Celestial Atlas
(NGC 7200 - 7249) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 7250 - 7299 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 7300 - 7349)
Click here for Introductory Material
QuickLinks:
7250, 7251, 7252, 7253, 7254, 7255, 7256, 7257, 7258, 7259, 7260, 7261, 7262, 7263, 7264, 7265, 7266,
7267, 7268, 7269, 7270, 7271, 7272, 7273, 7274, 7275, 7276, 7277, 7278, 7279, 7280, 7281, 7282, 7283,
7284, 7285, 7286, 7287, 7288, 7289, 7290, 7291, 7292, 7293, 7294, 7295, 7296, 7297, 7298, 7299

Page last updated Apr 6, 2017
Checked historical databases, added Dreyer NGC entries
WORKING 7250: Add/update Steinicke listings/data, check IDs

NGC 7250 (= PGC 68535)
Discovered (Nov 8, 1790) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sdm?) in Lacerta (RA 22 18 17.7, Dec +40 33 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7250 (= GC 4778 = WH III 864, 1860 RA 22 12 29, NPD 50 08.2) is "very faint, small, much extended 165°±".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 1165 km/sec, NGC 7250 is about 55 million light years away, in reasonable agreement with a redshift-independent distance measurement of 45 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 1.7 by 0.8 arcmin, the galaxy is about 25 thousand light years across. It is listed as a starburst galaxy. In the closeup below, NGC 7250 is the galaxy at the center. The group of three bright blue knots above center is listed as a quarter arcmin wide galaxy (PGC 214816) in LEDA, but I can't find any other reference to such a galaxy, and the knots look more like a part of NGC 7250 than anything else. So although I have noted the position of the supposed galaxy in the image, no other entry will be posted for that "galaxy" unless and until some proof of its existence comes to light. NGC 7250 is listed as a member of a pair in NED, but without any indication of where the other member might be, so that will also have to wait for a later iteration of this page.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7250
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7250
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7250

NGC 7251 (= PGC 68604)
Discovered (Sep 6, 1793) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Aug 5, 1826) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Aquarius (RA 22 20 27.2, Dec -15 46 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7251 (= GC 4779 = JH 2158 = WH III 933, 1860 RA 22 12 53, NPD 106 27.8) is "faint, pretty small, round, gradually pretty much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 1.7? arcmin

NGC 7252 (= PGC 68612 =
Arp 226), "Atoms For Peace Galaxy"
Discovered (Oct 26, 1785) by William Herschel
Also observed (Jul 29, 1834) by John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude peculiar galaxy (type (R)SA0(r)? pec) in Aquarius (RA 22 20 44.8, Dec -24 40 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7252 (= GC 4780 = JH 3934 = WH III 458, 1860 RA 22 12 58, NPD 115 22.7) is "faint, small, round, extremely mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: NGC 7252 is a pair of colliding galaxies well on the way to becoming a single galaxy, which displays a complex structure of stellar filaments surrounding the central core, and flung far into intergalactic space. Based on a recessional velocity of 4790 km/sec, NGC 7252 is about 225 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 2.1 by 1.7 arcmin, the main structure is about 135 thousand light years across, and its outer filaments, which cover nearly the entire width of the 9 arcmin wide image below, stretch across more than half a million light years. NGC 7252 contains over 500 very bright, unusually blue globular clusters, whose hot young stars have Main Sequence lifetimes between 50 and 500 million years. The globular clusters in most galaxies are 12 to 13 billion years old, and contain only relatively faint, cool Main Sequence stars (such as the Sun, and still fainter, cooler stars). The young globulars in NGC 7252 must be a by-product of the collision which is turning two spiral galaxies into a larger elliptical. The idea that large elliptical galaxies form from such collisions has been around for a while, but such galaxies have far more globular clusters than would be expected from the combination of the smaller galaxies which formed them. NGC 7252 shows that this anomaly can be explained by the formation of new globulars during the collision.
ESO image of region near peculiar galaxy NGC 7252, also known as Arp 226
Above, a ? arcmin wide image centered on NGC 7252 (Image Credit above & below ESO)
Below, a 9 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (click here for a much larger image)
ESO image of peculiar galaxy NGC 7252, also known as Arp 226

