Celestial Atlas
(NGC 7250 - 7299) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 7300 - 7349 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 7350 - 7399)
Click here for Introductory Material
QuickLinks:
7300, 7301, 7302, 7303, 7304, 7305, 7306, 7307, 7308, 7309, 7310, 7311, 7312, 7313, 7314, 7315, 7316,
7317, 7318, 7319, 7320, 7321, 7322, 7323, 7324, 7325, 7326, 7327, 7328, 7329, 7330, 7331, 7332, 7333,
7334, 7335, 7336, 7337, 7338, 7339, 7340, 7341, 7342, 7343, 7344, 7345, 7346, 7347, 7348, 7349

Page last updated May 27, 2017
Checked historical databases, added Dreyer NGC entries, images
WORKING 7300: Add/update Steinicke listings/data, check IDs

NGC 7300 (= PGC 69040)
Discovered (Jul 26, 1830) by
John Herschel
Also observed (Nov 4, 1850) by Bindon Stoney
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Aquarius (RA 22 30 59.9, Dec -14 00 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7300 (= GC 4801 = GC 4799 = JH 2164, 1860 RA 22 23 28, NPD 104 43.5) is "very faint, considerably small, extended, very gradually a little brighter middle". The second IC notes "7300 is not considerably small, but pretty large, extended 150 degrees (John Herschel and Herbert Howe)".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 0.75 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7300
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7300
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7300
Below, a 2.2 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7300

NGC 7301 (= PGC 69021)
Discovered (1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SABab?) in Aquarius (RA 22 30 34.8, Dec -17 34 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7301 (Leavenworth list I (#252), 1860 RA 22 24 20, NPD 108 18.2) is "very faint, pretty small, a little extended, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size about 0.8 by 0.45 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7301
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7301
Below, a 1.25 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy and its apparent companion
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7301
Below, a 1.25 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the apparent pair
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7301

NGC 7302 (=
IC 5228 = PGC 69094)
Discovered (Oct 3, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 7302)
Also observed (Aug 5, 1826) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 7302)
Discovered (Aug 8, 1896) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5228)
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Aquarius (RA 22 32 23.9, Dec -14 07 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7302 (= GC 4802 = JH 2165 = WH IV 31, 1860 RA 22 24 54, NPD 104 50.4) is "faint, pretty small, round, very suddenly brighter middle and small nucleus".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.65 by 0.95 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 7302
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7302
Below, a 2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 7302
Below, a 2 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 7302

NGC 7303 (= PGC 69061)
Discovered (Sep 15, 1828) by
John Herschel
Also observed (Aug 24, 1884) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SABbc? pec) in Pegasus (RA 22 31 33.0, Dec +30 57 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7303 (= GC 4804 = JH 2166, 1860 RA 22 25 00, NPD 59 46.4) is "very faint, small, round, gradually a very little brighter middle". The second IC adds "Bigourdan 452 is 2 seconds to the west of this. I assume it is a very faint double star that I saw in 1875 100 arcsec west southwest, as Bigourdan says his object may be a cluster".
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.7 by 1.3 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7303
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7303, also showing the stars listed as NGC 7304
Below, a 2.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7303

NGC 7304
Recorded (Aug 20, 1862) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
Three stars in Pegasus (RA 22 31 44.4, Dec +30 58 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7304 (= GC 4803, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 22 25 02, NPD 59 45.3) is "very faint, pretty small, a very little brighter middle, northeast of h 2166(?)", h 2166 being NGC 7303.
SDSS image of region near the three stars listed as NGC 7304, also showing NGC 7303
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on the stars listed as NGC 7304, also showing NGC 7303

NGC 7305 (= PGC 69091)
Discovered (Sep 1, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Pegasus (RA 22 32 13.9, Dec +11 42 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7305 (Swift list IV (#84), 1860 RA 22 25 16, NPD 79 00.3) is "extremely faint, small, round, 4 faint stars around".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.0 by 1.0 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 7305
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7305
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 7305

NGC 7306 (= PGC 69132)
Discovered (Jul 30, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Piscis Austrinus (RA 22 33 16.4, Dec -27 14 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7306 (= GC 4805 = JH 3948, 1860 RA 22 25 28, NPD 117 58.1) is "very faint, small, a little extended, 11th magnitude star to west".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.45 by 0.7 arcmin (from the image below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7306
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7306
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7306
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7306

NGC 7307 (= PGC 69161)
Discovered (Oct 4, 1836) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SABcd? pec) in Grus (RA 22 33 52.4, Dec -40 56 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7307 (= GC 4806 = JH 3947, 1860 RA 22 25 33, NPD 131 39.9) is "faint, pretty large, pretty much extended".
Physical Information: NGC 7307 is listed as a member of a group of galaxies in or near Sculptor with recessional velocities of about 1500 to 1800 km/sec (this is not "the" Sculptor Group, a close neighbor to our Local Group, with an average recessional velocity of less than 300 km/sec). Apparent size of about 3.9 by 1.05 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7307
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7307
Below, a 4.4 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of spiral galaxy NGC 7307

