Celestial Atlas
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Page last updated Mar 7, 2017
WORKING 7450: Add/update Dreyer/Steinicke listings/data, check IDs

NGC 7450 (= PGC 70252)
Discovered (Nov 19, 1876) by
Wilhelm Tempel (AN 2138, I-47, IV-11)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type (R)SB(r)a?) in Aquarius (RA 23 00 47.7, Dec -12 55 04)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 3185 km/sec, NGC 7450 is about 150 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.8 by 1.8? arcmin, it is about 80 thousand light years across. It is a Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 1.5), with the very bright core typical of such galaxies.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7450
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7450
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7450

NGC 7451 (= PGC 70245)
Discovered (Dec 7, 1865) by
Otto Struve
Also observed by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Pegasus (RA 23 00 40.6, Dec +08 28 03)
Historical Identification: The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Bigourdan) of 22 53 20.
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.0 by 0.5 arcmin.

NGC 7452 (= PGC 1306660)
Discovered (Oct 14, 1884) by
Lewis Swift (2-95)
A 16th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Pisces (RA 23 00 47.5, Dec +06 44 45)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 0.4 by 0.3 arcmin.

NGC 7453
Recorded (Nov 7, 1860) by
Christian Peters
Three close stars in Aquarius (RA 23 01 25.6, Dec -06 21 14)
Historical Identification:

NGC 7454 (= PGC 70264)
Discovered (Oct 15, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E4?) in Pegasus (RA 23 01 06.6, Dec +16 23 21)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 2.2 by 1.6 arcmin.

NGC 7455 (= PGC 70246)
Discovered (Oct 14, 1884) by
Lewis Swift (2-96)
Also observed by Herbert Howe
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Pisces (RA 23 00 40.9, Dec +07 18 12)
Historical Identification: The second IC notes "No preceding star, but a 10th magnitude star 2 arcmin to the northeast (Howe)".
Physical Information: Apparent size about 0.6 by 0.4 arcmin.

NGC 7456 (= PGC 70304)
Discovered (Sep 4, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Grus (RA 23 02 10.1, Dec -39 34 09)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 5.5 by 1.6 arcmin.

NGC 7457 (= PGC 70258)
Discovered (Sep 12, 1784) by
William Herschel
An 11th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/SA0(rs)?) in Pegasus (RA 23 00 59.8, Dec +30 08 41)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 810 km/sec, NGC 7457 is about 38 million light years away, and although for such a small radial velocity, peculiar (non-Hubble expansion) velocities could considerably alter the result, the value is in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 38 to 43 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 4.3 by 2.3 arcmin, the galaxy is about 50 thousand light years across. As is typical of most galaxies, stars in its core are much closer together than in more distant regions. Estimates based on HST images of the core are that it is packed with more than 30 thousand times as many stars per unit volume of space than the region near our Sun. This means that the stars near the center of the galaxy are over thirty times closer together than stars near the Sun. That represents separations of only a light month or two; but although the sky would be full of stars in the core of NGC 7457, they would still be infinitely small dots in comparison to their distance from each other. Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type SA0-.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 7457
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7457
Below, a 4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 7457
Below, a ? arcmin wide false-color image of the core of the galaxy (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
False-color HST image of core of lenticular galaxy NGC 7457

NGC 7458 (= PGC 70277)
Discovered (Sep 18, 1786) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude elllipical galaxy (type E1?) in Pisces (RA 23 01 28.5, Dec +01 45 12)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.4 by 1.2 arcmin.

NGC 7459 (= PGC 70261)
Discovered (Oct 14, 1884) by
Lewis Swift (2-97)
A pair of 15th-magnitude galaxies in Pisces
Component 1 = A spiral galaxy (type S??) at RA 23 00 59.6, Dec +06 44 58
Component 2 = A peculiar galaxy (type pec?) at RA 23 01 00.3, Dec +06 45 03
Historical Identification: The NGC entry corresponds to the pair, not to either of the individual galaxies.
Physical Information: A contact double system. Apparent size of component 1 is about 0.4 by 0.4 arcmin. Apparent size of component 2 is about 0.8 by 0.4 arcmin.
SDSS image of the region near the pair of galaxies listed as NGC 7459
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7459
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy pair
SDSS image of the pair of galaxies listed as NGC 7459

NGC 7460 (= PGC 70287)
Discovered (Sep 21, 1876) by
Édouard Stephan (8a-26)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb? pec) in Pisces (RA 23 01 42.7, Dec +02 15 49)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.5 by 1.1 arcmin.

