Celestial Atlas
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Page last updated Apr 9, 2017
Checked historical databases, added Dreyer NGC entries
WORKING 7350: Add/update Steinicke listings/data, check IDs

NGC 7350
Recorded (Aug 7, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A double star in Pegasus (RA 22 40 48.2, Dec +12 00 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7350 (= GC 6077, Marth #492, 1860 RA 22 34 07, NPD 78 46) is "very faint".
Physical Information: Consisting of a 12th-magnitude star preceded by a 16th-magnitude star
SDSS image of region near double star NGC 7350, also showing part of NGC 7348
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7350, also showing part of NGC 7348
Below, a 6 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on the double star
SDSS image of region near double star NGC 7350

NGC 7351 (= PGC 69489)
Discovered (Oct 3, 1878) by
Édouard Stephan
Also observed (Nov 18, 1884) by Lewis Swift
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Aquarius (RA 22 41 26.9, Dec -04 26 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7351 (Stephan list IX (#30), Swift list II (#??), 1860 RA 22 34 12, NPD 95 10.5) is "pretty faint, pretty small, round, brighter middle, mottled but not resolved". The second IC notes "is not round but much extended 180 degrees (Howe)".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 1.0? arcmin.

NGC 7352
Discovered (Sep 24, 1829) by
John Herschel
A group of stars in Cepheus (RA 22 39 44.2, Dec +57 23 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7352 (= GC 4826 = JH 2177, 1860 RA 22 34 15, NPD 33 20.0) is "a cluster, very large, pretty rich, very little compressed".
Physical Information: Apparent size 5? arcmin.

NGC 7353 (= PGC 85285)
Discovered (Aug 7, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S??) in Pegasus (RA 22 42 12.5, Dec +11 52 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7353 (= GC 6078, Marth #493, 1860 RA 22 34 27, NPD 78 48) is "extremely faint".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.5? arcmin.

NGC 7354
Discovered (Nov 3, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Oct 9, 1829) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude planetary nebula in Cepheus (RA 22 40 20.0, Dec +61 17 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7354 (= GC 4827 = JH 2178 = WH II 705, 1860 RA 22 35 08, NPD 29 26.7) is "a planetary nebula, bright, small, round, pretty gradually a very little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6? arcmin.
NOAO image of region near planetary nebula NGC 7354 superimposed on a DSS background
Above, a 12 arcmin wide NOAO/DSS composite image centered on NGC 7354
(Image Credit Adam Block/NOAO/AURA/NSF, superimposed on a DSS background)
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide NOAO image of the planetary nebula (NOAO Image Credit as above)
NOAO image of planetary nebula NGC 7354
Below, a "raw" ? arcmin wide HST image of the nebula (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
HST image of planetary nebula NGC 7354

NGC 7355 (= PGC 69587)
Discovered (Sep 1, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Grus (RA 22 43 30.4, Dec -36 51 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7355 (= GC 4828 = JH 3952, 1860 RA 22 35 26, NPD 128 36.5) is "most extremely faint, small, round, double star 40 seconds of time to east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.4? arcmin.

NGC 7356 (= PGC 69530)
Discovered (Oct 4, 1883) by
Édouard Stephan
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Pegasus (RA 22 42 02.3, Dec +30 42 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7356 (Stephan list XIII (#94), 1860 RA 22 35 30, NPD 60 01.4) is "extremely faint, pretty small, round, gradually a little brighter middle, star attached".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.5? arcmin.

NGC 7357 (= PGC 69544)
Discovered (Sep 26, 1883) by
Édouard Stephan (13b-95)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Pegasus (RA 22 42 23.9, Dec +30 10 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7357 (Stephan list XIII (#95), 1860 RA 22 35 51, NPD 60 33.6) is "very faint, very small, very faint star involved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.7? arcmin.

NGC 7358 (= PGC 69664)
Possibly observed (Sep 5, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Jul 20, 1835) by John Herschel
Also observed (date?) by DeLisle Stewart
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Tucana (RA 22 45 36.3, Dec -65 07 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7358 (= GC 4829 = JH 3953, Dunlop 255?, 1860 RA 22 36 10, NPD 155 51.3) is "faint, small, round, brighter middle". The second IC adds "Stellar nucleus with wisps at 175 degrees, DeLisle Stewart".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 0.5? arcmin.

