Celestial Atlas
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Page last updated Apr 4, 2017
Checked Steinicke historical databases, added Dreyer NGC entries
WORKING 7150: Add/update Dreyer/Steinicke listings/data, check IDs

NGC 7150
Recorded (Feb 10, 1848) by
George Bond
A group of stars in Cygnus (RA 21 50 23.0, Dec +49 45 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7150 (= GC 5077, G. P. Bond (25, HN 1), 1860 RA 21 45 13, NPD 40 53.8) is "a nebula, no description".
Physical Information: NGC 7150 consists of several faint stars, ranging from 14th to 16th magnitude, arranged in the shape of a horseshoe.
DSS image of region near stellar group NGC 7150
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7150
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the group
DSS image of stellar group NGC 7150

NGC 7151 (= PGC 67634)
Discovered (Jul 8, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Indus (RA 21 55 04.0, Dec -50 39 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7151 (= GC 4713 = JH 3896, 1860 RA 21 45 46, NPD 141 19.2) is "very faint, pretty large, a little extended, very gradually brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.9 by 1.1? arcmin.

NGC 7152 (= PGC 67601)
Discovered (Aug 18, 1835) by
John Herschel
Looked for but not found (date?) by William Lassell
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Piscis Austrinus (RA 21 53 59.0, Dec -29 17 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7152 (= GC 4714 = JH 3897, 1860 RA 21 45 50, NPD 119 56.6) is "most extremely faint, very small (Lassell not found)"; but though Lassell could not find the object, the second IC notes "Observed by Howe". The position precesses to RA 21 53 57.5, Dec -29 17 10, barely off the northwestern rim of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.6? arcmin.

NGC 7153 (= PGC 67624)
Discovered (Sep 28, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Piscis Austrinus (RA 21 54 35.3, Dec -29 03 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7153 (= GC 4715 = JH 3898, 1860 RA 21 46 30, NPD 119 41.5) is "extremely faint, small, extended or has extremely faint star near".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 0.3? arcmin

NGC 7154 (= PGC 67641)
Discovered (Sep 23, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBm?) in Piscis Austrinus (RA 21 55 21.1, Dec -34 48 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7154 (= GC 4716 = JH 3900, 1860 RA 21 46 59, NPD 125 28.4) is "bright, pretty large, irregularly round, gradually a little brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.2 by 1.8? arcmin.

NGC 7155 (=
IC 5143 = PGC 67663)
Discovered (Sep 30, 1834) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 7155)
Discovered (Sep 17, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5143)
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Indus (RA 21 56 09.8, Dec -49 31 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7155 (= GC 4717 = JH 3899, 1860 RA 21 46 59, NPD 140 10.8) is "pretty bright, small, a little extended, much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.3 by 2.0? arcmin.

NGC 7156 (= PGC 67622)
Discovered (Oct 8, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Oct 13, 1827) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Pegasus (RA 21 54 33.5, Dec +02 56 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7156 (= GC 4718 = JH 2135 = WH III 452, 1860 RA 21 47 28, NPD 87 43.0) is "faint, pretty large, round, brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.4? arcmin.

NGC 7157 (= PGC 67693)
Discovered (1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
Looked for but not found (Nov 14, 1891) by Rudolf Spitaler
Looked for but not found (date?) by Herbert Howe
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Piscis Austrinus (RA 21 56 56.7, Dec -25 21 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7157 (Leavenworth list I (#244), 1860 RA 21 48 15, NPD 116 02.5) is "very faint, very small, round, suddenly brighter middle and nucleus, bright double star 8 seconds of time to west". The first IC notes "Not found by Spitaler". The second IC adds "Not found by Howe".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.5? arcmin.

NGC 7158
Recorded (1886) by
Frank Muller
Also observed (Sep 10, 1888) by Guillaume Bigourdan
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
Three stars in Capricornus (RA 21 57 28.0, Dec -11 35 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7158 (Muller list II (#464), 1860 RA 21 49 25, NPD 102 15.4) is "a very faint nebulous star, 9.5 magnitude star 3' to northeast". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Bigourdan and Howe) of 21 49 56.
Physical Information:

NGC 7159 (= PGC 67674)
Discovered (Nov 14, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Pegasus (RA 21 56 25.6, Dec +13 33 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7159 (Swift list VI (#94), 1860 RA 21 49 47, NPD 77 06.0) is "most extremely faint, extremely small, round, very faint star to southeast". The second IC notes (per Howe) "The star to the southeast is involved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.5? arcmin.

