Celestial Atlas
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7217, 7218, 7219, 7220, 7221, 7222, 7223, 7224, 7225, 7226, 7227, 7228, 7229, 7230, 7231, 7232, 7233,
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Page last updated Mar 7, 2017
WORKING 7200: Add/update Dreyer/Steinicke listings/data, check IDs

NGC 7200 (= PGC 68068)
Discovered (Sep 30, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Indus (RA 22 07 09.6, Dec -49 59 44)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.8? arcmin

NGC 7201 (= PGC 68040)
Discovered (Sep 27, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAa?) in Piscis Austrinus (RA 22 06 32.0, Dec -31 15 50)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 4415 km/sec, NGC 7201 is about 205 million light years away. This is not much further than apparently nearby NGC 7203, and if really at nearly the same distance, the two may be gravitationally bound (they are listed as possible group members in NED). Given its distance and apparent size of 1.6 by 0.5? arcmin, NGC 7201 is about 95 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7201, also showing part of  NGC 7203
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7201, also showing part of NGC 7203
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7201
Below, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered between NGC 7201 and 7203
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7201 and lenticular galaxy NGC 7203

NGC 7202
Recorded (Aug 15, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude star in Piscis Austrinus (RA 22 06 43.3, Dec -31 13 07)
Historical Identification:

NGC 7203 (= PGC 68053)
Discovered (Sep 27, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.7 lenticular galaxy (type (R)SB(r)0/a?) in Piscis Austrinus (RA 22 06 43.8, Dec -31 09 48)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 4060 km/sec, NGC 7203 is about 190 million light years away. Given that and its 1.6 by 0.9? arcmin apparent size, it is about 90 thousand light years across. Although considerably further away, NGC 7203 is in nearly the same direction as NGC 7204, which see for a wide-field image of the region between the two.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 7203, also showing part of NGC 7201
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7203, also showing part of NGC 7201
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 7203
Below, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered between NGC 7201 and 7203
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7201 and lenticular galaxy NGC 7203

NGC 7204 (= PGC 68060 (= PGC 68054) + PGC 68061 (= PGC 2801173))
Discovered (Sep 27, 1834) by
John Herschel
A pair of interacting galaxies in Piscis Austrinus
PGC 68061 = 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a? pec) at RA 22 06 53.1, Dec -31 03 00
PGC 68060 = 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBab? pec) at RA 22 06 55.0, Dec -31 03 13
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 2590 km/sec, galaxy pair NGC 7204 is about 120 million light years away. The more elongated southeastern Component 2 (PGC 68060) has a bright central region about 1.2 by 0.3, with a fainter western extension not quite the same size. Given that and its distance, the brighter portion is about 40 thousand light years across, and the overall extent of the galaxy is about 70 thousand light years. The irregularly round northwestern Component 1 (PGC 68061) has a bright central region about 0.6 by 0.4 arcmin, and fainter east-west extensions which approximately double that size. Given that and its distance, its brighter portion is about 20 thousand light years across, and the overall size of the galaxy is about 40 thousand light years. (Note: NED appears to reverse the size of the two components, although its coordinates agree with those listed above.) Even in the crude images below it is obvious that the two galaxies are strongly interacting, and a really good image of the pair would undoubtedly be quite spectacular.
DSS image of region near interacting galaxy pair NGC 7204
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7204
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the interacting pair of galaxies
DSS image of NGC 7204, an interacting pair of galaxies
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered between NGC 7204 and the more distant NGC 7203
DSS image of region between interacting galaxy pair NGC 7204 and the much more distant NGC 7203

NGC 7205 (= PGC 68128)
Discovered (Jul 10, 1834) by
John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SA(s)bc) in Tucana (RA 22 08 33.2, Dec -57 26 33)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 1685 km/sec, NGC 7205 is about 80 million light years away, in reasonable agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 50 to 75 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 4.0 by 2.0 arcmin, it is about 90 thousand light years across.
Wikisky cutout (credited to Jim Riffle) of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7205
Above, a 12 arcmin wide image centered on NGC 7205 (Image Credit Wikisky cutout uploaded by Jim Riffle)
Below, a 4 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image credit as above)
Wikisky cutout (credited to Jim Riffle) of spiral galaxy NGC 7205

