Celestial Atlas
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Page last updated Apr 3, 2017
Checked Steinicke historical data, added Dreyer NGC listings
WORKING 7050: Add/update Steinicke listings/data, check IDs

NGC 7050
Discovered (Aug 19, 1828) by
John Herschel
A group of stars in Cygnus (RA 21 15 13.8, Dec +36 10 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7050 (= GC 4652 = JH 2111, 1860 RA 21 09 33, NPD 54 23.3) is "a cluster, no description". The position precesses to RA 21 15 12.8, Dec +36 11 31, on the northwestern edge of a group of a dozen or so 12th to 15th magnitude stars scattered across a region about 5 arcmin on a side. Corwin considers that group to be Herschel's cluster, so I have used its center for the position listed above. However, as shown in the image below, there are two sparse groups with stars as bright as 11th magnitude to the west and southwest of the "chosen" group; and some references list NGC 7050 as the combination of all three groups.
DSS image of stellar group NGC 7050
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on the most likely candidate for NGC 7050

NGC 7051 (= PGC 66566)
Discovered (Jul 30, 1827) by
John Herschel
Also observed (Aug 26, 1864) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Aquarius (RA 21 19 51.3, Dec -08 46 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7051 (= GC 4654 = JH 2113, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 21 12 20, NPD 99 22.5) is "very faint, round, gradually brighter middle, double star near".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.1? arcmin

NGC 7052 (= PGC 66537)
Discovered (Sep 10, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Sep 5, 1828) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E5?) in Vulpecula (RA 21 18 33.0, Dec +26 26 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7052 (= GC 4653 = JH 2112 = WH III 145, 1860 RA 21 12 23, NPD 64 08.5) is "faint, small, very little extended, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 1.1? arcmin

NGC 7053 (= PGC 66610)
Discovered (Sep 2, 1863) by
Albert Marth
Discovered (Oct 8, 1865) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A 13th-magnitude galaxy (type C??) in Pegasus (RA 21 21 07.5, Dec +23 05 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7053 (= GC 5990, Marth #438, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 21 14 48, NPD 67 30.5) is "pretty bright, small, very little extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.3? arcmin

NGC 7054 (=
NGC 7080 = PGC 66861)
Discovered (Sep 6, 1863) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 7080)
Also observed (Aug 31, 1872) by Édouard Stephan (and later listed as NGC 7054)
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Vulpecula (RA 21 30 01.9, Dec +26 43 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7054 (= GC 5991, Stephan list IV (#4), 1860 RA 21 15 11, NPD 51 25.2) is "very faint, very small, round, faint star involved".
Discovery Notes: Previously thought to be a lost or nonexistent object, but recently shown to be an observation of NGC 7080 with a misidentified comparison star; to be fleshed out when the Historical Identification is taken care of.

NGC 7055
Discovered (Sep 25, 1829) by
John Herschel
A group of stars in Cepheus (RA 21 19 25.8, Dec +57 35 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7055 (= GC 4655 = JH 2114, 1860 RA 21 15 26, NPD 32 59.8) is "a cluster, faint, pretty small, poor".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4? arcmin across

NGC 7056 (=
IC 1382 = PGC 66641)
Discovered (Sep 17, 1863) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 7056)
Discovered (Sep 29, 1866) by Truman Safford (and later listed as IC 1382)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Pegasus (RA 21 22 07.5, Dec +18 39 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7056 (= GC 5992, Marth #439, (Safford ??), 1860 RA 21 15 37, NPD 71 56) is "pretty faint, small, round".
Discovery Notes: Safford's observations were published long after the fact, while Dreyer was in the last stages of preparing the NGC for publication, so they were only mentioned in an appendix, and none were listed in the individual NGC entries, hence his name being shown in parentheses. In the case of this entry, either Dreyer failed to notice the correspondence of Safford's observation to NGC 7056 (hence the IC listing), or Safford's position was sufficiently different to confuse the issue; but that problem will be dealt with when I finish the Historical Identification for the two entries.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.9? arcmin

NGC 7057 (= PGC 66708)
Discovered (Sep 2, 1836) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Microscopium (RA 21 24 58.5, Dec -42 27 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7057 (= GC 4656 = JH 3861, 1860 RA 21 15 58, NPD 133 03.7) is "extremely faint, very small, round, western of 2", the other being NGC 7060.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.0? arcmin

NGC 7058
Discovered (Sep 8, 1829) by
John Herschel
A group of stars in Cygnus (RA 21 21 48.3, Dec +50 48 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7058 (= GC 4657 = JH 2115, 1860 RA 21 16 17, NPD 39 47.1) is "a cluster, poor, a little compressed".
Physical Information: Apparent size 10 arcmin?

