Celestial Atlas
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Page last updated Oct 31, 2014
WORKING 7750: Add/update Dreyer/Steinicke listings/data, check IDs

NGC 7750 (= PGC 72367)
Discovered (Aug 30, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type (R)SB(rs)c? pec) in Pisces (RA 23 46 37.8, Dec +03 47 59)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 2940 km/sec, NGC 7750 is about 135 million light years away, in good agreement with admittedly uncertain redshift-independent distance estimates of 60 to 135 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 1.6 by 0.8? arcmin, it is about 65 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7750
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7750
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7750

NGC 7751 (= PGC 72381)
Discovered (Sep 27, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S??) in Pisces (RA 23 46 58.4, Dec +06 51 43)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 3245 km/sec, NGC 7751 is about 150 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.0 by 1.0? arcmin, it is about 45 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7751
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7751
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7751
Below, the 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7751, also showing PGC 141134
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7751, also showing irregular galaxy PGC 141134

PGC 141134
Not an NGC object but temporarily listed here due to its apparent proximity to
NGC 7751
A 16th-magnitude irregular galaxy (type Irr?) in Pisces (RA 23 46 50.8, Dec +06 51 33)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 3065 km/sec, PGC 141134 is about 145 million light years away, just a few million light years closer than its apparent companion, NGC 7751. Given that and its apparent size of 0.8 by 0.4? arcmin, it is about 35 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of irregular galaxy PGC 141134
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 141134; see NGC 7751 for a wide-field view

NGC 7752 (= PGC 72382, and with
NGC 7753 = Arp 86)
Discovered (Nov 22, 1854) by R. J. Mitchell
A 14th-magnitude irregular galaxy (type SBm?/I0 pec?) in Pegasus (RA 23 46 58.5, Dec +29 27 34)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5070 km/sec, NGC 7752 is about 235 million light years away. However, given its apparent involvement with NGC 7753, with which it forms Arp 86, it is probably at the same 235 to 240 million light year distance of the larger galaxy. Given that and its apparent size of 0.8 by 0.5? arcmin, it is about 55 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of irregular galaxy NGC 7752 and part of its larger companion, NGC 7753, with which it comprises Arp 86
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 7752, also showing part of NGC 7753, which see for more

NGC 7753 (= PGC 72387, and with
NGC 7752 = Arp 86)
Discovered (Sep 12, 1784) by William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)bc?) in Pegasus (RA 23 47 04.8, Dec +29 29 02)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5170 km/sec, NGC 7753 is about 240 million light years away. However, given its apparent involvement with NGC 7752, with which it forms Arp 86, it is probably at the same 235 to 240 million light year distance of the smaller galaxy. Given that and its apparent size of 3.3 by 2.1? arcmin, it is about 230 thousand light years across, over twice the size of our galaxy, and probably ten times as massive.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7753 and its companion, NGC 7752, collectively also known as Arp 86
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7753 and 7752
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the pair
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7753 and its companion, NGC 7752, collectively also known as Arp 86
Below, a similar NOAO image of the pair (Image Credit Adam Block/NOAO/AURA/NSF)
NOAO image of spiral galaxy NGC 7753 and its companion, NGC 7752, collectively also known as Arp 86

NGC 7754 (= PGC 72511)
Discovered (Nov 28, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth (I-266)
Also observed by Herbert Howe
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Aquarius (RA 23 49 11.2, Dec -16 36 02)
Historical Identification: The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 23 41 58.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 7500 km/sec, NGC 7754 is about 350 million light years away. (Need to do relatisvistic correction for the distance.) Given that and its apparent size of 1.5 by 1.0? arcmin, it is about 150 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7754, also showing NGC 7759 and PGC 72509 (which is sometimes referred to as NGC 7754A)
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7754, also showing NGC 7759 and PGC 75209
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7754

PGC 72509 (= "NGC 7754A" = PGC 196759 = PGC 196760)
Not an NGC object but listed here because sometimes called NGC 7754A
A 16th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in
Aquarius (RA 23 49 06.4, Dec -16 34 45)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 8100 km/sec, PGC 72509 is about 375 million light years away, or about 25 million light years more distant than NGC 7754. (Need to do relatisvistic correction for the distance.) Given that and its apparent size of 0.3 by 0.1? arcmin, it is about 35 thousand light years across.
DSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 72509, sometimes referred to as NGC 7754A
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of PGC 72509, showing part of NGC 7754 (which see for wider views)