NGC 7308 (=
IC 1448 = PGC 69194)
Discovered (1886) by Francis Leavenworth (and later listed as NGC 7308)
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe (while listed as NGC 7308)
Discovered (Nov 2, 1891) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 1448)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Aquarius (RA 22 34 32.0, Dec -12 56 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7308 (Leavenworth list I (#253), 1860 RA 22 26 25, NPD 103 42.2) is "pretty bright, very small, round". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 22 27 05.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.1 by 0.8 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 7308
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7308
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 7308
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 7308

NGC 7309 (= PGC 69183)
Discovered (Nov 28, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Sep 9, 1825) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc? pec) in Aquarius (RA 22 34 20.6, Dec -10 21 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7309 (= GC 4807 = JH 2167 = WH II 476, 1860 RA 22 26 56, NPD 101 04.9) is "very faint, pretty large, round, gradually a little brighter middle, mottled but not resolved" (Dreyer's NGC entry is misprinted 7319).
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.9 by 1.6 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7309
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7309
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7309
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7309

NGC 7310 (= PGC 69202)
Discovered (Jul 20, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SABbc?) in Aquarius (RA 22 34 36.8, Dec -22 29 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7310 (Leavenworth list I (#254), 1860 RA 22 27, NPD 113 14.3) is "very faint, pretty small, round, brighter middle and nucleus". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 22 26 57.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7310
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7310
Below, a 1.2 by 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy and its apparent companions
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7310 and its apparent companions
Below, a 1.2 by 1.5 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy and its apparent companions
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7310 and its apparent companions

NGC 7311 (= PGC 69172)
Discovered (Aug 30, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Oct 13, 1827) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Pegasus (RA 22 34 06.7, Dec +05 34 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7311 (= GC 4808 = JH 2168 = WH II 428, 1860 RA 22 27 03, NPD 85 09.0) is "pretty faint, small, pretty suddenly brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 4535 km/sec, NGC 7311 is about 210 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 180 to 220 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of about 1.6 by 0.75 arcmin (from the images below), it is about 100 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7311
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7311
Below, a 2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7311

NGC 7312 (= PGC 69198)
Discovered (Oct 30, 1863) by
Albert Marth
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(r)b?) in Pegasus (RA 22 34 34.9, Dec +05 49 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7312 (= GC 6058, Marth #485, 1860 RA 22 27 32, NPD 84 54) is "faint, small".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.15 by 0.9 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7312
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7312
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7312

NGC 7313 (= PGC 69242)
Discovered (Sep 24, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Piscis Austrinus (RA 22 35 32.4, Dec -26 06 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7313 (= GC 6059, Marth #486, 1860 RA 22 27 46, NPD 116 50) is "extremely faint, extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.5 by 0.35 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7313, also showing NGC 7314
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7313, also showing NGC 7314
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7313
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7313

NGC 7314 (=
Arp 14 = PGC 69253)
Discovered (Jul 29, 1834) by John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)bc?) in Piscis Austrinus (RA 22 35 45.9, Dec -26 03 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7314 (= GC 4810 = JH 3949, 1860 RA 22 28 02, NPD 116 45.9) is "considerably faint, large, much extended 0°, a very little brighter middle".
Physical Information: NGC 7314 is a Seyfert galaxy (type S1h). Based on a recessional velocity of 1430 km/sec, it is about 65 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 50 to 70 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of about 4.6 by 1.9 arcmin (from the images below), it is 75 to 80 thousand light years across. NGC 7314 is listed as a member of a group of galaxies in or near Sculptor with recessional velocities of about 1500 to 1800 km/sec (this is not "the" Sculptor Group, a close neighbor to our Local Group, with an average recessional velocity of less than 300 km/sec).
DSS image of region near  spiral galaxy NGC 7314, also known as Arp 14
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7314, also showing NGC 7313
Below, a 5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7314, also known as Arp 14
Below, a 3 by 5 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of spiral galaxy NGC 7314, also known as Arp 14

NGC 7315 (= PGC 69241)
Discovered (Sep 11, 1872) by
Édouard Stephan
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Pegasus (RA 22 35 31.6, Dec +34 48 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7315 (= GC 6060, Stephan list IV (#13), 1860 RA 22 29 08, NPD 55 55.0) is "very faint, extremely small, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.5 by 1.5 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 7315
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7315
Below, a 2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 7315

NGC 7316 (= PGC 69259)
Discovered (Sep 18, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Aug 24, 1827) by John Herschel
Also observed (Sep 19, 1862) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Pegasus (RA 22 35 56.3, Dec +20 19 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7316 (= GC 3809 = JH 2169 = WH III 180, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 22 29 11, NPD 70 24.1) is "faint, small, round, 8th magnitude star to southwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.05 by 0.9 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7316
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7316
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7316