NGC 7359 (= PGC 69638)
Discovered (Jul 14, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (date?) by Ormond Stone
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Aquarius (RA 22 44 47.9, Dec -23 41 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7359 (Leavenworth list I (#256), 1860 RA 22 36 20, NPD 114 26.4) is "pretty faint, very small, pretty much extended, brighter middle and nucleus". The first IC gives a corrected RA (per Ormond Stone) of 22 38 01. The second IC has a lengthy note: "Howe gives RA 22 37 10, NPD 114 25.3, while Ormond Stone has RA 22 38 01, NPD 114 26.6. Stone's comparison star is said to be CD 17171 and 3 anonymous stars following. None of these seem to be in the Cordoba DM. But if he used CD 17165, his first anonymous star, 51 seconds east and 2 arcmin south, would be CD 17171, and his result would agree with Howe's". (In other words, Dreyer suggests that Howe's position is correct, and Stone's differs because of an error in identifying the comparison star.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.4 by 0.6? arcmin.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 7359
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7359
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 7359

NGC 7360 (= PGC 69591)
Discovered (Aug 29, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S??) in Pegasus (RA 22 43 34.1, Dec +04 09 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7360 (= GC 6079, Marth #494, 1860 RA 22 36 26, NPD 86 34) is "extremely faint, very small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.4? arcmin.

NGC 7361 (=
IC 5237 = PGC 69539)
Discovered (Sep 28, 1834) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 7361)
Discovered (Jul 19, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5237)
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Piscis Austrinus (RA 22 42 17.9, Dec -30 03 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7361 (= GC 4830 = JH 3954, 1860 RA 22 36 31, NPD 120 47.1) is "faint, pretty large, very much extended 0°, very gradually a very little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.9 by 1.0? arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7361
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7361
Below, a 4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7361

NGC 7362 (= PGC 69602)
Discovered (Sep 2, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Pegasus (RA 22 43 49.2, Dec +08 42 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7362 (Swift list IV (#85), 1860 RA 22 36 45, NPD 82 01.8) is "very faint, small, round, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.8? arcmin.

NGC 7363 (= PGC 69580)
Discovered (Aug 27, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBcd?) in Pegasus (RA 22 43 18.5, Dec +33 59 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7363 (= GC 6080, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 22 36 50, NPD 56 43.7) is "pretty faint, pretty large, extended, double star to east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.9? arcmin.

NGC 7364 (= PGC 69630)
Discovered (Oct 1, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Sep 12, 1830) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Aquarius (RA 22 44 24.2, Dec -00 09 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7364 (= GC 4831 = JH 2179 = WH II 442, 1860 RA 22 37 14, NPD 90 53.7) is "faint, small, round, pretty suddenly brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 1.1? arcmin.

NGC 7365 (= PGC 69651)
Discovered (1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Aquarius (RA 22 45 10.0, Dec -19 57 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7365 (Leavenworth list I (#257), 1860 RA 22 37 20, NPD 110 41.4) is "very faint, extremely small, round, gradually brighter middle and nucleus, 11th magnitude star 4' to northeast". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 22 37 37.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 1.0? arcmin.

NGC 7366 (= PGC 69629)
Discovered (Aug 7, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S??) in Pegasus (RA 22 44 26.6, Dec +10 46 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7366 (= GC 6081, Marth #495, 1860 RA 22 37 26, NPD 79 56) is "extremely faint, small, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.4? arcmin.

NGC 7367 (= PGC 69633)
Discovered (Aug 29, 1864) by
Albert Marth
Discovered (Aug 30, 1865) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Pegasus (RA 22 44 34.2, Dec +03 38 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7367 (= GC 6082, d'Arrest, Marth #496, 1860 RA 22 37 29, NPD 87 04.7) is "very faint, pretty small, a little extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.4? arcmin.

NGC 7368 (= PGC 69661)
Discovered (Oct 4, 1836) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Grus (RA 22 45 31.4, Dec -39 20 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7368 (= GC 4832 = JH 3955, 1860 RA 22 37 31, NPD 130 04.6) is "faint, considerably small, a little extended, gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.9 by 0.6? arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7368
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7368
Below, a 3 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7368

NGC 7369 (= PGC 69619)
Discovered (Aug 29, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Pegasus (RA 22 44 12.2, Dec +34 21 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7369 (= GC 6083, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 22 37 43, NPD 56 23.2) is "pretty faint, between 2 faint stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.1? arcmin.