NGC 7461 (= PGC 70290)
Discovered (Aug 8, 1863) by
Albert Marth (513)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Pegasus (RA 23 01 48.1, Dec +15 34 57)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin.

NGC 7462 (= PGC 70324)
Discovered (Sep 5, 1834) by
John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Grus (RA 23 02 46.2, Dec -40 50 08)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 4.3 by 0.8 arcmin.
DSS image of the region near spiral galaxy NGC 7462
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7462
Below, a 4.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7462
Below, a ? arcmin wide HST image of the central portion of the galaxy (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
Raw HST image of central portion of spiral galaxy NGC 7462
Below, an overlay of the HST image on the 4.8 arcmin wide DSS image, to show its location
Overlay of HST image of central portion of spiral galaxy NGC 7462 on a DSS background, to show its field of view

NGC 7463 (= PGC 70291)
Discovered (Oct 16, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SABb? pec) in Pegasus (RA 23 01 51.8, Dec +15 58 55)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 2.6 by 0.6 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7463 and elliptical galaxy NGC 7464, also showing NGC 7465
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7463 and 7464, also showing NGC 7465
Below, an exaggerated-exposure version of the image above, to show the galaxies' distorted outer regions
Exaggerated-exposure SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7463 and elliptical galaxy NGC 7464, also showing polar-ring galaxy NGC 7465
Below, a 3.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 7463 and 7464
SDSS closeup of spiral galaxy NGC 7463 and elliptical galaxy NGC 7464

NGC 7464 (= PGC 70292)
Discovered (Aug 27, 1864) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1? pec) in Pegasus (RA 23 01 53.8, Dec +15 58 28)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 0.55 by 0.5 arcmin. (See NGC 7463 for images.)

NGC 7465 (= PGC 70295)
Discovered (Oct 16, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type (R')SB0(s)a?) in Pegasus (RA 23 02 00.9, Dec +15 57 55)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: A polar-ring galaxy; also a Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 2). Apparent size about 2.2 by 1.8 arcmin.
SDSS closeup of polar-ring galaxy NGC 7465
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 7465; see NGC 7463 for wide-field images

NGC 7466 (=
IC 5281 = PGC 70299)
Discovered (Sep 20, 1873) by Édouard Stephan (5-10) (and later listed as NGC 7466)
Discovered (Nov 19, 1895) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 5281)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Pegasus (RA 23 02 03.4, Dec +27 03 11)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.5 by 0.5 arcmin.

NGC 7467 (= PGC 70310)
Discovered (Oct 23, 1864) by
Albert Marth (515)
A 15th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Pegasus (RA 23 02 27.4, Dec +15 33 17)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 0.4 by 0.3 arcmin.

NGC 7468 (= PGC 70332)
Discovered (Oct 15, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1?? pec) in Pegasus (RA 23 02 59.2, Dec +16 36 16)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 0.9 by 0.6 arcmin.

PGC 70414 (= "NGC 7468A")
Not an NGC object but listed here because sometimes (though not usually) called NGC 7468A
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB?? pec) in
Pegasus (RA 23 04 53.5, Dec +16 40 44)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.3 by 0.5 arcmin.
SDSS image of peculiar spiral galaxy PGC 70414
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 70414

NGC 7469 (= PGC 70348; and with
IC 5283 = Arp 298)
Discovered (Nov 12, 1784) by William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type (R')SAB(rs)a?) in Pegasus (RA 23 03 15.5, Dec +08 52 26)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.4 by 1.0 arcmin.
HST image of region near spiral galaxies NGC 7469 and IC 5283 (also known as Arp 298), overlaid on an SDSS background
Above, a 12 arcmin wide HST/SDSS composite image centered between NGC 7469 and IC 5283
(Image Credit above and below NASA, ESA, the Hubble Heritage (STScI/AURA)-ESA/Hubble Collaboration,
and A. Evans (U. of Va., Charlottesville/NRAO/Stony Brook Univ.), overlaid on a SDSS background)

Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide image of Arp 298
HST image of spiral galaxies NGC 7469 and IC 5283 (also known as Arp 298), overlaid on an SDSS background for the small area not otherwise covered

NGC 7470 (= PGC 70431)
Discovered (Sep 30, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Grus (RA 23 05 13.9, Dec -50 06 42)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.4 by 0.9 arcmin.