NGC 7253 (= PGC 68572 + PGC 68573 =
Arp 278)
Discovered (Sep 9, 1863) by Albert Marth
A pair of spiral galaxies in Pegasus
PGC 68572 = A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SABc?) at RA 22 19 27.3, Dec +29 23 49
PGC 68573 = A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) at RA 22 19 30.0, Dec +29 23 16
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7253 (= GC 6037, Marth #471, 1860 RA 22 13 01, NPD 61 19) is "very faint, pretty extended".
Physical Information: NGC 7253 is a pair of interacting spiral galaxies, which must be at the same distance from us. Based on PGC 68572's recessional velocity of 4570 km/sec and PGC 68573's recessional velocity of 4495 km/sec, that common distance should be about 210 million light years. This is in good agreement with redshift-distance estimates of 190 to 235 million light years for PGC 68572, but far greater than redshift-independent estimates of only 120 to 185 million light years for PGC 68573. If the two galaxies were not interacting, the redshift-independent distance estimates for PGC 68573 might be considered as reliable as the recessional-velocity distance; but since they are interacting, the redshift-independent values must be wrong. Using a common distance of 210 million light years, PGC 68572's apparent size of 1.7 by 0.5 arcmin corresponds to a physical size of just over 100 thousand light years, while PGC 68573's apparent size of 1.6 by 0.5 arcmin corresponds to just under 100 thousand light years.
SDSS image of region near NGC 7253, a pair of interacting spiral galaxies also known as Arp 278
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7253
Below, a 3 arcmin wide SDSS image of the interacting galaxies
SDSS image of NGC 7253, a pair of interacting spiral galaxies also known as Arp 278

NGC 7254 (=
NGC 7256 = PGC 68686)
Discovered (Sep 27, 1864) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 7256)
Discovered (1886) by Frank Muller (and later listed as NGC 7254)
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Aquarius (RA 22 22 36.0, Dec -21 44 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7254 (Muller list II (#467), 1860 RA 22 14 20, NPD 112 26.0) is "very faint, very small, round, 11th magnitude star 4.5 arcmin to west". The second IC notes "7254 = 7256, NPD is 112 26.5, Howe", so the identity of the two listings has been known for more than a century.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.6? arcmin

NGC 7255 (= PGC 68721)
Discovered (Oct 1, 1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Aquarius (RA 22 23 08.0, Dec -15 32 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7255 (Leavenworth list I (#249), 1860 RA 22 14 25, NPD 106 16.0) is "extremely faint, large, much extended 30°, suddenly brighter middle and nucleus".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.4? arcmin

NGC 7256 (=
NGC 7254 = PGC 68686)
Discovered (Sep 27, 1864) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 7256)
Discovered (1886) by Frank Muller (and later listed as NGC 7254)
Also observed by Herbert Howe
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Aquarius (RA 22 22 36.0, Dec -21 44 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7256 (= GC 6038, Marth #472, 1860 RA 22 14 55, NPD 112 36) is "3 faint stars in a faint nebula". The second IC notes "7254 = 7256, NPD is 112 26.5, Howe", so the identity of the two listings has been known for more than a century.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 7254 for anything else.

NGC 7257 (=
NGC 7260 = PGC 68691)
Discovered (Oct 1, 1864) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 7257)
Also observed (Sep 1, 1886) by Lewis Swift (#??) (and later listed as NGC 7257)
Discovered (Sep 22, 1876) by Édouard Stephan (and later listed as NGC 7260)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Aquarius (RA 22 22 36.5, Dec -04 07 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7257 (= GC 6039, Marth #473, 1860 RA 22 14 56, NPD 94 44) is "faint, very small, a little extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 1.4? arcmin

NGC 7258 (= PGC 68710)
Discovered (Jul 30, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Piscis Austrinus (RA 22 22 58.1, Dec -28 20 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7258 (= GC 4781 = JH 3935, 1860 RA 22 15 07, NPD 119 03.4) is "very faint, small, extended, gradually a little brighter middle, binuclear?".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.6? arcmin

NGC 7259 (= PGC 68718)
Discovered (Sep 28, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Piscis Austrinus (RA 22 23 05.6, Dec -28 57 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7259 (= GC 4782 = JH 3936, 1860 RA 22 15 10, NPD 119 39.3) is "extremely faint, pretty large, round, very little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.9? arcmin

NGC 7260 (=
NGC 7257 = PGC 68691)
Discovered (Oct 1, 1864) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 7257)
Also observed (Sep 1, 1886) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 7257)
Discovered (Sep 22, 1876) by Édouard Stephan (and later listed as NGC 7260)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Aquarius (RA 22 22 36.5, Dec -04 07 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7260 (= GC 6040, Stephan list VIII (#13), 1860 RA 22 15 21, NPD 94 49.5) is "extremely faint, pretty small, irregularly round".
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 7257 for anything else.