NGC 7755 (= PGC 72444)
Discovered (Sep 27, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(r)bc?) in Sculptor (RA 23 47 51.9, Dec -30 31 25)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 2960 km/sec, NGC 7755 is about 140 million light years away, in fair agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 85 to 120 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 3.8 by 2.9? arcmin, it is about 150 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7755
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7755
Below, a 4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7755

NGC 7756
Recorded (Dec 11, 1873) by
Lawrence Parsons
A 13th-magnitude star in Pisces (RA 23 48 28.5, Dec +04 07 32)
Historical Identification:
See the wide-field image of NGC 7757 for a view of NGC 7756

NGC 7757 (= PGC 72491, and with an emission region =
Arp 68)
Discovered (Sep 24, 1830) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SA(rs)c?) in Pisces (RA 23 48 45.5, Dec +04 10 17)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 2955 km/sec, NGC 7757 is about 135 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 2.6 by 1.7? arcmin, it is about 100 thousand light years across. The "small high brightness companion" that caused this galaxy to be listed as Arp 68 is the oblong object on the western side of the galaxy (pointed out in the wide-field view by an arrow). Although its appearance is similar to a small amorphous galaxy, it is not believed to be a separate object, but a star-forming region within the larger galaxy old enough that its hottest, brightest stars have already died. As a result it does not have a separate official designation (it is, however, listed in NED as UM 007 NED01, at RA 23 48 41.6, Dec +04 10 36).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7757, also known as Arp 68, showing the position of the emission region that led to the Arp listing with an arrow; also shown is the star listed as NGC 7756
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7757, also showing the star listed as NGC 7756
(The arrow points to the emission region that led to the listing as Arp 68)
Below, a 3 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7757, also known as Arp 68

NGC 7758 (= PGC 72497)
Discovered (1886) by
Frank Muller (II-475)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SAB(s)0?) in Aquarius (RA 23 48 55.1, Dec -22 01 27)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 13085 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that NGC 7758 is about 610 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances, we must take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 580 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 590 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during that time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.7 by 0.5 arcmin, NGC 7758 is about 120 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 7758
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on the galaxy
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 7758

NGC 7759 (= PGC 72496)
Discovered (Nov 28, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth (I-267)
Also observed by Herbert Howe
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SAB0? pec) in Aquarius (RA 23 48 54.6, Dec -16 32 27)
Historical Identification: The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 23 41 41.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 7325 km/sec, NGC 7759 is about 340 million light years away. (Should use relativistic correction for distance calculation.) Given that and its apparent size of 1.3 by 1.0 arcmin, it is about 130 thousand light years across. NGC 7759 is physically interacting with the object to its east (PGC 72499).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 7759 and its probable companion, PGC 72499 (sometimes called NGC 7759A); also shown are NGC 7754 and PGC 72509 (sometimes called NGC 7754A)
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7759 and PGC 72499
(also shown above are NGC 7754 and PGC 72509)
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of NGC 7759 and PGC 72499
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 7759, also showing its probable companion PGC 72499, also known as NGC 7759A

PGC 72499 (= "NGC 7759A" = PGC 196742)
Not an NGC object but listed here since a companion of
NGC 7759 and often called NGC 7759A
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S??) in Aquarius (RA 23 48 54.6, Dec -16 32 27)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 7345 km/sec, PGC 72499 is about 340 million light years away, the same distance as NGC 7759 (which see for images), and they are a physically interacting pair. (Should do a relativistic correction for the distance of the pair.) Given that and its apparent size of 0.5 by 0.15 arcmin, the galaxy is about 50 thousand light years across.