NGC 7317 (= PGC 69256)
With
NGC 7318, 7319 and 7320 = Stephan's Quintet = Arp 319 = Hickson 92
Discovered (Sep 23, 1876) by Édouard Stephan
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Pegasus (RA 22 35 51.9, Dec +33 56 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7317 (= GC 6061, Stephan list VIII (#19), 1860 RA 22 29 30, NPD 56 46.7) is "very faint, very small".
Physical Information: NGC 7317 is one of the four galaxies in Stephan's Quintet that are at about the same distance from us (NGC 7320 is merely a foreground galaxy). Based on its recessional velocity of 6600 km/sec, NGC 7317 is about 310 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.7 by 0.7? arcmin, it is about 65 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near Stephan's Quintet, also known as Arp 319 and Hickson Compact Group 92, also showing PGC 69279
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on Stephan's Quintet, also showing PGC 69279
Below, a 4 arcmin wide HST image of Stephan's Quintet, showing NGC 7318 near center
(Image Credit NASA, ESA and the Hubble SM4 ERO Team)
Labeled HST image of Stephans Quintet, also known as Arp 319 and Hickson Compact Group 92
Below, an unlabeled version of the image above (Image Credit as above)
HST image of Stephans Quintet, also known as Arp 319 and Hickson Compact Group 92
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide image of NGC 7317 (Image Credit as for the images above)
HST image of elliptical galaxy NGC 7317, part of Stephan's Quintet, also known as Arp 319 and Hickson Compact Group 92

NGC 7318 (= PGC 69260 + 69263)
With
NGC 7317, 7319 and 7320 = Stephan's Quintet = Arp 319 = Hickson 92
Discovered (Sep 23, 1876) by Édouard Stephan
A pair of interacting 13th-magnitude galaxies in Pegasus
PGC 69260 = "NGC 7318A" = An elliptical galaxy (type E2? pec) at RA 22 35 56.7, Dec +33 57 58
PGC 69263 = "NGC 7318B" = A spiral galaxy (type SB(s)bc? pec) at RA 22 35 58.3, Dec +33 58 00
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7318 (= GC 6062, Stephan list VIII (#20), 1860 RA 22 29 35, NPD 56 45.5) is "extremely faint, extremely small".
Physical Information: NGC 7318 represents two of the four galaxies in Stephan's Quintet that are at about the same distance from us (NGC 7320 is merely a foreground galaxy). Based on a recessional velocity of 6630 km/sec, PGC 69260 (the western member of the pair) should be about 310 million light years away, which is about the same distance as NGC 7317. However, there must be a substantial effect due to peculiar (non-Hubble-expansion) velocities, since PGC 69263, which is strongly interacting with PGC 69260 and must be at the same distance, has a recessional velocity of only 5775 km/sec, which corresponds to a distance of only 270 million light years. That value is probably too low, and the other distance probably too high, and the pair must have an actual distance around 290 million light years (give or take at least 10 million light years). Given that, PGC 69260's apparent size of 1.3 by 1.2 arcmin corresponds to about 110 thousand light years, and PGC 69263's apparent size of 2.0 by 1.0 arcmin corresponds to about 170 thousand light years (these sizes probably include the clouds of gas and stars ejected from the main structures by their gravitational interaction).
SDSS image of region near Stephan's Quintet, also known as Arp 319 and Hickson Compact Group 92, also showing PGC 69279
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on Stephan's Quintet, also showing PGC 69279
Below, a 4 arcmin wide HST image of Stephan's Quintet, showing NGC 7318 near center
(Image Credit NASA, ESA and the Hubble SM4 ERO Team)
Labeled HST image of Stephans Quintet, also known as Arp 319 and Hickson Compact Group 92
Below, an unlabeled version of the image above (Image Credit as above)
HST image of Stephans Quintet, also known as Arp 319 and Hickson Compact Group 92
Below, a 1.6 by 2.0 arcmin wide image of NGC 7318 (Image credit as above)
HST image of the interacting pair of galaxies, PGC 69260 and PGC 69263, which comprise NGC 7318, one of the members of Stephan's Quintet, also known as Arp 319 and Hickson Compact Group 92
Below, a labeled version of the image above
Labeled HST image of the interacting pair of galaxies, PGC 69260 and PGC 69263, which comprise NGC 7318, one of the members of Stephan's Quintet, also known as Arp 319 and Hickson Compact Group 92
Below, a ? arcmin wide infrared image of the region shows (in false-color green) a region of gas larger than our Milky Way galaxy colliding with the esatern side of NGC 7318 at more than a million miles an hour. The shock wave caused by that collision heats up the gas (causing the radiation shown in the image) and compresses it, forming knots of hot, bright young stars seen scattered throughout the region in the visible-light images above. (Infrared Image Credit NASA/JPL-Caltech/Max-Planck Institute/P. Appleton (Spitzer Science Center / Caltech), Spitzer Space Telescope)
Spitzer Space Telescope infrared image of Stephans Quintet, also known as Arp 319 and Hickson Compact Group 92

