Celestial Atlas
(NGC 650 - 699) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 700 - 749 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 750 - 799)
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Page last updated May 1, 2016
Checked Corwin positions, original NGC entries
WORKING: Several images need cleanup of image artifacts
Next: Update Steinicke history/physical data

WORKING HERE: Remove artifact in wide-field image

NGC 700 (= PGC 6928)
Discovered (Oct 28, 1850) by
Bindon Stoney
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Andromeda (RA 01 52 16.8, Dec +36 02 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 700 (= GC 423, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 01 44 08, NPD 54 35) is "extremely faint, very small, round, southwest of h 157", (JH) 157 being NGC 703. Often misidentified as PGC 6924.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case Bindon Stoney.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.7 arcmin?
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 700, also showing NGC 704
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 700, also showing NGC 704 and PGC 6924
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 700

WORKING HERE: Remove artifact in wide-field image

PGC 6924 (not =
NGC 700)
Not an NGC object but listed here since often misidentified as NGC 700
A magnitude 14.5(?) lenticular galaxy (type S0? pec) in Andromeda (RA 01 52 12.7, Dec +36 05 50)
Historical Misidentification: See the discussion at the entry for the correct NGC 700.
Physical Information:
DSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 6924, which is often misidentified as NGC 700; also shown are the actual NGC 700 and NGC 703, 704 and 705
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 6924, also showing NGC 700, 703, 704 and 705
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 6924, which is often misidentified as NGC 700

NGC 701 (= PGC 6826)
Discovered (Jan 10, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Cetus (RA 01 51 03.8, Dec -09 42 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 701 (= GC 418 = JH 160 = JH 2442 = WH I 62, 1860 RA 01 44 08, NPD 100 23.8) is "faint, pretty large, extended, very gradually very little brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.6 by 1.4 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 701, also showing IC 1738
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 701, also showing IC 1738
Below, a 3 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 701

NGC 702 (= PGC 6852, and =
Arp 75)
Discovered (Sep 20, 1784) by William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(s)bc? pec) in Cetus (RA 01 51 19.2, Dec -04 03 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 702 (= GC 419 = JH 158 = WH III 192, 1860 RA 01 44 17, NPD 94 45.0) is "extremely faint, very little extended 0°, 13th magnitude star 90 arcsec to south".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 10585 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that NGC 702 is about 495 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the Universal expansion during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was a little less than 475 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 480 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 1.2 by 0.8 arcmin, NGC 702 is about 165 thousand light years across. Arp's Atlas plate for Arp 75 shows no companion near the galaxy; its listing as a spiral galaxy with a small high brightness companion appears to be due to the mottled appearance the galaxy presented on the plate. A review of other images suggests that at low brightness levels, the bright emission regions on the northern side of the galaxy can appear to be a separate object, and perhaps that is what Arp had in mind in assigning the listing. However, the image below makes it clear that there is only a single object involved, namely NGC 702 itself.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 702, also known as Arp 75
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 702
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 702, also known as Arp 75
Corwin lists a northwesern companion at RA 01 51 18.3, Dec -04 02 57
and a western companion at RA 01 51 18.8, Dec -04 03 16

WORKING HERE: Remove artifact in wide-field image

NGC 703 (= PGC 6957)
Discovered (Sep 21, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0??) in Andromeda (RA 01 52 39.6, Dec +36 10 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 703 (= GC 422 = JH 157 = WH III 562, 1860 RA 01 44 25, NPD 54 31.4) is "very faint, very small, round, 1st of 4", the others being NGC 704, 705 and 708.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin?
DSS image of region near lenticular NGC 703, also showing NGC 704, NGC 705, NGC 708 and NGC 709, and PGC 6924, which is often misidentified as NGC 700
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 703, also showing NGC 704, 705, 708, 709
(PGC 6924 is also shown since it is often misidentified as NGC 700)
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 703