NGC 7760 (= PGC 72512)
Discovered (Oct 9, 1790) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Pegasus (RA 23 49 11.9, Dec +30 58 59)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5250 km/sec, NGC 7760 is about 245 million light years away (although a drastically different measurement of 13200 km/sec implies a distance of nearly 600 million light years). Given that and its apparent size of 1.0 by 1.0? arcmin, it is about 70 thousand light years across (but the larger recessional velocity and distance, if correct, would imply a size of 170 thousand light years).
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 7760
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7760
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 7760

NGC 7761 (=
IC 5361 = PGC 72641)
Discovered (1886) by Ormond Stone (I-268) (and later listed as NGC 7761)
Looked for but not found by Herbert Howe (while listed as NGC 7761)
Discovered (Nov 30, 1891) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 5361)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SA(rs)0?) in Aquarius (RA 23 51 28.8, Dec -13 22 52)
Historical Identification: The second IC notes "Not found by Howe". Also noted in the second IC (at NGC 7776) is the comment: "7776 and 7761: Howe only found one nebula (IC 5361), RA 23 44 16, NPD 104 09.5, with a 9th magnitude star 3.5 arcmin to the west".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 7190 km/sec, NGC 7761 is about 335 million light years away. (Should do relativistic correction for the distance.) Given that and its apparent size of 1.2 by 1.2 arcmin, it is about 115 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 7761
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on the galaxy
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 7761

NGC 7762 (= OCL 280)
Discovered (Nov 23, 1788) by
William Herschel
A 10th-magnitude open cluster (type II2p) in Cepheus (RA 23 50 00.0, Dec +68 02 18)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Approximately 15 to 20 arcmin wide. A relatively young cluster, with many hot blue stars.
Image Notes: The DSS photomosaics below are the best available closeups of the region near NGC 7762, but their quality is uneven because the cluster is on the outskirts of a large emission nebula, Cederblad 214, a small portion of which is seen as reddish-brown clouds scattered throughout the image, and the DSS photomosaic is much redder or not nearly red enough in various oddly shaped regions covering difficult parts of the field; so it is hard to correct for the photomosaic errors without substantially altering the color balance. The corrections I applied to the 24 arcmin wide image and the very wide images are fairly good, but the one degree wide image still has a number of more or less obvious artifacts.
DSS image of open cluster NGC 7762
Above, a 24 arcmin wide DSS image of NGC 7762
Below, a one degree wide DSS image centered on the cluster, partially corrected for photomosaic problems
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 7762
Below, a 3 degree wide DSS image showing the position of the 1 degree image above (outlined by a white border); note the rotation of the smaller image, caused by the difference in projection from the celestial sphere onto a flat image, due to different centering of the images. Such differences are often seen in overlapping portions of different sky atlas charts.
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 7762, compared to a much wider field of view centered near Cederblad 214, to the east of NGC 7762
Below, a comparison of the image above to a HST/ESA/FITS Liberator adjustment of the DSS data (outlined in white, to show its position relative to the original image; FITS Liberator image credits and HST site links shown at following image). Despite the posting of this image on the HST site the image was not constructed using HST data. Instead, the software techniques used on HST images were applied to the same DSS images shown above. As a result, although the Liberator images are better corrected for artifacts and use slightly different color-adjustments, they look more like the images above than not.
DSS images of 1 and 3 degree wide fields of view near NGC 7762 and Cederblad 214, compared to a FITS liberator reworking of the DSS data
Below, the full ? by ? degree wide FITS image
(Image Credit Davide De Martin & the ESA/ESO/NASA Photoshop FITS Liberator)
FITS Liberator DSS image of emission nebula Cederblad 214, open cluster NGC 7822, and in the upper right corner, the region near open cluster NGC 7762

NGC 7763 (= PGC 72565)
Discovered (Nov 28, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth (I-269)
Also observed by Herbert Howe
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Aquarius (RA 23 50 15.7, Dec -16 35 23)
Historical Identification: The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 23 43 03.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of around 5550 km/sec, NGC 7763 is about 260 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.7 by 0.4 arcmin, it is about 55 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 7763
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7763
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 7763

NGC 7764 (= PGC 72597)
Discovered (Oct 4, 1836) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(s)m? pec) in Phoenix (RA 23 50 53.6, Dec -40 43 48)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 1695 km/sec, NGC 7764 is about 80 million light years away, in fair agreement with a redshift-independent distance estimate of 65 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 2.0 by 1.5 arcmin, it is about 45 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near peculiar spiral galaxy NGC 7764
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7764
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of peculiar spiral galaxy NGC 7764
Below, a more detailed image of the nucleus is superimposed on the image above (image origin unknown)
Superposition of a detailed image of the core of peculiar spiral galaxy NGC 7764 on a DSS background