NGC 7319 (= PGC 69269)
With
7317, NGC 7318 and 7320 = Stephan's Quintet = Arp 319 = Hickson 92
Discovered (Sep 23, 1876) by Édouard Stephan
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(s)bc? pec) in Pegasus (RA 22 36 03.5, Dec +33 58 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7319 (= GC 6063, Stephan list VIII (#21), 1860 RA 22 29 40, NPD 56 44.8) is "extremely faint, extremely small".
Physical Information: NGC 7319 is one of the four galaxies in Stephan's Quintet that are at about the same distance from us (NGC 7320 is merely a foreground galaxy). Based on a recessional velocity of 6745 km/sec, NGC 7319 is about 300 million light years away, which is about the same as the estimated distances for the other members of the group. Given that and its apparent size of 1.7 by 1.3 arcmin, it about 150 thousand light years across, and a long arm of ejected material extends another 200 thousand light years or so to its southwest. Presumably due to its gravitational interaction with the other members of the Quintet, NGC 7319 is a Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 2).
SDSS image of region near Stephan's Quintet, also known as Arp 319 and Hickson Compact Group 92, also showing PGC 69279
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on Stephan's Quintet, also showing PGC 69279
Below, a 4 arcmin wide HST image of Stephan's Quintet, showing NGC 7318 near center
(Image Credit NASA, ESA and the Hubble SM4 ERO Team)
Labeled HST image of Stephans Quintet, also known as Arp 319 and Hickson Compact Group 92
Below, an unlabeled version of the image above (Image Credit as above)
HST image of Stephans Quintet, also known as Arp 319 and Hickson Compact Group 92
Below, a 2 arcmin wide image of NGC 7319 (Image Credit as above)
HST image of NGC 7319, a spiral galaxy in Stephans' Quintet, also known as Arp 319 and Hickson Compact Group 92

NGC 7320 (= PGC 69270)
With
7317, NGC 7318 and 7319 = Stephan's Quintet = Arp 319 = Hickson 92
Discovered (Sep 23, 1876) by Édouard Stephan
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SA(s)d?) in Pegasus (RA 22 36 03.5, Dec +33 56 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7320 (= GC 6064, Stephan list VIII (#22), 1860 RA 22 29 41, NPD 56 46.5) is "faint, very small".
Physical Information: Although listed as a member of Stephan's Quintet (because discovered by Stephan at the same time, and in the same direction), NGC 7320 is unconnected to the other galaxies in the group, being nearly ten times closer to us. Based on a recessional velocity of 785 km/sec, NGC 7320 is about 35 million light years away. However, for such small distances, peculiar (non-Hubble-expansion) velocities can significantly affect the distance estimate, and the value is considerably less than redshift-independent estimates of 45 to 60 million light years; so for the purposes of this discussion, I have assumed an approximate distance of about 50 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 2.2 by 1.1 arcmin, the galaxy is probably about 30 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near Stephan's Quintet, also known as Arp 319 and Hickson Compact Group 92, also showing PGC 69279
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on Stephan's Quintet, also showing PGC 69279
Below, a 4 arcmin wide HST image of Stephan's Quintet, showing NGC 7318 near center
(Image Credit NASA, ESA and the Hubble SM4 ERO Team)
Labeled HST image of Stephans Quintet, also known as Arp 319 and Hickson Compact Group 92
Below, an unlabeled version of the image above (Image Credit as above)
HST image of Stephans Quintet, also known as Arp 319 and Hickson Compact Group 92
Below, a 2 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 7320 (Image Credit as above)
HST image of spiral galaxy NGC 7320, an apparent but not physical member of Stephan's Quintet

2MASXJ22363213+3347456 (= "PGC 3965656" = "NGC 7320A")
Not an NGC object but listed here because sometimes called NGC 7320A
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in
Pegasus (RA 22 36 32.2, Dec +33 47 46)
Note About Non-Standard Designations: The use of NGC/IC designations plus letters is common but inconsistent, and has led to errors in assigning physical data to one galaxy or another; hence my usual use of the PGC (Principal Galaxy Catalog) designation as shown above. However, the original PGC only had about 73,000 entries, and although LEDA lists several million supplementary entries (which are used throughout this catalog), their use is "deprecated", meaning discouraged whenever better designations are available. In this case, the preferred designation would be 2MASXJ22363213+3347456, as also shown above.
Physical Information: PGC 3965656 has no apparent relationship to NGC 7320, so save for being within a quarter degree of Stephan's Quintet, it is a mystery why it received its faux NGC name. Other than its apparent size (about 0.7 by 0.15 arcmin from the images below), there appears to be nothing available.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy PGC 3965656, also known as NGC 7320A
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on PGC 3965656
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 3965656, also known as NGC 7320A
Below, a 24 arcmin wide SDSS image showing the position of PGC 3965656 relative to Stephan's Quintet
Also shown are PGC 69279 and PGC 69346
SDSS image of region between Stephan's Quintet and PGC 3965656 (also known as NGC 7320A), PGC 69346 (also known as NGC 7320B) and PGC 69279 (also known as NGC 7320C)