NGC 704 (= PGC 6953)
Discovered (Sep 21, 1786) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Andromeda (RA 01 52 37.8, Dec +36 07 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 704 (= GC 420, WH III 563, 1860 RA 01 44 26, NPD 54 33.7) is "very faint, very small, round, 2nd of 4", the others being NGC 703, 705 and 708.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 4730 km/sec, NGC 704 is about 220 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.6 by 0.3 arcmin, it is about 40 thousand light years across. Its apparent companion (PGC 197601) is too faint to make any difference in the visual appearance of the pair, and is usually called "NGC 704B", instead of being considered part of the original NGC listing.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 704; also shown are NGC 700, NGC 703, NGC 705, NGC 708, NGC 709 and NGC 710, and PGC 6924, which is often misidentified as NGC 700
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 704, also showing NGC 700, 703, 708, 709 and 710
(PGC 6924 is also shown since it is often misidentified as NGC 700)
Below, a 0.9 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy, also showing NGC 705 and PGC 197601
(PGC 6945 is also shown since it is sometimes incorrectly listed as the companion of NGC 704)
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 704 and its apparent companion, PGC 197601; also shown are NGC 705 and PGC 6945
Below, a 1.2 acmin wide DSS image of NGC 704 and its companion
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 704 and its apparent companion, PGC 197601
Corwin lists a northwestern companion at RA 01 52 37.7, Dec +36 07 37

PGC 197601 = PGC 200199 (= "NGC 704B")
Not an NGC object but listed here due to its apparent proximity to
NGC 704
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Andromeda (RA 01 52 38.0, Dec +36 07 28)
Physical Information: PGC 197601 is an apparent companion of NGC 704 (which see for images). Whether they constitute a physical pair is less certain. They are members of Abell 262, a cluster of galaxies in which a relatively large number of galaxies lie in a relatively small field of view, so it would hardly be surprising if one or more galaxies appeared to overlap even if not physically paired. However, the nebulosity that surrounds the pair and a fainter object to their southeast suggests that they may be interacting. NED lists essentially identical radial velocities for the pair, but LEDA lists a substantially lower recessional velocity (4085 km/sec) for PGC 197601, albeit with a very large uncertainty. So they could be a pair, or merely an optical double. Either way they are probably at nearly the same (about 220 million light year) distance from us, and if so PGC 197601's apparent size of 0.2 by 0.2 arcmin would correspond to about 12 thousand light years.

PGC 6945
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes incorrectly listed as a companion of
NGC 704
Also, included in Corwin's ngcnot notes
Recorded (Oct 7, 1855) by Lawrence Parsons, 4th Lord Rosse
Also observed (1875) by John Dreyer
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Andromeda (RA 01 52 32.6, Dec +36 06 55)
Discovery Notes: Recorded as object "B" in Lord Rosse's diagram of the NGC 708 group, sketched on Oct 7, 1855, with the note "B is suspected to be a nebula". But although also observed by Dreyer twenty years later, the fact that it was not included in the General Catalog by John Herschel apparently dissuaded Dreyer from adding it to the NGC, either. Lord Rosse's sketch and note were pointed out by Steve Gottlieb, and as a result, Corwin added it to his "notngc" list. Given its position to the west of NGC 703 and 704, if it had been included in the NGC it would have had an entry a little earlier on this page.
Physical Information: Recessional velocity 4295 km/sec. Apparent size 0.25 by 0.2 arcmin? Generally presumed to be a member of Abell 262, and sometimes incorrectly listed as the companion of NGC 704.
DSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 6945, which is sometimes misidentified as a companion of NGC 704
Above, a 0.6 arcmin wide DSS image of PGC 6945; for wider-field images see NGC 704

WORKING HERE: Remove artifact in wide-field image

NGC 705 (= PGC 6958)
Discovered (Sep 21, 1786) by
William Herschel
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a??) in Andromeda (RA 01 52 41.5, Dec +36 08 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 705 (= GC 421 = WH III 564, 1860 RA 01 44 29, NPD 54 33.4) is "very faint, very small, round, 3rd of 4", the others being NGC 703, 704 and 708.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.3 arcmin?
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 705, also showing NGC 703, NGC 704, NGC 708, NGC 709, NGC 710 and PGC 6924, which is often misidentified as NGC 700
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 705, also showing NGC 703, 704, 708, 709 and 710
(PGC 6924 is also shown since it is often misidentified as NGC 700)
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 705

NGC 706 (= PGC 6897)
Discovered (Sep 30, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc??) in Pisces (RA 01 51 50.5, Dec +06 17 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 706 (= GC 426 = JH 161 = WH II 596, 1860 RA 01 44 31, NPD 84 23.8) is "faint, small, brighter middle, 13th magnitude star 1 arcmin to north".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 1.5 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 706
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 706