NGC 7059 (= PGC 66784)
Discovered (Jul 22, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Pavo (RA 21 27 21.7, Dec -60 00 53)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7059 (= GC 4658 = JH 3862, 1860 RA 21 16 42, NPD 150 37.3) is "bright, pretty large, a little compressed, gradually pretty much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.3 by 1.7? arcmin

NGC 7060 (= PGC 66732)
Discovered (Sep 2, 1836) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Microscopium (RA 21 25 53.5, Dec -42 24 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7060 (= GC 4659 = JH 3863, 1860 RA 21 16 54, NPD 133 00.4) is "very faint, pretty small, round, eastern of 2", the other being NGC 7057.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0 by 1.2? arcmin

NGC 7061 (= PGC 66785)
Discovered (Sep 30, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E4?) in Indus (RA 21 27 26.7, Dec -49 03 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7061 (= GC 4660 = JH 3864, 1860 RA 21 17 59, NPD 139 40.2) is "most extremely faint, very small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.7? arcmin

NGC 7062 (= OCL 205)
Discovered (Oct 19, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Aug 21, 1829) by John Herschel
An 8th-magnitude open cluster (type III1p) in Cygnus (RA 21 23 27.4, Dec +46 22 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7062 (= GC 4661 = JH 2116 = WH VII 51, 1860 RA 21 18 12, NPD 44 13.1) is "a cluster, pretty small, pretty rich, pretty compressed, stars from 13th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 5 arcmin?

NGC 7063 (= OCL 192)
Discovered (Aug 19, 1828) by
John Herschel
A 7th-magnitude open cluster (type III2p) in Cygnus (RA 21 24 22.0, Dec +36 29 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7063 (= GC 4662 = JH 2117, 1860 RA 21 18 45, NPD 54 05.7) is "a cluster, poor, stars from 10th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 9 arcmin?

NGC 7064 (= PGC 66836)
Discovered (Jul 8, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Indus (RA 21 29 03.2, Dec -52 46 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7064 (= GC 4663 = JH 3865, 1860 RA 21 19 09, NPD 143 23.3) is "extremely faint, pretty large, very much extended 91°, star to south".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.8 by 0.7? arcmin

NGC 7065 (= PGC 66766)
Discovered (Aug 3, 1864) by
Albert Marth
Discovered (Aug 24, 1865) by Heinrich d'Arrest
Discovered (Sep 22, 1876) by Édouard Stephan
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBab?) in Aquarius (RA 21 26 42.2, Dec -06 59 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7065 (= GC 5993, Marth #440, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 21 19 20, NPD 97 36.3) is "very faint, suddenly brighter middle (Marth has 19m 33s)", indicating that Marth's position differs from the NGC position by 13 seconds.
Discovery Notes: Steinicke does not list Marth among the discoverers, though Dreyer does, so it may be that Marth observed a different object (his RA is 13 seconds to the east of the NGC position). And why Stephan is not mentioned by Dreyer is another question. Will take care of both questions when finish Historical Identification.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.9? arcmin

PGC 66774 (= "NGC 7065A")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 7065A
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in
Aquarius (RA 21 26 57.8, Dec -07 01 16)
Physical Information: Apparent size .0 by 0.9? arcmin

NGC 7066 (= PGC 66747)
Discovered (Aug 31, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Pegasus (RA 21 26 13.7, Dec +14 10 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7066 (Swift list IV (#80), 1860 RA 21 19 29, NPD 76 25.2) is "most extremely faint, close southeast of middle of 3 faint stars"
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.9? arcmin

NGC 7067 (= OCL 208)
Discovered (Sep 27, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Sep 14, 1829) by John Herschel
A 10th-magnitude open cluster (type II2p) in Cygnus (RA 21 24 12.3, Dec +48 00 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7067 (= GC 4664 = JH 2118 = WH VII 50, 1860 RA 21 19 37, NPD 42 34.8) is "a cluster, poor, nebulous?".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3 arcmin?