NGC 7261 (= OCL 237)
Discovered (Oct 5, 1829) by
John Herschel
An 8th-magnitude open cluster (type III1p) in Cepheus (RA 22 20 10.0, Dec +58 06 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7261 (= GC 4783 = JH 2159, 1860 RA 22 15 24, NPD 32 36.9) is "a cluster, large, pretty rich, a little compressed".
Physical Information: Apparent size 6? arcmin

NGC 7262 (= PGC 68737)
Discovered (Sep 27, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Piscis Austrinus (RA 22 23 28.4, Dec -32 21 53)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7262 (= GC 4784 = JH 3937, 1860 RA 22 15 26, NPD 123 03.5) is "extremely faint, small, round, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.7? arcmin

NGC 7263 (= PGC 68642)
Discovered (Sep 9, 1863) by
Albert Marth
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Lacerta (RA 22 21 45.2, Dec +36 20 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7263 (= GC 6041, Marth #474, 1860 RA 22 15 33, NPD 54 21) is "faint, small, round".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 6205 km/sec, NGC 7263 is about 290 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.7 by 0.5 arcmin, it is about 60 thousand light years across. The galaxy appears to be accompanied by a 15th-magnitude compact galaxy 0.4 by 0.4 arcmin in size (at RA 22 21 46.0, Dec +36 21 09), but whether the two are in any way connected appears to be unknown.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 7263, also showing part of NGC 7264
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7263, also showing part of NGC 7264
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 7263 and its possible compact companion

NGC 7264 (= PGC 68658)
Discovered (Sep 17, 1863) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Lacerta (RA 22 22 13.5, Dec +36 23 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7264 (= GC 6042, Marth #475, 1860 RA 22 16 02, NPD 54 19) is "very faint, pretty small, much extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.2 by 0.3? arcmin
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7264, also showing NGC 7263
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7264, also showing NGC 7263
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7264

NGC 7265 (= PGC 68668)
Discovered (Sep 20, 1876) by
Édouard Stephan
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Lacerta (RA 22 22 27.5, Dec +36 12 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7265 (= GC 6043, Stephan list VIII (#14), 1860 RA 22 16 15, NPD 54 29.5) is "faint, very small, round, much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.4 by 1.9? arcmin

NGC 7266 (= PGC 68758)
Discovered (Oct 1, 1864) by
Albert Marth
Also observed (Nov 3, 1887) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Aquarius (RA 22 23 59.0, Dec -04 04 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7266 (= GC 6044, Marth #476, 1860 RA 22 16 18, NPD 94 41) is "faint, very small, round, almost stellar". The second IC lists a corrected position (per Bigourdan) of RA 22 16 42, NPD 94 47.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7? arcmin

NGC 7267 (= PGC 68780)
Discovered (Sep 23, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (SBa?) in Piscis Austrinus (RA 22 24 21.5, Dec -33 41 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7267 (= GC 4785 = JH 3938, 1860 RA 22 16 21, NPD 124 24.0) is "considerably bright, pretty small, very little extended, gradually a little brighter middle, bright triple star to southwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.4? arcmin

NGC 7268 (= PGC 68847 + PGC 68848 (= PGC 68839))
Discovered (Sep 28, 1834) by
John Herschel
A pair of galaxies in Piscis Austrinus
PGC 68847 = A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0 pec?) at RA 22 25 40.6, Dec -31 12 04
PGC 68848 = A 15th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3 pec?) at RA 22 25 42.2, Dec -31 12 01
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7268 (= GC 4786 = JH 3939, 1860 RA 22 16 44, NPD 121 53.8) is "faint, considerably small, very little extended, western of 2", the other being NGC 7277.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity for PGC 68847 of 8495 km/sec, and for PGC 68848 of 8805 km/sec, and their apparent closeness, it appears that the two galaxies are at about the same 400 million light year distance. Given that and an apparent size of 0.9 by 0.4 arcmin, PGC 68847 is a little over 100 thousand light years across, while its smaller companion, at 0.15 by 0.1 arcmin apparent size, spans less than 20 thousand light years.
DSS image of region near galaxy pair NGC 7268
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7268
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide image of the galaxy pair
DSS image of galaxy pair NGC 7268