PGC 69346 (= "NGC 7320B")
Not an NGC object but listed here because sometimes called NGC 7320B
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S??) in
Pegasus (RA 22 37 28.1, Dec +33 55 24)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 6380 km/sec, PGC 69346 is about 300 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 0.8 by 0.2 arcmin (from the images below), it is about 75 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 69346, also known as NGC 7320B
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on PGC 69346
Below, a 0.9 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 69346, also known as NGC 7320B
Below, a 24 arcmin wide SDSS image showing the position of PGC 69346 relative to Stephan's Quintet
Also shown are PGC 69279 and PGC 3965656
SDSS image of region between Stephan's Quintet and PGC 3965656 (also known as NGC 7320A), PGC 69346 (also known as NGC 7320B) and PGC 69279 (also known as NGC 7320C)

PGC 69279 (= "NGC 7320C")
Not an NGC object but listed here because sometimes called NGC 7320C
A 16th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type (R)SAB0(s)ab?) in
Pegasus (RA 22 36 20.3, Dec +33 59 08)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5985 km/sec, PGC 69279 is about 280 million light years away, which is close to the average distance of Stephen's Quintet, so unlike NGC 7320, which is a foreground galaxy, PGC 69279 may be a member of the main group. Given that distance and its apparent size of 0.7 by 0.45 arcmin (from the images below), it is about 55 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 69279, also known as NGC 7320C
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on PGC 69279
Below, a 1 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 69279, also known as NGC 7320C
Below, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image showing Stephan's Quintet and PGC 69279
SDSS image of region near Stephan's Quintet, also known as Arp 319 and Hickson Compact Group 92, also showing PGC 69279 (also known as NGC 7320C)

NGC 7321 (= PGC 69287)
Discovered (Nov 17, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Sep 13, 1830) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)b?) in Pegasus (RA 22 36 27.9, Dec +21 37 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7321 (= GC 4811 = JH 2170 = WH III 237, 1860 RA 22 29 45, NPD 69 06.1) is "faint, small, irregularly round, very gradually a very little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.5 by 1.1 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7321
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7321
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7321

NGC 7322 (=
NGC 7334 = PGC 69365)
Discovered (Aug 30, 1834) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 7322)
Discovered (Oct 23, 1835) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 7334)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Grus (RA 22 37 51.4, Dec -37 13 53)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7322 (= GC 4812 = JH 3950, 1860 RA 22 29 46, NPD 127 57.2) is "very faint, small, very little extended, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.9 by 0.55 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 7322
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7322
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 7322

NGC 7323 (= PGC 69311)
Discovered (Sep 13, 1863) by
Albert Marth
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type (R)S(rs)b?) in Pegasus (RA 22 36 53.6, Dec +19 08 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7323 (= GC 6065, Marth #487, 1860 RA 22 30 06, NPD 71 35) is "pretty faint, pretty large, irregularly round".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.3 by 1.0 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7323
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7323, also showing NGC 7324
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7323

NGC 7324 (= PGC 69321)
Discovered (Sep 13, 1863) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (E/S0?) in Pegasus (RA 22 37 00.9, Dec +19 08 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7324 (= GC 6066, Marth #488, 1860 RA 22 30 14, NPD 71 34) is "very faint, very small, nebulous star".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.85 by 0.5 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 7324
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7324, also showing NGC 7323
Below, a 1 arcmin SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 7324

NGC 7325
Recorded (Sep 20, 1865) by
Herman Schultz
A pair of stars in Pegasus (RA 22 36 48.4, Dec +34 22 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7325 (= GC 6067, Schultz (#10, Nova VIII), 1860 RA 22 30 25, NPD 56 21.4) is "faint, very small, h 2172 to east", h 2172 being NGC 7331.
SDSS image of region near the pair of stars listed as NGC 7325, also showing the pairs of stars listed as NGC 7326 and NGC 7333, and NGC 7331
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7325, also showing NGC 7326, 7331 and 7333

NGC 7326
Recorded (Oct 7, 1874) by
Lawrence Parsons, 4th Lord Rosse
A pair of stars in Pegasus (RA 22 36 52.0, Dec +34 25 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7326 (= GC 6068, 4th Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 22 30 27, NPD 56 18.2) is "considerably faint, extremely small, h 2172 to east", h 2172 being NGC 7331.
SDSS image of region near the pair of stars listed as NGC 7326, also showing the pairs of stars listed as NGC 7325 and NGC 7333, and NGC 7331 and 7335
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7326, showing NGC 7325, 7331, 7333 and 7335

WORKING HERE (next iteration of this page): Finish the historical discussion for NGC 7327

NGC 7327
Recorded (1882) by
Wilhelm Tempel
Per Steinicke, a 12th-magnitude star in Pegasus (RA 22 37 24.5, Dec +34 25 42)
BUT definitely a different but not easily identifiable object
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7327 (Temple list V, 1860 RA 22 30 30, NPD 56 15) is "extremely faint, extremely small, northwest of h 2172", h 2172 being NGC 7331.
Warning About Misidentification: Steinicke lists NGC 7327 as the star listed above, but that is east of NGC 7331, while Tempel stated his nova was northwest of that galaxy, so Steinicke's identification must be wrong; but some references are bound to use the incorrect identification (as did this entry until I referred to Dreyer's and Corwin's notes on the subject). Unfortunately, just which object northwest of NGC 7331 is NGC 7327 is not obvious, so for now this entry merely points out that the previous identification was incorrect, and a discussion of the more likely "correct" identifications must wait for the next iteration of this page.
SDSS image showing Steinicke's proposed NGC 7327, which is clearly to the east of NGC 7331, instead of to its northwest, and therefore must be misidentified
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on the star Steinicke misidentifies as NGC 7327
Also shown are NGC 7331, 7333, 7335, 7336, 7337 and 7340

