Celestial Atlas
(NGC 7450 - 7499) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 7500 - 7549 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 7550 - 7599)
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7500, 7501, 7502, 7503, 7504, 7505, 7506, 7507, 7508, 7509, 7510, 7511, 7512, 7513, 7514, 7515, 7516,
7517, 7518, 7519, 7520, 7521, 7522, 7523, 7524, 7525, 7526, 7527, 7528, 7529, 7530, 7531, 7532, 7533,
7534, 7535, 7536, 7537, 7538, 7539, 7540, 7541, 7542, 7543, 7544, 7545, 7546, 7547, 7548, 7549

Page last updated Apr 11, 2017
Checked historical references, added Dreyer NGC entries
WORKING 7500: Add/update Steinicke listings/data, check IDs

NGC 7500 (= PGC 70620)
Discovered (Aug 8, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Pegasus (RA 23 10 29.7, Dec +11 00 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7500 (Swift list IV (#90), 1860 RA 23 03 20, NPD 79 43.7) is "extremely faint, very small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 1.1? arcmin.

NGC 7501 (= PGC 70619)
Discovered (Sep 2, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1??) in Pisces (RA 23 10 30.3, Dec +07 35 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7501 (= GC 6128, Marth #527, 1860 RA 23 03 25, NPD 89 09) is "extremely faint".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.5? arcmin.

NGC 7502
Recorded (1886) by
Frank Muller
A pair of stars in Aquarius (RA 23 10 19.7, Dec -21 44 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7502 (Muller list II (#471), 1860 RA 23 03 25, NPD 112 30.7) is "extremely faint, very small, extended 290°, a faint double star?".

NGC 7503 (= PGC 70628)
Discovered (Sep 2, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2??) in Pisces (RA 23 10 42.2, Dec +07 34 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7503 (= GC 6129, Marth #528, 1860 RA 23 03 36, NPD 83 11) is "very faint, small, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.8? arcmin.

NGC 7504
Recorded (Sep 2, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 13th-magnitude star in Pegasus (RA 23 10 41.1, Dec +14 23 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7504 (= GC 6130, Marth #529, 1860 RA 23 03 37, NPD 76 21) is "very faint, small, stellar".

NGC 7505 (= PGC 70636)
Discovered (Sep 25, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S??) in Pegasus (RA 23 11 00.7, Dec +13 37 53)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7505 (Swift list V (#94), 1860 RA 23 03 55, NPD 77 07.6) is "most extremely faint, extremely small, a little extended, between a bright and 2 faint stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.2? arcmin.

NGC 7506 (= PGC 70660)
Discovered (Sep 20, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Oct 16, 1827) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Pisces (RA 23 11 41.0, Dec -02 09 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7506 (= GC 4899 = JH 2210 = WH III 184, 1860 RA 23 04 29, NPD 92 55.0) is "considerably faint, very small, round, suddenly brighter middle equal to 15th magnitude star".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.1? arcmin.

NGC 7507 (= PGC 70676)
Discovered (Oct 30, 1783) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Sep 14, 1830) by John Herschel
A 10th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Sculptor (RA 23 12 07.5, Dec -28 32 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7507 (= GC 4900 = JH 2211 = JH 3974 = WH II 2, 1860 RA 23 04 34, NPD 119 17.9) is "pretty bright, considerably small, round, pretty suddenly very much brighter middle, 10th magnitude star to northwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.8 by 2.7? arcmin.

NGC 7508 (= PGC 70663)
Discovered (Oct 13, 1825) by
John Herschel
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S??) in Pegasus (RA 23 11 49.2, Dec +12 56 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7508 (= GC 4901 = JH 2212, 1860 RA 23 04 45, NPD 77 49.6) is "extremely faint, brighter middle like a star, 11th magnitude star 2' to northwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.3? arcmin.

NGC 7509 (= PGC 70679)
Discovered (Aug 8, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A 13th-magnitude compact galaxy (type C??) in Pegasus (RA 23 12 21.3, Dec +14 36 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7509 (Swift list IV (#91), 1860 RA 23 05 15, NPD 76 07.6) is "very faint, small, round, between 2 stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 1.1? arcmin.