NGC 7269 (= PGC 68841)
Discovered (1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Aquarius (RA 22 25 46.8, Dec -13 10 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7269 (Leavenworth list I (#250), 1860 RA 22 17 25, NPD 103 55.1) is "extremely faint, pretty small, round, gradually a little brighter middle". The second IC lists a corrected position (per Howe) of RA 22 18 19, NPD 103 52.6.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.7? arcmin

NGC 7270 (= PGC 68748)
Discovered (Sep 9, 1863) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Pegasus (RA 22 23 47.5, Dec +32 24 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7270 (= GC 6045, Marth #477, 1860 RA 22 17 28, NPD 58 16) is "very faint, small, extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.6? arcmin
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7270
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7270, also showing NGC 7271
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7270

NGC 7271 (= PGC 68753)
Discovered (Sep 9, 1863) by
Albert Marth
A 16th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Pegasus (RA 22 23 57.5, Dec +32 22 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7271 (= GC 6046, Marth #478, 1860 RA 22 17 38, NPD 58 19) is "very faint, small, very little extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.3? arcmin
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 7271, also showing NGC 7270 and NGC 7275
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7271, also showing NGC 7270 and 7275
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 7271

NGC 7272 (= PGC 68786)
Discovered (Aug 7, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Pegasus (RA 22 24 31.6, Dec +16 35 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7272 (= GC 6047, Marth #479, 1860 RA 22 17 43, NPD 74 07) is "very faint, small, irregularly round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.8? arcmin

NGC 7273 (= PGC 68768)
Discovered (Sep 20, 1876) by
Édouard Stephan
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Lacerta (RA 22 24 09.1, Dec +36 12 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7273 (= GC 6048, Stephan list VIII (#15), 1860 RA 22 17 56, NPD 54 30.4) is "faint, very small, round, much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.5? arcmin

NGC 7274 = PGC 68770)
Discovered (Sep 20, 1876) by
Édouard Stephan
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Lacerta (RA 22 24 11.0, Dec +36 07 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7274 (= GC 6049, Stephan list VIII (#16), 1860 RA 22 17 57, NPD 54 34.9) is "pretty faint, very small, much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 1.5? arcmin

NGC 7275 (= PGC 68774)
Discovered (Sep 9, 1863) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Pegasus (RA 22 24 17.3, Dec +32 26 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7275 (= GC 6050, Marth #480, 1860 RA 22 17 58, NPD 58 14) is "extremely faint, small, much extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.2? arcmin
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7275, also showing NGC 7271 and part of NGC 7270
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7275, also showing NGC 7271 and NGC 7270
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7275

NGC 7276 (= PGC 68773)
Discovered (Sep 20, 1876) by
Édouard Stephan
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Lacerta (RA 22 24 14.3, Dec +36 05 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7276 (= GC 6051, Stephan list VIII (#17), 1860 RA 22 18 01, NPD 54 37.2) is "very faint, very small, much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.9? arcmin

NGC 7277 (= PGC 68861)
Discovered (Sep 27, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (Sb?) in Piscis Austrinus (RA 22 26 10.9, Dec -31 08 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7277 (= GC 4787 = JH 3940, 1860 RA 22 18 16, NPD 121 51.4) is "faint, considerably small, very little extended, eastern of 2", the other being NGC 7268.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.6? arcmin

NGC 7278 (= PGC 68940)
Discovered (Aug 11, 1836) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (SBc?) in Tucana (RA 22 28 22.6, Dec -60 10 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7278 (= GC 4788 = JH 3941, 1860 RA 22 18 57, NPD 150 52.9) is "most extremely faint, a little extended, very gradually a very little brighter middle, 3 stars to southeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.5? arcmin

NGC 7279 (= PGC 68896)
Discovered (Sep 1, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (SBc?) in Piscis Austrinus (RA 22 27 12.6, Dec -35 08 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7279 (= GC 4789 = JH 3942, 1860 RA 22 19 07, NPD 125 51.3) is "very faint, pretty small, round, very gradually a very little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.8? arcmin