PGC 68083 (= "NGC 7205A")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 7205A
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SA(s)c?) in
Tucana (RA 22 07 32.0, Dec -57 27 51)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 7235 km/sec, PGC 68083 is about 340 million light years away. Given that and its 1.2 by 0.9 arcmin apparent size, it is about 120 thousand light years across. (Note: Other than being in roughly the same direction, there is no relationship between "NGC 7205A" and NGC 7205, which is almost 300 million light years closer.)
Wikisky cutout (credited to Jim Riffle) of region near spiral galaxy PGC 68083, which is also known as NGC 7205A, superimposed on a DSS background
Above, a 12 arcmin wide composite image centered on PGC 68083
(Image credit for all images currently posted: Wikisky cutout posted by Jim Riffle, superimposed on a DSS background)
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide composite image of the galaxy
Composite of Wikisky cutout (credited to Jim Riffle) of spiral galaxy PGC 68083, which is also known as NGC 7205A, superimposed on a DSS background
Below, a 12 arcmin wide image centered between PGC 68083 and the much closer NGC 7205
Wikisky cutout (credited to Jim Riffle) of region between spiral galaxies NGC 7205 and PGC 68083 (which is also known as NGC 7205A)

NGC 7206 (= PGC 68014)
Discovered (Aug 7, 1864) by
Albert Marth (462)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Pegasus (RA 22 05 40.9, Dec +16 47 07)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.7? arcmin

NGC 7207 (= PGC 68017)
Discovered (Aug 7, 1864) by
Albert Marth (463)
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Pegasus (RA 22 05 45.6, Dec +16 46 04)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.2? arcmin

NGC 7208 (= PGC 68120)
Discovered (Sep 28, 1834) by
John Herschel
Also observed by Herbert Howe
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Piscis Austrinus (RA 22 08 24.7, Dec -29 03 05)
Historical Identification: The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 22 00 23.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.6? arcmin

NGC 7209 (= OCL 215)
Discovered (Oct 19, 1788) by
William Herschel
An 8th-magnitude open cluster (type III1p) in Lacerta (RA 22 05 08.0, Dec +46 29 00)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 15? arcmin.

NGC 7210 (=
NGC 7487 = PGC 70496)
Discovered (Nov 17, 1827) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 7210)
Discovered (Aug 3, 1886) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 7487)
A magnitude 13.5 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Pegasus (RA 23 06 50.5, Dec +28 10 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7210 (= GC 4756 = JH 2148, 1860 RA 21 59 58, NPD 63 34.3) is "extremely faint, round, brighter middle, very faint double star to northwest". The position precesses to RA 22 06 22.2, Dec +27 06 31, but there is nothing there nor anywhere near there, so until recently the object was thought to be lost or nonexistent. However, in April 2016 Corwin took a look at the record of Herschel's sweep, and found that Herschel made a one hour error in recording the right ascension (which was too small), and a one degree error in the NPD (which was too large). Correcting for that, the position becomes 1860 RA 22 59 58, NPD 62 34.3, which precesses to RA 23 06 44.2, Dec 28 11 03, about 1.4 arcmin west northwest of the galaxy listed above, the description fits, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Discovery Notes: Herschel's GC entry (and a GC note about it) showed that he was very uncertain about the position of the object, and Corwin stated in his original discussion of the observation (when it appeared to be of a lost or nonexistent object) that the NPD in Herschel's original record differed from that in the GC by a degree, but that he was unable to find anything at either declination (as it turns out, due to the unrecognized error in the right ascension). Reviewing Herschel's reduction of the NPD shows that the original record was correct and Herschel and Dreyer's usage of the incorrect NPD in the GC led to a one degree error in the declination. The error in the right ascension is not as obvious, but as discussed in detail by Corwin in his current notes, the only right ascension recorded in the sweep has a position differing from the clock entry by an hour. Presuming the clock entry was correct produces a one hour change in the right ascension, and reasonably accurate positions for all three objects observed in the sweep (two double stars and JH 2148), thereby confirming the accuracy of the present identification of NGC 7210 as a prior observation of NGC 7487.
Physical Information: Given the relatively recent discovery of the duplicate entry, NGC 7210 is still listed as lost or nonexistent in most places; so see NGC 7487 for anything else.