NGC 7328 (= PGC 69349)
Discovered (Oct 12, 1825) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Pegasus (RA 22 37 29.3, Dec +10 31 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7328 (= GC 4813 = JH 2171, 1860 RA 22 30 31, NPD 80 11.7) is "extremely faint, pretty small, a little extended 90°, very gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 2.05 by 0.7 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7328
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7328
Below, a 2.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7328

NGC 7329 (= PGC 69453)
Discovered (Jul 20, 1835) by
John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)bc?) in Tucana (RA 22 40 24.2, Dec -66 28 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7329 (= GC 4814 = JH 3951, 1860 RA 22 30 37, NPD 157 12.3) is "pretty bright, pretty small, much extended 90°".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 4.2 by 2.7 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7329
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7329
Below, a 4.25 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of spiral galaxy NGC 7329

NGC 7330 (= PGC 69314)
Discovered (Jul 26, 1870) by
Édouard Stephan
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Lacerta (RA 22 36 56.1, Dec +38 32 53)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7330 (= GC 6069, Stephan list I (#30), 1860 RA 22 30 40, NPD 52 10.6) is "pretty bright, small, a little extended, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.5 by 1.2 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 7330
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7330
Below, a 2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 7330
Below, a 1.6 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy's central region
PanSTARRS image of central region of elliptical galaxy NGC 7330

WORKING HERE: Measure apparent size of images, label NGC objects

NGC 7331 (= PGC 69327)
Discovered (Sep 6, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Nov 17, 1827) by John Herschel
A 10th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Pegasus (RA 22 37 05.1, Dec +34 25 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7331 (= GC 4815 = JH 2172 = WH I 53, 1860 RA 22 30 40, NPD 56 18.5) is "bright, pretty large, pretty much extended 163°, suddenly much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 10.2 by 4.2? arcmin. Note: Although some images of NGC 7331 are shown below, several others will be posted when a discussion of the galaxy's physical characteristics is added to this entry (presumably in the next iteration of this page).
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7331
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 7331
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of the region
(Image Credit Paul Mortfield/Dietmar Kupke/Flynn Haase/NOAO/AURA/NSF)
NOAO image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7331
Below, a ? arcmin wide image (Image Credit & © Jim Misti, Misti Mountain Observatory; used by permission)
Misti Mountain Observatory image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7331
Below, a ? arcmin wide infrared image of the galaxy
(Image Credit NASA/JPL-Caltech/M. Regan (STScI), SINGS Team, Spitzer)
Spitzer infrared image of spiral galaxy NGC 7331

NGC 7332 (= PGC 69342)
Discovered (Sep 19, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Aug 17, 1828) by John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Pegasus (RA 22 37 24.6, Dec +23 47 53)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7332 (= GC 4821 = JH 2173 = WH II 233, 1860 RA 22 30 44, NPD 66 55.6) is "considerably bright, small, much extended 156°, suddenly much brighter middle and nucleus, western of 2", the other being NGC 7339.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 3.3 by 0.65 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 7339
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7332, also showing NGC 7339
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 7339

NGC 7333
Recorded (Sep 20, 1865) by
Herman Schultz
A magnitude 15.1 double star in Pegasus (RA 22 37 11.6, Dec +34 26 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7333 (= GC 6070, Schultz (#9, Nova IX), 1860 RA 22 30 48, NPD 56 17.3) is "very faint, very small, west of h 2174", h 2174 being NGC 7335.
SDSS image of region near the double star listed as NGC 7333, also showing NGC 7331 and several other NGC objects
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on the double star listed as NGC 7333
Also shown are NGC 7325, 7326, 7331, 7335, 7336, 7337 and 7338
Below, a 2 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7333
SDSS image of the double star listed as NGC 7333

NGC 7334 (=
NGC 7322 = PGC 69365)
Discovered (Aug 30, 1834) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 7322)
Discovered (Oct 23, 1835) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 7334)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Grus (RA 22 37 51.4, Dec -37 13 53)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7334 (= GC 4822 = JH 3950?, 1860 RA 22 30 50, NPD 127 55.8) is "most extremely faint, = GC 4812?", the last note indicating that Dreyer thought this might be a duplicate entry for NGC 7322 (which it is).
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 7322 for anything else.