NGC 7471
Recorded (1886) by
Frank Muller (II-470)
A lost or nonexistent object in Aquarius (RA 23 03 53.0, Dec -22 54 24)
Historical Identification:

NGC 7472 (=
NGC 7482 = PGC 70446)
Discovered (Aug 11, 1864) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 7482)
Discovered (Dec 7, 1865) by Otto Struve (and later listed as NGC 7472)
Also observed by Sherburne Burnham
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Pisces (RA 23 05 38.6, Dec +03 03 32)
Historical Identification: The first IC states "7472 and 7477 to be struck out, both being = 7482 with errors of 2 minutes and 1 minute in RA (Burnham)". (Despite Dreyer's statement, the galaxy is usually called NGC 7472, and NGC 7482 is treated as the duplicate entry.)
Physical Information: Apparent size about 0.6 by 0.4 arcmin.

NGC 7473 (= PGC 70373)
Discovered (Sep 6, 1863) by
Albert Marth (516)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Pegasus (RA 23 03 57.1, Dec +30 09 36)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.1 by 0.5 arcmin.

NGC 7474 (= PGC 70379)
Discovered (Sep 9, 1864) by
Albert Marth (517)
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Pegasus (RA 23 04 04.3, Dec +20 04 04)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 0.5 by 0.5 arcmin.

NGC 7475 (= PGC 70382 + PC 70383)
Discovered (Sep 9, 1864) by
Albert Marth (518)
A pair of elliptical galaxies in Pegasus
PGC 70383 = A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2?) at RA 23 04 10.1, Dec +20 04 45
PGC 70382 = A 15th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E4?) at RA 23 04 11.6, Dec +20 05 04
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size of PGC 70383 is about 1.1 by 0.9 arcmin. Apparent size of PGC 70382 is about 0.5 by 0.3 arcmin.

NGC 7476 (= PGC 70427)
Discovered (Sep 5, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBab?) in Grus (RA 23 05 12.0, Dec -43 05 53)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.4 by 1.0 arcmin.

NGC 7477 (= PGC 1245518)
Discovered (Sep 9, 1866) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
Perhaps also observed by Sherburne Burnham
A 16th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in Pisces (RA 23 04 40.7, Dec +03 07 06)
Historical Identification: The first IC states "7472 and 7477 to be struck out, both being = 7482 with errors of 2 minutes and 1 minute in RA (Burnham)".
Physical Information: Apparent size about 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin.

NGC 7478 (= PGC 70418)
Discovered (Aug 11, 1864) by
Albert Marth (519)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Pisces (RA 23 04 56.5, Dec +02 34 39)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 0.4 by 0.3 arcmin.

NGC 7479 (= PGC 70419)
Discovered (Oct 19, 1784) by
William Herschel
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Pegasus (RA 23 04 56.7, Dec +12 19 20)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 4.0 by 3.1 arcmin.
Misti Mountain Observatory image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7479
Above, a 12 arcmin wide image centered on NGC 7479
(Image Credit & © above and below Jim Misti, Misti Mountain Observatory; used by permission)
Below, a 4 arcmin wide image of the galaxy
Misti Mountain Observatory image of spiral galaxy NGC 7479
Below, a ? arcmin wide HST image of the galaxy (Image Credit Hubble/ESA/NASA)
HST closeup of spiral galaxy NGC 7479

NGC 7480 (= PGC 70432)
Discovered (Aug 11, 1864) by
Albert Marth (520)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Pisces (RA 23 05 13.5, Dec +02 32 58)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.3 by 0.3 arcmin.

PGC 85377 (= "NGC 7480B")
Not an NGC object but listed here because sometimes referred to as NGC 7480B
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in
Pisces (RA 23 05 01.7, Dec +02 32 26)
Physical Information: Apparent size about 0.6 by 0.3 arcmin.