NGC 7280 (= PGC 68870)
Discovered (Oct 15, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Oct 7, 1825) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a?) in Pegasus (RA 22 26 27.6, Dec +16 08 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7280 (= GC 4790 = JH 2160 = WH II 248, 1860 RA 22 19 39, NPD 74 33.8) is "faint, considerably small, round, gradually brighter middle equivalent to a small (faint) star, 3 stars to north and northeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 1.5? arcmin

NGC 7281 (= OCL 238)
Discovered (Oct 5, 1829) by
John Herschel
An open cluster (type IV2p) in Cepheus (RA 22 24 55.7, Dec +57 50 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7281 (= GC 4791 = JH 2161, 1860 RA 22 19 39, NPD 32 52.4) is "a cluster, large, pretty rich, a little compressed, stars from 10th to 16th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 12? arcmin

NGC 7282 (= PGC 68843)
Discovered (Oct 2, 1878) by
Édouard Stephan
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Lacerta (RA 22 25 53.9, Dec +40 18 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7282 (Stephan list IX (#29), 1860 RA 22 19 49, NPD 50 23.7) is "extremely faint, pretty large, diffuse, between 3 stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.5 by 1.0? arcmin

NGC 7283 (= PGC 68946)
Discovered (Aug 7, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Pegasus (RA 22 28 32.7, Dec +17 28 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7283 (= GC 6052, Marth #481, 1860 RA 22 20 51, NPD 73 17) is "very faint, very small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.4? arcmin

NGC 7284 (= PGC 68950, and with
NGC 7285 = Arp 93)
Discovered (Oct 26, 1785) by William Herschel
Also observed (Jul 29, 1834) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0(s)? pec) in Aquarius (RA 22 28 35.8, Dec -24 50 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7284 (= GC 4792 = JH 3943 = WH II 469, 1860 RA 22 20 51, NPD 115 34.3) is "considerably faint, considerably small, a little extended, mottled but not resolved, double star involved". The second Index Catalog adds "Delete 'double star involved'. This and 4285 are two nebulous stars of magnitudes 12.5 and 13, position angle 60°, distance about 40 arcsec, per Howe" (4285 apparently being a typographical error for NGC 7285). NGC 7284 is part of an interacting pair with NGC 7285, and Dreyer's NGC note and IC correction make it clear that Herschel observed the interacting pair of galaxies now called NGC 7284 and 7285 as a binuclear nebula, supposing the nuclei to be two stars. There is no indication of which listing corresponds to which galaxy, but since the NGC is arranged in order of right ascension, NGC 7284 must refer to the western member of the pair, and NGC 7285 to the eastern member.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 4680 km/sec, NGC 7284 is about 220 million light years away. However, it must be the same distance as its companion, whose radial velocity corresponds to only 200 million light years; so I have adopted an average distance of 210 million light years for the pair. Given that and its apparent size of 1.9 by 1.4 arcmin, NGC 7284 is about 115 thousand light years across. As a member of an interacting pair of galaxies, the galaxy is grossly disturbed by their encounter, and extended streams of gas and stars are visible for some distance from its central structure.
DSS image of region near interacting galaxies NGC 7284 and 7285, also known as Arp 93
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on interacting pair NGC 7284 and 7285
(Image processed to show off the long southeastern "tail")
Below, a 3 arcmin wide DSS image of the pair
DSS image of interacting galaxies NGC 7284 and 7285, also known as Arp 93

NGC 7285 (= PGC 68953, and with
NGC 7284 = Arp 93)
Discovered (Oct 26, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 7284 and 7285)
Discovered (October, 1862) by William Lassell (and later listed as NGC 7285)
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)a? pec) in Aquarius (RA 22 28 37.8, Dec -24 50 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7285 (= GC 5078, Lassell, 1860 RA 22 20 51±, NPD 115 34±) is "a nebulous star 1 arcmin distant from h 3943", h 3943 being NGC 7284. The position Dreyer listed is essentially the same as for NGC 7284 and precesses to the same position, an arcmin south of the pair of galaxies now known as NGC 7284 and 7285. As indicated by the ± signs in the 1860 position for NGC 7285, which member of the pair should receive which listing, and who should receive credit for discovering one or the other might be a matter of some debate in more obscure circumstances. But the question is not which galaxy did Herschel or Lassell see. They both saw both galaxies. The difference is that Herschel saw what he thought a single nebula involved with two stars, while Lassell realized that the "two stars" were two nebulae. And the question of which galaxy is NGC 7284 or 7285 is easy to answer, since the NGC is arranged in order of right ascension: therefore NGC 7284 must be the western galaxy, and 7285 the eastern.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 4325 km/sec, NGC 7285 is about 200 million light years away. However, it must be the same distance as NGC 7284 (which see for images), whose radial velocity corresponds to 220 million light years; so I have adopted an average distance of 210 million light years for the pair. Given that and its apparent size of 2.45 by 1.5 arcmin, NGC 7285 is about 150 thousand light years across. As a member of an interacting pair of galaxies, the galaxy is grossly disturbed by the encounter, and extended streams of gas and stars are visible for some distance from its central structure.

