Celestial Atlas
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Page last updated Oct 31, 2014
WORKING 7650: Add/update Dreyer/Steinicke listings/data, check IDs

NGC 7650 (= PGC 71394)
Discovered (Oct 28, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Tucana (RA 23 25 20.9, Dec -57 47 28)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.1? arcmin.

NGC 7651 (= PGC 71353 + PGC 3085862)
Discovered (Sep 1, 1886) by
Lewis Swift (4-96)
A pair of galaxies in Pegasus
PGC 71353 = a magnitude 14(?) lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) at RA 23 24 26.0, Dec +13 58 20
PGC 3085862 = a magnitude 15.5(?) lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) at RA 23 24 25.6, Dec +13 58 02
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7651 (Swift list IV (#96), 1860 RA 23 17 25, NPD 76 47.6) is "extremely faint, small, round". The position precesses to RA 23 24 27.6, Dec +13 58 30, less than half an arcmin east northeast of PGC 71353, and there is nothing else nearby that is nearly as bright, so the identification is certain. The fainter companion (PGC 3085862) is far too faint for Swift to have seen, but it is almost certainly a fairly close companion of the brighter galaxy, so the NGC listing can be reasonably thought of as either the brighter galaxy (what Swift saw) or as the apparent pair. Possibly = NGC 7644, but the identity of that object is sufficiently uncertain that adding such a statement to the title of this entry seems premature at the time of this post. (Note to self: Steinicke misidentifies the brighter object as PGC 71344, which is to the west, and overestimates the brightness of the fainter object by a magnitude; so need to use better references for the final version of this entry.)
Physical Information: PGC 71353's apparent size is 1.0 by 0.6 arcmin; PGC 3085862's apparent size is 0.3 by 0.15 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near NGC 7651 and its probable companion, PGC 3085862
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7651
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy and its probable companion
SDSS image of NGC 7651 and its probable companion, PGC 3085862

NGC 7652 (= PGC 71402)
Discovered (Oct 28, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Tucana (RA 23 25 37.6, Dec -57 53 15)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.7? arcmin.

NGC 7653 (= PGC 71370)
Discovered (Nov 2, 1823) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Pegasus (RA 23 24 49.1, Dec +15 16 32)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.5? arcmin.

NGC 7654 (=
M52 = OCL 260)
Discovered (Sep 7, 1774) by Charles Messier (and listed as M52)
A 7th-magnitude open cluster (type I2r) in Cassiopeia (RA 23 24 48.0, Dec +61 36 00)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.5? arcmin.
NOAO image of region near open cluster NGC 7654, also known as M52
Above, an 18 arcmin wide image centered on NGC 7654 (Image Credit AURA/NSF/NOAO)
Below, a 12 arcmin wide image of the open cluster
(Image Credit & © Jim Misti, Misti Mountain Observatory; used by permission)
Misti Mountain Observatory image of open cluster NGC 7654, also known as M52

NGC 7655 (= PGC 71452)
Discovered (Jul 24, 1835) by
John Herschel
Perhaps also observed by DeLisle Stewart
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Indus (RA 23 26 45.9, Dec -68 01 39)
Historical Identification: The second IC notes "Group of stars, not a nebula (DeLisle Stewart)".
Physical Information: Apparent size about 0.8 by 0.6? arcmin.

NGC 7656 (= PGC 71357)
Discovered (Oct 9, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth (I-263)
Also observed by Herbert Howe
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Aquarius (RA 23 24 31.5, Dec -19 03 33)
Historical Identification: The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 23 17 11.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 1.1? arcmin.

NGC 7657 (= PGC 71456)
Discovered (Oct 2, 1836) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBd?) in Tucana (RA 23 26 47.1, Dec -57 48 19)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.4 by 0.4? arcmin.

NGC 7658 (= PGC 71432)
Discovered (Sep 4, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Grus (RA 23 26 24.9, Dec -39 13 37)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: This is the southern of two very faint galaxies, separated by less than an arcmin (the other is listed below as PGC 71433). Although both galaxies' magnitudes round off to the same 14th-magnitude value, this one is half a magnitude brighter and much easier to see, and since Herschel made no mention of a "double" nucleus or nebula, there is little doubt that he saw only this galaxy, and it should be listed as NGC 7658. However, some catalogs list it as NGC 7658B, as though its companion deserves pride of place, and as a result, Wikisky does the same. Apparent size about 0.8 by 0.3? arcmin.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxies NGC 7658 and PGC 71433, the latter also being known as NGC 7658A
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7658 and PGC 71433
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the apparent pair
DSS image of lenticular galaxies NGC 7658 and PGC 71433, the latter also being known as NGC 7658A

PGC 71433 (= "NGC 7658A")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 7658A
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in
Grus (RA 23 26 24.6, Dec -39 12 57)
Physical Information: Apparent size about 0.6 by 0.2? arcmin. See NGC 7658 for images.