PGC 72755 (= "NGC 7764A1")
Not an NGC/IC object, but listed here since sometimes called NGC 7764A1
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Scd? pec?) in
Phoenix (RA 23 53 20.1, Dec -40 48 15)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 9160 km/sec, PGC 72755 is about 425 million light years away. (Need to do relativistic correction for distance.) Given that and its apparent size of 0.7 by 0.2 arcmin, it is about 85 thousand light years across. Given its proximity to PGC 72762 (which see for images) and the peculiar appearance of that galaxy, the galaxies may be gravitationally interacting.

PGC 72762 (= "NGC 7764A2")
Not an NGC/IC object, but listed here since sometimes called NGC 7764A2
A 14th-magnitude peculiar spiral galaxy (type S?? pec) in
Phoenix (RA 23 53 23.7, Dec -40 48 25)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 9160 km/sec, PGC 72762 is about 425 million light years away. (Need to do relativistic correction for distance.) Given that and its apparent size of 1.3 by 0.7 arcmin, about 160 thousand light years across. It is about the same distance as PGC 72755 and PGC 72769, and given their proximity and the peculiar appearance of PGC 72762, it is probably gravitationally interacting with those galaxies.
DSS image of peculiar galaxies PGC 72755, 72762 and 72769, also referred to as NGC 7764A
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of PGC PGC 72755, 72762 and 72769
Below, a ? arcmin wide "raw" HST image of PGC 72762 and 72769 (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
HST image of PGC 72762 and 72769
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of the central portion of PGC 72762 (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
HST image of central portion of PGC 72762
Below, a 36 arcmin wide DSS image centered between "NGC 7764A" and NGC 7764
("NGC 7764A" being PGC 72755, PGC 72762 and PGC 72769)
DSS image of region between NGC 7764 and the so-called NGC 7764A

PGC 72769 (= "NGC 7764A3")
Not an NGC/IC object, but listed here since sometimes called NGC 7764A3
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0? pec) in
Phoenix (RA 23 53 26.2, Dec -40 48 58)
Based on a recessional velocity of 8845 km/sec, PGC 72769 is about 410 million light years away. (Need to do relativistic correction for distance.) Given that and its apparent size of 0.4 by 0.3 arcmin, it is about 50 thousand light years across. Given its proximity to PGC 72762 (which see for images) and the peculiar appearance of that galaxy, the galaxies may be gravitationally interacting.

NGC 7765 (= PGC 72596)
Discovered (Oct 12, 1855) by
R. J. Mitchell
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)c?) in Pegasus (RA 23 50 52.2, Dec +27 09 58)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 7650 km/sec, NGC 7765 is about 355 million light years away. (Need to do relativistic correction for distance.) Given that and its apparent size of 0.7 by 0.7 arcmin, it is about 75 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7765, also showing NGC 7766, 7767 and 7768
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7765, also showing NGC 7766, 7767 and 7768
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7765

NGC 7766 (= PGC 72611)
Discovered (Oct 9, 1872) by
Ralph Copeland
A 16th-magnitude compact galaxy (type C??) in Pegasus (RA 23 50 55.8, Dec +27 07 37)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 0.5 by 0.2? arcmin.

NGC 7767 (= PGC 72601)
Discovered (Oct 9, 1872) by
Ralph Copeland
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Pegasus (RA 23 50 56.5, Dec +27 05 12)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.0 by 0.2? arcmin.

NGC 7768 (= PGC 72605)
Discovered (Sep 5, 1828) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Pegasus (RA 23 50 58.4, Dec +27 08 52)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.6 by 1.3? arcmin.