NGC 7370 (= PGC 69662)
Discovered (Aug 7, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S??) in Pegasus (RA 22 45 37.1, Dec +11 03 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7370 (= GC 6084, Marth #497, 1860 RA 22 38 36, NPD 79 41) is "extremely faint, very small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.2? arcmin.

NGC 7371 (= PGC 69677)
Discovered (Nov 28, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Sep 9, 1825) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a?) in Aquarius (RA 22 46 03.6, Dec -11 00 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7371 (= GC 4833 = JH 2180 = WH II 477, 1860 RA 22 38 40, NPD 101 44.5) is "very faint, pretty large, round, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0 by 2.0? arcmin.

NGC 7372 (= PGC 69670)
Discovered (Aug 7, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Pegasus (RA 22 45 46.0, Dec +11 07 53)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7372 (= GC 6085, Marth #498, 1860 RA 22 38 46, NPD 79 37) is "faint, small, irregularly round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.9? arcmin.

NGC 7373 (= PGC 69688)
Discovered (Aug 11, 1864) by
Albert Marth
Also observed (Aug 16, 1890) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Pegasus (RA 22 46 19.4, Dec +03 12 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7373 (= GC 6086, Marth #499, 1860 RA 22 39 00, NPD 87 31) is "faint, very small, brighter middle, stellar". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Bigourdan) of 22 39 13.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.5? arcmin.

NGC 7374 (= PGC 69676)
Discovered (Aug 7, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Pegasus (RA 22 46 01.1, Dec +10 51 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7374 (= GC 6087, Marth #500, 1860 RA 22 39 02, NPD 79 52) is "very faint, pretty large, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7? arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7374, also showing IC 1452
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7374, also showing IC 1452
Below, a 4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxies
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7374, also showing IC 1452

NGC 7375 (= PGC 69695)
Discovered (Oct 1, 1866) by
Truman Safford
Discovered (Sep 2, 1886) by Lewis Swift
Also observed (Oct 5, 1888) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Pegasus (RA 22 46 32.0, Dec +21 05 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7375 (Swift list IV (#??), (Safford 57), 1860 RA 22 39 33, NPD 69 38.8) is "extremely faint, very small, round". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Bigourdan) of 22 39 44.
Discovery Notes: Safford's observations weren't published until long after the fact, and Dreyer didn't become aware of them until he was in the last stages of preparing the NGC for publication. As a result they were only mentioned in an appendix, and none were included in the individual NGC entries (hence the credit here in parentheses).
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.6? arcmin.

NGC 7376 (= PGC 69715)
Discovered (Aug 29, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Pegasus (RA 22 47 17.5, Dec +03 38 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7376 (= GC 6088, Marth #501, 1860 RA 22 40 11, NPD 87 07) is "extremely faint, very small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.5? arcmin.

NGC 7377 (= PGC 69733)
Discovered (Oct 13, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Sep 16, 1830) by John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SA0(s)a?) in Aquarius (RA 22 47 47.4, Dec -22 18 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7377 (= GC 4834 = JH 2181 = WH II 598, 1860 RA 22 40 12, NPD 113 02.9) is "pretty bright, small, very little extended, very gradually much brighter middle, 12th magnitude star to west".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 3340 km/sec, NGC 7377 is about 155 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 3.0 by 2.5 arcmin, it is about 135 thousand light years across. Like many lenticular galaxies, typical exposures render NGC 7377 nearly featureless, but as shown in the Carnegie-Irvine Survey Image below, there are dusty regions within it; however, there is no evidence of significant star formation associated with the arms.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 7377
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7377
Below, a 4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 7377
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of dusty arms in lenticular galaxy NGC 7377

NGC 7378 (= PGC 69734)
Discovered (Sep 19, 1879) by
Wilhelm Tempel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBab?) in Aquarius (RA 22 47 47.5, Dec -11 49 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7378 (Tempel list III (#??, & list IV #10), 1860 RA 22 40 25, NPD 102 33.0) is "very faint, pretty large".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.9? arcmin.