NGC 7510 (= OCL 256)
Discovered (Nov 3, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Sep 29, 1829) by John Herschel
An 8th-magnitude open cluster (type II2m) in Cepheus (RA 23 11 04.2, +60 34 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7510 (= GC 4902 = JH 2213 = WH VII 44, 1860 RA 23 05 27, NPD 30 11.4) is "a cluster, pretty rich, pretty compressed, fan-shaped, stars pretty bright".
Physical Information: NGC 7510 lies about 10 thousand light years away. Its several hundred members, scattered across 10 to 15 light years of space, were formed around 10 million years ago. (Apparent size listed as about 7 arcmin.)
Misti Mountain Observatory image of open cluster NGC 7510
Above, a 12 arcmin wide image centered on NGC 7510
(Image Credit & © Jim Misti, Misti Mountain Observatory; used by permission)

NGC 7511 (= PGC 70691)
Discovered (Sep 6, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S??) in Pegasus (RA 23 12 26.3, Dec +13 43 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7511 (Swift list IV (#92), 1860 RA 23 05 35, NPD 77 01.7) is "most extremely faint, small, round, very difficult, several stars to northeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.5? arcmin.

NGC 7512 (= PGC 70683)
Discovered (Sep 28, 1878) by
Édouard Stephan
Discovered (Oct 10, 1884) by Lewis Swift (#??)
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Pegasus (RA 23 12 20.9, Dec +31 07 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7512 (Stephan list IX (#34), 1860 RA 23 05 36, NPD 59 38.1) is "faint, small, round, very small (faint) star in center".
Discovery Notes: It isn't clear why Steinicke notes Swift's observation, as he usually does that only when Dreyer also notes additional observers; so I'll try to deal with that question in the next iteration of this page.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 1.0? arcmin.

NGC 7513 (= PGC 70714)
Discovered (Sep 24, 1864) by
Albert Marth
Discovered (1883) by Edward Barnard
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb? pec) in Sculptor (RA 23 13 13.7, Dec -28 21 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7513 (= GC 6131, Marth #530, 1860 RA 23 05 39, NPD 119 07) is "very faint, pretty large, extended, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.2 by 2.1? arcmin. NGC 7513 is listed as a member of a group of galaxies in or near Sculptor with recessional velocities of about 1500 to 1800 km/sec (this is not "the" Sculptor Group, a close neighbor to our Local Group, with an average recessional velocity of less than 300 km/sec).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7513
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7513 (the distant cluster to its southwest is Abell 3980)
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7513

NGC 7514 (= PGC 70689)
Discovered (Sep 21, 1876) by
Édouard Stephan
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Pegasus (RA 23 12 25.5, Dec +34 52 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7514 (= GC 6132, Stephan list VIII (#27), 1860 RA 23 05 47, NPD 55 52.3) is "extremely faint, pretty large, irregularly round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.9? arcmin.

NGC 7515 (= PGC 70699)
Discovered (Oct 19, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Oct 12, 1825) by John Herschel
Discovered (Sep 29, 1886) by Lewis Swift (#??)
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Pegasus (RA 23 12 48.6, Dec +12 40 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7515 (= GC 4903 = JH 2214 = WH III 220, 1860 RA 23 05 47, NPD 78 04.9) is "faint, considerably small, round, very gradually a little brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Discovery Notes: It isn't clear why Steinicke notes Swift's observation, as he usually does that only when Dreyer also notes additional observers; so I'll try to deal with that question in the next iteration of this page.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.6? arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7515
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7515
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7515

NGC 7516 (= PGC 70703)
Discovered (Sep 5, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Pegasus (RA 23 12 51.8, Dec +20 14 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7516 (= GC 6133, Marth #531, 1860 RA 23 05 53, NPD 70 30) is "faint, very small, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 1.0? arcmin.

NGC 7517 (= PGC 70715)
Discovered (Oct 5, 1863) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E5?) in Pisces (RA 23 13 13.8, Dec -02 06 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7517 (= GC 6134, Marth #532, 1860 RA 23 06 02, NPD 92 51) is "very faint, very small, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.3? arcmin.