NGC 7659 (= PGC 71417)
Discovered (Oct 16, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Pegasus (RA 23 25 55.5, Dec +14 12 35)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 0.8 by 0.3? arcmin.

NGC 7660 (= PGC 71413)
Discovered (Sep 5, 1828) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Pegasus (RA 23 25 48.7, Dec +27 01 47)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.4 by 1.1? arcmin.

NGC 7661 (= PGC 71473)
Discovered (Nov 1, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Tucana (RA 23 27 14.5, Dec -65 16 18)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.8 by 1.2? arcmin.

NGC 7662, The Blue Snowball Nebula
Discovered (Oct 6, 1784) by
William Herschel
An 8th-magnitude planetary nebula in Andromeda (RA 23 25 53.9, Dec +42 32 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7662 (= John Herschel's GC 4964, 1860 RA 23 19 11, NPD 48 14.0) is "a magnificent object, planetary or annular nebula, very bright, pretty small, round, blue". The second IC adds "The nucleus is variable to the extent of three magnitudes, with a period of 27 1/3 days (Barnard, M.N. lxviii. p. 465)".
Physical Information: NGC 7662 is 5 to 6 thousand light years away, and 50 to 60 thousand AUs across (its size being as uncertain as its distance). The central, bright portion of the nebula is about 0.6 arcmin across, but a fainter outer halo covers more than 2 arcmin. The nebula's central star is a relatively young, very hot white dwarf (about 75,000 Kelvins, or 135,000 Fahrenheit degrees). In small telescopes it appears to be a nearly starlike, slightly fuzzy 8th magnitude object. In a dark sky, 6 inch or larger telescopes reveal a slightly bluish gray ball (hence its name). The NOAO image below was taken with a 16-inch telescope equipped with a CCD camera. Its colors, though exaggerated, are more or less "true". The false-color HST images of the planetary nebula, aside from showing more detail within the nebula, reveal so-called "fliers", unusually dense outlying blobs of gas which were apparently ejected by the star before the formation of the central nebula.
DSS image of region near planetary nebula NGC 7662, also known as the Blue Snowball Nebula, processed to show off its outer halo
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7662, processed to show off its outer halo
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the planetary nebula
DSS image of planetary nebula NGC 7662, also known as the Blue Snowball Nebula
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide image of the central region (Image Credit Adam Block/AURA/NSF/NOAO)
NOAO image of planetary nebula NGC 7662, also known as the Blue Snowball Nebula
Below, a ? arcmin wide HST image of the nebula (Image Credit B. Balick (U. Washington) et al., WFPC2, HST, NASA)
HST image of planetary nebula NGC 7662, also known as the Blue Snowball Nebula
Below, a superposition of the HST image on a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS background
HST image of planetary nebula NGC 7662, also known as the Blue Snowball Nebula, superimposed on a DSS background to show the correct orientation of the image
Below, various HST closeups of the "fliers" (Image Credit B. Balick (U. Washington) et al., WFPC2, HST, NASA)
HST closeups of fliers near planetary nebula NGC 7662, also known as the Blue Snowball Nebula

NGC 7663
Recorded (1865) by
Gaspare Ferrari (5)
A lost or nonexistent object in Aquarius (RA 23 26 40.0, Dec -04 45 12)
Historical Identification:

NGC 7664 (= PGC 71450)
Discovered (Oct 17, 1876) by
Édouard Stephan (8a-29)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Pegasus (RA 23 26 39.7, Dec +25 04 49)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 2.6 by 1.5 arcmin; with outer arms, nearly 3.6 arcmin wide.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7664
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7664
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7664

NGC 7665 (= PGC 71474)
Discovered (Sep 28, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sm?) in Aquarius (RA 23 27 14.8, Dec -09 23 11)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 0.7 by 0.7? arcmin.

NGC 7666
Recorded (1865) by
Gaspare Ferrari (8)
A lost or nonexistent object in Aquarius (RA 23 27 24.0, Dec -04 11 00)
Historical Identification:

NGC 7667 (= PGC 71345)
Discovered (1865) by
Gaspare Ferrari (9)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sm?) in Pisces (RA 23 24 23.1, Dec -00 06 31)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.6 by 1.1? arcmin.

NGC 7668
Recorded (1865) by
Gaspare Ferrari (10)
A lost or nonexistent object in Pisces (RA 23 26 41.7, Dec -00 11 29)
Historical Identification:

NGC 7669
Recorded (1865) by
Gaspare Ferrari (11)
A lost or nonexistent object in Pisces (RA 23 26 41.7, Dec -00 11 29)
Historical Identification:

NGC 7670
Recorded (1865) by
Gaspare Ferrari (12)
A lost or nonexistent object in Pisces (RA 23 26 41.7, Dec -00 11 29)
Historical Identification:

NGC 7671 (= PGC 71478)
Discovered (Oct 21, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Pegasus (RA 23 27 19.3, Dec +12 28 04)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.4 by 0.8? arcmin.