NGC 7286 (= PGC 68922)
Discovered (Sep 15, 1828) by
John Herschel
Also observed (Aug 1, 1884) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Pegasus (RA 22 27 50.5, Dec +29 05 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7286 (= GC 4793 = JH 2162, 1860 RA 22 20 52, NPD 61 36.8) is "very faint, small, round, among stars". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Bigourdan) of 22 21 21.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.7? arcmin

NGC 7287
Recorded (1886) by
Frank Muller
Recorded (Sep or Oct 1891) by Sherburne Burnham but probably a different object
Probably also observed (between Jul 1, 1898 and Jun 30, 1899) by Herbert Howe
Probably a triplet of stars in Aquarius (RA 22 27 17.1, Dec -22 07 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7287 (Muller list II (#468), 1860 RA 22 20 54, NPD 112 51.1) is "extremely faint, slightly nebulous double star". The position precesses to RA 22 28 35.6, Dec -22 08 18, but there is nothing there. The second IC confuses the situation by stating "Howe says that the RA is about 2 minutes too great, and that the object is only a faint double star, distance (separation) 6 arcsec. But he must have found a different object, as Burnham (Lick Obs., ii., p. 180), without noticing any great error in RA, gives position angle 60 degrees, distance 20 arcsec, and states that the preceding (western) one is undoubtedly a nebula, while the following (eastern) one may be a star". Corwin agrees with Dreyer that Burnham's object must be different from Howe's, but concludes that Howe's observation is probably of the same object seen by Muller, as their descriptions are essentially identical (namely a position angle equivalent to 150 degrees and a separation of about 6 arcsec, though Muller estimated the magnitude as 15 and Howe as 11) and a 1 or 2 minute of time error in the right ascension is fairly typical of observations at the Leander McCormick Observatory, where Muller worked. Unfortunately, there is nothing at Howe's position either (2 minutes of time to the west of the NGC position, thereby precessing to about RA 22 26 35, Dec -22 08 30), but there is an object between the NGC and Howe's positions that almost perfectly fits Muller and Howe's descriptions of the object, namely the triplet of stars listed above (although the total extent of the triplet is 12 arcsec, if seen as a pair of stars the separation would look more like 8 or so seconds of arc). So although the identification of the triplet with NGC 7287 cannot be considered certain, it is probably what Howe and Muller observed.
Physical Information: Apparent size from one end of the triplet to other about 12 arcsec. Apparent magnitude about 11.5 for each star, overall magnitude a little less than 11.
DSS image of region near the triplet of stars listed as NGC 7287
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on the probable NGC 7287