NGC 7518 (= PGC 70712)
Discovered (Aug 29, 1863) by
Albert Marth
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Pisces (RA 23 13 12.8, Dec +06 19 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7518 (= GC 6135, Marth #533, 1860 RA 23 06 05, NPD 84 26) is "very faint, small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.0? arcmin.

NGC 7519 (= PGC 70713)
Discovered (Oct 5, 1864) by
Albert Marth
Also observed (Oct 30, 1886) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Pegasus (RA 23 13 11.2, Dec +10 46 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7519 (= GC 6136, Marth #534, 1860 RA 23 06 09, NPD 79 59) is "very faint, pretty large". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Bigourdan) of 23 05 40.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.1? arcmin.

NGC 7520 (=
IC 5290 = PGC 70705)
Discovered (1876) by Wilhelm Tempel (and later listed as NGC 7520)
Looked for but not found (date?) by Herbert Howe
Discovered (Oct 4, 1896) by Johann Palisa (and later listed as IC 5290)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Aquarius (RA 23 12 53.1, Dec -23 28 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7520 (= GC 6137, Tempel list I (#49), 1860 RA 23 06 16, NPD 114 33.3) is "faint, pretty small, between 2 stars". The second IC notes "Not found by Howe (2 nights)".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.8? arcmin.

NGC 7521 (= PGC 70725)
Discovered (Nov 18, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Pisces (RA 23 13 35.3, Dec -01 43 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7521 (= GC 6138, Marth #535, 1860 RA 23 06 23, NPD 92 30) is "very faint, pretty small, pretty suddenly brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.5? arcmin.

NGC 7522
Recorded (1886) by
Frank Muller
Looked for but not found (date?) by Herbert Howe
A star in Aquarius (RA 23 15 36.3, Dec -22 53 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7522 (Muller list II (#472), 1860 RA 23 06 25, NPD 113 38.7) is "extremely faint, very small, irregularly round, 10th magnitude star 3' to the east northeast". The second IC notes "Not found by Howe (3 nights)".

NGC 7523 (= PGC 70726)
Discovered (Nov 3, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S??) in Pegasus (RA 23 13 34.7, Dec +13 59 12)
Historical Identification: Per NGC 7523 (= GC 6139, Marth #536, 1860 RA 23 06 30, NPD 76 47) is "most extremely faint, extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.2? arcmin.

NGC 7524 (= PGC 70737)
Discovered (Nov 18, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Pisces (RA 23 13 46.5, Dec -01 43 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7524 (= GC 6140, Marth #537, 1860 RA 23 06 35, NPD 92 30) is "extremely faint, very small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.3? arcmin.

NGC 7525 (= PGC 70731)
Discovered (Nov 3, 1864) by
Albert Marth
Two spiral galaxies in Pegasus
NGC 7525 NED02 = A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S??) at RA 23 13 40.4, Dec +14 01 17
NGC 7525 NED01 = A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S??) at RA 23 13 40.2, Dec +14 01 27
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7525 (= GC 6141, Marth #538, 1860 RA 23 06 36, NPD 76 45) is "extremely faint, very small, very little extended, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: The galaxies that comprise NGC 7525 have about the same recessional velocity (as discussed below), and are therefore at nearly the same distance. However, there is no obvious tidal distortion in the image below, so they may not be as close as they appear (although even if they are separated by several million light years, that would be nothing in comparison to their half billion light year distance from us). Face-on NED02 obviously lies in front of edge-on NED01, but their separation is unknown and probably unknowable, given the caveats listed above. Their recessional velocities (11945 km/sec for NED01 and 12260 km/sec for NED02), if used in a straightforward calculation, would indicate a distance of about 555 to 570 million light years. However, for objects at that distance, it is necessary to take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the two galaxies were about 545 million light years away when the light by which we see them was emitted, about 555 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and their apparent sizes (about 0.35 by 0.35 arcmin for face-on NED02, and 0.45 by 0.1 arcmin for edge-on NED01), NED01 is about 70 thousand light years across, and NED02 about 60 thousand light years in size. Since NED01 is nearly edge-on, it is difficult to say much about its detailed structure; but face-on NED02 is a starburst galaxy, and also a Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 1.5).
SDSS image of region near possible galaxy pair NGC 7525, also showing NGC 7523
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7525, also showing NGC 7523
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of possible galaxy pair NGC 7525