NGC 7160 (= OCL 236)
Discovered (Nov 9, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Oct 7, 1829) by John Herschel
A 6th-magnitude open cluster (type II3p) in Cepheus (RA 21 53 40.2, Dec +62 36 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7160 (= GC 4719 = JH 2136 = WH VIII 67, 1860 RA 21 49 48, NPD 28 03.0) is "a cluster, poor, very little compressed".
Physical Information: Apparent size 5? arcmin.

NGC 7161
Recorded (Sep 13, 1862) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A pair of stars in Pegasus (RA 21 56 57.9, Dec +02 55 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7161 (= GC 4720, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 21 49 53, NPD 87 42.7) is "a cluster, very small, stars of 19th magnitude, between two 16th magnitude stars".

NGC 7162 (= PGC 67795)
Discovered (Sep 5, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type (R')SA(r)bc?) in Grus (RA 21 59 38.8, Dec -43 18 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7162 (= GC 4721 = JH 3901, 1860 RA 21 50 58, NPD 133 58.5) is "considerably faint, considerably large, considerably extended, gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 2315 km/sec, NGC 7162 is about 110 million light years away, in reasonable agreement with a redshift-independent distance estimate of 95 million light years. Given that and its 2.8 by 1.0 arcmin apparent size, it is about 85 thousand light years across. Listed in NED as a member of a pair, presumably with PGC 67818
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7162
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7162
Below, a 3 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7162
Below, a 20 arcmin wide DSS image centered between NGC 7162 and PGC 67818, also showing NGC 7166
DSS image of region between spiral galaxies NGC 7162 and PGC 67818 (which is also known as NGC 7162A), also showing NGC 7166

PGC 67818 (= "NGC 7162A")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 7162A
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)m?) in
Grus (RA 22 00 35.7, Dec -43 08 30)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 2270 km/sec, PGC 67818 is about 105 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 65 to 115 million light years. Given that and its 2.6 by 2.3 arcmin apparent size, it is about 80 thousand light years across. Listed in NED as a member of a pair, presumably with NGC 7162
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 67818, also known as NGC 7162A
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 67818; see NGC 7162 for a wider view
Below, a 3 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 67818, also known as NGC 7162A

NGC 7163 (= PGC 67785)
Discovered (Sep 27, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBab?) in Piscis Austrinus (RA 21 59 20.3, Dec -31 53 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7163 (= GC 4722 = JH 3902, 180 RA 21 51 11, NPD 122 33.1) is "faint, pretty large, very little extended, very gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 1.1? arcmin.

NGC 7164 (= PGC 67673)
Discovered (1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SAB0(rs)a? pec) in Aquarius (RA 21 56 23.5, Dec +01 21 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7164 (Leavenworth list II (#465), 1860 RA 21 51 28, NPD 89 14.5) is "extremely faint, round, 4 very faint stars to north". (Note to self: See Corwin's historical note, and check out apparently nonexistent component 2)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.6? arcmin
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 7164
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7164
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 7164

NGC 7165 (= PGC 67788)
Discovered (Sep 6, 1793) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Aug 5, 1826) by John Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Aquarius (RA 21 59 26.1, Dec -16 30 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7165 (= GC 4723 = JH 2137 = WH III 930, 1860 RA 21 51 49, NPD 107 10.7) is "extremely faint". The second IC adds "Observed by Howe, is brighter middle equivalent to 13th-magnitude star".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.8? arcmin.

NGC 7166 (= PGC 67817)
Discovered (Sep 5, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Grus (RA 22 00 32.7, Dec -43 23 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7166 (= GC 4724 = JH 3903, 1860 RA 21 51 54, NPD 134 03.5) is "considerably bright, small, very little extended, suddenly much brighter middle and nucleus".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.4 by 0.9? arcmin.