NGC 707 (= PGC 6861)
Discovered (Nov 13, 1879) by
Wilhelm Tempel
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0??) in Cetus (RA 01 51 27.1, Dec -08 30 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 707 (Tempel list IV (#6), 1860 RA 01 44 31, NPD 99 12.0) is "very faint, faint star in centre".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.9 arcmin? (Note: On DSS images it appears as though there is a compact companion overlapping the galaxy's nucleus on its southeastern side; as noted by Tempel and shown below, it is actually a foreground star.)
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 707
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 707
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 707

WORKING HERE: Remove artifact in wide-field image

NGC 708 (= PGC 6962)
Discovered (Sep 21, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2??) in Andromeda (RA 01 52 46.4, Dec +36 09 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 708 (= GC 427 = JH 159 = WH III 565, 1860 RA 01 44 34, NPD 54 32.3) is "faint, pretty large, brighter middle, 4th of 4", the others being NGC 703, 704 and 705.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.35 by 1.6 arcmin (from images below)
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 708, also showing NGC 703, NGC 704, NGC 705, NGC 709 and NGC 710
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 708, also showing NGC 703, 704, 705, 709 and 710
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy, also showing part of NGC 705
DSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 708, also showing part of NGC 705

NGC 709 (= PGC 6969)
Discovered (Oct 28, 1850) by
Bindon Stoney
Also observed (date?) by John Dreyer
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Andromeda (RA 01 52 50.6, Dec +36 13 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 709 (= GC 5195, Dreyer (using Lord Rosse's 72-inch telescope), 1860 RA 01 44 35, NPD 54 28.6) is "very faint, pretty small, between 2 stars, group to southwest", the "group" being NGC 703, 704, 705 and 708.
Discovery Notes: Steinicke lists Stoney as the discoverer, presumably on the basis of a detailed examination of the 3rd Lord Rosse's observational records; but since Dreyer listed himself as the discoverer, he must have been unaware of the earlier observation. It will take some research to unravel the details of this mystery, so it will be put off till the next iteration of this page.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.5 arcmin?
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 709, also showing NGC 703, NGC 704, NGC 705 and NGC 708
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 709, also showing NGC 703, 704, 705 and 708
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 709

NGC 710 (= PGC 6972)
Discovered (Oct 28, 1850) by
Bindon Stoney
Discovered (Aug 12, 1863) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc??) in Andromeda (RA 01 52 54.0, Dec +36 03 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 710 (= GC 5196, 3rd Lord Rosse, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 01 44 45, NPD 54 38.2) is "very faint, pretty small, 2 stars to south".
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case Bindon Stoney.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.2 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 710, also showing NGC 704 and 705 and part of NGC 708
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 710, also showing NGC 704, 705 and 708
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 710

NGC 711 (= PGC 6940)
Discovered (Nov 4, 1881) by
Édouard Stephan
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Aries (RA 01 52 27.8, Dec +17 30 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 711 (Stephan list XII (#19), 1860 RA 01 44 52, NPD 73 10.8) is "very faint star in very faint, very small nebulosity".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.7 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 711
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 711
Below, a 1.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 711

NGC 712 (= PGC 6988)
Discovered (October 1828) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Andromeda (RA 01 53 08.4, Dec +36 49 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 712 (= GC 429 = JH 163, 1860 RA 01 44 54, NPD 53 52.5) is "very faint, round, among pretty bright stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.6 arcmin?
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 712
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 712
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 712

55 Andromedae
Not an NGC object but listed here since in Corwin's
ngcnot notes
Recorded (Oct 17, 1691) by John Flamsteed
Observed (late 1700's) by Guiseppe Piazzi
Observed (Oct 1, 1828) by John Herschel
Also observed (11 times) by Lawrence Parsons, 4th Lord Rosse
A magnitude 5.4 star in Andromeda (RA 01 53 17.3, Dec +40 43 47)
Historical Identification: 55 And (= GC 428 = JH 162, 1860 RA 01 44 56, NPD 49 57.7) is a "fine nebulous star with strong atmosphere".
Discovery Note: Here is the text of Corwin's "notngc" entry: "h 162 is 55 And. JH claims to have seen it as "A fine nebulous * with a strong atmosphere losing itself imperceptibly; diam 90 [arcsec]." He goes on to note that it is a double star, and was called "nebulosa" by Piazzi. However, by the time the GC was compiled, LdR had looked at the star eight times without seeing any nebulosity. JH noted this, but "retained [the star] for occasional future examination." By the time Dreyer pulled together LdR's "complete" observations, the star had been viewed 11 times with the 72-inch without detecting any nebulosity. He adds a note "It has probably never been nebulous, see Schjellerup Astron. Nachr. No. 1613, comp. Phil. Trans. 1833, p. 499-500." So Dreyer omitted the object from the NGC. I see no verifiable trace of nebulosity around 55 And's image on any of the sky survey plates/scans, so have to agree with Dreyer's omitting the object from NGC."
Additional Notes: (1) Of the eleven observations attributed to Lord Rosse, most were probably done by one assistant or another, but in any event they were carried out over a number of years, always without finding any hint of nebulosity. (2) I have placed the entry here because Herschel's GC entry showed an 1860 RA of 01 44 56, placing it between NGC 712 and NGC 713.
DSS image of region near 55 Andromedae
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on 55 Andromedae