NGC 7379 (= PGC 69724)
Discovered (Sep 22, 1876) by
Édouard Stephan
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Lacerta (RA 22 47 32.9, Dec +40 14 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7379 (= GC 6089, Stephan list VIII (#24), 1860 RA 22 41 13, NPD 50 30.0) is "extremely faint, small, round, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.8? arcmin.

NGC 7380 (= OCL 244)
Discovered (Aug 7, 1787) by
Caroline Herschel
Also observed (Nov 1, 1788) by William Herschel
Also observed (Sep 24, 1829) by John Herschel
A 7th-magnitude open cluster (type III3pn) in Cepheus (RA 22 47 21.0, Dec +58 07 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7380 (= GC 4842 = JH 2182 = WH VIII 77, Caroline Herschel, 1860 RA 22 41 23, NPD 32 39.1) is "a cluster, pretty large, pretty rich, a little compressed, stars from 9th to 13th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 20? arcmin; surrounded by a large emission nebula.
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 7380
Above, a 45 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 7380 and the surrounding emission nebula
Below, a 30 arcmin wide DSS image of the region
DSS image of open cluster NGC 7380

NGC 7381 (= PGC 69828)
Discovered (Oct 9, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Scd?) in Aquarius (RA 22 50 08.1, Dec -19 43 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7381 (Leavenworth list I (#258), 1860 RA 22 41 25, NPD 110 29.5) is "extremely faint, very small, round, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.5? arcmin.

NGC 7382 (= PGC 69840)
Discovered (Sep 1, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Grus (RA 22 50 23.8 Dec -36 51 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7382 (= GC 4843 = JH 3956, 1860 RA 22 42 23, NPD 127 34.9) is "extremely faint, very small, round, 12th magnitude star attached on northwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.4? arcmin.

NGC 7383 (= PGC 69809)
Discovered (Nov 27, 1850) by
Bindon Stoney
Discovered (Sep 19, 1862) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Pegasus (RA 22 49 35.5, Dec +11 33 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7383 (= GC 4844, 3rd Lord Rosse, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 22 42 38, NPD 79 11.1) is "very faint, very small, round, (WH) III 216 to northeast", WH III 216 being NGC 7385.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case Bindon Stoney.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.7? arcmin.

NGC 7384
Observed (Nov 27, 1850) by
Bindon Stoney
A 16th-magnitude star in Pegasus (RA 22 49 42.5, Dec +11 29 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7384 (3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 22 42 46, NPD 79 15) is "extremely faint, 5' northeast of GC 4844", GC 4844 being NGC 7384.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case Bindon Stoney.

NGC 7385 (= PGC 69824)
Discovered (Oct 18, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Oct 17, 1825) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Pegasus (RA 22 49 54.6, Dec +11 36 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7385 (= GC 4845 = JH 2183 = WH III 216, 1860 RA 22 42 55, NPD 79 07.9) is "considerably faint, small, round, gradually a little brighter middle, 11th magnitude star to northwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.1? arcmin.

NGC 7386 (= PGC 69825)
Discovered (Oct 18, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Oct 9, 1830) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Pegasus (RA 22 50 02.0, Dec +11 41 53)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7386 (= GC 4846 = JH 2184 = WH III 217, 1860 RA 22 43 04, NPD 79 02.5) is "considerably faint, small, round, pretty gradually brighter middle, eastern of 2", the other being NGC 7385.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 1.1? arcmin.

NGC 7387 (= PGC 69834)
Discovered (Sep 9, 1856) by
R. J. Mitchell
Observed (Sep 19, 1862) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Pegasus (RA 22 50 17.6, Dec +11 38 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7387 (= GC 4847, 3rd Lord Rosse, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 22 43 19, NPD 79 05.9) is "extremely faint, very small, round, two 11th magnitude stars to south".
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case R. J. Mitchell.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.4? arcmin.

NGC 7388
Observed (Oct 11, 1873) by
Lawrence Parsons, 4th Lord Rosse
A 16th-magnitude star in Pegasus (RA 22 50 21.0, Dec +11 42 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7388 (= GC 6090, 4th Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 22 43 21, NPD 79 01.3) is "very faint, 11th magnitude star 2.5 arcmin to east".

NGC 7389 (= PGC 69836)
Discovered (Nov 27, 1850) by
Bindon Stoney
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S??) in Pegasus (RA 22 50 16.0, Dec +11 34 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7389 (= GC 4848, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 22 43 24, NPD 79 07.8) is "very faint, round".
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case Bindon Stoney.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.9? arcmin.