NGC 7672 (= PGC 71485)
Discovered (Oct 23, 1857) by
R. J. Mitchell
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Pegasus (RA 23 27 31.4, Dec +12 23 06)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 0.8 by 0.6? arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7672, also showing NGC 7671
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7672, also showing NGC 7671
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7672

NGC 7673 (= PGC 71493)
Discovered (Sep 5, 1864) by
Albert Marth (577)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc? pec) in Pegasus (RA 23 27 41.2, Dec +23 35 21)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.3 by 1.2? arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7673, also showing NGC 7677
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7673, also showing NGC 7677
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7673

NGC 7674 (= PGC 71504)
Discovered (Aug 16, 1830) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(r)bc? pec) in Pegasus (RA 23 27 56.7, Dec +08 46 43)
Historical Identification: Sometimes misidentified as NGC 7675.
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.1 by 1.0? arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7674, also showing NGC 7675
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7674, also showing NGC 7675
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy, also showing PGC 71505 and 71707
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7674, also showing PGC 71505 (which is sometimes called NGC 7674A) and PGC 71707

PGC 71505 (= "NGC 7674A")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 7674A
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S??) in
Pegasus (RA 23 27 58.7, Dec +08 46 58)
Physical Information: Apparent size about 0.3 by 0.2? arcmin. (See NGC 7674 for images.)

NGC 7675 (= PGC 71518)
Discovered (Aug 16, 1830) by
John Herschel
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SAB0(s)?) in Pegasus (RA 23 28 05.8, Dec +08 46 09)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 0.6 by 0.45 arcmin. Also shown in wide-field image of NGC 7674; sometimes misidentified as that NGC object.

NGC 7676 (= PGC 71564)
Discovered (Oct 28, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Tucana (RA 23 29 01.7, Dec -59 43 00)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.6 by 0.9? arcmin.

NGC 7677 (= PGC 71517)
Discovered (Sep 5, 1864) by
Albert Marth (578)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Pegasus (RA 23 28 06.1, Dec +23 31 53)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.6 by 1.0? arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7677, also showing NGC 7673
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7677, also showing NGC 7673
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7677

NGC 7678 (=
Arp 28 = PGC 71534)
Discovered (Sep 15, 1784) by William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)c?) in Pegasus (RA 23 28 27.8, Dec +22 25 16)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 3490 km/sec, NGC 7678 is about 160 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 115 to 165 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 2.15 by 1.65 arcmin, it is about 100 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7678, also known as Arp 28
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7678
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7678, also known as Arp 28

NGC 7679 (= PGC 71554, and with
NGC 7682 = Arp 216)
Discovered (Sep 23, 1864) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0? pec) in Pisces (RA 23 28 46.5, Dec +03 30 39)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.7 by 0.9? arcmin. A Seyfert galaxy with far-flung star clouds, suggesting recent activity.
SDSS image of region near peculiar galaxy NGC 7679, also showing NGC 7682, with which it comprises Arp 216
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7679, also showing NGC 7682
Below, a 4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy and its nearby star clouds
SDSS image of star clouds near peculiar galaxy NGC 7679
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of peculiar galaxy NGC 7679

NGC 7680 (= PGC 71541)
Discovered (Nov 2, 1790) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Pegasus (RA 23 28 35.2, Dec +32 24 56)
Historical Identification: (Steinicke states accompanied by PGC 3088959, a 15th-magnitude compact galaxy (type C?, apparent size 0.2 by 0.2? arcmin) just northwest of NGC 7680, at RA 23 28 31.5, Dec +32 25 22; but Herschel couldn't have noticed such a faint object, so any connection between the two has no historical significance.)
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.9 by 1.9? arcmin.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 7680
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7680
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy and PGC 3088959
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 7680, also showing PGC 3088959

NGC 7681 (= PGC 71558)
Discovered (Oct 11, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Pegasus (RA 23 28 54.8, Dec +17 18 34)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.8 by 1.5? arcmin.

NGC 7682 (= PGC 71566, and with
NGC 7679 = Arp 216)
Discovered (Sep 23, 1862) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBab?) in Pisces (RA 23 29 03.8, Dec +03 32 02)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 2.0 by 1.8? arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7682, also showing NGC 7679, with which it comprises Arp 216
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7682, also showing NGC 7679
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7682

NGC 7683 (= PGC 71565)
Discovered (1865) by
Gaspare Ferrari (1)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Pegasus (RA 23 29 03.8, Dec +11 26 43)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.9 by 0.9? arcmin.