Burnham's "7287" (= a star + (PGC 68959 + PGC 68960),
but almost certainly not =
NGC 7287)
Recorded (Sep or Oct 1891) by Sherburne Burnham as an observation of NGC 7287
A star and galaxy pair in Aquarius (RA 22 28 49.1, Dec -22 12 08)
PGC 68960 is a magnitude 15(?) lenticular galaxy (type S0(s)a?) at RA 22 28 48.5, Dec -22 12 12
PGC 68959 is a magnitude 16(?) lenticular galaxy (type SB0(rs)a? pec) at RA 22 28 49.0, Dec -22 12 09
Historical Identification: As noted in the entry for NGC 7287, there was (and to a certain extent still is) considerable confusion about the identity of that object, and when Burnham observed the star and nebula listed in this entry, he presumed it was Muller's NGC 7287; but the orientation and separation of the star and galaxy are completely different from Muller's description of what he observed, so Burnham's object is certainly not the same thing, and therefore not the NGC object, either.
Physical Information: The supposed "double" consists of a magnitude 15(?) star about 20 arcsec east northeast of magnitude 15(?) galaxy PGC 68960, plus a magnitude 16(?) galaxy (PGC 68959) that would have contributed little or nothing to Burnham's impression of the pair. PGC 68960 has an apparent size of 0.4 by 0.15 arcmin, but its distance is unknown, so its actual size is also unknown. PGC 68959 has an apparent size of 0.2 by 0.15 arcmin, but its distance can be estimated, based on its recessional velocity of 11905 km/sec. A straightforward calculation (dividing the recessional velocity by the Hubble expansion "constant") indicates that PGC 68959 is about 555 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 530 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 540 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size, PGC 68959 is about 30 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near the lenticular galaxy (PGC 68960) and star that Burnham thought might be NGC 7287; also shown is the much fainter and much more distant lenticular galaxy PGC 68959
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on Burnham's "7287", showing PGC 68959 and 68960
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the star and galaxies
DSS image of the lenticular galaxy (PGC 68960) and star that Burnham thought might be NGC 7287; also shown is the much fainter and much more distant lenticular galaxy PGC 68959

PGC 68960 (= "NGC 7287A")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 7287A
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in
Aquarius (RA 22 28 48.9, Dec -22 12 08)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.3 by 0.2? arcmin

NGC 7288 (= PGC 68933)
Discovered (Oct 1, 1864) by
Albert Marth
Discovered (Sep 19, 1867) by Truman Safford
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Aquarius (RA 22 28 14.9, Dec -02 53 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7288 (= GC 6053, Marth #482, (Safford ??), 1860 RA 22 21 00, NPD 93 36) is "very faint, extremely small, stellar".
Discovery Notes: Safford's observations were not published until long after the fact, and Dreyer was already in the last stages of publication of the NGC when he read about them, so he only noted them in an appendix and none of the individual NGC entries mention his observations; hence the inclusion of his name in parentheses.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.3 by 1.5? arcmin

NGC 7289 (= PGC 68980)
Discovered (Sep 25, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Piscis Austrinus (RA 22 29 20.1, Dec -35 28 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7289 (= GC 4794 = JH 3944, 1860 RA 22 21 12, NPD 126 10.4) is "very faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.0? arcmin

NGC 7290 (= PGC 68942)
Discovered (Aug 7, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Pegasus (RA 22 28 26.5, Dec +17 08 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7290 (= GC 6054, Marth #483, 1860 RA 22 21 40, NPD 73 34) is "pretty bright, small, pretty much extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.0? arcmin

NGC 7291 (= PGC 68944)
Discovered (Oct 1, 1866) by
Truman Safford
Discovered (Sep 21, 1876) by Édouard Stephan
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Pegasus (RA 22 28 29.4, Dec +16 47 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7291 (= GC 6055, Stephan list VIII (#18), (Safford 56), 1860 RA 22 21 42, NPD 73 55.9) is "extremely faint, extremely small, round, suddenly much brighter middle".
Discovery Notes: Safford's observations were not published until long after the fact, and Dreyer was already in the last stages of publication of the NGC when he read about them, so he only noted them in an appendix and none of the individual NGC entries mention his observations; hence the inclusion of his name in parentheses.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 1.7? arcmin

NGC 7292 (= PGC 68941)
Discovered (Sep 6, 1872) by
Édouard Stephan
A 13th-magnitude irregular galaxy (type IBm?) in Pegasus (RA 22 28 25.7, Dec +30 17 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7292 (= GC 6056, Stephan list IV (#12), 1860 RA 22 21 59, NPD 60 25.4) is "extremely faint, small, oval, faint star involved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 1.6? arcmin