NGC 7390 (= PGC 69837)
Discovered (Nov 27, 1850) by
Bindon Stoney
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Pegasus (RA 22 50 19.5, Dec +11 31 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7390 (3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 22 43 24, NPD 79 09.5) is "extremely faint, south of GC 4848", GC 4848 being NGC 7389.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case Bindon Stoney.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.7? arcmin.

NGC 7391 (= PGC 69847)
Discovered (Oct 1, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Sep 12, 1830) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E??) in Aquarius (RA 22 50 36.0, Dec -01 32 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7391 (= GC 4849 = JH 2185 = WH II 443, 1860 RA 22 43 24, NPD 92 17.1) is "considerably faint, considerably small, round, suddenly brighter middle equal to a 13th magnitude star, star to the northwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.5? arcmin.

NGC 7392 (= PGC 69887)
Discovered (Sep 11, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Sep 16, 1830) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Aquarius (RA 22 51 48.6, Dec -20 36 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7392 (= GC 4850 = JH 2186 = WH II 702, 1860 RA 22 44 16, NPD 111 21.0) is "pretty bright, pretty small, a little extended 120°, much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.2 by 1.4? arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7392
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7392
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7392
Below, a ? arcmin wide "raw" HST image of part of the galaxy (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
HST image of spiral galaxy NGC 7392

NGC 7393 (=
Arp 15 = PGC 69874)
Discovered (Oct 5, 1785) by William Herschel
Also observed (Oct 4, 1828) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)c? pec) in Aquarius (RA 22 51 38.2, Dec -05 33 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7393 (= GC 4851 = JH 2187 = WH II 453, 1860 RA 22 44 22, NPD 96 18.0) is "very faint, pretty large, a little extended, very gradually brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 3765 km/sec, NGC 7393 is about 175 million light years away, in fair agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 130 to 140 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 2.0 by 0.9 arcmin, it is about 100 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7393, also known as Arp 15
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7393, also known as Arp 15
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7393, also known as Arp 15

NGC 7394
Discovered (Sep 12, 1829) by
John Herschel
A group of stars in Lacerta (RA 22 50 12.0, Dec +52 10 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7394 (= GC 4852 = JH 2188, 1860 RA 22 44 36, NPD 38 33.9) is "a cluster, very poor".
Physical Information: Apparent size 8 by 5? arcmin.

NGC 7395 (= PGC 69861)
Discovered (Aug 21, 1873) by
Édouard Stephan
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Lacerta (RA 22 51 02.8, Dec +37 05 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7395 (= GC 6091, Stephan list V (#8), 1860 RA 22 44 36, NPD 53 39.3) is "extremely faint, very small, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 1.1? arcmin.

NGC 7396 (= PGC 69889)
Discovered (Oct 12, 1827) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Pisces (RA 22 52 22.6, Dec +01 05 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7396 (= GC 4853 = JH 2189, 1860 RA 22 45 14, NPD 89 39.0) is "pretty faint, pretty small, round, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.4 by 1.6? arcmin.

NGC 7397 (= PGC 69904)
Discovered (Oct 2, 1856) by
R. J. Mitchell
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a?) in Pisces (RA 22 52 46.6, Dec +01 07 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7397 (= GC 4854, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 22 45 36, NPD 89 36.7) is "extremely faint, very small".
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case R. J. Mitchell.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.5? arcmin.

NGC 7398 (= PGC 69905)
Discovered (Oct 2, 1856) by
R. J. Mitchell
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Pisces (RA 22 52 49.2, Dec +01 12 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7398 (= GC 4855, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 22 45 38, NPD 89 32.5) is "very faint, pretty large".
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case R. J. Mitchell.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.8? arcmin.

NGC 7399 (= PGC 69902)
Discovered (Nov 15, 1884) by
Lewis Swift
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Aquarius (RA 22 52 39.3, Dec -09 16 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7399 (Swift list II (#93), 1860 RA 22 45 42, NPD 99 59.4) is "extremely faint, pretty large". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 22 45 19.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.4? arcmin.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 7399
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7399
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 7399
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 7300 - 7349) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 7350 - 7399     → (NGC 7400 - 7449)