NGC 7068 (= PGC 66765)
Discovered (Nov 7, 1863) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S??) in Pegasus (RA 21 26 32.3, Dec +12 11 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7068 (= GC 5994, Marth #441, 1860 RA 21 19 47, NPD 78 26) is "very faint, close to a small (faint) star".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.3? arcmin

NGC 7069 (= PGC 66807)
Discovered (Oct 12, 1863) by
Albert Marth
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Aquarius (RA 21 28 05.8, Dec -01 38 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7069 (= GC 5995, Marth #442, 1860 RA 21 20 52, NPD 92 15) is "very faint, small, round, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.8? arcmin

NGC 7070 (= PGC 66869)
Discovered (Sep 5, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Grus (RA 21 30 25.2, Dec -43 05 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7070 (= GC 4665 = JH 3866, 1860 RA 21 21 27, NPD 133 41.8) is "faint, considerably large, a little extended, gradually a very little brighter middle, western of 2", the other being NGC 7072.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.4 by 1.9? arcmin

PGC 66909 (= "NGC 7070A")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 7070A
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in
Grus (RA 21 31 47.0, Dec -42 50 49)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.6? arcmin

NGC 7071
Discovered (Sep 19, 1829) by
John Herschel
A group of stars in Cygnus (RA 21 26 40.0, Dec +47 55 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7071 (= GC 4666 = JH 2119, 1860 RA 21 21 31, NPD 42 40.4) is "a cluster, small, compressed, considerably extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4 arcmin?

NGC 7072 (= PGC 66874)
Discovered (Sep 5, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBcd?) in Grus (RA 21 30 37.0, Dec -43 09 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7072 (= GC 4667 = JH 3867, 1860 RA 21 21 38, NPD 133 46.0) is "faint, small, round, very gradually a little brighter middle, eastern of 2", the other being NGC 7070.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7? arcmin

PGC 66870 (= "NGC 7072A")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 7072A
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in
Grus (RA 21 30 25.6, Dec -43 12 08)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.6? arcmin

NGC 7073 (= PGC 66847)
Discovered (Aug 25, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Capricornus (RA 21 29 26.0, Dec -11 29 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7073 (= GC 5996, Marth #443, 1860 RA 21 21 52, NPD 102 06) is "very faint, very small, irregularly round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.8? arcmin

NGC 7074 (= PGC 66850)
Discovered (Oct 16, 1863) by
Albert Marth
Also observed (Nov 6, 1891) by Rudolf Spitaler
A 14th-magnitude galaxy (type C??) in Pegasus (RA 21 29 38.8, Dec +06 40 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7074 (= GC 5997, Marth #444, 1860 RA 21 22 41, NPD 83 49) is "very faint, small, extended". The first IC lists a corrected NPD (per Spitaler) of 83 55.5.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.3? arcmin

NGC 7075 (= PGC 66895)
Discovered (Sep 4, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Grus (RA 21 31 32.9, Dec -38 37 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7075 (= GC 4668 = JH 3868, 1860 RA 21 22 49, NPD 129 14.0) is "considerably faint, considerably small, round, pretty gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.9? arcmin

NGC 7076
Discovered (Oct 15, 1794) by
William Herschel
A 14th-magnitude planetary nebula in Cepheus (RA 21 26 24.1, Dec +62 53 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7076 (= GC 4669 = WH III 936, 1860 RA 21 22 52, NPD 27 43.5) is "very faint, extremely mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.9? arcmin
(Note: A Wikisky search for NGC 7076 shows open cluster NGC 1900 (an incomprehensible error, but nonetheless...), so its coordinates have to be used to view the correct object on that website.)
DSS image of region near planetary nebula NGC 7076
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7076
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the planetary nebula
DSS image of planetary nebula NGC 7076

NGC 7077 (= PGC 66860)
Discovered (Aug 11, 1863) by
Albert Marth
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Aquarius (RA 21 29 59.5, Dec +02 24 53)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7077 (= GC 5998, Marth #445, 1860 RA 21 22 55, NPD 88 12) is "faint".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.7? arcmin