NGC 7211 (= PGC 68033)
Discovered (Aug 3, 1864) by
Albert Marth (464)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Aquarius (RA 22 06 21.8, Dec -08 05 22)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.7? arcmin
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 7211
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7211
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 7211

NGC 7212 (= PGC 68065)
Discovered (Oct 2, 1886) by
Lewis Swift (5-93)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Pegasus (RA 22 07 02.2, Dec +10 14 05)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.6? arcmin

NGC 7213 (= PGC 68165)
Discovered (Sep 30, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 10th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Grus (RA 22 09 16.2, Dec -47 10 01)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.1 by 2.8? arcmin

NGC 7214 (= PGC 68152)
Discovered (July 30, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc? pec) in Piscis Austrinus (RA 22 09 07.6, Dec -27 48 35)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.2 by 1.4? arcmin

NGC 7215 (= PGC 68127)
Discovered (Aug 11, 1864) by
Albert Marth (465)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Aquarius (RA 22 08 34.5, Dec +00 30 44)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.4? arcmin

NGC 7216 (= PGC 68291)
Discovered (Jun 29, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Indus (RA 22 12 36.0, Dec -68 39 43)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.0? arcmin

NGC 7217 (= PGC 68096)
Discovered (Sep 7, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 10th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Pegasus (RA 22 07 52.1, Dec +31 21 34)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.0 by 3.4? arcmin

NGC 7218 (= PGC 68199)
Discovered (Sep 6, 1793) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Aquarius (RA 22 10 11.5, Dec -16 39 38)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.6 by 1.1? arcmin

NGC 7219 (= PGC 68312)
Discovered (Jun 22, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Tucana (RA 22 13 08.9, Dec -64 50 56)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.0? arcmin

NGC 7220 (= PGC 68241)
Discovered (1886) by
Frank Muller (II-466)
Also observed by Herbert Howe
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Aquarius (RA 22 11 30.9, Dec -22 57 11)
Historical Identification: The second IC lists a corrected position (per Howe) of RA 22 03 43, NPD 113 38.2.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7? arcmin

NGC 7221 (= PGC 68235)
Discovered (Sep 27, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Piscis Austrinus (RA 22 11 15.1, Dec -30 33 48)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0 by 1.6? arcmin

NGC 7222 (= PGC 68224)
Discovered (Aug 11, 1864) by
Albert Marth (466)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Aquarius (RA 22 10 51.7, Dec +02 06 23)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 1.2? arcmin

NGC 7223 (= PGC 68197)
Discovered (Nov 8, 1790) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Lacerta (RA 22 10 09.2, Dec +41 01 02)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.1? arcmin

NGC 7224 (= PGC 68242)
Discovered (Sep 6, 1863) by
Albert Marth (467)
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E4?) in Pegasus (RA 22 11 35.3, Dec +25 51 54)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.0? arcmin

NGC 7225 (= PGC 68311)
Discovered (Jul 30, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a? pec) in Piscis Austrinus (RA 22 13 07.8, Dec -26 08 54)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0 by 1.0? arcmin

NGC 7226 (= OCL 226)
Discovered (Jun 20, 1881) by
Edward Holden (22)
A 10th-magnitude open cluster (type I1p) in Cepheus (RA 22 10 27.0, Dec +55 23 55)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 10? arcmin

NGC 7227 (= PGC 68243)
Discovered (Sep 1, 1872) by
Édouard Stephan (4-8)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Lacerta (RA 22 11 31.3, Dec +38 43 15)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.6? arcmin

NGC 7228 (= PGC 68254)
Discovered (Sep 1, 1872) by
Édouard Stephan (4-9)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Lacerta (RA 22 11 48.6, Dec +38 41 56)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 1.2? arcmin