NGC 7526
Recorded (Nov 28, 1785) by
William Herschel
Three stars in a line in Aquarius (RA 23 14 02.3, Dec -09 13 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7526 (= GC 4904 = WH III 470, 1860 RA 23 06 37, NPD 99 57.5) is "extremely faint, very small".

NGC 7527 (= PGC 70728)
Discovered (Sep 5, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Pegasus (RA 23 13 41.7, Dec +24 54 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7527 (= GC 6142, Marth #539, 1860 RA 23 06 49, NPD 65 51) is "very faint, very small, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.3 by 0.9? arcmin.

NGC 7528 (= PGC 70770)
Discovered (August, 1880) by
Andrew Common
A 15th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Pegasus (RA 23 14 20.0, Dec +10 13 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7528 (Common (#26), 1860 RA 23 06 52, NPD 80 32) is "faint, small".
Physical Information: Apparent size about 0.4 by 0.3? arcmin.

NGC 7529 (= PGC 70755)
Discovered (Jul 2, 1880) by
Wilhelm Tempel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Pegasus (RA 23 14 03.1, Dec +08 59 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7529 (Tempel list IV (#12), 1860 RA 23 06 57, NPD 81 46.1) is "very faint".
Physical Information: Apparent size about 0.9 by 0.8? arcmin.

NGC 7530 (= PGC 70759)
Discovered (Oct 1, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Pisces (RA 23 14 11.7, Dec -02 46 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7530 (= GC 6143, Marth #540, 1860 RA 23 07 00, NPD 93 32) is "extremely faint, very small, almost stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size about 0.9 by 0.5? arcmin.

NGC 7531 (= PGC 70800)
Discovered (Sep 2, 1836) by
John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Grus (RA 23 14 48.4, Dec -43 35 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7531 (= GC 4905 = JH 3975, 1860 RA 23 07 01, NPD 134 21.8) is "pretty bright, small, a little extended, pretty gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size about 4.5 by 1.7? arcmin. NGC 7531 is listed as a member of a group of galaxies in or near Sculptor with recessional velocities of about 1500 to 1800 km/sec (this is not "the" Sculptor Group, a close neighbor to our Local Group, with an average recessional velocity of less than 300 km/sec). Apparently associated with a faint stellar cloud off to its west, in addition to having unusually farflung outer arms.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7531, using exaggerated contrast to show its associated stellar cloud
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7531, also showing its associated stellar cloud
Below, a 6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy and associated stellar cloud
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7531, with exaggerated contrast to show its associated stellar cloud

NGC 7532 (= PGC 70779)
Discovered (Oct 1, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a?) in Pisces (RA 23 14 22.2, Dec -02 43 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7532 (= GC 6144, Marth #541, 1860 RA 23 07 10, NPD 93 29) is "very faint, very small, a little extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.4 by 0.7? arcmin.

NGC 7533 (= PGC 70778)
Discovered (Oct 5, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Pisces (RA 23 14 22.0, Dec -02 02 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7533 (= GC 6145, Marth #542, 1860 RA 23 07 10, NPD 92 48) is "faint, small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size about 0.7 by 0.3? arcmin.

NGC 7534 (= PGC 70781)
Discovered (Oct 1, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude irregular galaxy (type IBm?) in Pisces (RA 23 14 26.5, Dec -02 41 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7534 (= GC 6146, Marth #543, 1860 RA 23 07 14, NPD 93 27) is "extremely faint, very small, a little extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.0 by 0.7? arcmin.
SDSS image of region near irregular galaxy NGC 7534, also showing NGC 7530 and NGC 7532
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7534, also showing NGC 7530 and 7532
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of irregular galaxy NGC 7534

NGC 7535 (= PGC 70761)
Discovered (Sep 29, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Scd?) in Pegasus (RA 23 14 12.8, Dec +13 34 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7535 (Swift list V (#97), 1860 RA 23 07 15, NPD 77 10.3) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, round, very difficult, northern of 2", the other being NGC 7536.
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.5 by 1.5? arcmin.