NGC 713 (= PGC 7161)
Discovered (1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb??) in Cetus (RA 01 55 21.6, Dec -09 05 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 713 (Leavenworth list II (#320), 1860 RA 01 45 07, NPD 99 47.0) is "extremely faint, pretty small, extended 90°, gradually a little brighter middle and nucleus, 14th magnitude star to northwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.3 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 713, also showing part of NGC 731
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 713, also showing part of NGC 731
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 713

WORKING HERE: Remove wide-field image artifact

NGC 714 (= PGC 7009)
Discovered (Oct 28, 1850) by
Bindon Stoney
Discovered (Aug 12, 1863) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a??) in Andromeda (RA 01 53 29.6, Dec +36 13 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 714 (= GC 5197, 3rd Lord Rosse, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 01 45 18, NPD 54 28.1) is "faint, very small, round, two 13th magnitude stars to west and northwest".
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case Bindon Stoney.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.4 arcmin?
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 714, also showing NGC 717
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 714, also showing NGC 717
Below, a 2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 714

NGC 715 (= PGC 6991)
Discovered (Dec 12, 1885) by
Ormond Stone
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb??) in Cetus (RA 01 53 12.5, Dec -12 52 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 710 (Ormond Stone list I (#38), 1860 RA 01 45 30, NPD 103 31.0) is "extremely faint, small, gradually brighter middle and nucleus". The second Index Catalog lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 01 46 23.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.4 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 715
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 715
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 715

NGC 716 (=
IC 1743 = PGC 6982)
Discovered (Sep 1, 1886) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 716)
Discovered (Jan 1, 1892) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 1743)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa??) in Aries (RA 01 52 59.7, Dec +12 42 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 716 (Swift list IV (#6), 1860 RA 01 45 30, NPD 78 38.6) is "extremely faint, small, round, bright star to east". The second Index Catalog states "Not found by B (Bigourdan). Query, = B250 (IC 1743)". As it turned out, the query was justified.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 0.8 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 716
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 716
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 716

WORKING HERE: Remove image artifacts

NGC 717 (= PGC 7033)
Discovered (Oct 28, 1850) by
Bindon Stoney
Discovered (Aug 12, 1863) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a??) in Andromeda (RA 01 53 55.1, Dec +36 13 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 717 (= GC 5198, 3rd Lord Rosse, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 01 45 41, NPD 54 28.0) is "very faint, pretty small, 15th magnitude star 1 arcmin to southeast".
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case Bindon Stoney.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.2 arcmin?
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 717, also showing NGC 714
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 717, also showing NGC 714
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 717

NGC 718 (= PGC 6993)
Discovered (Dec 13, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)a?) in Pisces (RA 01 53 13.3, Dec +04 11 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 718 (= GC 430 = JH 164 = WH II 270, 1860 RA 01 45 57, NPD 86 29.8) is "pretty bright, small, irregularly round, pretty suddenly much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.3 by 2.2 arcmin? Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type (R')SAB(rs)a .
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 718
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 718
Below, a 3 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 718

NGC 719 (=
IC 1744 = PGC 7019)
Discovered (Nov 24, 1861) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 719)
Discovered (Jan 18, 1896) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 1744)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Aries (RA 01 53 38.9, Dec +19 50 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 719 (= GC 432, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 01 46 11, NPD 70 50.3) is "extremely faint, round, very faint star to east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.1 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 719
Below, a 1.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 719

NGC 720 (= PGC 6983)
Discovered (Oct 3, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 10th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E5??) in Cetus (RA 01 53 00.5, Dec -13 44 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 720 (= GC 431 = JH 165 = JH 2443 = WH I 105, 1860 RA 01 46 12, NPD 104 25.8) is "considerably bright, pretty large, a little extended, pretty suddenly much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.7 by 2.4 arcmin? Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type E5.
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 720
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 720
Below, a 6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 720