NGC 7769 (= PGC 72615)
Discovered (Sep 18, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type (R)SA(rs)b?) in Pegasus (RA 23 51 04.1, Dec +20 09 02)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: The brightest member of the NGC 7771 group, which consists of NGC 7769, 7770, and 7771. Based on a recessional velocity of 4210 km/sec, NGC 7769 is about 195 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 3.2 by 2.7 arcmin, it is about 180 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7769, also showing NGC 7770 and 7771
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7769, also showing NGC 7770 and 7771
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7769
Below, a ? arcmin wide HST image of the central portion of the galaxy (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
HST image of central portion of spiral galaxy NGC 7769

NGC 7770 (= PGC 72635)
Discovered (Nov 5, 1850) by
Bindon Stoney
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Pegasus (RA 23 51 22.5, Dec +20 05 49)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: A member of the NGC 7771 group, which consists of NGC 7769, 7770, and 7771 (which see for images). Based on a recessional velocity of 4115 km/sec, NGC 7770 is about 190 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.7 by 0.4 arcmin, it is about 40 thousand light years across.

NGC 7771 (= PGC 72638)
Discovered (Sep 18, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(s)a?) in Pegasus (RA 23 51 24.6, Dec +20 06 44)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: A member of the NGC 7771 group, which consists of NGC 7769, 7770, and 7771. Based on a recessional velocity of 4275 km/sec, NGC 7771 is about 200 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 2.4 by 1.1 arcmin, it is about 140 thousand light years across. In images of the members of the NGC 7771 group, noticeable extensions of their fainter outer regions show the effects of their gravitational interaction. Eventually, all three galaxies in the group should merge to form a single galaxy.
SDSS image of NGC 7771 group, consisting of NGC 7769, 7770 and 7771
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on the NGC 7771 group (= NGC 7769, 7770, and 7771)
Below, a 3 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 7770 and 7771
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 7770 and spiral galaxy NGC 7771
Below, another (? arcmin wide) image of the NGC 7771 group (Credit Adam Block/AURA/NSF, NOAO)
NOAO image of the NGC 7771 group of galaxies

NGC 7772 (= OCL 230)
Discovered (Oct 7, 1825) by
John Herschel
An open cluster (type III1p) in Pegasus (RA 23 51 45.0, Dec +16 14 54)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 5? arcmin.

NGC 7773 (= PGC 72681)
Discovered (Oct 9, 1790) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Pegasus (RA 23 52 10.0, Dec +31 16 37)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 1.2? arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7773
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7773
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7773

NGC 7774 (= PGC 72679)
Discovered (Aug 9, 1886) by
Lewis Swift (4-100)
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E4?) in Pegasus (RA 23 52 10.6, Dec +11 28 13)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.6? arcmin.

NGC 7775 (= PGC 72696)
Discovered (Oct 6, 1883) by
Édouard Stephan (13b-98)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Pegasus (RA 23 52 24.4, Dec +28 46 21)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.8? arcmin.

NGC 7776 (=
IC 1514 = PGC 72812)
Discovered (Oct 31, 1885) by Ormond Stone (I-270) (and later listed as NGC 7776)
Looked for by Herbert Howe (while listed as NGC 7776)
Discovered (Sep 19, 1893) by Johann Palisa (and later listed as IC 1514)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Aquarius (RA 23 54 16.5, Dec -13 35 11)
Historical Identification: The second IC notes: "7776 and 7761: Howe only found one nebula (IC 5361), RA 23 44 16, NPD 104 09.5, with a 9th magnitude star 3.5 arcmin to the west". As noted at NGC 7761, that is considered to be the same as IC 5361; how the second IC comment relates to NGC 7776 will be dealt with in the next iteration of this page.
Physical Information: Apparent size about 0.9 by 0.3 arcmin.

NGC 7777 (= PGC 72744)
Discovered (Oct 25, 1876) by
Édouard Stephan (8a-30)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Pegasus (RA 23 53 12.5, Dec +28 17 02)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.8? arcmin.

NGC 7778 (= PGC 72756)
Discovered (Nov 12, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Pisces (RA 23 53 19.5, Dec +07 52 14)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 1.0? arcmin.

NGC 7779 (= PGC 72770)
Discovered (Nov 12, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Pisces (RA 23 53 26.6, Dec +07 52 34)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.1? arcmin.

NGC 7780 (= PGC 72775)
Discovered (Oct 18, 1881) by
Édouard Stephan (12b-96)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBab?) in Pisces (RA 23 53 32.1, Dec +08 07 06)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.5? arcmin.

NGC 7781 (= PGC 72785)
Discovered (Aug 16, 1830) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S??) in Pisces (RA 23 53 45.9, Dec +07 51 39)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.2? arcmin.