NGC 7536 (= PGC 70765)
Discovered (Sep 29, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Pegasus (RA 23 14 13.1, Dec +13 25 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7536 (Swift list V (#98), 1860 RA 23 07 15, NPD 77 19.3) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, round, among 6 stars, southern of 2", the other being NGC 7535.
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.9 by 0.7? arcmin.

NGC 7537 (= PGC 70786)
Recorded (Aug 30, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Oct 16, 1827) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Pisces (RA 23 14 34.6, Dec +04 29 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7537 (= GC 4906 = JH 2215 = WH II 429, 1860 RA 23 07 27, NPD 86 15.7) is "very faint, considerably small, round, brighter middle, southwestern of 2", the other being NGC 7541.
Physical Information: Apparent size about 2.1 by 0.5? arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7537, also showing NGC 7541
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7357, also showing NGC 7541
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7537
Below, a superimposition of a HST image (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive) on the image above
Raw HST image of eastern portion of spiral galaxy NGC 7537 superimposed on an SDSS background
Below, a closer view of the ? arcmin wide HST image shown above
Raw HST image of eastern portion of spiral galaxy NGC 7537
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of the galaxy's nucleus
(Image Credit HST/NASA, ESA, Reynier Peletier (Univ. of Nottingham, UK)
Early HST image of central portion of spiral galaxy NGC 7537

NGC 7538
Recorded (Nov 3, 1787) by
William Herschel
An emission nebula in Cepheus (RA 23 13 38.0, Dec +61 30 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7538 (= GC 4907 = WH II 706, 1860 RA 23 07 34, NPD 29 15.0) is "very faint, large, 2 pretty bright stars involved".
Physical Information: Apparent size about 9.0 by 6.0? arcmin.

NGC 7539 (= PGC 70783)
Discovered (Aug 17, 1828) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Pegasus (RA 23 14 29.4, Dec +23 41 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7539 (= GC 4908 = JH 2217, 1860 RA 23 07 36, NPD 67 04.7) is "faint, small, round, pretty suddenly brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.5 by 1.2? arcmin.

NGC 7540 (= PGC 70788)
Discovered (Nov 3, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 15th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E4?) in Pegasus (RA 23 14 36.1, Dec +15 57 01)
Accompanied by a 16th-magnitude compact galaxy (type C??) at RA 23 14 37.4, Dec +15 57 10
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7540 (= GC 6147, Marth #544, 1860 RA 23 07 36, NPD 74 49) is "faint, very small, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent sizes about 0.5 by 0.3? arcmin and 0.2 by 0.2? arcmin, respectively.
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 7540
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7540 and its apparent companion
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the pair
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 7540

NGC 7541 (=
NGC 7581 = PGC 70795)
Recorded (Aug 30, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 7541)
Also observed (Oct 16, 1827) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 7541)
Recorded (Jan 11, 1875) by Horace Tuttle (and later listed as NGC 7581)
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Pisces (RA 23 14 43.2, Dec +04 32 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7541 (= GC 4909 = JH 2216 = WH II 430, 1860 RA 23 07 36, NPD 86 13.7) is "bright, large, much extended 97°, much brighter middle, northeastern of 2", the other being NGC 7537.
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.5 by 1.2? arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7541, also showing NGC 7537
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7541, also showing NGC 7537
Below, a 4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7541
Below, a ? arcmin wide HST image of the galaxy (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
HST image of spiral galaxy NGC 7541
Below, the same HST image rotated to allow for greater detail (north is on the right)
HST image of spiral galaxy NGC 7541

NGC 7542 (= PGC 70796)
Discovered (Oct 5, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S??) in Pegasus (RA 23 14 41.7, Dec +10 38 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7542 (= GC 6148, Marth #545, 1860 RA 23 07 39, NPD 80 07) is "extremely faint, extremely small, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size about 0.8 by 0.5? arcmin.