NGC 7229 (= PGC 68344)
Discovered (Sep 27, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Piscis Austrinus (RA 22 14 03.3, Dec -29 23 00)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 1.5? arcmin

NGC 7230 (= PGC 68350)
Discovered (Sep 6, 1793) by
William Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Aquarius (RA 22 14 13.1, Dec -17 04 28)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.9? arcmin

NGC 7231 (= PGC 68285)
Discovered (Oct 24, 1786) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Lacerta (RA 22 12 30.3, Dec +45 19 43)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 0.7? arcmin

NGC 7232 (= PGC 68431)
Discovered (Sep 6, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Grus (RA 22 15 37.6, Dec -45 51 01)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.6 by 1.0? arcmin

PGC 68329 (= "NGC 7232A")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 7232A
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBab?) in
Grus (RA 22 13 41.1, Dec -45 53 37)
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 0.4? arcmin

PGC 68443 (= "NGC 7232B")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 7232B
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBm?) in
Grus (RA 22 15 52.4, Dec -45 46 50)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.5? arcmin

NGC 7233 (= PGC 68441)
Discovered (Sep 6, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a?) in Grus (RA 22 15 49.0, Dec -45 50 47)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.3? arcmin

NGC 7234 (=
NGC 7235 = OCL 229)
Discovered (Oct 16, 1787) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 7234)
Discovered (Sep 24, 1829) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 7235)
A magnitude 7.7 open cluster in Cepheus (RA 22 12 24.0, Dec +57 16 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7234 (= GC 4771 = WH VIII 63, 1860 RA 22 07 08, NPD 33 42.9) is a "cluster, small, poor, a little compressed". The position precesses to RA 22 12 06.7, Dec +56 58 33, but there is nothing there, or at least nothing obvious. Various suggestions have been made over the years, assigning one or more small groups of stars (corresponding to "small, poor") to this NGC entry, but most modern catalogs listed it as lost or nonexistent. As it happens the problem with Herschel's observation was solved by Arthur von Auwers in an 1862 publication of observations and corrections for objects in Herschel's catalogs. On page 197 of that work he lists a corrected position for (WH) VIII 63 of (1830) RA 22 06 21, Dec +56 26, which precesses to RA 22 12 22.0, Dec +57 16 18, right on the cluster recorded by John Herschel as JH 2154. Unfortunately, although Auwers' publication specifically noted the equivalence of the two observations, the younger Herschel failed to notice Auwers' correction when compiling his General Catalog, as did Dreyer when compiling his New General Catalog. So even though Auwers discovered the equivalence of what became NGC 7234 and NGC 7235 two years before the publication of the GC and 25 years before the publication of the NGC, what the elder Herschel had observed remained essentially unknown for well over a century.
Discovery Notes: As noted above John Herschel did not notice Auwers' correction when he compiled the GC, nor did Dreyer when he compiled the NGC; and though Dreyer's 1912 study of Herschel's papers revealed an error in the reduction of Herschel's position by his sister Caroline, Dreyer failed to realize that this meant that NGC 7234 = NGC 7235, and did not include "7234 = 7235" in his 1912 list of corrections to the NGC. As a result, for many years NGC 7234 was thought to be a completely different cluster, and was listed as such by Steinicke as recently as 2013; and since I used Steinicke's database when I entered the basic information for this page in 2012, NGC 7234 was also misidentified here until I received a private communication in early 2015. If I'd had time to get back to this entry earlier I would have noticed that Corwin's 2004 update of his database included a reference to Auwers' paper and the resulting equality of the two NGC entries, but as those following my work on this catalog are aware, it is a long-term project, so save for entries that include complete historical identifications there are probably many similar mistakes yet to be unearthed.
Physical Information: Given the centuries-long error in the identification of NGC 7234, see NGC 7235 for anything else.
DSS image of the region near Herschel's incorrect published position for his VIII 63, also showing the position of the cluster therefore long thought to be NGC 7234, the correct position for Herschel's VIII 63, and John Herschel's JH 2154 = NGC 7235
Above, a 45 arcmin wide DSS image centered on Herschel's incorrect published position for his VIII 63, also showing the position of the cluster therefore long thought to be NGC 7234, the correct position for Herschel's VIII 63, and John Herschel's JH 2154 = NGC 7235