NGC 7078 (=
M15 = GCL 120)
Discovered (Sep 7, 1746) by Jean-Dominique Maraldi
Recorded (Jun 3, 1764) by Charles Messier as M15
Also observed (Sep 23, 1774) by Johann Bode
Also observed (1825) by Wilhelm Struve
Also observed (Jul 21, 1794) by Joseph Lalande
Also observed (Nov 23, 1805) by William Herschel
Also observed (Oct 12, 1825) by John Herschel
A 6th-magnitude globular cluster (type IV) in Pegasus (RA 21 29 58.3, Dec +12 10 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7078 (= GC 4670 = JH 2120, Maraldi, M 15, Lalande 40815, 1860 RA 21 23 13, NPD 78 26.7) is "a remarkable object, a globular cluster, very bright, very large, irregularly round, very suddenly much brighter middle, well resolved, clearly consisting of stars, stars very small (faint)".
Physical Information: One of the oldest globular clusters known, M15 is about 13.2 billion years old, and aside from being filled with dying stars -- orange and yellow giants -- it has undergone a core compression, in which many of its stars have gravitationally "sunk" toward its central regions, making it one of the most densely packed clusters in our galaxy. Between that and its 35 thousand light-year distance, even the Hubble Space Telescope cannot resolve all the stars in its central regions.
Misti Mountain Observatory image of globular cluster NGC 7078, also known as M15
Above, a ? arcmin wide image of NGC 7078
(Image Credit & © Jim Misti, Misti Mountain Observatory; used by permission)
Below, a 3.4 arcmin wide image of the core of the cluster (Image Credit Hubble/ESA/NASA)
HST image of the core of globular cluster NGC 7078, also known as M15
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of the central 10 light years of the cluster
(Image Credit NASA and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)
HST view of the central 10 light years of globular cluster NGC 7078, also known as M15

NGC 7079 (= PGC 66934)
Discovered (Sep 6, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type (RL)SB(s)0) in Grus (RA 21 32 35.0, Dec -44 04 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7079 (= GC 4671 = JH 3869, 1860 RA 21 23 32, NPD 134 40.9) is "bright, round, considerably small, pretty suddenly brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size about 2.15 by 1.35 arcmin (from the images below). Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type (RL)SB(s)0°.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 7079
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7079
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 7079
Below, another 2.4 arcmin wide image (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 7079

NGC 7080 (= PGC 66861 =
NGC 7054)
Discovered (Sep 6, 1863) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 7080)
Also observed (Aug 31, 1872) by Édouard Stephan (and later listed as NGC 7054)
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Vulpecula (RA 21 30 01.9, Dec +26 43 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7080 (= GC 5999, Marth #446, 1860 RA 21 23 48, NPD 63 54) is "very faint, small, very little extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 1.7? arcmin

NGC 7081 (= PGC 66891)
Discovered (Oct 10, 1790) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Sep 18, 1830) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Aquarius (RA 21 31 24.3, Dec +02 29 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7081 (= GC 4672 = JH 2121 = WH III 859, 1860 RA 21 24 18, NPD 88 07.4) is "faint, small, round, much brighter middle, 14th magnitude star to south".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.3? arcmin

NGC 7082 (= OCL 209)
Discovered (Oct 19, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date unknown) by John Herschel
A 7th-magnitude open cluster (type IV2p) in Cygnus (RA 21 29 17.0, Dec +47 07 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7082 (= GC 4673 = JH 2122 = WH VII 52, 1860 RA 21 24 23, NPD 43 31.1) is "a cluster, large, considerably rich, a little compressed, stars from 10th to 13th magnitude".
Discovery Notes: John Herschel failed to indicate the "sweep" of the sky during which he observed this object, which has (at least as of this writing) made it impossible to find the original observation in his records; hence the current lack of a date of observation. Per Corwin, JH writes "A 10th magnitude star, the chief of a pretty rich, large, coarse cluster. Stars 10th to 13th magnitude", but gives a position a minute of time east of the aforementioned star (BD +46 3329), which lies on the western edge of the cluster.
Physical Information: Apparent size 24 arcmin?

NGC 7083 (= PGC 67023)
Discovered (Aug 28, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (Jun 22, 1835) by John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Indus (RA 21 35 44.6, Dec -63 54 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7083 (= GC 4674 = JH 3870, Dunlop 263?, 1860 RA 21 24 39, NPD 154 31.2) is "pretty faint, considerably large, very little extended, very gradually pretty much brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.9 by 2.3? arcmin

NGC 7084
Discovered (Oct 11, 1825) by
John Herschel
A group of stars in Pegasus (RA 21 32 33.0, Dec +17 30 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7084 (= GC 4675 = JH 2123, 1860 RA 21 25 11, ND 73 11.5) is "a cluster, a little compressed".
Physical Information: Apparent size 18 arcmin?