NGC 7481
Recorded (1886) by
Ormond Stone (I-261)
A lost or nonexistent object in Aquarius (RA 23 05 51.0, Dec -19 56 24)
Historical Identification:

NGC 7482 (=
NGC 7472 = PGC 70446)
Discovered (Aug 11, 1864) by Albert Marth (521) (and later listed as NGC 7482)
Discovered (Dec 7, 1865) by Otto Struve (and later listed as NGC 7472)
Also observed by Sherburne Burnham
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Pisces (RA 23 05 38.6, Dec +03 03 32)
Historical Identification: The first IC states "7472 and 7477 to be struck out, both being = 7482 with errors of 2 minutes and 1 minute in RA (Burnham)". (Despite Dreyer's statement, the galaxy is usually called NGC 7472, and NGC 7482 is treated as the duplicate entry.)
Physical Information: Given the way the duplicate entry is usually treated, see NGC 7472 for anything else.

NGC 7483 (= PGC 70455)
Discovered (Sep 18, 1830) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Pisces (RA 23 05 48.2, Dec +03 32 43)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.6 by 1.1 arcmin.

NGC 7484 (= PGC 70505)
Discovered (Aug 30, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Sculptor (RA 23 07 04.9, Dec -36 16 22)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.8 by 1.7 arcmin.

NGC 7485 (= PGC 70470)
Discovered (Aug 19, 1828) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Pegasus (RA 23 06 04.8, Dec +34 06 29)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.3 by 0.3 arcmin.

NGC 7486
Recorded (Aug 25, 1871) by
Ralph Copeland
A pair of stars in Pegasus (RA 23 06 13.4, Dec +34 06 08)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information:

NGC 7487 (= PGC 70496 =
NGC 7210)
Discovered (Nov 17, 1827) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 7210)
Discovered (Aug 3, 1886) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 7487)
A magnitude 13.5 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Pegasus (RA 23 06 50.5, Dec +28 10 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7487 (Swift list IV (#89), 1860 RA 23 00 13, NPD 62 34.1) is "very faint, small, round". The position precesses to RA 23 06 59.3, Dec +28 11 16, about 2 arcmin east northeast of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain.
Discovery Notes: Herschel's GC (and hence Dreyer's NGC) entry for NGC 7210 (which see for a discussion of its relatively recent identification as a prior observation of NGC 7487) had a right ascension an hour too small and an NPD a degree too large; as a result, Herschel's observation was not connected with any physical object until 2016. Given the all too recent identification of NGC 7210, the galaxy is universally listed as NGC 7487, and the usual usage of the lower NGC number is not appropriate in this case.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 9535 km/sec, a straightforward calculation (using H = 70 km/sec/Mpc) indicates that NGC 7487 is about 445 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 425 to 430 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 435 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 1.8 by 1.3 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 225 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 7487, which is also NGC 7210
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7487
Below, a 2.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 7487, which is also NGC 7210

NGC 7488 (= PGC 70539)
Discovered (Aug 11, 1864) by
Albert Marth (522)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Pisces (RA 23 07 48.9, Dec +00 56 28)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 0.6 by 0.5 arcmin.

NGC 7489 (= PGC 70532)
Discovered (Sep 14, 1863) by
William Lassell (523)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Scd?) in Pegasus (RA 23 07 32.5, Dec +22 59 52)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 2.1 by 1.1 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7489
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7489
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7489

NGC 7490 (= PGC 70526)
Discovered (Oct 11, 1879) by
Édouard Stephan (10-39)
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Pegasus (RA 23 07 25.1, Dec +32 22 32)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 2.7 by 2.6 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7490
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7490
Below, a 3 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7490

NGC 7491 (= PGC 70546)
Discovered (Aug 21, 1881) by
Édouard Stephan (12b-94)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Aquarius (RA 23 08 06.0, Dec -05 57 59)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.0 by 0.7 arcmin.

NGC 7492 (= GCL 125)
Discovered (Sep 21, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed by Isaac Roberts
An 11th-magnitude globular cluster (type XII) in Aquarius (RA 23 08 26.7, Dec -15 36 39)
Historical Identification: The second IC notes "is a cluster of extremely faint stars (Roberts)".
Physical Information: Apparent size of central core about 4 arcmin, but a fainter halo extends another arcmin or so in all directions. The distance of the cluster is about 85 thousand light years, so its core is about 100 light years across, and its outer halo about 150 light years. The globular is moving toward us at about 200 km/sec, which is a "real" radial velocity, as the Universal expansion has no effect on even outlying members of our galaxy. (Note about the high-resolution image of the cluster at bottom: This image is posted on or linked from several online catalogs of open and globular clusters, but with no indication of its original source. As a result, its copyright status is unclear. I am attempting to determine where it came from, so I can request permission to keep the image on this site. If you know where it came from, please let me know. Once I determine the original source and obtain (or do not obtain) permission to leave the image as-is, this note will be deleted and if need be the image as well.)
DSS image of globular cluster NGC 7492
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7492
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of the cluster (Image Credit unknown; see note above about copyright status)
Closeup of globular cluster NGC 7492, of unknown origin; it should be assumed that this image cannot be used on commercial sites