NGC 721 (= PGC 7097)
Discovered (Aug 27, 1862) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc??) in Andromeda (RA 01 54 45.4, Dec +39 23 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 721 (= GC 433, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 01 46 32, NPD 51 18.3) is "extremely faint, pretty large".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.0 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 721
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 721
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 721

NGC 722 (= PGC 7098)
Discovered (Dec 2, 1861) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc??) in Aries (RA 01 54 47.0, Dec+20 41 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 722 (= GC 434, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 01 47 04, NPD 69 59.6) is "very faint, very small, round, β Arietis to north".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 0.5 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 722
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 722
(The considerable glare is from 3rd-magnitude β Arietis (Sheratan))
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 722

NGC 723 (=
NGC 724 = PGC 7024)
Discovered (Oct 26, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 723)
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 723)
Discovered (Sep 14, 1830) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 724)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc??) in Cetus (RA 01 53 45.7, Dec -23 45 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 723 (= GC 435 = JH 166 = JH 2444 = WH III 460, 1860 RA 01 47 14, NPD 114 26.8) is "pretty faint, very small, round, very gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 1.3 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 723
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 723
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 723

NGC 724 (=
NGC 723 = PGC 7024)
Discovered (Oct 26, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 723)
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 723)
Discovered (Sep 14, 1830) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 724)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc??) in Cetus (RA 01 53 45.7, Dec -23 45 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 724 (= GC 436 = JH 167, 1860 RA 01 47 15, NPD 114 33.4) is "very faint, pretty large, round, gradually bright middle, small (faint) star to south southwest [? = h 166]", (JH) 166 being NGC 723; as it turned out, Dreyer's supposition that NGC 724 might be a duplicate of NGC 723 was correct.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 723 for anything else.

NGC 725 (= PGC 6950)
Discovered (Nov 9, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc??) in Cetus (RA 01 52 35.5, Dec -16 31 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 725 (Leavenworth list I (#39), 1860 RA 01 47 30, NPD 107 13.9) is "very faint, very small, round". The second Index Catalog lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 01 45 51.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.5 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 725
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 725
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 725

NGC 726 (= PGC 7182)
Discovered (1886) by
Frank Muller
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sd??) in Cetus (RA 01 55 31.9, Dec -10 48 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 726 (Muller list I (#40), 1860 RA 01 47 30, NPD 101 29.9) is "very faint, pretty large, irregularly round, 9th magnitude star 3 arcmin to east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.6 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 726
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 726
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 726

NGC 727 (=
NGC 729 = PGC 7027)
Discovered (Sep 1, 1834) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 727)
Discovered (Nov 30, 1837) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 729)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBab??) in Fornax (RA 01 53 49.4, Dec -35 51 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 727 (= GC 437 = JH 2445, 1860 RA 01 47 43, NPD 126 34.4) is "faint, small, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.6 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 727
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 727
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 727

NGC 728
Recorded (Oct 16, 1827) by
John Herschel
Looked for but not found (date?) by Heinrich d'Arrest
Three stars in Pisces (RA 01 55 01.5, Dec +04 13 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 728 (= GC 438 = JH 168, 1860 RA 01 47 48, NPD 86 29.2) is a "suspected nebula (d'Arrest, not found)".
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near the stars listed as NGC 728
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on the stars listed as NGC 728

NGC 729 (=
NGC 727 = PGC 7027)
Discovered (Sep 1, 1834) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 727)
Discovered (Nov 30, 1837) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 729)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBab??) in Fornax (RA 01 53 49.4, Dec -35 51 22)
(Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 729 (= GC 439 = JH 2446, 1860 RA 01 47 50, NPD 126 32.0) is "most extremely faint, small, round".
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 727 for anything else.

NGC 730
Recorded (Nov 7, 1885) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A 14th-magnitude star in Pisces (RA 01 55 18.0, Dec +05 38 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 730 (Bigourdan (list I #11), 1860 RA 01 48 00, NPD 85 04.0) is "very faint, very stellar".
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near the star listed as NGC 730
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on the star listed as NGC 730

NGC 731 (=
NGC 757 = PGC 7118)
Discovered (Jan 10, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 731)
Also observed (date?) by Christian Peters (and later listed as NGC 731)
Discovered (1886) by Ormond Stone (and later listed as NGC 757)
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0??) in Cetus (RA 01 54 56.2, Dec -09 00 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 731 (= GC 440 = WH III 266, Peters, 1860 RA 01 48 01, NPD 99 42.0) is "extremely faint, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.7 arcmin?
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 731, also showing part of NGC 713
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 731, also showing part of NGC 713
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 731