NGC 7335 (= PGC 69338)
Discovered (Sep 13, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Aug 19, 1828) by John Herschel
Also observed (Sep 10, 1849) by George Stoney
Also observed (Sep 10, 1849) by William Parsons, 3rd Lord Rosse
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0(rs)a?) in Pegasus (RA 22 37 19.4, Dec +34 26 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7335 (= GC 4823 = JH 2174 = WH III 166, 1860 RA 22 30 56, NPD 56 16.7) is "very faint, very small, B of 3rd Lord Rosse", the last note indicating that this was labeled B in a survey of the region by the 3rd Lord Rosse and his assistant, George Stoney.
Discovery Notes: Lord Rosse and his assistant both examined the region near NGC 7331 in detail on Sep 10, 1849. Two nights later Stoney measured the position of the "knots" near that galaxy, which were labeled with various letters in their notes and in sketches of the region. Whether Rosse was present when Stoney measured the positions isn't clear, but he was present when they were first observed, so both of them are credited in the four entries involved (NGC 7335, 7336, 7337 and 7340).
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.15 by 0.6 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 7335, also showing the pairs of stars listed as NGC 7326, NGC 7333 and NGC 7338, and galaxies NGC 7331, NGC 7335, NGC 7336, NGC 7337 and NGC 7340
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7335
Also shown are NGC 7326, 7331, 7333, 7336, 7337, 7338 and 7340
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 7335

NGC 7336 (= PGC 69337)
Discovered (Sep 10, 1849) by
George Stoney
Also observed (Sep 10, 1849) by William Parsons, 3rd Lord Rosse
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)b?) in Pegasus (RA 22 37 21.9, Dec +34 28 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7336 (= GC 4816, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 22 30 59, NPD 56 14.8) is "extremely faint, very small, C", the last note indicating that this was labeled C in a survey of the region by the 3rd Lord Rosse and his assistant, George Stoney.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case George Stoney; but Lord Rosse was also present on the night in question, and also observed the object, as noted above.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.65 by 0.3 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7336, also showing the stars listed as NGC 7333 and NGC 7338, and galaxies NGC 7331, NGC 7335 and NGC 7340
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7336
Also shown are NGC 7331, 7333, 7335, 7338 and 7340
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7336

NGC 7337 (= PGC 69344)
Discovered (Sep 10, 1849) by
George Stoney
Also observed (Sep 10, 1849) by William Parsons, 3rd Lord Rosse
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)b?) in Pegasus (RA 22 37 26.7, Dec +34 22 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7337 (= GC 4817, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 22 31 03, NPD 56 21.2) is "extremely faint, small, stellar, E", the last note indicating that this was labeled E in a survey of the region by the 3rd Lord Rosse and his assistant, George Stoney.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case George Stoney; but Lord Rosse was also present on the night in question, and also observed the object, as noted above.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.3 by 1.2 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7337, also showing the stars listed as NGC 7333 and NGC 7338, and galaxies NGC 7331, NGC 7335 and NGC 7340
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7337
Also shown are NGC 7331, 7333, 7335, 7338 and 7340
Below, a 1.75 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7337

NGC 7338
Recorded (1882) by
Wilhelm Tempel
A magnitude 14.6 and 16.4 pair of stars in Pegasus (RA 22 37 31.3, Dec +34 24 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7338 (Tempel list V, 1860 RA 22 31 03, NPD 56 18) is "extremely faint, extremely small, southeast of h 2174", h 2174 being NGC 7335.
Warning About Misidentification: Steinicke lists NGC 7338 as a star at RA 22 36 46.8, Dec +34 27 47, but that is west of NGC 7331, while Tempel stated his nova was southeast of NGC 7335, so Steinicke's identification must be wrong; but some references are bound to use the incorrect identification (as did this entry until I referred to Dreyer's and Corwin's notes on the subject).
SDSS image of region near the pair of stars listed as NGC 7338, also showing the stars listed as NGC 7333, and galaxies NGC 7331, NGC 7335, NGC 7336, NGC 7337 and NGC 7340
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on the pair of stars listed as NGC 7338
Also shown are NGC 7331, 7333, 7335, 7336, 7337 and 7340

NGC 7339 (= PGC 69364)
Discovered (Sep 19, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Aug 17, 1828) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Pegasus (RA 22 37 47.0, Dec +23 47 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7339 (= GC 4824 = JH 2175 = WH II 234, 1860 RA 22 31 06, NPD 66 56.4) is "faint, pretty small, much extended 89°, very gradually a little brighter middle, eastern of 2", the other being NGC 7332.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 2.8 by 0.7 arcmin (from the images below). Since the galaxy is seen edge-on, classification is difficult.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7339, also showing NGC 7332
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7339, also showing NGC 7332
Below, a 3.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7339

NGC 7340 (= PGC 69362)
Discovered (Sep 10, 1849) by
George Stoney
Also observed (Sep 10, 1849) by William Parsons, 3rd Lord Rosse
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Pegasus (RA 22 37 44.1, Dec +34 24 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7340 (= GC 4818, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 22 31 20, NPD 56 19.0) is "very faint, very small, D of 3rd Lord Rosse", the last note indicating that this was labeled D in a survey of the region by the 3rd Lord Rosse and his assistant, George Stoney.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case George Stoney; but Lord Rosse was also present on the night in question, and also observed the object, as noted above.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.0 by 0.7 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 7340, also showing the pair of stars listed as NGC 7338, and galaxies NGC 7335, NGC 7336 and NGC 7337
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7340
Also shown are NGC 7335, 7336, 7337 and 7338
Below, a 1.25 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 7340