NGC 7167 (= PGC 67816)
Discovered (Jul 29, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Aquarius (RA 22 00 30.8, Dec -24 37 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7167 (= GC 4725 = JH 3905, 1860 RA 21 52 37, NPD 115 18.3) is "faint, pretty small, round, very gradually a little brighter middle, 10th magnitude star to east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.3? arcmin.

NGC 7168 (= PGC 67882)
Discovered (Jul 8, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Indus (RA 22 02 7.3, Dec -51 44 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7168 (= GC 4726 = JH 3904, 1860 RA 21 52 54, NPD 142 25.1) is "pretty bright, small, round, pretty suddenly brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 1.4? arcmin.

NGC 7169 (= PGC 67913)
Discovered (Sep 30, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/SB0?) in Grus (RA 22 02 48.7, Dec -47 41 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7169 (= GC 4727 = JH 3906, 1860 RA 21 53 07, NPD 138 21.8) is "extremely faint, small, round, 8th magnitude star to northwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.5? arcmin.

NGC 7170 (= PGC 67848)
Discovered (1886) by
Francis Leavenworth (I-245)
Also observed (date?) by Ormond Stone
Also observed (Oct 27, 1888) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Aquarius (RA 22 01 26.3, Dec -05 25 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7170 (Leavenworth list I (#245), 1860 RA 21 53 26, NPD 96 07.6) is "very faint, pretty small, irregularly round, brighter middle and nucleus, double star 36 seconds of time to west". The first IC lists a corrected RA (per Ormond Stone) of 21 55 07. The second IC lists a different RA (per Bigourdan) of 21 54 06.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.8? arcmin.

NGC 7171 (= PGC 67839)
Discovered (Aug 12, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Sep 9, 1825) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Aquarius (RA 22 01 01.9, Dec -13 16 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7171 (= GC 4728 = JH 2138 = WH III 692, 1860 RA 21 53 27, NPD 103 56.5) is "very faint, considerably large, extended 124°, very gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.6 by 1.5? arcmin.

NGC 7172 (= PGC 67874 = HCG 90A)
A member of
Hickson Compact Group 90
Discovered (Sep 23, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.9 spiral galaxy (type Sa? pec) in Piscis Austrinus (RA 22 02 01.9, Dec -31 52 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7172 (= GC 4729 = JH 3908, 1860 RA 21 53 52, NPD 122 32.6) is "pretty bright, pretty large, a little extended, gradually brighter middle, 1st of 4", the others being NGC 7173, 7174 and 7176 (with which it comprises Hickson Compact Group 90). The position precesses to RA 22 02 02.1, Dec -31 52 18, right on the galaxy listed above and the description fits, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 2605 km/sec, NGC 7172 is about 120 million light years away, in good agreement with a redshift-independent distance estimate of 110 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 2.1 by 1.4 arcmin, it is about 75 thousand light years across. It is a Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 2), and the largest member (with NGC 7173, 7174 and 7176) of Hickson Compact Group 90.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7172, also showing part of NGC 7173, another member of Hickson Compact Group 90
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7172, also showing part of NGC 7173
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of spiral galaxy NGC 7172, a member of Hickson Compact Group 90

NGC 7173 (= PGC 67878 = HCG 90C)
A member of
Hickson Compact Group 90
Discovered (Sep 25, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.0 elliptical galaxy (type E0? pec) in Piscis Austrinus (RA 22 02 03.2, Dec -31 58 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7173 (= GC 4730 = JH 3909, 1860 RA 21 53 53, NPD 122 38.1) is "considerably bright, considerably small, round, suddenly brighter middle like star, 2nd of 4", the others being NGC 7172, 7174 and 7176 (with which it comprises Hickson Compact Group 90). The position precesses to RA 22 02 03.3, Dec -31 57 48, just north of the galaxy listed above and its description and the relative position of its companions fit, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 2495 km/sec, NGC 7173 is about 115 million light years away, in good agreement with widely varying redshift-independent distance estimates of 100 to 160 million light years, and in even better agreement with the Hubble expansion distances of its companions. (It is the northernmost member of a triplet of interacting galaxies (NGC 7173, 7174 and 7176) that comprise 3/4 of Hickson Compact Group 90, so it must be at about the same distance as its companions, or about 120 million light years away.) Given that and its apparent size of 0.8 by 0.8 arcmin, it is almost 30 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 7173, also showing spiral galaxy NGC 7174, elliptical galaxy NGC 7176, and spiral galaxy NGC 7172, with which it comprises Hickson Compact Group 90
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7173, also showing NGC 7172, 7174 and 7176
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide HST image of the southern members of HCG 90 (NGC 7173, 7174 and 7176)
(Image Credit NASA, ESA, and R. Sharples (University of Durham))
HST image of the southern members (NGC 7173, NGC 7174 and NGC 7176) of Hickson Compact Group 90