NGC 7782 (= PGC 72788)
Discovered (Nov 12, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Pisces (RA 23 53 53.9, Dec +07 58 14)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.2 by 1.3? arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7782
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7782
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7782

NGC 7783 (= PGC 72803)
A member of Hickson Compact Group 98 (=
Arp 323)
Discovered (Sep 9, 1864) by Albert Marth (591)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Pisces (RA 23 54 10.1, Dec +00 23 00)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.3 by 0.6? arcmin. The brightest member of Hickson Compact Group 98 (= Arp 323).
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 7783, a member of Hickson Compact Group 98, also known as Arp 323
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7783 and Hickson Compact Group 98 (= Arp 323)
Below, a 3 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 7783, PGC 72806, PGC 72808 and PGC 72810
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 7783 and the other members of Hickson Compact Group 98, also known as Arp 323

PGC 72808 (= "NGC 7783B")
A member of Hickson Compact Group 98 (=
Arp 323)
Not an NGC object but listed here since often called NGC 7783B
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Pisces (RA 23 54 12.0, Dec +00 22 39)
Physical Information: Apparent size about 0.7 by 0.5? arcmin. A member of Hickson Compact Group 98 (= Arp 323). See NGC 7783 for images.

PGC 72810 (= "NGC 7783C")
A member of Hickson Compact Group 98 (=
Arp 323)
Not an NGC object but listed here since often called NGC 7783C
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Pisces (RA 23 54 13.8, Dec +00 21 25)
Physical Information: Apparent size about 0.2 by 0.2? arcmin. A member of Hickson Compact Group 98 (= Arp 323). See NGC 7783 for images.

PGC 72806 (= "NGC 7783D")
A member of Hickson Compact Group 98 (=
Arp 323)
Not an NGC object but listed here since often called NGC 7783D
A 16th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Pisces (RA 23 54 10.6, Dec +00 23 39)
Physical Information: Apparent size about 0.2 by 0.2? arcmin. A member of Hickson Compact Group 98 (= Arp 323). See NGC 7783 for images.

NGC 7784 (= PGC 72862)
Discovered (Oct 1, 1883) by
Édouard Stephan (13b-99)
A 15th-magnitude compact galaxy (type C??) in Pegasus (RA 23 55 13.6, Dec +21 45 46)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.5? arcmin.

NGC 7785 (= PGC 72867)
Discovered (Oct 25, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E5?) in Pisces (RA 23 55 18.9, Dec +05 54 58)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.5 by 1.3? arcmin.

NGC 7786 (= PGC 72870)
Discovered (Oct 1, 1883) by
Édouard Stephan (13b-100)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S??) in Pegasus (RA 23 55 21.7, Dec +21 35 19)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.7? arcmin.

NGC 7787 (= PGC 72930)
Discovered (Oct 23, 1864) by
Albert Marth (592)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Pisces (RA 23 56 07.8, Dec +00 32 59)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 0.5? arcmin.

NGC 7788 (= OCL 275)
Discovered (Oct 5, 1829) by
John Herschel
A 9th-magnitude open star cluster (type I2p) in Cassiopeia (RA 23 56 46.0, Dec +61 24 00)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: NGC 7788 is thought to be about 7700 light years away, which probably puts it in the Perseus Arm of the galaxy. Approximately two dozen fairly bright stars lie within a 4-arcmin diameter, which corresponds to 9 light years at the estimated distance. Based on the turnoff point of its Main Sequence stars, it is about 40 million years old. Its distance is sufficiently uncertain that it may form a double cluster with NGC 7790, which lies about a quarter-degree to the southeast.
DSS image of open cluster NGC 7788
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7788
Below, a 24 arcmin wide DSS image centered between NGC 7788 and NGC 7790
DSS image of region including open clusters NGC 7788 and 7790

