extended, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.2 by 1.0? arcmin

NGC 6949 (= PGC 65010)
Discovered (Sep 20, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S??) in Cepheus (RA 20 35 07.0, Dec +64 48 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 6949 (Swift list V (#91), 1860 RA 20 33 08, NPD 25 40.3) is "extremely faint, pretty small, irregularly round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.2? arcmin
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 6949
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 6949
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 6949
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 6850 - 6899) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 6900 - 6949     → (NGC 6950 - 6999)