NGC 7174 (= PGC 67881 = HCG 90D)
A member of
Hickson Compact Group 90
Discovered (Sep 28, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type Sab? pec) in Piscis Austrinus (RA 22 02 06.5, Dec -31 59 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7174 (= GC 4731 = JH 3910, 1860 RA 21 53 55, NPD 122 40.0) is "considerably faint, small, round, preceding (western) of double nebula (the other being NGC 7176), 3rd of 4", the others being NGC 7172, 7173 and 7176 (with which it comprises Hickson Compact Group 90). The position precesses to RA 22 02 05.4, Dec -31 59 42, on the southern rim of the galaxy listed above, and its description and the relative position of its companion fit, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 2660 km/sec, NGC 7174 is about 125 million light years away, in good agreement with a redshift-independent distance estimate of 115 million light years. (It is one of a triplet of interacting galaxies (NGC 7173 (which see for images), 7174 and 7176) that comprise 3/4 of Hickson Compact Group 90, so it must be at about the same distance as its companions, or about 120 million light years away.) Given that and its apparent size of 1.5 by 0.5 arcmin (counting its western extension, but not its fainter northern one), it is about 50 thousand light years across.

NGC 7175
Discovered (Sep 25, 1829) by
John Herschel
A group of stars in Cygnus (RA 21 58 50.0, Dec +54 31 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7175 (= GC 4732 = JH 2141, 1860 RA 21 53 56, NPD 35 50.8) is "a cluster, very large, pretty rich, a little compressed".
Physical Information: Apparent size 20? arcmin.

NGC 7176 (= PGC 67883 = HCG 90B)
A member of
Hickson Compact Group 90
Discovered (Sep 23, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.4 elliptical galaxy (type E0? pec) in Piscis Austrinus (RA 22 02 08.4, Dec -31 59 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7176 (= GC 4733 = JH 3911, 1860 RA 21 53 59, NPD 122 39.5) is "bright, pretty large, round, following (eastern) of double nebula (the other being NGC 7174), 4th of 4", the others being NGC 7172, 7173 and 7174 (with which it comprises Hickson Compact Group 90). The position precesses to RA 22 02 09.4, Dec -31 59 11, on the northeastern rim of the galaxy listed above, and its description and the relative position of its companion fit, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 2510 km/sec, NGC 7176 is about 115 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 100 to 140 million light years, and in even better agreement with the Hubble expansion distances of its companions. (It is one of a triplet of interacting galaxies (NGC 7173 (which see for images), 7174 and 7176) that comprise 3/4 of Hickson Compact Group 90, so it must be at about the same distance as its companions, or about 120 million light years away.) Given that and its apparent size of 1.0 by 0.95 arcmin, it is about 35 thousand light years across.

NGC 7177 (= PGC 67823)
Discovered (Oct 15, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Oct 7, 1825) by John Herschel
Also observed (Oct 10, 1903) by Stephane Javelle
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Pegasus (RA 22 00 41.2, Dec +17 44 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7177 (= GC 4734 = JH 2139 = WH II 247, 1860 RA 21 54 01, NPD 72 55.9) is "pretty bright, pretty small, round, brighter middle and nucleus, mottled but not resolved, star to southwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.2 by 2.1? arcmin.

NGC 7178 (= PGC 67898)
Discovered (Aug 31, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Piscis Austrinus (RA 22 02 25.1, Dec -35 47 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7178 (= GC 4735 = JH 3912, 1860 RA 21 54 06, NPD 126 28.8) is "extremely faint, small, round, 8th magnitude star 2' to south".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.5? arcmin.