NGC 7543 (= PGC 70785)
Discovered (Sep 19, 1878) by
Édouard Stephan
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Pegasus (RA 23 14 34.5, Dec +28 19 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7543 (Stephan list IX (#35), 1860 RA 23 07 44, NPD 62 26.1) is "very faint, small, round, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.1 by 0.9? arcmin.

NGC 7544 (= PGC 70811)
Discovered (Nov 18, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Pisces (RA 23 14 56.9, Dec -02 11 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7544 (= GC 6149, Marth #546, 1860 RA 23 07 46, NPD 92 57) is "extremely faint, very small".
Physical Information: Apparent size about 0.8 by 0.2? arcmin.

NGC 7545 (= PGC 70840)
Discovered (Sep 4, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Grus (RA 23 15 32.3, Dec -38 32 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7545 (= GC 4910 = JH 3976, 1860 RA 23 07 49, NPD 129 17.9) is "faint, small, very little extended, very gradually a very little brighter middle, 10th magnitude star attached".
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.1 by 0.7? arcmin.

NGC 7546 (= PGC 70820)
Discovered (Oct 1, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Pisces (RA 23 15 05.5, Dec -02 19 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7546 (= GC 6150, Marth #547, 1860 RA 23 07 54, NPD 93 06) is "extremely faint, small, a little extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.1 by 0.9? arcmin.

NGC 7547 (= PGC 70819) (not part of
Arp 99)
Discovered (Aug 26, 1827) by John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type (R')SAB0(s)a? pec) in Pegasus (RA 23 15 03.4, Dec +18 58 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7547 (= GC 4911 = JH 2218, 1860 RA 23 08 06, NPD 71 47.4) is "very faint, small, irregularly round".
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.1 by 0.5? arcmin. Some catalogs include this galaxy in Arp 99, which is listed in the Arp Atlas as an example of a spiral galaxy with an elliptical companion; however, the remarks in Arp's catalog make it clear that the spiral galaxy in question is NGC 7549, and though NGC 7547 is mentioned in passing (as the "West galaxy"), it is clearly not the galaxy that is meant to be part of Arp 99. Arguments that NGC 7547 should still be considered part of Arp 99 ignore the fact that if it were, the entry would have been listed as an elliptical galaxy with spiral companions; and since it was not, NGC 7547 is clearly not part of Arp 99. However, it probably is part of a triple system with the galaxies comprising Arp 99, as all three have similar radial velocities.

NGC 7548 (= PGC 70826)
Discovered (Sep 30, 1861) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
Also observed (Nov 23, 1899) by Stephane Javelle
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Pegasus (RA 23 15 11.1, Dec +25 16 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7548 (= GC 4914, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 23 08 17, NPD 65 29.3) is "very faint, very small, 16th magnitude star 11 seconds of time to west".
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.1 by 0.9? arcmin.

NGC 7549 (= PGC 70832, and with
NGC 7550 = Arp 99)
Discovered (Nov 2, 1850) by Bindon Stoney
Discovered (Aug 30, 1864) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(s)cd? pec) in Pegasus (RA 23 15 17.1, Dec +19 02 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7549 (= GC 4912 = GC 6151, 3rd Lord Rosse, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 23 08 18, NPD 71 43.2) is "pretty faint, pretty small, round, 10th or 11th magnitude star to west".
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case Bindon Stoney.
Physical Information: Apparent size about 2.8 by 0.7? arcmin. Used by the Arp Atlas as an example of a spiral galaxy with an elliptical companion (NGC 7550). Some catalogs incorrectly include NGC 7547 as part of Arp 99, so see that entry for a discussion of why that is wrong. However, NGC 7547 probably is part of a triple system with the pair of galaxies that form Arp 99, as all three have similar radial velocities.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7549, also showing NGC 7547, NGC 7550 and NGC 7553Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7549, also showing NGC 7547, 7550 and 7553
Below, a 3 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7549
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 7450 - 7499) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 7500 - 7549     → (NGC 7550 - 7599)