NGC 732 (= PGC 7270)
Discovered (Dec 5, 1883) by
Édouard Stephan (13-15)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Andromeda (RA 01 56 27.7, Dec +36 48 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 732 (Stephan list XIII (#15), 1860 RA 01 48 13, NPD 53 53.2) is "a very faint star in very faint, very small, round nebulosity".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.0 arcmin?
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 732
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 732
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 732

NGC 733 (= PGC 3325905)
Recorded (Oct 11, 1850) by
Bindon Stoney
A 15th-magnitude star in Triangulum (RA 01 56 34.0, Dec +33 03 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 733 (= GC 442, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 01 48 26, NPD 57 38.3) is "very faint, 2 arcmin west of h 169", (JH) 169 being NGC 736. Though the star listed above is the most likely NGC 733, PGC 7255 is also often identified as NGC 733, so it is discussed immediately below.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case Bindon Stoney.
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near the star that is probably NGC 733, also showing NGC 736, NGC 740 and PGC 7255, which is often identified as NGC 733
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on the star listed as NGC 733
Also shown are NGC 736, 737, 738 and 740, and PGC 7255

PGC 7255 (perhaps =
NGC 733??)
Probably not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes (mis?)identified as NGC 733
A magnitude 15.5(?) lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Triangulum (RA 01 56 24.7, Dec +33 03 52)
Historical Identification: Considered unlikely to be NGC 733, but occasionally (mis?)identified as such. (Note: NED shows the star listed above as NGC 733, but incorrectly identifies it as PGC 7255. It lists this galaxy as 2MASX J01562472+3303524, but gives absolutely no information about it. LEDA shows PGC 7255 as the galaxy listed here, but does not identify it as NGC 733, and provides no information save its position, approximate brightness, and approximate size.)
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.5 by 0.15 arcmin (from the images below); nothing else available.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy PGC 7255, which is sometimes (mis?)identified as NGC 733, also showing NGC 733, NGC 736, NGC 737 and NGC 738
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on PGC 7255, also showing NGC 733, 736, 737 and 738
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 7255, which is sometimes (mis?)identified as NGC 733

NGC 734 (= PGC 170023)
Discovered (Nov 9, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBab? pec) in Cetus (RA 01 53 28.7, Dec -16 59 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 734 (Leavenworth list I (#41), 1860 RA 01 48 30, NPD 107 42.9) is "very faint, very small, round, brighter middle and nucleus, 11th magnitude star 11 seconds of time to west". (Note: Often misidentifed as PGC 7121; so a Wikisky search for NGC 734 incorrectly shows that object, instead of PGC 170023.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.5 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 734
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 734
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 734

PGC 7121 (not =
NGC 734)
Not an NGC object, but listed here since often misidentified as NGC 734
A 16th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)a?) in Cetus (RA 01 54 57.3, Dec -17 04 48)
Historical Misidentification: As noted in the entry for NGC 734, often misidentified as that object.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 14895 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 7121 is 695 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the Universal expansion during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 655 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 670 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.55 by 0.3 arcmin, the galaxy is about 100 thousand light years across. (LEDA says galaxy type SB0/a, and any detailed classification seems uncertain without better images than those shown below.)
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 7121, which is not NGC 734, overlaid on a DSS image to cover part of the area otherwise missing (a small area not covered by either image database is noted)
Above, an SDSS image overlaid on a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 7121
(A small area not covered by either image database is noted)
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 7121, which is often misidentified as NGC 734

NGC 735 (= PGC 7275 = PGC 7282)
Discovered (Sep 13, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb??) in Triangulum (RA 01 56 38.0, Dec +34 10 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 735 (= GC 443 = WH III 176, 1860 RA 01 48 33, NPD 56 23.1) is "most extremely faint, stellar". (Note: A Wikisky search for NGC 735 shows the correct object, but labeled PGC 7275.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 0.8 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 735
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 734
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 735