The "cluster" formerly known as NGC 7234
Not an NGC object but listed here since long thought to be
NGC 7234
A sparse grouping of stars in Cepheus (RA 22 12 28.0, Dec +57 02 30)
Historical Identification: As noted in the entry above, until recently many catalogs incorrectly listed this grouping as NGC 7234 (though as many or more catalogs listed that NGC object as lost or nonexistent).
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.5? arcmin.
DSS image of region near the sparse grouping of stars formerly thought to be NGC 7234
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on the "cluster" formerly thought to be NGC 7234

NGC 7235 (= OCL 229 and =
NGC 7234)
Discovered (Oct 16, 1787) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 7234)
Discovered (Sep 24, 1829) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 7235)
A magnitude 7.7 open cluster in Cepheus (RA 22 12 24.0, Dec +57 16 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7235 (= GC 4772 = JH 2154, 1860 RA 22 07 35, NPD 33 25.2) is a "cluster, pretty compressed, has a ruby 10th magnitude star".
Discovery Notes: See NGC 7234 for a discussion of the double listing.
Physical Information: Apparent size 6 arcmin?
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 7235
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7235

NGC 7236 (= PGC 68384, and with
NGC 7237 and PGC 200377 = Arp 169)
Discovered (Aug 25, 1864) by Albert Marth (468)
A magnitude 13.6 lenticular galaxy (type E/SB0?) in Pegasus (RA 22 14 45.0, Dec +13 50 47)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 7880 km/sec, NGC 7236 is about 365 million light years away, in poor agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of only 250 to 280 million light years. Assuming a distance corresponding to its redshift, its apparent size of 1.25 by 0.55 arcmin would represent a physical size of about 130 thousand light years. It is a contact companion of NGC 7237, meaning that whatever their distance, the two galaxies are at the same distance from us. A third galaxy in line with the pair, PGC 200377 (listed in NED as NGC 7237C), is probably not physically connected with them, but may be a member of the same group of galaxies. (Whether the pair is physically connected to PGC 200377 or not, the triplet is used by the Arp Atlas as an example of galaxies with diffuse counter-tails.)
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy pair NGC 7236 and NGC 7237, also showing lenticular galaxy PGC 200377; the three galaxies are also known as Arp 169
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7236 and 7237, also showing PGC 200377
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxies
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy pair NGC 7236 and NGC 7237, also showing lenticular galaxy PGC 200377; the three galaxies are also known as Arp 169

NGC 7237 (= PGC 68383, and with
NGC 7236 and PGC 200377 = Arp 169)
Discovered (Aug 25, 1864) by Albert Marth (469)
A magnitude 13.6 lenticular galaxy (type E/SA0?) in Pegasus (RA 22 14 46.9, Dec +13 50 27)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 7870 km/sec, NGC 7237 is about 365 million light years away, in poor agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of only 250 to 280 million light years. Assuming a distance corresponding to its redshift, its apparent size of 1.8 by 0.7 arcmin would represent a physical size of about 190 thousand light years. It is a contact companion of NGC 7236 (which see for images), meaning that whatever their distance the two galaxies are at the same distance from us. (Whether the pair is physically connected to PGC 200377 or not, the triplet is used by the Arp Atlas as an example of galaxies with diffuse counter-tails.)