NGC 7293, the Helix Nebula
Discovered (September, 1823) by
Karl Ludwig Harding
A 7th-magnitude planetary nebula in Aquarius (RA 22 29 38.4, Dec -20 50 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7293 (= GC 4795, Harding (4), 1860 RA 22 22 06, NPD 111 33.0) is "a remarkable object, pretty faint, very large, extended or binuclear (Auwers 48)".
Discovery Notes: "(Auwers 48)" refers to the fact that John Herschel became aware of Harding's discovery as a result of its entry in Auwers' catalog.
Physical Information: At less than 500 light years' distance, the Helix Nebula has the largest apparent size of any planetary nebula, its brighter central region covering nearly 20 arcmin, and its faint outer halo extending another 5 arcmin to the northeast. Because of its size, its light is spread out (and correspondingly faint), and it went unnoticed by both Herschels; but with modern telescopes and CCD cameras it is easy to detect, and is considered one of the finest objects for amateur observers.
DSS image of planetary nebula NGC 7293, the Helix Nebula
Above, a 30 arcmin wide DSS image of the Helix Nebula shows its faint outer structure
Below, a 17 arcmin wide image of the nebula (Image Credit Adam Block/NOAO/AURA/NSF )
NOAO image of planetary nebula NGC 7293, the Helix Nebula
Below, a ? arcmin wide HST image of the entire nebula
(Image Credit NASA, NOAO, ESA, the Hubble Helix Nebula Team, M. Meixner (STScI), and T.A. Rector (NRAO))
HST image of planetary nebula NGC 7293, the Helix Nebula
Below, a ? arcmin wide portion of the image above highlights comet-like radial structures
HST closeup of central portion of planetary nebula NGC 7293, the Helix Nebula
Below, a ? arcmin wide infrared image of the nebula
(Image Credit NASA/JPL-Caltech/K. Su (Univ. of Arizona)/Spitzer)
Spitzer Space Telescope infrared image of planetary nebula NGC 7293, the Helix Nebula
Below, a ? arcmin wide composite of visual and infrared images of the Helix Nebula
(Image Credit NASA/JPL-Caltech/ESA/J. Hora (Harvard-Smithsonian CfA), C.R. O'Dell (Vanderbilt University))
Composite of HST visual image and Spitzer Space Telescope infrared image of planetary nebula NGC 7293, the Helix Nebula

NGC 7294 (=
IC 5225 = PGC 69088)
Discovered (1886) by Francis Leavenworth (and later listed as NGC 7294)
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe (while listed as NGC 7294)
Discovered (Oct 6, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5225)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Piscis Austrinus (RA 22 32 07.8, Dec -25 23 53)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7294 (Leavenworth list I (#251), 1860 RA 22 22 20, NPD 116 08.2) is "very faint, very small, round". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 22 24 22.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0 by 1.2? arcmin

NGC 7295 (=
NGC 7296 = OCL 228)
Discovered (Oct 14, 1787) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 7296)
Discovered (Nov 8, 1831) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 7295)
An open cluster in Lacerta (RA 22 28 02.0, Dec +52 17 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7295 (= GC 4796 = JH 2163, 1860 RA 22 22 21, NPD 37 53.4) is "a cluster, poor, a little compressed, stars from 12th to 13th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4? arcmin

NGC 7296 (=
NGC 7295 = OCL 228)
Discovered (Oct 14, 1787) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 7296)
Discovered (Nov 8, 1831) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 7295)
An open cluster in Lacerta (RA 22 28 02.0, Dec +52 17 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7296 (= GC 4797 = WH VII 41, 1860 RA 22 22 37, NPD 38 24.8) "a cluster, irregularly round, a little compressed, stars very small (faint)".
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 7295 for anything else.

NGC 7297 (= PGC 69046)
Discovered (Sep 1, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Grus (RA 22 31 10.2, Dec -37 49 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7297 (= GC 4798 = JH 3945, 1860 RA 22 22 59, 128 33.0) is "extremely faint, small, round, western of 2", the other being NGC 7299.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.6? arcmin

NGC 7298 (= PGC 69033)
Discovered (Aug 7, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Aquarius (RA 22 30 50.6, Dec -14 11 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7298 (= GC 6057, Marth #484, 1860 RA 22 23 18, NPD 104 54) is "very faint, pretty large, irregularly round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.1? arcmin

NGC 7299 (= PGC 69060)
Discovered (Sep 1, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Grus (RA 22 31 33.0, Dec -37 48 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7299 (= GC 4800 = JH 3946, 1860 RA 22 23 24, NPD 128 32.2) is "extremely faint, small, round, eastern of 2", the other being NGC 7297.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.7? arcmin
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7299, also showing NGC 7297
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7299, also showing NGC 7297
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7299
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 7200 - 7249) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 7250 - 7299     → (NGC 7300 - 7349)