NGC 7789 (= OCL 269)
Discovered (Oct 30, 1783) by
Caroline Herschel
A 7th-magnitude open star cluster (type II1r) in Cassiopeia (RA 23 57 28.6, Dec +56 42 52)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: NGC 7789 is about 8000 light years away, which probably puts in the Perseus Arm of the galaxy. Several hundred stars lie within a 25-arcmin diameter, which corresponds to 60 light years at the estimated distance. At about 1.6 billion years of age, most of its upper Main Sequence stars have died, and the 2 to 3 solar mass stars now dying have red giant lifetimes long enough to fill the relatively rich cluster with bright, reddish "dots".
DSS image of open cluster NGC 7789
Above, a half-degree wide region centered on NGC 7789

NGC 7790 (= OCL 276)
Discovered (Dec 16, 1788) by
William Herschel
A 9th-magnitude open star cluster (type III2p) in Cassiopeia (RA 23 58 24.2, Dec +61 12 30)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: NGC 7790 is thought to be about 9600 light years away, which probably puts it in the Perseus Arm of the galaxy. Approximately two dozen fairly bright stars lie within a 5 by 2 arcmin region, which corresponds to 14 light years at the estimated distance. Based on the turnoff point of its Main Sequence stars, it is about 55 million years old. Its distance is sufficiently uncertain that it may form a double cluster with NGC 7788, which lies about a quarter-degree to the northwest.
DSS image of open cluster NGC 7790
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7790
Below, a 24 arcmin wide DSS image centered between NGC 7788 and NGC 7790
DSS image of region including open clusters NGC 7788 and 7790

NGC 7791
Recorded (Oct 10, 1830) by
John Herschel
A pair of stars in Pegasus (RA 23 57 57.2, Dec +10 45 58)
Historical Identification:

NGC 7792 (= PGC 73066)
Discovered (Sep 20, 1873) by
Édouard Stephan (5-15)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Pegasus (RA 23 58 03.6, Dec +16 30 07)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.8? arcmin.

NGC 7793 (= PGC 73049)
Discovered (Jul 14, 1826) by
James Dunlop (608)
A 9th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SA(s)d?) in Sculptor (RA 23 57 49.2, Dec -32 35 30)
Historical Identification: The first IC notes "Occurs in the Cordoba DM, RA 23 50 38, NPD 123 22.3.
Physical Information: NGC 7793 is a member of the Sculptor Group of galaxies, one of the nearest group of galaxies to our Local Group. Its recessional velocity of 225 km/sec is too small to provide a reliable estimate of distance, but the 10 million light year value obtained by ignoring that happens to be in reasonable agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 10 to 20 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 9.3 by 6.3 arcmins, the galaxy is about 35 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7793
Above, a 20 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7793
Below, a ? arcmin wide visible-light image of the galaxy (Image Credit ESO)
ESO image of spiral galaxy NGC 7793
Below, a ? arcmin wide infrared image of the galaxy (Image Credit Spitzer Space Telescope)
Spitzer infrared image of spiral galaxy NGC 7793

NGC 7794 (= PGC 73103)
Discovered (Nov 23, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Pegasus (RA 23 58 34.1, Dec +10 43 42)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.0? arcmin.

NGC 7795
Recorded (Sep 29, 1829) by
John Herschel
A group of stars in Cassiopeia (RA 23 58 34.5, Dec +60 01 25)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 16? arcmin.

NGC 7796 (= PGC 73126)
Discovered (Sep 11, 1836) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Phoenix (RA 23 58 59.7, Dec -55 27 29)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.2 by 1.9? arcmin.

NGC 7797 (= PGC 73125)
Discovered (Dec 6, 1790) by
William Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Pisces (RA 23 58 58.8, Dec +03 38 03)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.9? arcmin.

NGC 7798 (= PGC 73163)
Discovered (Sep 18, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Pegasus (RA 23 59 25.6, Dec +20 45 00)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.4 by 1.3? arcmin. The galaxy is listed as a pair with NGC 7817, with a probable separation of about 2 million light years.

NGC 7799
Recorded (Nov 7, 1863) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 15th-magnitude star in Pegasus (RA 23 59 31.5, Dec +31 17 46)
Historical Identification: Wikisky misidentifies PGC 73156, the galaxy to the west of this star, as NGC 7799.
SDSS image of region near the star presumed to be NGC 7799, also showing spiral galaxy PGC 73156, which is sometimes misidentified as NGC 7799
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the star presumed to be NGC 7799
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 7700 - 7749) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 7750 - 7799     → (NGC 7800 - 7840)