NGC 7179 (= PGC 67995)
Discovered (Jun 22, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Indus (RA 22 04 49.0, Dec -64 02 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7179 (= GC 4736 = JH 3907, 1860 RA 21 54 21, NPD 154 43.2) is "considerably faint, pretty small, very gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0 by 0.8? arcmin.

NGC 7180 (= PGC 67890)
Discovered (Sep 11, 1787) by
William Herschel
Discovered (Sep 23, 1830) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Aquarius (RA 22 02 18.5, Dec -20 32 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7180 (= GC 4737 = JH 2140 = WH III 693, 1860 RA 21 54 27, NPD 111 13.4) is "very faint, small, round, a little brighter middle, western of 2", the other being NGC 7185.
Discovery Information: Steinicke only lists John Herschel as discoverer, so there may be a problem with the original attribution. (See 7185?)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.7? arcmin.

NGC 7181 (= PGC 67859)
Discovered (Jul 31, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Aquarius (RA 22 01 43.4, Dec -01 57 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7181 (= GC 6016, Marth #458, 1860 RA 21 54 32, NPD 92 38) is "extremely faint, very small, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.8? arcmin.

NGC 7182 (= PGC 67864)
Discovered (Jul 31, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Aquarius (RA 22 01 51.6, Dec -02 11 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7182 (= GC 6017, Marth #459, 1860 RA 21 54 37, NPD 92 52) is "extremely faint, very small, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.4? arcmin.

NGC 7183 (= PGC 67892)
Discovered (Sep 23, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Sep 8, 1830) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.0 spiral galaxy (type Sa pec?) in Aquarius (RA 22 02 21.6, Dec -18 54 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7183 (= GC 4738 = JH 2142 = WH II 595, 1860 RA 21 54 38, NPD 109 34.2) is "very faint, pretty large, extended 90°, a little brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 22 02 21.3, Dec -18 53 51, about an arcmin north of the galaxy listed above, there is nothing else nearby and it fits the description, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 2635 km/sec, NGC 7183 is about 120 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 3.75 by 0.95 arcmin, it is about 135 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7183
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7183
Below, a 4.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7183

NGC 7184 (= PGC 67904)
Discovered (Oct 28, 1783) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Sep 23, 1830) by John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Aquarius (RA 22 02 39.9, Dec -20 48 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7184 (= GC 4739 = JH 2143 = WH II 1, 1860 RA 21 54 53, NPD 111 29.0) is "pretty bright, pretty large, much extended 64°, between 3 stars, extremely mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 5.9 by 1.3? arcmin.

NGC 7185 (= PGC 67919)
Discovered (Sep 11, 1787) by
William Herschel
Discovered (Sep 23, 1830) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/SB0?) in Aquarius (RA 22 02 56.6, Dec -20 28 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7185 (= GC 4740 = JH 2144, 1860 RA 21 55 11, NPD 111 08.6) is "very faint, pretty large, irregularly round, very gradually a little brighter middle, eastern of 2", the other being NGC 7180.
Discovery Notes: See NGC 7180 re WH discovery information
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.3 by 1.5? arcmin.

NGC 7186
Discovered (Sep 13, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Aug 24, 1884) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A group of stars in Pegasus (RA 22 01 05.0, Dec +35 04 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7186 (= GC 4741 = WH III 165, 1860 RA 21 55 14, NPD 55 33.9) is "very faint, among 5 or 6 stars". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Bigourdan) of 21 54 57.
Physical Information:

NGC 7187 (= PGC 67909)
Discovered (1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Piscis Austrinus (RA 22 02 44.4, Dec -32 48 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7187 (Leavenworth list I (#246), 1860 RA 21 55 15, NPD 123 27.6) is "pretty faint, pretty small, round, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.2? arcmin.

NGC 7188 (= PGC 67943)
Discovered (Oct 9, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Aquarius (RA 22 03 29.0, Dec -20 19 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7188 (Leavenworth list I (#247), 1860 RA 21 55 20, NPD 111 00.6) is "extremely faint, pretty small, extended, a little brighter middle". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 21 55 44.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.8? arcmin.