NGC 736 (= PGC 7289)
Discovered (Sep 12, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type (R)E0? pec) in Triangulum (RA 01 56 40.9, Dec +33 02 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 736 (= GC 444 = JH 169 = WH II 221?, 1860 RA 01 48 35, NPD 57 38.9) is "pretty bright, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of central region about 1.65 by 1.65 arcmin; of outer shell, about 4.1 by 3.1 arcmin (from images below).
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 736, also showing NGC 733, NGC 737, NGC 738 and NGC 740, and PGC 7255 (which may be the actual NGC 733)
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 736
Also shown are NGC 733, 737, 738 and 740 and PGC 7255
Below, a 4.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy and its shell, also showing NGC 733, 737 and 738
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 736 and its outer shell, also showing NGC 737 and NGC 738
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy, also showing NGC 737 and 738
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 736, also showing NGC 737 and NGC 738

NGC 737
Discovered (Oct 11, 1850) by
Bindon Stoney
Also observed (date?) by Sherburne Burnham
Four stars in Triangulum (RA 01 56 40.8, Dec +33 03 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 737 (= GC 445, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 01 48 36, NPD 57 38.4) is a "stellar nebula (perhaps a faint star?), 27 arcsec north of h 169", (JH 169) being NGC 736. The first Index Catalog notes (per Burnham) "Only a faint star".
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case Bindon Stoney.
Physical Information: A line of three stars overlapping NGC 736, the northeastern actually being double, making a total of four stars.
SDSS image of the stars listed as NGC 737, also showing part of NGC 736
Above, a 1.6 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on the stars listed as NGC 737
Also shown is part of NGC 736, which see for wider-field images

NGC 738 (= PGC 7303)
Discovered (Oct 11, 1850) by
Bindon Stoney
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Triangulum (RA 01 56 45.7, Dec +33 03 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 738 (= GC 446, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 01 48 38, NPD 57 38.0) is a "nebula, 75 arcsec northeast of h 169", (JH) 169 being NGC 736.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case Bindon Stoney.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.2 arcmin?
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 738
Above, a 0.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 738 (see NGC 736 for wider-field images)

NGC 739 (= PGC 7312)
Discovered (Jan 9, 1874) by
Ralph Copeland
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type (R)SAB0/a?) in Triangulum (RA 01 56 54.7, Dec +33 16 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 739 (= GC 5199, Copeland using Lord Rosse's 72-inch telescope, 1860 RA 01 48 47, NPD 57 32.0) is "considerably faint, very small, round, in triangle of stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.6 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 739
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 739
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 739

NGC 740 (= PGC 7316)
Possibly but probably not observed (Sep 12, 1784) by
William Herschel
Discovered (Oct 11, 1850) by Bindon Stoney
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb??) in Triangulum (RA 01 56 54.9, Dec +33 00 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 740 (= GC 447, WH II 221?, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 01 48 48, NPD 57 40.3) is "faint, large, considerably extended".
Discovery Notes: Dreyer (and the GC) equated WH II 221? with both NGC 736 and NGC 740, and obviously one of those must be wrong. Current opinion is that NGC 736 is what Herschel observed, hence the dubious reference to his possible observation immediately above. Also, although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case Bindon Stoney.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.3 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 740, also showing NGC 733, NGC 736, NGC 738, and the line of stars listed as NGC 737
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 740, also showing NGC 733, 736, 737 and 738
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 740

NGC 741 (=
IC 1751 = PGC 7252)
Discovered (Dec 13, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 741)
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 741)
Discovered (Nov 26, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 1751)
Also observed (Nov 24, 1899) by Herbert Howe (and later listed as IC 1751)
An 11th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0??) in Pisces (RA 01 56 21.0, Dec +05 37 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 741 (= GC 448 = JH 172 = WH II 271, 1860 RA 01 49 04, NPD 85 03.5) is "pretty faint, small, round, western of 2, position angle 102°", the eastern of 2 being NGC 742. The position precesses to RA 01 56 22.5, Dec +05 37 44, essentially dead center on the galaxy listed above, the description fits and the relative position of NGC 741 and 742 make the identification certain.
Discovery Notes: The IC2 position and description of IC 1751 make its identification as the same galaxy (and therefore a duplicate entry) equally certain, so the duplicate entry must have been due to a simple oversight on the part of Swift, Howe and Dreyer. Despite this, PGC 7250 is often misidentifed IC 1751, so it is also shown in the images below, and discussed immediately following the entry for IC 1751.
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0 by 2.9 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 741, also showing NGC 742 and PGC 7250
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 741, also showing NGC 742 and PGC 7250
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the three galaxies
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 741, also showing NGC 742