NGC 7341 (= PGC 69412)
Discovered (Jul 20, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (date?) by Ormond Stone
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(s)ab?) in Aquarius (RA 22 39 05.6, Dec -22 39 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7341 (Leavenworth list I (#255), 1860 RA 22 31, NPD 113 25.3) is "pretty faint, pretty small, extended, a little brighter middle". The first IC lists a corrected RA (per Ormond Stone) of 22 31 27.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 2.2 by 0.9 arcmin (from the images below). Its unusually bright nucleus suggests it may be a Seyfert galaxy.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7341
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7341
Below, a 2.7 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7341
Below, a 2.7 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7341

NGC 7342 (= PGC 69374)
Discovered (Sep 11, 1872) by
Édouard Stephan
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)ab?) in Pegasus (RA 22 38 13.1, Dec +35 29 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7342 (= GC 6071, Stephan list IV (#14), 1860 RA 22 31 51, NPD 55 13.7) is "extremely faint, very small".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.3 by 1.2 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7342
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7342
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7342

NGC 7343 (= PGC 69391)
Discovered (Sep 14, 1866) by
Truman Safford
Discovered (Sep 26, 1876) by Édouard Stephan
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)bc?) in Pegasus (RA 22 38 37.8, Dec +34 04 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7343 (= GC 6072, Stephan list VIII (#23), (Safford 53), 1860 RA 22 32 13, NPD 56 39.4) is "extremely faint, very small, round, a little brighter middle, small (faint) star involved".
Discovery Notes: Safford's observations were not published until long after the fact, so Dreyer didn't become aware of them until he was in the last stages of preparing the publication of the NGC. As a result they were only mentioned in an appendix, and none of the individual NGC entries gave Safford credit for his observations (hence the inclusion of his name in parentheses).
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.95 by 0.7 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7343
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7343
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7343

NGC 7344 (= PGC 69433)
Discovered (Oct 1, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SABab?) in Aquarius (RA 22 39 36.2, Dec -04 09 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7344 (= GC 6073, Marth #489, 1860 RA 22 32 21, NPD 94 53) is "pretty faint, very small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.3 by 0.65 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7344
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7344
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7344

NGC 7345 (= PGC 69401)
Discovered (Sep 11, 1872) by
Édouard Stephan
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Pegasus (RA 22 38 44.9, Dec +35 32 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7345 (= GC 6074, Stephan list IV (#15), 1860 RA 22 32 22, NPD 55 11.2) is "extremely faint, very small".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.3 by 0.2 arcmin (from the images below). The nucleus has a slightly X-shaped contour, which I have seen in similarly edge-on images of a few other lenticular galaxies.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 7345
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7345
The bright star to the south is listed as magnitude 9.5, but its image corresponds to magnitude 7.5
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 7345

NGC 7346 (= PGC 69430)
Discovered (Aug 7, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 15th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Pegasus (RA 22 39 35.4, Dec +11 05 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7346 (= GC 6075, Marth #490, 1860 RA 22 32 39, NPD 79 39) is "extremely faint, very small, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.6 by 0.45 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 7346, also showing NGC 7347
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7346, also showing NGC 7347
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 7346

NGC 7347 (= PGC 69443)
Discovered (Oct 9, 1830) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Pegasus (RA 22 39 56.3, Dec +11 01 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7347 (= GC 4825 = JH 2176, 1860 RA 22 32 58, NPD 79 42.7) is "extremely faint, pretty large, extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.6 by 0.3 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7347, also showing NGC 7346
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7347, also showing NGC 7346
Below, a 1.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7347

NGC 7348 (= PGC 69463)
Discovered (Aug 7, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)c?) in Pegasus (RA 22 40 36.3, Dec +11 54 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7348 (= GC 6076, Marth #491, 1860 RA 22 33 39, NPD 78 50) is "very faint, pretty large, irregularly round".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.15 by 0.6 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7348, also showing the stars listed as NGC 7350
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7348, also showing the stars listed as NGC 7350
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7348

NGC 7349 (= PGC 69488)
Discovered (1886) by
Frank Muller
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type (R)SBbc? pec) in Aquarius (RA 22 41 14.7, Dec -21 47 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7349 (Muller list II (#469), 1860 RA 22 33 52, NPD 113 37.3) is "extremely faint, very small, extended 175°, binuclear, brighter on north side".
Physical Information: Apparent size Based on a recessional velocity of 4480 km/sec, NGC 7349 is about 210 million light years away, about 35 million light years beyond redshift-independent distance estimates of about 175 million light years. Presuming an intermediate distance of about 200 million light years, its apparent size of about 1.0 by 0.3 arcmin (from the images below) corresponds to about 60 thousand light years.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7349
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7349
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7349
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7349
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 7250 - 7299) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 7300 - 7349     → (NGC 7350 - 7399)