NGC 7189 (= PGC 67934)
Discovered (Oct 12, 1863) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Aquarius (RA 22 03 15.9, Dec +00 34 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7189 (= GC 6018, Marth #460, 1860 RA 21 56 07, NPD 90 06) is "faint, small, a little extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.7? arcmin.

NGC 7190 (= PGC 67928)
Discovered (Jul 23, 1870) by
Édouard Stephan
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Pegasus (RA 22 03 06.6, Dec +11 11 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7190 (= GC 6019 = GC 6020, Stephan list II (#28) & list IV (#7), 1860 RA 21 56 15, NPD 79 28.6) is "extremely faint, very small, irregularly round, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.5? arcmin.

NGC 7191 (= PGC 68059)
Discovered (Jun 22, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Indus (RA 22 06 51.2, Dec -64 38 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7191 (= GC 4742 = JH 3913, 1860 RA 21 56 20, NPD 155 19.1) is "very faint, small, a little extended, very gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.6? arcmin.

NGC 7192 (= PGC 68057)
Discovered (Jun 22, 1835) by
John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Indus (RA 22 06 49.9, Dec -64 18 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7192 (= GC 4743 = JH 3914, 1860 RA 21 56 25, NPD 154 59.4) is "pretty bright, small, round, pretty much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 1.8? arcmin. Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type SA0-.
DSS image of region near galaxy NGC 7192
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7192
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of galaxy NGC 7192

NGC 7193
Discovered (Oct 13, 1825) by
John Herschel
A group of stars in Pegasus (RA 22 03 03.8, Dec +10 48 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7193 (= GC 4744 = JH 2145, 1860 RA 21 56 43, NPD 79 51.4) is "a cluster, a little rich, a little compressed, stars from 9th to 10th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 5? arcmin.

NGC 7194 (= PGC 67945)
Discovered (Nov 9, 1884) by
Lewis Swift
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Pegasus (RA 22 03 30.9, Dec +12 38 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7194 (Swift list II (#91), 1860 RA 21 56 49, NPD 78 00.5) is "very faint, very small, round, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.8? arcmin.

NGC 7195 (= PGC 67940)
Discovered (Nov 9, 1884) by
Lewis Swift
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S??) in Pegasus (RA 22 03 30.2, Dec +12 39 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7195 (Swift list II (#90), 1860 RA 21 56 49, NPD 77 59.5) is "most extremely faint, round, very difficult".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.3? arcmin.

NGC 7196 (= PGC 68020)
Discovered (Jul 8, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Indus (RA 22 05 54.8, Dec -50 07 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7196 (= GC 4745 = JH 3915, 1860 RA 21 56 51, NPD 140 48.0) is "considerably bright, small, round, among stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.5 by 1.9? arcmin.

NGC 7197 (= PGC 67921)
Discovered (Oct 17, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Oct 1, 1828) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Lacerta (RA 22 05 57.9, Dec +41 03 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7197 (= GC 4746 = JH 2146 = WH II 599, 1860 RA 21 57 09, NPD 49 37.2) is "faint, considerably small, considerably extended, very gradually a little brighter middle, extremely mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.8? arcmin.

NGC 7198 (= PGC 68006)
Discovered (Jul 31, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Aquarius (RA 22 05 14.1, Dec -00 38 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7198 (= GC 6021, Marth #461, 1860 RA 21 58 03, NPD 91 20) is "extremely faint, very small, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 1.0? arcmin.

NGC 7199 (= PGC 68124)
Discovered (Jun 22, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(r)a?) in Indus (RA 22 08 30.1, Dec -64 42 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7199 (= GC 4747 = JH 3916, 1860 RA 21 58 04, NPD 155 23.0) is "very faint, small, round, pretty suddenly a little brighter middle, 11th magnitude star 3' to west".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 2865 km/sec, NGC 7199 is about 130 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.1 by 0.9 arcmin, it is about 45 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7199
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7199
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7199
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 7100 - 7149) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 7150 - 7199     → (NGC 7200 - 7249)