NGC 742 (= PGC 7264)
Discovered (Dec 13, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Pisces (RA 01 56 24.2, Dec +05 37 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 742 (= GC 449 = JH 173 = WH II 272, 1860 RA 01 49 08, NPD 85 03.7) is "very faint, very small, round, suddenly brighter middle, eastern of 2", the other being NGC 741.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.35 by 0.35 arcmin (from image below).
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 742
Above, a 0.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 742; see NGC 741 for wider=field views

NGC 743 (= OCL 343)
Discovered (Sep 29, 1829) by
John Herschel
An open cluster (type II1p) in Cassiopeia (RA 01 58 36.0, Dec +60 09 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 743 (= GC 450 = JH 170, 1860 RA 01 49 08, NPD 30 30.8) is "a cluster, not rich, double star (h 1098)". The reference to (JH) 1098 is not to Herschel's list of nebular observations, but to his list of double stars. Per Corwin, Herschel's 1830 position precesses to J2000 RA 01 58 49.2, Dec +60 10 19, almost exactly on the double star at J2000 RA 01 58 50.2, Dec +60 10 24, and about 1.8 arcmin east of the center of the cluster, as shown in the image below.
Physical Information: Apparent size 7.0 arcmin?
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 743
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 743

NGC 744 (= OCL 345)
Discovered (Nov 28, 1831) by
John Herschel
An 8th-magnitude open cluster (type IV2p) in Perseus (RA 01 58 32.0, Dec +55 28 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 744 (= GC 451 = JH 171, 1860 RA 01 49 08, NPD 35 13.2) is "a cluster, pretty large, pretty rich, irregular figure, stars from 11th through 13th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 5.0 arcmin?
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 744
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 744

NGC 745 (= PGC 7054 = PGC 398008)
Discovered (Oct 27, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.9 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Eridanus (RA 01 54 07.8, Dec -56 41 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 745 (= GC 452 = JH 2449, 1860 RA 01 49 12, NPD 147 22.7) is "pretty bright, small, round, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.45 arcmin (from images below). Vr = 6075 km/sec. Part of a group (confirmed by radial velocities) with PGC 95386 and J015407.7-564116.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 745, also showing NGC 754
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 745, also showing NGC 754
Below, a 1.3 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy and its companions, PGC 95386 and J015407.7-564116
DSS image of lenticular galaxies NGC 745, PGC 95386 and J015407.7-564116

PGC 95386
Not an NGC object but listed here since part of a group with
NGC 745
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Eridanus (RA 01 54 11.2, Dec -56 41 07)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.2 arcmin (from images for NGC 745). Vr 6070 km/sec. Misidentified in NED. Part of a radial-velocity confirmed group with NGC 745, which see for images.

J015407.7-564116
Not an NGC object but listed here since part of a group with
NGC 745
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Eridanus (RA 01 54 07.7, Dec -56 41 16)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.15 by 0.15 arcmin (from images for NGC 745). Vr 6275 km/sec. Misidentified in NED as PGC 95386, but not actually listed in LEDA at all. Part of a radial-velocity confirmed group with NGC 745, which see for images.

NGC 746 (= PGC 7399)
Discovered (Sep 12, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
A 13th-magnitude irregular galaxy (type IBm?) in Andromeda (RA 01 57 51.0, Dec +44 55 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 746 (Swift list II (#15), 1860 RA 01 49 18, NPD 45 45.9) is "very faint, pretty small, a little extended, several stars near".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.8 arcmin (from images below).
DSS image of region near irregular galaxy NGC 746
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 746
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of irregular galaxy NGC 746

NGC 747 (= PGC 7366)
Discovered (1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Cetus (RA 01 57 30.5, Dec -09 27 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 747 (Leavenworth list II (#321), 1860 RA 01 49 19, NPD 100 08.9) is "extremely faint, pretty small, a little extended 180°".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.5 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 747
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 747
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 747

NGC 748 (= PGC 7259)
Discovered (Sep 20, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb??) in Cetus (RA 01 56 21.8, Dec -04 28 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 748 (= GC 453 = JH 176 = WH III 193, 1860 RA 01 49 20, NPD 95 09.2) is "pretty faint, 9th magnitude star to northwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.3 by 1.1 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 748
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 748
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 748

NGC 749 (= PGC 7191)
Discovered (Sep 27, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a?) in Fornax (RA 01 55 41.1, Dec -29 55 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 749 (= GC 454 = JH 2448, 1860 RA 01 49 22, NPD 120 36.4) is "pretty bright, small, extended, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0 by 1.4 arcmin?
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 749
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 749
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 749
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 650 - 699) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 700 - 749     → (NGC 750 - 799)