NGC 7493
Recorded (Oct 28, 1886) by
Guillaume Bigourdan (II-95)
A 15th-magnitude star in Pisces (RA 23 08 31.6, Dec +00 54 36)
Historical Identification:

NGC 7494 (= PGC 70568)
Discovered (Sep 24, 1864) by
Albert Marth (524)
A 15th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Aquarius (RA 23 08 58.4, Dec -24 22 09)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 0.8 by 0.7 arcmin.

NGC 7495 (= PGC 70566)
Discovered (Oct 31, 1885) by
Lewis Swift (2-98)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Pegasus (RA 23 08 57.4, Dec +12 02 53)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.8 by 1.6 arcmin.

NGC 7496 (= PGC 70588)
Discovered (Sep 5, 1834) by
John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Grus (RA 23 09 46.9, Dec -43 25 39)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.3 by 3.1? arcmin. (Note concerning the Faulkes Telescope Project image below: This image was posted on a commercial forum by Oliver Tunnah, the person who took it. Under normal circumstances, if the image were copyrighted, there would be some notice to that effect. There was no such notice, so it is probably legal to use it on a non-commercial site such as this one, as long as credit is given where credit is due; hence my decision to post it on a temporary basis, with a link to the original posting. However, I am also attempting to contact Mr. Tunnah and FTP, to see whether that is correct and if not, to request permission to keep the post as-is. If I obtain such permission, this note will be removed; if I do not, the image will be removed. In the meantime, anyone wishing to use the image on any other site (particularly a commercial site) should seek such permission as well.)
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7496
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7496
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit Oliver Tunnah, Faulkes Telescope Project)
Faulkes Telescope Project image of spiral galaxy NGC 7496
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of part of the galaxy
(Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive; artifacts removed by Courtney Seligman)
Raw HST image of part of spiral galaxy NGC 7496

PGC 70687 (= "NGC 7496A")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 7496A
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(s)m?) in
Grus (RA 23 12 23.4, Dec -43 46 43)
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.4 by 0.7 arcmin. The star-forming regions on the western side of the galaxy are sometimes called "NGC 7496B", but this designation is not recognized by any standard database, and in any event the regions are almost certainly part of PGC 70687, and giving them a separate designation merely confuses the situation.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 70687, also known as NGC 7496A
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 70687
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 70687, also known as NGC 7496A
Below, a 36 arcmin wide region showing the relative position of NGC 7496 and PGC 70687
DSS image of region between spiral galaxy NGC 7496 and spiral galaxy PGC 70687, also known as NGC 7496A

NGC 7497 (= PGC 70569)
Discovered (Oct 15, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Pegasus (RA 23 09 03.5, Dec +18 10 39)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 4.4 by 1.7 arcmin. Noticeably obscured by clouds of gas and dust in our own galaxy.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7497, showing obscuring clouds of gas and dust in our own galaxy
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7497
Below, a 4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7497

NGC 7498 (= PGC 70590)
Discovered (Sep 24, 1864) by
Albert Marth (525)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Aquarius (RA 23 09 56.0, Dec -24 25 28)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 0.9 by 0.4 arcmin.

NGC 7499 (= PGC 70608)
Discovered (Sep 2, 1864) by
Albert Marth (526)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Pisces (RA 23 10 22.3, Dec +07 34 52)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.2 by 0.7 arcmin. A member of the Pisces Cluster of galaxies.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 7499, also showing NGC 7501 and 7503, and a host of smaller members of the Pisces Cluster of galaxiesAbove, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7499, also showing NGC 7501 and 7503
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy and numerous smaller cluster members
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 7499
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 7400 - 7449) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 7450 - 7499     → (NGC 7500 - 7549)