PGC 200377 (= "NGC 7237C", and with
NGC 7236 and NGC 7237 = Arp 169)
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 7237C
A magnitude 16(?) lenticular galaxy (type E/SA0?) in Pegasus (RA 22 14 48.8, Dec +13 50 01)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 7155 km/sec, PGC 200377 (listed in NED as NGC 7237C) is about 330 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.45 by 0.35 arcmin, it is about 45 thousand light years across. PGC 200377 is nearly in line with galaxy pair NGC 7237 and 7236 (which see for images), and may be a group member with them; but the 700 km/sec velocity difference between it and the pair implies that it is over 30 million light years closer to us. Even if PGC 200377 happened to be at the same distance as the pair and its difference in velocity is not due to a difference in distance but to a difference in the galaxies' peculiar velocities (that is, their random motions relative to each other), such a large velocity relative to its "companions" would prevent it from remaining in their sphere of influence for very long. So whether it is a foreground object or not, it is not a permanent companion of the two larger galaxies. (Whether the pair is physically connected to PGC 200377 or not, the triplet is used by the Arp Atlas as an example of galaxies with diffuse counter-tails.)

NGC 7238
Recorded (Sep 1, 1886) by
Lewis Swift (4-82)
A lost or nonexistent object in Pegasus (RA 22 15 20.5, Dec +22 31 10)
Historical Identification:

NGC 7239 (= PGC 68388)
Discovered (Oct 1, 1864) by
Albert Marth (470)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Aquarius (RA 22 15 01.3, Dec -05 03 10)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.7? arcmin

NGC 7240 (= PGC 68415)
Discovered (Sep 24, 1873) by
Édouard Stephan (5-6)
Probably observed by Edward Barnard
Possibly observed by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Lacerta (RA 22 15 22.7, Dec +37 16 50)
Historical Identification: The second IC notes "Barnard, A.N. 4136, gives a sketch of six nebulae, three of which must be 7240, 7242, and Bigourdan 449, but it is difficult to identify these".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.6? arcmin.

NGC 7241 (= PGC 68442)
Discovered (Sep 3, 1872) by
Édouard Stephan (4-10)
Also observed by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc? pec) in Pegasus (RA 22 15 49.7, Dec +19 13 53)
Historical Identification: The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Bigourdan) of 22 09 08.
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.4 by 1.1? arcmin.

NGC 7242 (= PGC 68434)
Discovered (August, 1865) by
Auguste Voigt (10)
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Lacerta (RA 22 15 39.3, Dec +37 17 52)
Historical Identification: (See the second IC note for NGC 7240.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.3 by 1.7? arcmin

NGC 7243 (= OCL 221)
Discovered (Sep 26, 1788) by
William Herschel
A 6th-magnitude open cluster (type IV2p) in Lacerta (RA 22 15 08.5, Dec +49 53 51)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 30 arcmin?

NGC 7244 (= PGC 68468)
Discovered (Sep 6, 1872) by
Édouard Stephan (4-11)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Pegasus (RA 22 16 26.7, Dec +16 28 18)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.4? arcmin

NGC 7245 (= OCL 225)
Discovered (Oct 14, 1787) by
William Herschel
A 9th-magnitude open cluster (type II1p) in Lacerta (RA 22 15 12.0, Dec +54 20 36)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 5 arcmin?

NGC 7246 (=
IC 5198 = PGC 68512)
Discovered (Sep 6, 1793) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 7246)
Discovered (Oct 16, 1898) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 5198)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Aquarius (RA 22 17 42.6, Dec -15 34 12)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.8? arcmin

NGC 7247 (= PGC 68511)
Discovered (1886) by
Francis Leavenworth (I-248)
Also observed by Herbert Howe
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Aquarius (RA 22 17 41.1, Dec -23 43 50)
Historical Identification: The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 22 09 53.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.8? arcmin.

NGC 7248 (= PGC 68485)
Discovered (Nov 8, 1790) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Lacerta (RA 22 16 52.5, Dec +40 30 19)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 0.9? arcmin

NGC 7249 (= PGC 68606)
Discovered (Oct 4, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SA0?) in Grus (RA 22 20 30.9, Dec -55 07 29)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size Based on a recessional velocity of 11945 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that NGC 7249 is about 555 million light years away. However, for objects at that distance we must take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 530 million light years away when the light by which we see it was emitted, about 540 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 1.1 by 0.8 arcmin, NGC 7249 is about 170 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 7249
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7249
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 7249
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 7150 - 7199) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 7200 - 7249     → (NGC 7250 - 7299)