NGC 7684 (= PGC 71625)
Discovered (Oct 5, 1863) by
Albert Marth (580)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Pisces (RA 23 30 32.0, Dec +00 04 53)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.5 by 0.4? arcmin.

NGC 7685 (= PGC 71628)
Discovered (Aug 30, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Pisces (RA 23 30 33.3, Dec +03 54 06)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.9 by 1.5? arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7685
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7685
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7685

NGC 7686 (= OCL 251)
Discovered (Dec 3, 1787) by
William Herschel
A 6th-magnitude open cluster (type IV1p) in Andromeda (RA 23 30 07.3, Dec +49 08 03)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 15? arcmin, with 6th-magnitude red giant HD 221246 near its center.
DSS image of open cluster NGC 7686
Above, a 24 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7686

NGC 7687 (= PGC 71635)
Discovered (Sep 21, 1862) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Pisces (RA 23 30 54.4, Dec +03 32 50)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.3 by 1.0? arcmin.

NGC 7688 (= PGC 71648)
Discovered (Aug 13, 1865) by
Christian Peters
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Pegasus (RA 23 31 05.4, Dec +21 24 43)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 0.4 by 0.3? arcmin.

NGC 7689 (= PGC 71729)
Discovered (Sep 5, 1826) by
James Dunlop (347)
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)c?) in Phoenix (RA 23 33 16.4, Dec -54 05 39)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 2.8 by 1.9? arcmin.
Composite of NED image of unknown origin and DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7689
Above, a NED image (of unknown origin) on a 12 arcmin wide DSS background centered on NGC 7689
Below, a 3 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit as above)
Composite of NED image of unknown origin and DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7689
Below, a ? arcmin wide HST image of part of the galaxy (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)HST image of part of spiral galaxy NGC 7689

NGC 7690 (= PGC 71716)
Discovered (Oct 3, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Phoenix (RA 23 33 02.4, Dec -51 41 54)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 2.1 by 0.8? arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7690
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7690
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7690
Below, a ? arcmin wide HST image of part of the galaxy (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
HST image of part of spiral galaxy NGC 7690

NGC 7691 (= PGC 71699)
Discovered (Oct 16, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Pegasus (RA 23 32 24.6, Dec +15 50 56)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 1.6? arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7691
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7691
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7691

NGC 7692 (= PGC 71712)
Discovered (Oct 23, 1848) by
George Bond (26, HN 2)
A 15th-magnitude irregular galaxy (type Irr??) in Aquarius (RA 23 32 46.7, Dec -05 35 46)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 0.45 by 0.3? arcmin.
SDSS image of region near irregular galaxy NGC 7692
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7692
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of irregular galaxy NGC 7692

NGC 7693 (= PGC 71720)
Discovered (Dec 1, 1882) by
Asaph Hall
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Pisces (RA 23 33 10.4, Dec -01 17 29)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.8? arcmin.

NGC 7694 (= PGC 71728)
Discovered (Sep 20, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude irregular galaxy (type Im?) in Pisces (RA 23 33 16.1, Dec -02 42 13)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.9? arcmin.
SDSS image of region near irregular galaxy NGC 7694 and lenticular galaxy NGC 7695
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered between NGC 7694 and NGC 7695
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxies
SDSS image of irregular galaxy NGC 7694 and lenticular galaxy NGC 7695

NGC 7695 (= PGC 71726)
Discovered (Nov 18, 1864) by
Albert Marth (581)
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Pisces (RA 23 33 14.9, Dec -02 43 11)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.3? arcmin. (Near NGC 7694, which see for images.)

NGC 7696 (= PGC 71757)
Discovered (Nov 14, 1863) by
Albert Marth (582)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S??) in Pisces (RA 23 33 50.2, Dec +04 52 17)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.9? arcmin.

NGC 7697 (=
IC 5333 = PGC 71800)
Discovered (Sep 6, 1836) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 7697)
Discovered (Aug 29, 1900) by DeLisle Stewart (784) (and later listed as IC 5333)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Tucana (RA 23 34 52.3, Dec -65 23 46)
Historical Identification: The second IC notes as a misprint, "Minutes of RA should be 26".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.3? arcmin.

NGC 7698 (= PGC 71762)
Discovered (Sep 26, 1883) by
Édouard Stephan (13b-96)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Pegasus (RA 23 34 01.5, Dec +24 56 43)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.8? arcmin.

NGC 7699 (= PGC 71782)
Discovered (Nov 18, 1864) by
Albert Marth (583)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Pisces (RA 23 34 27.0, Dec -02 54 00)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.3? arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7699, also showing NGC 7700 and 7701
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7699, also showing NGC 7700 and 7701
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7699
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 7600 - 7649) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 7650 - 7699     → (NGC 7700 - 7749)