NGC 7085 (= PGC 66926)
Discovered (Aug 3, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Pegasus (RA 21 32 25.1, Dec +06 34 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7085 (= GC 6001, Marth #447, 1860 RA 21 25 28, NPD 84 02) is "extremely faint, small, extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.7? arcmin

NGC 7086 (= OCL 214)
Discovered (Sep 21, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Sep 8, 1829) by John Herschel
An 8th-magnitude open cluster (type II2m) in Cygnus (RA 21 30 27.5, Dec +51 36 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7086 (= GC 4676 = JH 2124 = WH VI 32, 1860 RA 21 25 43, NPD 39 01.9) is "a cluster, considerably large, very rich, pretty compressed, stars from 11th to 16th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 12 arcmin?

NGC 7087 (= PGC 66988)
Discovered (Sep 4, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Grus (RA 21 34 33.4, Dec -40 49 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7087 (= GC 4677 = JH 3871, 1860 RA 21 25 44, NPD 131 26.5) is "considerably faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.6? arcmin

NGC 7088, Baxendell's (Unphotographable) Nebula
Recorded (Sep 28, 1880) by
Joseph Baxendell
A nonexistent object in Aquarius (RA 21 33 22.0, Dec -00 23 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7088 (Baxendell, 1860 RA 21 26 10±, NPD 91 00±) is "extremely faint, extremely large, diffuse, extended east-west, north of M 2". Although "Baxendell's Nebula" was observed visually by a number of astronomers between 1880 and 1930, all efforts to photograph the nebula have been unsuccessful, leading to the nickname "Baxendell's Unphotographable Nebula". It appears that the "nebula" was an illusion caused by reflections or glare from the nearby globular cluster M2, and has no real physical existence.

NGC 7089 (=
M2 = GCL 121)
Discovered (Sep 11, 1746) by Jean-Dominique Maraldi
Recorded (Sep 11, 1760) by Charles Messier as M2
Also observed (Sep 22, 1775) by Johann Bode
Also observed (Jul 30, 1783) by Caroline Herschel
Also observed (Jul 30, 1783) by William Herschel
Also observed (Aug 28, 1795) by Joseph Lalande
Also observed (Jul 21, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 6.6 globular cluster (type II) in Aquarius (RA 21 33 27.2, Dec -00 49 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7089 (= GC 4678 = JH 2125, Maraldi, M 2 = Lalande 41928, 1860 RA 21 26 15, NPD 91 26.5) is "a very remarkable object, a globular cluster, bright, very large, gradually pretty much brighter middle, well resolved, clearly consisting of stars, stars extremely small (faint)".
Physical Information: Apparent size 16 arcmin?
NOAO image of globular cluster NGC 7089, also known as M2
Above, a ? arcmin wide image of NGC 7089 (Image Credit D. Williams, N. A. Sharp, AURA, NOAO, NSF)
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of the cluster
(Image Credit & © Jim Misti, Misti Mountain Observatory; used by permission)
Misti Mountain Observatory image of globular cluster NGC 7089, also known as M2

NGC 7090 (= PGC 67045)
Discovered (Oct 4, 1834) by
John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Indus (RA 21 36 27.7, Dec -54 33 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7090 (= GC 4679 = JH 3872, 1860 RA 21 26 36, NPD 145 10.8) is "pretty bright, pretty large, very much extended 127°, gradually then pretty suddenly a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 7.3 by 1.2? arcmin

NGC 7091 (=
IC 5114 = PGC 66972)
Discovered (Sep 1, 1834) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 7091)
Discovered (Jul 9, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5114)
A magnitude 12.6 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)dm?) in Grus (RA 21 34 07.7, Dec -36 39 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7091 (= GC 4680 = JH 3873, 1860 RA 21 26 51, NPD 127 24.1) is "extremely faint, pretty large, very gradually brighter middle, 6th magnitude star 40 seconds of time to east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 1.7 arcmin?

NGC 7092 (=
M39 = OCL 211)
Discovered (or recorded) (325 B.C.E.) by Aristotle
Recorded (Oct 24, 1764) by Charles Messier as M39
Also observed (Oct 27, 1774) by Johann Bode
Also observed (Sep 27, 1788) by William Herschel
Also observed (Sep 14, 1829) by John Herschel
A 5th-magnitude open cluster (type III2p) in Cygnus (RA 21 31 52.0, Dec +48 25 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7092 (= GC 4681 = JH 2126, M 39, 1860 RA 21 27 13, NPD 42 11.0) is "a cluster, very large, very poor, very little compressed, stars from 7th to 10th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 30 arcmin?
NOAO image of open cluster NGC 7092, also known as M39
Above, a ? arcmin wide image of NGC 7092 (Image Credit Heidi Schweiker, WIYN, AURA, NSF, NOAO)

NGC 7093
Discovered (Sep 19, 1829) by
John Herschel
A group of stars in Cygnus (RA 21 34 35.8, Dec +45 59 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7093 (= GC 4682 = JH 2127, 1860 RA 21 29 05, NPD 44 37.1) is "a cluster, poor, a little compressed".
Physical Information: Apparent size 6? arcmin

NGC 7094
Discovered (Oct 10, 1884) by
Lewis Swift
A 13th-magnitude planetary nebula in Pegasus (RA 21 36 53.0, Dec +12 47 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7094 (Swift list II (#88), 1860 RA 21 29 33, NPD 77 50.7) is "a star in most extremely faint nebulosity, very difficult".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6? arcmin
NOAO image of region near planetary nebula NGC 7094, superimposed on a DSS background
Above, a 12 arcmin wide NOAO/DSS composite image centered on NGC 7094
(Image Credit above and below: Adam Block/NOAO/AURA/NSF)
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide NOAO image of the planetary nebula
NOAO image of planetary nebula NGC 7094

NGC 7095 (= PGC 67546)
Discovered (Sep 21, 1837) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Octans (RA 21 52 24.8, Dec -81 31 53)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7095 (= GC 4683 = JH 3875, 1860 RA 21 30 04, NPD 133 10.4) is "faint, pretty large, round, very gradually a little brighter middle, 13th magnitude star involved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.0 by 3.3? arcmin

NGC 7096 (=
IC 5121 = PGC 67168)
Discovered (Aug 31, 1836) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 7096)
Discovered (Sep 19, 1903) by Royal Frost (and later listed as IC 5121)
A magnitude 11.9 spiral galaxy (type SA(s)a?) in Indus (RA 21 41 19.1, Dec -63 54 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7096 (= GC 4684 = JH 3874, 1860 RA 21 30 20, NPD 154 32.0) is "very faint, small, round, very small (faint) double star to northeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 1.6? arcmin

IC 5120 (= PGC 67093 = "NGC 7096A")
Not an NGC object, but listed here since sometimes needlessly called NGC 7096A
Discovered (Sep 19, 1903) by Royal Frost (and later listed as IC 5120)
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)bc pec?) in Indus (RA 21 38 48.2, Dec -64 21 01)
Although sometimes referred to as NGC 7096A, it is more properly called IC 5120, which see for anything else.

NGC 7097 (= PGC 67146)
Discovered (Sep 5, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E??) in Grus (RA 21 40 12.8, Dec -42 32 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7097 (= GC 4685 = JH 3877, 1860 RA 21 31 24, NPD 133 10.3) is "bright, small, very little extended, much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 1.2? arcmin

PGC 67160 (= "NGC 7097A")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 7097A
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in
Grus (RA 21 40 37.9, Dec -42 28 49)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.4? arcmin

NGC 7098 (= PGC 67266)
Discovered (Sep 22, 1835) by
John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Octans (RA 21 44 16.0, Dec -75 06 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7098 (= GC 4686 = JH 3876, 1860 RA 21 32 00, NPD 165 44.4) is "pretty faint, round, gradually then pretty suddenly much brighter middle, among stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size4.0 by 2.6? arcmin

NGC 7099 (=
M30 = GCL 122)
Discovered (Aug 3, 1764) by Charles Messier (and listed as M30)
Also observed (1783) by William Herschel
Also observed (Sep 23, 1830) by John Herschel
A 7th-magnitude globular cluster (type V) in Capricornus (RA 21 40 22.0, Dec -23 10 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7099 (= GC 4687 = JH 2128 = JH 3878, M 30, 1860 RA 21 32 25, NPD 113 48.7) is "a remarkable object, a globular cluster, bright, large, a little extended, gradually pretty much brighter middle, stars from 12th to 16th magnitude".
Physical Information: About 75 light years across, and 26 thousand light years away (about 12 arcmin wide)
NOAO image of globular cluster NGC 7099, also known as M30
Above, a ? arcmin wide image of NGC 7099 (Image Credit REU program, AURA, NSF, NOAO)
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 7000 - 7049) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 7050 - 7099     → (NGC 7100 - 7149)